04 Numbers - 2013

Skip Heitzig

Numbers is a book with two themes: Israel's failure and God's faithfulness. As we consider Israel's desert wanderings, we learn what can happen when people refuse to believe God's promises, and we are challenged to walk humbly with our ever-faithful Lord.


 

Table of Contents

# SCRIPTURE: MESSAGE:
1 Numbers 1 Numbers 1
2 Numbers 2-3 Numbers 2-3
3 Numbers 4-5 Numbers 4-5
4 Numbers 6-7 Numbers 6-7
5 Numbers 8-9 Numbers 8-9
6 Numbers 10-11 Numbers 10-11
7 Numbers 12:1-13:16 Numbers 12:1-13:16
8 Numbers 13:17-14:45 Numbers 13:17-14:45
9 Numbers 15 Numbers 15
10 Numbers 16 Numbers 16
11 Numbers 17:1-18:23 Numbers 17:1-18:23
12 Numbers 18:21-19:22 Numbers 18:21-19:22
13 Numbers 20 Numbers 20
14 Numbers 21:1-22:13 Numbers 21:1-22:13
15 Numbers 22:10-23:30 Numbers 22:10-23:30
16 Numbers 24-25 Numbers 24-25
17 Numbers 26-27 Numbers 26-27
18 Numbers 28-29 Numbers 28-29
19 Numbers 30-31 Numbers 30-31
20 Numbers 32-34 Numbers 32-34
21 Numbers 35-36 Numbers 35-36

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 1
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 1
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2522

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The book of Numbers describes the wanderings of the nation of Israel in the wilderness. Because of their disobedience, what could've been an 11-day journey to the Promised Land turned into a 40-year trial. In this study, we see the reason for the book's title: the censuses in chapters 1 and 26. As we examine the list in chapter one, we learn about God's personal and caring nature.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 1-2

PREVIEW: In Numbers 1-2, the first census of Israel is taken as Moses and Aaron number the children of Israel, and the camping designations and marching orders for each tribe are given.

The First Census of Israel - Read Numbers 1:1-54

1.The book of Numbers received its name because of the numbering of the people of Israel. The name for this book in the Septuagint has the same root as the word arithmetic in English and Numeri, the Latin name of this book, which means numbers. The original Hebrew name for this book comes from the first three words of the book, “In the wilderness.” What is the setting for the book of Numbers (v. 1)?



2.It was in the wilderness that Moses heard the Word of the Lord. Sometimes when we go through a wilderness experience, we try to extract things from the Word and spend time in prayer, yet don’t hear the voice of the Lord. All of us go through such times. Where was Moses in the wilderness when the Lord spoke to him (v. 1)?



3.The first two years after the exodus included the making of the covenant between God and His people and the giving of the law at Sinai. What is the setting of this book? Exactly what day and month is recorded as the beginning (v. 1)? That day and month is exactly one month after what? (See Exodus 40:2, 17.)



4.God told Moses (v.1) to take a census (count the numbers) of all the congregation of the children of Israel (v. 2). How were they to organize the counting? Who exactly was included in that count (vv. 2-3)?




5.Although God spoke to Moses and commanded him to take the census, he was not to accomplish it alone. Who would help him accurately count the people (vv.3-4)?




6.God commissioned twelve men, one from each tribe of the children of Israel, to assist Moses and Aaron in counting the people (vv. 5-16). How did they determine how to count each man (vv. 17-18)?




7.The tribes of Israel (Jacob) are listed along with the number of men who were 20 years and older and able to go to war (vv. 20-43). One of Jacob’s wives, Rachel, was barren (Genesis 30:1-2) but God listened to her and opened her womb and she bore Joseph (Genesis 30:22-24). Upon her death, she bore Benjamin (Genesis 35:16-18). At this time, the number of Rachel's descendants totaled 108,100. Why is it important to pray and never give up? (See also Luke 18:1)



8.God instructed Moses not to number the Levites in this initial census (v. 49). Who was Levi? What did his name mean? (See Genesis 29:34.) Who was included among the Levites? (See 1 Chronicles 6:1-3.) Why were the Levites not numbered (vv. 50-51)?




9.During the Exodus, God fought the battles for His children to free them from their bondage. In the wilderness, they were to camp according to their armies (v. 52). They were to be trained and ready to fight battles by age 20. How too should we be ready to engage in spiritual battles? (See Ephesians 6:10-18, 2 Corinthians 10:4, and 2 Timothy 2:15.)




The Tribes and Leaders by Armies - Read Numbers 2:1-34

10.Although the numbering of able-bodied men and specific camping locations of each tribe seems irrelevant and trivial to some. Why should we try to find insights in these chapters? (See Romans 15:4, 1 Corinthians 10:11, and 2 Timothy 3:16-17.)




11.A standard is a banner or flag containing an emblem representing something (e.g., Old Glory, the stars and stripes, represent the United States of America). The tribes were to camp by their own standard (v. 2) and some distance from the tabernacle of meeting. The tribes were situated into four groups of three tribes with each tribe represented by their ensign: Judah - Lion, Reuben - Man, Ephraim - Ox, Dan - Eagle. Where else in scripture do we see these ensigns represented? (See Ezekiel 1:10 and Revelation 4:7-8.)




12.The camp of Judah was to be situated to the east side of the tabernacle of meeting (v. 3). Which direction did the tabernacle face? (See Numbers 3:38.)



13.The tribes of Judah, Issachar, and Zebulun, numbering 186,400 in all, were to camp in which direction of the tabernacle (vv. 3-9)? In which marching order were they to proceed (v. 9)?



14.The tribes of Reuben, Simeon, and Gad, numbering 151,450 in all, were to camp in which direction of the tabernacle (vv. 10-16)? In which marching order were they to proceed (v. 16)?



15.The tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin, numbering 108,100 in all, were to camp in which direction of the tabernacle (vv. 18-24)? In which marching order were they to proceed (v. 24)?




16.The tribes of Dan, Asher, and Naphtali, numbering 157,600 in all, were to camp in which direction of the tabernacle (vv. 25-31)? In which marching order were they to proceed (v. 31)?



17.In what order did the tabernacle and Levites proceed (v. 17)?



18.On their way to the Promised Land, the children of Israel pitched their tents in the plain of Moab. This caused consternation in the heart of Balak, the king of Moab, for he had heard of the Israelite’s victory over the Amorites. How did Balak describe what the camp of Israel looked like when viewed in its entirety? (See Numbers 22:5.)




19.Balaam the prophet accompanied Balak to the top of a mountain from which they could see the entire Israelite camp (see Numbers 23:9). Balaam looked down to see the tabernacle in the midst with 108,100 to the west, 186,400 plus the Levites to the east, 157,600 to the north, and 151,450 to the south. What would the camp of Israel appear as when viewed from afar?




20.Moses would meet with God in the tabernacle of meeting (see Numbers 1:1, 2:1) and God would speak with Moses, giving him instructions for the people. What would the people do with God’s instructions for them (v. 34)?



21.When we come to church and hear the Word of God being taught by a man of God who has been meeting with God in the Word of God throughout his week, what should we do when God speaks to us through the message that man of God is teaching? (See Hebrews 3:15, 1 Samuel 15:22, Deuteronomy 28:1, and Matthew 7:24-27.)



DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Have you studied the book of Numbers before?
    2. Road trip in the back of a 1960s Rambler station wagon with four Heitzig boys and no air-conditioning
    3. The Book of Numbers
      1.  It's called The Book of Numbers because of the census figures in chapters 1 and 26
      2. It has also been called The book of Journeyings, The Book of Wanderings, and the Fourth Book of Moses
      3. Skip calls it, On the Road Again
      4. It is an eleven-day journey from Mount Sinai to Kadesh Barnea—150 miles; it took them 38 years and 10 months
    4. We've covered so far:
      1. Genesis—a book of beginnings
      2. Exodus—a book of redemption and rescue
      3. Leviticus—a book of holiness and worship—how to approach God
      4. Now Numbers—a book of moving but not making any progress
        1. Everyone faces wilderness experiences
        2. We're never meant to stay in the wilderness—it's a season (see 1 Peter 1:6)
        3. God was not well pleased with the children of Israel (see 1 Corinthians 10:1-11)
        4. Organization, disorganization, reorganization
  2. Numbers 1
    1. "The Lord spoke to Moses"
      1. Face to face
      2. Audibly
    2. Geography
      1. Wilderness of Sinai
      2. Mount Sinai
      3. There are differing views on where Mount Sinai is
    3. Not pandemonium—God organized the people
      1. Numbered the people
      2. Organized according to clan, families, tribes
      3. The tabernacle in the middle of the camp—a tent
      4. The organization of the tent with the sections
      5. Solomon built a permanent structure for the tabernacle
        1. Nebuchadnezzar destroyed that temple
        2. Zerubbabel rebuilt the temple
        3. Herod the Great enlarged the temple
        4. To get close to God, the people had to go to the temple
        5. We live in New Testament times
          1. God doesn't care about that temple (see Acts 7:48)
          2. God inhabits people, not property (see Psalm 22:3, Matthew 18:20, and 1 Corinthians 6:19)
          3. The body of Christ is central
    4. The census
      1. Through each individual name, God is saying, "I love you. You are important to me."
        1. There's a great story by Marvin Rosenthal in the magazine Israel My Glory
        2. "Don't rejoice that you have power over demons, rejoice that your names are written in heaven" (Luke 10:20)
        3. God knows the numbers of the hairs on your head (see Luke 12:7)
      2. A military census
        1. God fought for them whenever there was a problem
        2. He was maturing them into a nation with their own army
        3. We live in a fallen world; until Jesus comes again, there will be scoundrels who gain power, get weapons, and abuse people
        4. Sermon on the Mount
          1. Jesus was speaking personally, not nationally
          2. When someone personally attacks you, you love them—you turn the other cheek (see Matthew 5:39)
          3. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy promotes absolute pacifism
          4. "I am not a pacifist in today's fallen world, simply because for me to be a pacifist would mean I neglect the people who need help the most"  —Francis Schaeffer
          5. What does love mean to you in the face of abuse of a child?
      3. Genealogy
        1. They could recite their genealogy
        2. Not uncommon in Africa or parts of the Middle East
        3. Author and Somalia Muslim Ayaan Hirsi Ali memorized and could recite eight hundred years of her father's genealogy
        4. Memorizing genealogy was done to honor ancestors and to know if you were related to someone else
        5. Compare the genealogy given in verse 20 to that given in chapter 26—there is a dramatic drop in all tribes except Judah, Manasseh, and Benjamin
          1. There are a lot of reasons for the drop in population
          2. They made a lot of motion, but not a lot of growth
          3. Apply this personally: Are you growing up, maturing, expanding spiritually? Or are you just growing old?
        6. The Tribe of Levi was not numbered
          1. They were not to fight
          2. They were all about the holy stuff
          3. They couldn't be around corpses or they would be defiled
    5. The body of Christ
      1. Christ is the head
      2. We are the members of one body (see 1 Corinthians 12)
      3. God has given us each skills, propensities, and anointing to help us do what He has called us to do
      4. Find the strengths you have and plug in
      5. Everyone works together
    6. The four camps around the tabernacle
      1. Eastern side: Moses and Aaron, the high priest
      2. Western side: the Gershonites
      3. Northern side: the family of Merari
      4. Southern side: the Kohathites
      5. Each camp with three tribes
      6. Each camp had their banner flying high with their insignia
      7. Understand what was on those banners—next week

Publications Referenced: Israel My Glory

Figures referenced: Marvin Rosenthal, Francis Schaeffer

Cross references: Psalm 22:3, Matthew 5:39, Matthew 18:20, Luke 10:20, Luke 12:7, Acts 7:48, 1 Corinthians 6:19, 1 Corinthians 10:1-11, 1 Corinthians 12, 1 Peter 1:6</p>

Topic: Nation of Israel

Keywords: God, priests, holy, tribes, tabernacle, desert, wandering, disobedience, tent, temple, banner

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 2-3
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 2-3
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2524

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 2 and 3, we are able to picture how the nation of Israel camped in the wilderness, and we look into the role of the Levitical priests. In this study, important principles about ministry become apparent, and we are reminded that God takes worship seriously.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 3-5

PREVIEW: In Numbers 3-5, the Levites are counted twice, substituted for the firstborn, and their duties are assigned. The Lord instructs His children what to do if they’ve wronged someone and need to make restitution, and He gives the law of jealousy.

The Sons of Aaron - Read Numbers 3:1-4

1. Numbers 3 opens by referring back to the Lord’s revelation to Moses. Where was this revelation given (v. 1)? What part of this revelation is being referred to (v. 2)? (See Exodus 28:1.)



2. Although Aaron had four sons who were consecrated to minister as priests, why were two of them no longer serving as priests (v. 4)? (See Leviticus 10:1-2.)



3. Only Aaron and his direct descendants could serve as priests (see Exodus 28:1, Exodus 29:9, and Exodus 40:15). Two of Aaron’s sons, Nadab and Abihu, were dead, leaving whom to serve as priests alongside Aaron (v. 4)?


The Levites Serve in the Tabernacle - Read Numbers 3:5-13

4. Since Aaron was a Levite, this meant that all the priests were Levites but not all the Levites could be priests. What qualified a Levite to be a priest? (See Exodus 28:1, Exodus 29:9, and Exodus 40:15.)



5. With only Eleazar, Ithamar, and their sons available to serve alongside Aaron as priests, the Lord spoke to Moses and assigned whom to attend to the needs of Aaron and the whole congregation (vv. 5-7)?



6. What non-priestly duties were assigned to the tribe of Levi (vv. 8-9)? (See also Numbers 1:50-51.)



7. The Old Testament priesthood was extremely exclusive: Only Aaron and his descendants could serve as priests. What would happen if someone attempted to perform a priestly duty but wasn’t a son of Aaron (v. 10)?



8. It was the Lord’s original intent that the firstborn of every family of every tribe be priests (see Exodus 13:1, 12, 15). Now the Lord spoke to Moses telling him that He was substituting the entire tribe of Levi instead of the firstborn (v. 12). Why might the Lord have selected the tribe of Levi? (See Exodus 32:25–29.)



Census of the Levites Commanded - Read Numbers 3:14-39

9. The Lord spoke to Moses in the wilderness of Sinai and instructed him to count the children of Levi who were not counted in the original census (Numbers 1:49). Who specifically was counted (v. 15)?



10. The Levites were divided into three major family groups. Who were the sons of Levi (v. 17)? Who were their sons (vv. 18-20)?



11. The duties of each family and camping locations were designated by the Lord to Moses. Where were the 7,500 Gershonites to camp (v. 23)? Where were the 8,600 Kohathites to camp (v. 29)? Where were the 6,200 Mararites to camp (v. 35)?


12. What special role and responsibility was given to Eleazar the son of Aaron (v. 32)?



13. The encampment of Levites surrounded the tabernacle (see Numbers 1:53). Who camped on the east side of the tabernacle (v. 38)?



14. How many males one month and older from the tribe of Levi were accounted for during this census (v. 39)?



Levites Dedicated Instead of the Firstborn - Read Numbers 3:40-51

15. The Lord told Moses to count the number of the firstborn males of the children of Israel so that He might substitute the Levites as His instead of the firstborn. How many firstborn were accounted for (vv. 40-43)?



16. The Levites are substituted, life for life, in place of the firstborn as dedicated to the Lord (v. 44). How many more firstborn males were there than Levites (v. 45)?



17. How were the remaining firstborn redeemed when there was not a Levite to take their place (vv. 46-48)?



18. How much redemption money was collected by Moses for the excess firstborn? What was done with that money (vv. 49-51)?


Duties of the Sons of Kohath - Read Numbers 4:1-20

19. Although males one month and older were counted in the census, they didn’t all serve at the tabernacle. What were the ages of men who served (v. 3)? (See also Numbers 8:24.)



20. Although the sons of Kohath carried the furniture and utensils of the tabernacle (see Numbers 3:31), they were not allowed to touch the items themselves. Who prepared these items before the sons of Kohath could carry them (v. 5)?




21. What would happen to the sons of Kohath if they touched any of the holy implements of the tabernacle (v. 15)?




22. What did the priests cover the ark of the Testimony with to prepare it for journey (vv. 5-6)? How did they carry it?



23. What did the priests cover the table of showbread with to prepare it for journey (vv. 7-8)? How did they carry it?



24. What did the priests cover the lampstand with to prepare it for journey (v. 9)? How did they carry it (v. 10)?



25. What did the priests cover the golden altar of incense with to prepare it for journey (v. 11)? How did they carry it (v. 11)?



26. What did the priests cover the utensils of service with to prepare them for journey (v. 12)? How did they carry them (v. 12)?



27. The bronze altar, where sacrifices for sins were made, was covered differently than the other pieces of furniture. What was different (v. 13)? (See also Mark 15:20.) How was it carried (v. 14)?



28. What duty was appointed to Eleazar (v. 16)?



29. In addition to not being able to touch the implements of the tabernacle, what could the sons of Kohath not do to the implements (v. 20)?



Duties of the Sons of Gershon - Read Numbers 4:21-28

30. What was assigned to the sons of Gershon to carry (vv. 25-26)?




31. Who appointed the sons of Gershon to their specific duties (v. 27)?



Duties of the Sons of Merari - Read Numbers 4:29-33

32. What was assigned to the sons of Merari to carry (vv. 31-32)?




33. God is a God of detail and organization. How specific were the assignments given to the sons of Merari (v. 32)?



Census of the Levites - Read Numbers 4:34-49

34. Although the entire tribe was numbered by counting males one month old and up, not all those served. Only those who were between the ages of 30 and 50 served. How many eligible service men were among the Kohathites (v. 36), Gershonites (v. 40) and Merarites (v. 44)? How many in total (v. 48)?



Ceremonially Unclean Persons Isolated - Read Numbers 5:1-4

35. The Lord reminded the people of His holiness and of their need for holiness if they were to live near His dwelling place. Who did the Lord command the children of Israel to put out of the camp and why (vv. 1-4)?



Confession and Restitution - Read Numbers 5:5-10

36. When a man or woman committed any sin and was guilty of it, who was it that they sinned against (v. 6)? (See also Psalm 51:4.)



37. What was the first step the guilty sinner was to take in the process of restitution to the one he or she wronged (v. 7a)?



38. Not only was the guilty sinner to make restitution, what else was he required to give to the one he or she had wronged (v. 7b)?



39. If the guilty sinner wanted to make restitution for their wrongdoing, but the person they wronged was dead, to whom would they make restitution (v. 8a)?



40. Restitution leads to restoration. If the wronged person was dead and had no remaining relatives, to whom was restitution made (v. 8b)?



Concerning Unfaithful Wives - Read Numbers 5:11-31

41. If a husband became jealous of his wife and suspected that she had committed adultery, what was he to bring to the priest in order to determine if she was unfaithful (v. 15)?



42. How might a husband become jealous of his wife and suspect that she was unfaithful to him (v. 14)?



43. If a woman was brought to the priest by a jealous husband who suspected that she had been unfaithful and committed adultery, what was the priest to do to the woman (vv. 16-28)?



44. What would happen if the woman was not guilty of adultery (v. 28)?



45. What would happen if the woman was guilty of adultery (v. 27)?


46. What else would likely happen if the woman was guilty of adultery? (See Exodus 20:14 and Leviticus 20:10.)



47. If a woman committed adultery and concealed that she had defiled herself, and there was no witness against her, nor was she caught—yet she remained with her husband—what might her husband become guilty of (v. 31)? (See also Luke 16:18 and 1 Corinthians 6:11.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Numbers 2 is about management
    2. Numbers 3 is about ministry
    3. Three million people in the wilderness
      1. 12 ½ months since they left Egypt
      2. Tribal allotments
      3. Before God sends them, He prepares them (see Isaiah 40:31)
      4. Learn to love the process (see Philippians 4:11)
        1. We have a hard time waiting
        2. If you're single, enjoy being single
        3. If you're married, enjoy being married
        4. If you're waiting on the Lord for something, enjoy the process of whatever He is teaching you
      5. The encampment
        1. In the center is the tabernacle
        2. On the east, the entrance; on the east side are three tribes: Judah, Issachar, and Zebulun
        3. On the south are three tribes: Reuben, Simeon, and Gad
        4. On the west side are three tribes: Ephraim, Manasseh, and Benjamin
        5. On the north side are three tribes:Dan, Asher, and Naphtali
        6. There are a total of 12 tribes
  2. Numbers 2—management
    1. The eastern camp
      1. The place of honor; the head tribe
      2. Under the banner, the mask of Judah
        1. A lion
        2. Green flag with a lion embroidered on it
        3. Bible commentators Keil and Delitzsch studied the rabbinical traditions extensively
    2. The southern camp
      1. Rueben is the anchor to the three tribes of the southern camp
      2. Their flag was red with the insignia of a man
    3. The western camp
      1. Ephraim with Manasseh and Benjamin
      2. A gold flag with the insignia of an ox
    4. The northern camp
      1. Dan was the anchor
      2. Asher and Naphtali were also there
      3. A white flag with an eagle
    5. The fighting men were numbered
    6. The Levites were not included in the numbers with the fighters
    7. The encampment laid out around the tabernacle was a picture of the throne of God
      1. Vision of a mobile throne of God and four angelic creatures with faces (see Ezekiel 1)
      2. John's vision of the throne of God and four living creatures (see Revelation 4)
      3. The four gospels
        1. Matthew portrays Jesus as the King of the Jews
        2. Mark portrays Jesus as the servant
        3. Luke portrays Jesus as the humble, Son of Man
        4. John portrays Jesus as the Son of God (see John 20:31)
      4. The encampment was shaped like a cross
  3. Numbers 3—ministry
    1. The priests represented the people before God
      1. Wore a stone on each shoulder with six names on one and six names on the other—the names of the tribes of Israel
      2. The high priest wore a breastplate with 12 stones representing the tribes of Judah
    2. The priests taught the Law of God to the people (see Leviticus 10)
    3. The priests judged the people (see Deuteronomy 17)
    4. When they get into the land, there was not a portion allotted to them—their portion was the Lord Himself
    5. The priests wore holy garments
      1. Today there is no need for clergy clothes
      2. We do not need to go to another human to represent us before God
      3. We can go ourselves (see 1 Timothy 2:5)
      4. Skip's mom had hoped that one of her sons would be a Roman Catholic priest; she got her wish, Skip is a priest (see 1 Peter 2:9)
    6. The sons of Aaron
      1. Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar
      2. Nadab and Abihu died when they offered unauthorized fire before the Lord (see Leviticus 10)
        1. The Bible doesn't hide or disguise the flaws of its characters
        2. Photographer Yousuf Karsh took pictures of people in a way that showed their flaws
        3. The fear of the Lord—the beginning of knowledge (see Proverbs 9:10)
        4. We're not sure what "unauthorized fire" was—maybe they took a shortcut
        5. "If you plan to be lazy, there are plenty of avocations in which you will not be wanted; but, above all, you are not wanted in the Christian ministry. For he who finds the ministry an easy life will discover it will bring a hard death." Charles Spurgeon
        6. These two priests were a little too brash, a little too bold
        7. Does God still do this today?
        8. Not in the same way, His mercies are new every morning (see Lamentations 3:22-24)
        9. There are special times when the Lord acted with this kind of judgment
        10. Uzza struck dead (see 2 Samuel 6)
        11. Ananias and Sapphira struck dead (see Acts 5)
        12. Paul wrote about some who were sick and died because they did not discern the Communion service correctly (see 1 Corinthians 11:30)
    7. The whole tribe of Levi helped the priests
      1. The job was too big and daunting a task for just the priests
      2. Jesus Christ is the high priest and we are given to him
      3. "Father, I have manifested Your name to those that You have given me out of the world. For they were Yours, but You have given them to me" (John 17:6)
      4. "I want to make you a kingdom of priests" (Exodus 19:6)
        1. A light to the Gentile nations
        2. But they became narrow-minded and legalistic
        3. They hated unbelievers
      5. What They Didn't Teach You in Seminary by James Emery White
        1. The church will grow old
        2. Turn inward
        3. Become outdated
        4. The death spiral
        5. Pray that we don't turn so inward that we're only thinking about our experience and what songs we like
    8. The Ark of the Covenant
    9. The firstborn—God laid claim to all the firstborn children of Israel (see Exodus 13:1-15)
    10. The redemption money
    11. The priests had different instructions than the rest of the people—they were servants of the Lord

Publications Referenced: What They Didn't Teach You in Seminary by James Emery White, LifeWay research of the Southern Baptist Church

Figures referenced: Keil and Delitzsch, Charles Spurgeon, Yousuf Karsh, Winston Churchill

Cross references: Exodus 13:1-15, Exodus 19:6, Leviticus 10, Deuteronomy 17, 2 Samuel 6, Proverbs 9:10, Isaiah 40:31, Lamentations 3:22-24, Ezekiel 1, John 17:6, John 20:31, Acts 5, 1 Corinthians 11:30, Philippians 4:11, 1 Peter 2:9, Revelation 4


Topic: Priests

Keywords: God, priests, holy, tribes, tabernacle, desert, wandering, garments, banner, census

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 4-5
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 4-5
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2528

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 4-5, God continues to give instructions to Moses and Aaron for the nation of Israel, and another census is taken. As we study this text, we are given insight into God's view of service and what our relationship with Him should look like.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 3-5

PREVIEW: In Numbers 3-5, the Levites are counted twice, substituted for the firstborn, and their duties are assigned. The Lord instructs His children what to do if they?ve wronged someone and need to make restitution, and He gives the law of jealousy.

The Sons of Aaron - Read Numbers 3:1-4

1. Numbers 3 opens by referring back to the Lord?s revelation to Moses. Where was this revelation given (v. 1)? What part of this revelation is being referred to (v. 2)? (See Exodus 28:1.)



2. Although Aaron had four sons who were consecrated to minister as priests, why were two of them no longer serving as priests (v. 4)? (See Leviticus 10:1-2.)



3. Only Aaron and his direct descendants could serve as priests (see Exodus 28:1, Exodus 29:9, and Exodus 40:15). Two of Aaron?s sons, Nadab and Abihu, were dead, leaving whom to serve as priests alongside Aaron (v. 4)?


The Levites Serve in the Tabernacle - Read Numbers 3:5-13

4. Since Aaron was a Levite, this meant that all the priests were Levites but not all the Levites could be priests. What qualified a Levite to be a priest? (See Exodus 28:1, Exodus 29:9, and Exodus 40:15.)



5. With only Eleazar, Ithamar, and their sons available to serve alongside Aaron as priests, the Lord spoke to Moses and assigned whom to attend to the needs of Aaron and the whole congregation (vv. 5-7)?



6. What non-priestly duties were assigned to the tribe of Levi (vv. 8-9)? (See also Numbers 1:50-51.)



7. The Old Testament priesthood was extremely exclusive: Only Aaron and his descendants could serve as priests. What would happen if someone attempted to perform a priestly duty but wasn?t a son of Aaron (v. 10)?



8. It was the Lord?s original intent that the firstborn of every family of every tribe be priests (see Exodus 13:1, 12, 15). Now the Lord spoke to Moses telling him that He was substituting the entire tribe of Levi instead of the firstborn (v. 12). Why might the Lord have selected the tribe of Levi? (See Exodus 32:25?29.)



Census of the Levites Commanded - Read Numbers 3:14-39

9. The Lord spoke to Moses in the wilderness of Sinai and instructed him to count the children of Levi who were not counted in the original census (Numbers 1:49). Who specifically was counted (v. 15)?



10. The Levites were divided into three major family groups. Who were the sons of Levi (v. 17)? Who were their sons (vv. 18-20)?



11. The duties of each family and camping locations were designated by the Lord to Moses. Where were the 7,500 Gershonites to camp (v. 23)? Where were the 8,600 Kohathites to camp (v. 29)? Where were the 6,200 Mararites to camp (v. 35)?


12. What special role and responsibility was given to Eleazar the son of Aaron (v. 32)?



13. The encampment of Levites surrounded the tabernacle (see Numbers 1:53). Who camped on the east side of the tabernacle (v. 38)?



14. How many males one month and older from the tribe of Levi were accounted for during this census (v. 39)?



Levites Dedicated Instead of the Firstborn - Read Numbers 3:40-51

15. The Lord told Moses to count the number of the firstborn males of the children of Israel so that He might substitute the Levites as His instead of the firstborn. How many firstborn were accounted for (vv. 40-43)?



16. The Levites are substituted, life for life, in place of the firstborn as dedicated to the Lord (v. 44). How many more firstborn males were there than Levites (v. 45)?



17. How were the remaining firstborn redeemed when there was not a Levite to take their place (vv. 46-48)?



18. How much redemption money was collected by Moses for the excess firstborn? What was done with that money (vv. 49-51)?


Duties of the Sons of Kohath - Read Numbers 4:1-20

19. Although males one month and older were counted in the census, they didn?t all serve at the tabernacle. What were the ages of men who served (v. 3)? (See also Numbers 8:24.)



20. Although the sons of Kohath carried the furniture and utensils of the tabernacle (see Numbers 3:31), they were not allowed to touch the items themselves. Who prepared these items before the sons of Kohath could carry them (v. 5)?




21. What would happen to the sons of Kohath if they touched any of the holy implements of the tabernacle (v. 15)?




22. What did the priests cover the ark of the Testimony with to prepare it for journey (vv. 5-6)? How did they carry it?



23. What did the priests cover the table of showbread with to prepare it for journey (vv. 7-8)? How did they carry it?



24. What did the priests cover the lampstand with to prepare it for journey (v. 9)? How did they carry it (v. 10)?



25. What did the priests cover the golden altar of incense with to prepare it for journey (v. 11)? How did they carry it (v. 11)?



26. What did the priests cover the utensils of service with to prepare them for journey (v. 12)? How did they carry them (v. 12)?



27. The bronze altar, where sacrifices for sins were made, was covered differently than the other pieces of furniture. What was different (v. 13)? (See also Mark 15:20.) How was it carried (v. 14)?



28. What duty was appointed to Eleazar (v. 16)?



29. In addition to not being able to touch the implements of the tabernacle, what could the sons of Kohath not do to the implements (v. 20)?



Duties of the Sons of Gershon - Read Numbers 4:21-28

30. What was assigned to the sons of Gershon to carry (vv. 25-26)?




31. Who appointed the sons of Gershon to their specific duties (v. 27)?



Duties of the Sons of Merari - Read Numbers 4:29-33

32. What was assigned to the sons of Merari to carry (vv. 31-32)?




33. God is a God of detail and organization. How specific were the assignments given to the sons of Merari (v. 32)?



Census of the Levites - Read Numbers 4:34-49

34. Although the entire tribe was numbered by counting males one month old and up, not all those served. Only those who were between the ages of 30 and 50 served. How many eligible service men were among the Kohathites (v. 36), Gershonites (v. 40) and Merarites (v. 44)? How many in total (v. 48)?



Ceremonially Unclean Persons Isolated - Read Numbers 5:1-4

35. The Lord reminded the people of His holiness and of their need for holiness if they were to live near His dwelling place. Who did the Lord command the children of Israel to put out of the camp and why (vv. 1-4)?



Confession and Restitution - Read Numbers 5:5-10

36. When a man or woman committed any sin and was guilty of it, who was it that they sinned against (v. 6)? (See also Psalm 51:4.)



37. What was the first step the guilty sinner was to take in the process of restitution to the one he or she wronged (v. 7a)?



38. Not only was the guilty sinner to make restitution, what else was he required to give to the one he or she had wronged (v. 7b)?



39. If the guilty sinner wanted to make restitution for their wrongdoing, but the person they wronged was dead, to whom would they make restitution (v. 8a)?



40. Restitution leads to restoration. If the wronged person was dead and had no remaining relatives, to whom was restitution made (v. 8b)?



Concerning Unfaithful Wives - Read Numbers 5:11-31

41. If a husband became jealous of his wife and suspected that she had committed adultery, what was he to bring to the priest in order to determine if she was unfaithful (v. 15)?



42. How might a husband become jealous of his wife and suspect that she was unfaithful to him (v. 14)?



43. If a woman was brought to the priest by a jealous husband who suspected that she had been unfaithful and committed adultery, what was the priest to do to the woman (vv. 16-28)?



44. What would happen if the woman was not guilty of adultery (v. 28)?



45. What would happen if the woman was guilty of adultery (v. 27)?


46. What else would likely happen if the woman was guilty of adultery? (See Exodus 20:14 and Leviticus 20:10.)



47. If a woman committed adultery and concealed that she had defiled herself, and there was no witness against her, nor was she caught?yet she remained with her husband?what might her husband become guilty of (v. 31)? (See also Luke 16:18 and 1 Corinthians 6:11.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The most important verse in the Bible is attached to the book of Numbers
      1. It's not John 3:16
      2. "As Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so the Son of Man must be lifted up, that whoever believes in Him would not perish but have everlasting life" (John 3:14-15).
      3. Jesus referred to the story of the serpents coming into the camp (see Num. 21).
    2. Paul admonished the Corinthians (see 1 Cor. 10).
    3. "Let us therefore enter into the rest that God has prepared for us" (Heb. 4:11).
    4. It is a book of numbers; two million people needed to be organized, numbered
    5. Organization and chaos: God provided a way for his people to march in an organized fashion through the wilderness
    6. Chapter three is a census of eligibility and chapter four is a census of viability
      1. In chapter three, they counted all the males in the tribe of Levi—those eligible to serve
      2. In chapter four, they counted the working Levites (ages thirty to fifty)
      3. Age thirty vs. age twenty-five; it's a clarification—it took five years to prepare them for their task
      4. King David became king when he was thirty
      5. At age thirty, Jesus began His ministry
    7. God spoke to Moses and Aaron; God instituted a theocracy—God is in charge
  2. The ministry (the service)
    1. It's not by self-appointment
      1. God had to appoint you
      2. Later, the people demanded a king
      3. After that, the kingdom split north and south
        1. They built two temples in the north
        2. They set up a golden calf like their forefathers did in the desert
        3. They chose priests out of every class of people, not just the Levites
        4. They brought idolatry into the land
      4. God set the parameters in the New Testament also (see 1 Tim. 3 and Titus)
    2. Maturity
      1. They had to be thirty years old
      2. The word service means warfare in Hebrew
      3. Paul, in the New Testament uses the metaphor of military service to speak of ministry
    3. Each worker is different—unique
      1. There were three families and they all had different duties
      2. Also in the New Testament in the body of Christ (see 1 Cor. 12:5-6)
      3. As the ministry grew, the need for people with specific gifts grew (see Acts 6)
      4. Every one of us has some gift or gifts
    4. The Kohathites
      1. Camped south of the tabernacle
      2. They were responsible to carry the furniture
        1. The ark of the covenant
        2. The altar of incense
        3. The menorah
        4. The table of showbread
        5. The altar and the laver out in the courtyard
      3. Those age 30 to 50 were counted
      4. They carried the articles of furniture, but they could not look at them or they would die (see v. 18 and 1 Sam. 6)
      5. The sons of Aaron used the veil to cover the ark of the covenant
    5. The Gershonites (sons of Gershon)
      1. Camped west of the tabernacle
      2. They were responsible to carry the soft items
        1. The cloths
        2. The curtains
        3. The skins
    6. The Merarites (sons of Merari)
      1. Camped north of the tabernacle
      2. They were responsible for the infrastructure
        1. The boards
        2. The bowls
        3. The sockets
        4. The pegs
    7. Compare to the New Testament
      1. In the Old Testament, there was an emphasis on a holy place, property, furnishings, and holy items
      2. In the New Testament we don't have a priesthood, a special place we go—we are the temple of the Holy Spirit
      3. That's the beautiful difference
      4. Worship should be going on inside of us every day
    8. 8,580 viable, working Levites
  3. How the work was done
    1. They were camped
    2. Every morning they would look outside and over the top of the tabernacle to see if the cloud was still or starting to move
    3. If it was starting to move, that was their signal
      1. Aaron and his sons would cover the ark and the alters
      2. The Gershonites took down all the curtains and skins, and pack them up
      3. The Merarites took down the sockets, boards, poles, pegs, and cords
    4. Then they would march orderly, a couple million people marching through the wilderness
    5. When the cloud or the pillar of fire would stop, they would stop and set everything back up
      1. They put the ark down first
      2. Then the Merarites would laid down the infrastructure around the ark
      3. After that the Gershonites hung the curtains, the cloths, the veils, and the skins
      4. The high priest would uncover the ark and set up shop for worship
    6. It was all well-timed and very well-organized
      1. Suppose one of the workers woke up and was tired—bored with his job—he felt unimportant and unvalued
      2. He decided not to do his job—did not cooperate with the work
      3. But without his job done, the worship couldn't happen
      4. Every job was important
      5. New Testament corollary
        1. The body of Christ
        2. Paul spoke of the church like a human body
        3. Each cell is important
        4. The DNA code of just one human would produce mass volumes of information—enough to fill the grand canyon
        5. We, the church, are the body of Christ; every cell, every activity, every organ, ever appendage is vital (see 1 Cor. 12:14-31)
  4. Separation
    1. Set diseased people outside the camp
      1. This seems harsh
      2. This doesn't seem like a loving God
      3. It was a loving God doing a very loving thing
      4. Some of these diseases were highly contagious and could kill the entire population
      5. The most loving thing was to isolate them for a period of time
      6. It was important to the health of God's people in the wilderness
    2. Leper is a broad term for an infectious skin disease
      1. Hebrew word tsara'at
      2. From allergy to psoriasis to eczema to full-blown leprosy
      3. The most extreme form was a bacteria—Mycobacterium leprae, a disease that took your life
      4. "It was a progression where you died by the inch" —William Barclay
        1. Foul discharge came out from the skin
        2. Nodules formed on the vocal cords
        3. Eyebrows fell out—hair fell out
        4. Limbs could fall off
        5. Loss of sensation
        6. Long slow death
        7. Very contagious
      5. The priest acted as the physician (see Lev. 13)
        1. Examination
        2. Quarantine
        3. Pronounced clean or unclean
        4. If unclean they were put out of the camp, hair was shaved, clothes torn; they would have to shout, "Unclean! Unclean!"
        5. There was a special chamber in the synagogues called the mehitzah isolated for lepers
        6. They couldn't cuddle their children or be touched
        7. Jesus stretched out his hand and touched the leper (see Matthew 8:3; Mark 1:41; and Luke 5:13)
  5. Sin and restitution (v. 5)
    1. Someone stole your camel
      1. He had to give your camel back
      2. He had to pay a 20% inconvenience charge
      3. It is the right thing to fix the problem—to make restitution
      4. If you sin against God's people, you sin against God; you had to do three things
        1. Confess your sin
        2. Pay restitution to the person you wronged
        3. Sacrifice at the tabernacle
    2. Unfaithful wife, jealous husband
      1. He had to take his wife to the priest
      2. He would take an offering required for her
      3. She would be put under oath
      4. Drink holy water
      5. If she is not guilty, nothing happens
      6. If she is guilty, the curse goes into her stomach
      7. The Old Testament equivalent of a lie detector test
      8. Psychological burden of guilt
      9. Many scholars believe this was a transitional law given for the wilderness march and wandering
      10. Josephus believe the "thigh will rot and the belly will swell," was dropsy
      11. Other scholars believed it was a miscarriage
      12. And others believed it was a thrombophlebitis
      13. We don't know exactly
      14. We do know that marriage fidelity is so high on God's list; you make a vow "Till death do you part"
      15. God hates divorce (see Malachi 2:16)
    3. We are the bride of Christ
      1. Our fidelity to Jesus is so important because He's always been faithful to us
      2. He has always loved us
      3. When God looks at us He sees His Son, Jesus—pure, spotless, undefiled
      4. That's the new covenant

Hebrew Terms: צָרָ֫עַת, tsaraath-leprosy; mehitzah

Figures referenced: William Barclay

Cross references: Numbers 21; 1 Samuel 6; Malachi 2:16; Matthew 8:3; Mark 1:41; Luke 5:13; John 3:14-16; Acts 6; 1 Corinthians 10; 1 Corinthians 12:5-6; 1 Corinthians 12:14-31; 1 Timothy 3; Titus; Hebrews 4:11


Topic: Job

Keywords: God, priests, holy, tabernacle, desert, census, body of Christ, job, restitution, bride, leprosy, curse

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 6-7
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 6-7
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2530

MESSAGE SUMMARY
As we study Numbers 6-7, we see some of the ways that God's chosen people separated themselves to the Lord and worshiped Him. As the body of Christ, we must also remember that the Lord should be the center of our lives and that our worship to Him is about giving rather than getting.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 6-8

PREVIEW: In Numbers 6-8, the law of the Nazirite is given for those who wanted to draw near to God by separating themselves to the Lord. A blessing is given to Aaron for the children of Israel, offerings are made for the tabernacle of meeting, and instructions are given for the cleansing and dedication of the Levites.

The Law of the Nazirite - Read Numbers 6:1-21

1. The Hebrew word zar means to separate. Therefore, a Nazirite vow spoke of one who separated himself or herself for a period of time in order to totally focus on the Lord. Who was eligible to make a Nazirite vow (v. 2)?



2. Unlike monks or other religious separatists, a person making a Nazirite vow didn?t separate themselves from others. What did a Nazirite separate themselves to (v.2)?



3. How might we consider ourselves separated to the Lord? (See John 17:14-19, 1 John 4:5-6, and 1 John 5:19-20.)



4. God set forth three things that a person making a Nazirite vow must separate Himself from. What was the first thing a person making a Nazirite vow must be separate from (vv. 3-4)?



5. What was the second thing a person making a Nazirite vow must be separate from (v. 5)?



6. What was the third thing a person making a Nazirite vow must be separate from (vv. 6-7)?


7. During the time of consecration, if a person fulfilling his/her Nazirite vow encountered a dead person, what were they to do (vv. 9-12)?



8. When the Nazirite completed their time of consecration, they were brought to the door of the tabernacle of meeting (v. 13) and they presented an offering to the Lord. What did the Nazirite do to indicate his/her vow was complete (v. 18)?


9. Ordinarily, a Nazirite vow was an act of devotion taken voluntarily by an adult; but on occasion, this vow would be made by parents on behalf of their children. Name several well-known people who were likely either Nazirites for life or made a Nazirite vow as an adult. (See 1 Samuel 1:11, Judges 13:5, Luke 1:15, and Acts 18:18.)



10. What are some steps we can take to separate ourselves to the Lord? (See Matthew 5:8, 48, Proverbs 4:23, James 1:27b, Romans 12:1-2, and 1 John 5:18.)


The Priestly Blessing - Read Numbers 6:22-27

11. The Lord spoke to Moses and gave him instructions for Aaron and his sons (the priests). What were these instructions (vv. 22-23)?



12. In the priestly blessing, the phrase ?the LORD,? is repeated three times. The three-fold repetition of Lord does not prove the Trinity, but it certainly illustrates it. List the things that the Lord wants to do when blessing His children (vv. 24-27)



13. Six times the word you is used in the priestly blessing. The priestly blessing was intentionally given to individuals. In verse 27 the blessing is corporate for the entire nation. What identification is upon the children of Israel that caused the Lord to bless them (v. 27)? (See also 2 Chronicles 7:14.)


14. How is this same blessing upon the New Testament priesthood? (See 1 Peter 2:9-10, Matthew 28:19, Acts 11:26, John 15:16, Ephesians 3:12, Hebrews 4:16, and Hebrews 10:19.)



Offerings of the Leaders - Read Numbers 7:1-89

15. When did Moses finish setting up the tabernacle (v. 1)? (See also Exodus 40:17 and Numbers 1:1.)



16. Once the tabernacle and all its furnishings along with the altar and all its utensils were setup, anointed, and consecrated, an offer was made. Who made this offering? What did the offering consist of (vv. 2-3)?



17. What did the Lord tell Moses to do with the offering (vv. 4-5)?



18. The offering was divided by Moses: One-third of the offering went to the sons of Gershon and two-thirds went to the sons of Merari, but to the sons of Kohath he gave none. Why (vv. 6-9)? (See also Numbers 4:15, 24?28, 29?33.)



19. The offering was not given all at once. Describe how the offering was offered (vv. 10-11).




20. What was included in each of the 12 offerings (vv. 13-17)?



21. The order in which the offerings were made matched what other order established by the Lord (vv. 12-84)? (See Numbers 2:3-31.)


Arrangement of the Lamps - Read Numbers 8:1-4

22. The instructions the Lord gave to Moses for Aaron regarding the arrangement of the lamps had not been previously communicated to the priests. How was Aaron to arrange the seven lamps? Why (vv. 1-3)?



23. What was the lampstand constructed of? Where did Moses get the pattern of design for it (v. 4)? (See also Exodus 25:40 and Acts 7:44.)



Cleansing and Dedication of the Levites - Read Numbers 8:5-26

24. The Lord spoke to Moses regarding cleansing and dedication of the Levites. What cleansing was done to the Levites as an outward purification (v. 7)?



25. The inward purification of the Levites was to be accompanied by the offering of sacrifices. What was offered as a sin offering and burnt offering for the Levites' inward purification (v. 8)?



26. The whole congregation of the children of Israel gathered together in dedication of the Levites. What did the congregation do to the Levites in dedicating them to service of the tabernacle (vv. 9-10)?



27. What did the Levites do to the young bulls before offering them as sacrifices (v. 12)? (See also Leviticus 16:21.)



28. All priests were Levites, but not all Levites were priests. However all the Levites belonged to whom? For what purpose (vv. 14-15)?



29. The Lord had sanctified all the firstborn as His (see Exodus 13:2, Leviticus 27:26, and Numbers 3:13) on the day that He struck all the firstborn of Egypt. The Lord now took the Levites instead of the firstborn. Why (vv. 18-19)?



30. What were the age ranges of the Levites who performed the work of the tabernacle of meeting (vv. 24-25)? (See also Numbers 4:3 and 1 Chronicles 23:3, 24, 27)



31. Once a Levite reached the age of 50, what was he allowed to do? What was he restricted from doing (v. 26)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. As a young Christian, Skip visited a Nazarene church who sang how they were so glad to be a Nazarene
    2. Chapter six is about a Jewish group called Nazirites
      1. The law of the Nazirite was a way in which anyone could act priestlike
      2. To be a priest, you had to be from the tribe of Levi—it was a very narrow set of parameters
      3. You could be priestly; man or woman—consecrate yourself for a period of time
  2. The law of the Nazirite (Num. 6)
    1. The most famous of all Nazirites in the Old Testament is Samson—Samson was a Nazirite from his youth
    2. The prophet Samuel was a Nazirite
    3. John the Baptist was a Nazirite
    4. Paul the apostle took the vow of Nazirite on two different occasions (see Acts 18 and 21)
    5. Women could take the vow of a Nazirite
      1. Biblically none are recorded
      2. Historically, there was a Jewish lady from Assyria who took the vow; Helena
    6. Nazirite was from the Hebrew word nazir meaning to separate—to consecrate
      1. The idea was to make yourself holy unto the Lord
      2. The minimum was the thirty days
      3. The maximum was typically one-hundred days
      4. There are some exceptions where some people were lifetime Nazirites—Samson was one (see Judg. 13)
      5. Samuel was a lifetime Nazirite; his mother dedicated him as soon as he was born (1 Sam. 1)
      6. John the Baptist also was a Nazirite (see Luke 1)
    7. No grape products; they symbolized joy—worldly joy
      1. While separated to God, the Nazirites' joy was to be totally to the Lord
      2. Wine in the Bible
        1. Among some, it's become quite controversial
        2. They have difficulty with Jesus turning water into wine and drinking wine at the Passover with his disciples
        3. Skip abstains from alcohol because it is so controversial
        4. The Bible doesn't talk against the taking of wine
        5. Paul told Timothy to drink for his stomach (see 1 Tim. 5:23)
        6. The Bible does condemn the excessive use of alcohol (see Eph. 5:18)
        7. Try getting high on God's goodness and love; it's better than earthly joy
      3. The prophet Amos chided the Israelites for making the Nazirites drink wine (see Amos 2:12)
        1. People with a worldly value system often get upset with those who have a higher value system
        2. Your higher moral standard makes some uncomfortable
        3. Sometimes believers ask the wrong question: "Can I be a Christian and do this activity?"
        4. They could ask: "How far can I go to please the Lord?"
    8. Nazirites let their hair grow
      1. Letting their hair grow was seen as a sign of strength
      2. A sign of humiliation—you were unkempt
      3. Shame (see 1 Cor. 11:14)
    9. Don't go near a dead body
      1. We are God's holy people—His separated people
      2. We should not do what the spiritually dead do
      3. We should be careful in how we deal with the spiritually dead among us
    10. God didn't require this vow
      1. It was completely voluntary
      2. Once you did it, you were required to follow through
    11. The principle is that God is higher than your family; you should put Jesus first (see Matt. 10:37)
    12. If they were defiled at any time during their vow, they had to start all over again
      1. That's not fair
      2. Look at it like a second start
      3. The beautiful nature of God to get a second chance, third chance, fourth chance...
    13. When the vow was complete, the head was shaved and offerings were made
      1. Paul did this (see Acts 18:18)
      2. They had to pay for the sacrifice and it could be costly; sometimes they were sponsored by someone from the tribe
      3. Paul did this also (see Acts 21)
      4. It was a public ceremony; there was accountability attached to it
      5. When we dedicate to the Lord we should not be afraid to say that we dedicate
      6. Your salvation should be public
      7. Jesus called people publicly; everybody could see it
  3. The blessing of the children of Israel
    1.  This was the blessing spoken of in Lev. 9
    2.  It is call in Hebrew the Birkat Kohanim, or the blessing of the high priest
    3.  Three lines
      1. All with Lord in all caps
      2. That is the covenant name Yahweh
      3. "I AM THAT I AM" (Exodus 3:14)
      4. Two blessings in each line
      5. The Hebrews observe the symmetry
      6. The central theme is that God loves you, God treasures you, God favors you, God wants to bless you
  4. An offering of the tribes for the tabernacle before they March (Chapter 7)
    1. Eighty-nine verses; the second longest chapter in the Bible (see Psalm 119)
    2. They are getting ready to March from Mount Sinai up to Kadesh Barnea
    3. The prince of each tribe brought the sacrifice for their tribe
      1. The priest lifted his hands and gave them God's blessing
      2. Now it's their turn to praise God
      3. "You bless me, thank You, I love You, I worship You"
      4. American way: worship is about us, not God
      5. Worship should be humble adoration of God
      6. Worship should not be about self-gratification
      7. Worship is a response; we love Him because he first loved us (see 1 John 4:19, Rom. 12:1)
      8. Worship from the heart (see John 4:23-24)
      9. Do it even if you don't feel like it; it's a commandment (see Matt. 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 10:27, Heb. 13:15)
    4. Six carts and twelve oxen, given according to their service (see Luke 12:48)
    5. The leaders offered the dedication
      1. One leader for each day
      2. The same information is repeated for all twelve tribes
      3. The beauty in this: "The Lord is not unjust to forget your work and your labor of love which you have show toward His name, in that you have ministered to the saints, and to minister" (Hebrews 6:10)
      4. God notices every little thing that someone does and He knows their name (see Mal. 3:16)
    6. God spoke to Moses from the mercy seat
      1. That's the only way God speaks to us today—the mercy seat; it comes to us through Jesus Christ
      2. God spoke to Moses face to face as a friend (see Ex. 33:11)
        1. They spoke in a familiar manner
        2. It's an instinctive "I know that's God speaking"
        3. People talk to God in different ways; like an emergency room doctor, or begrudgingly like a mother-in-law, or like a policeman—cautiously
        4. The best relationship is familiar, friendly
        5. Try talking to God out loud, it helps to take away distractions

Hebrew Terms: נָזִיר; nazir, Nazirite

Cross references: Exodus 3:14, Exodus 33:11, Leviticus 9, Judges 13, 1 Samuel 1, Psalm 119, Amos 2:12, Malachi 3:16, Matthew 10:37, Matthew 22:37, Mark 12:30, Luke 1, Luke 10:27, Luke 12:48, John 4:23-24, Acts 18, Acts 21, Romans 12:1, 1 Corinthians 11:14, 1 Timothy 5:23, Hebrews 6:10, Hebrews 13:15, 1 John 4:19


Topic: Nazirite

Keywords: God, priests, holy, tabernacle, vow, consecrate, mercy, prayer, dedication

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 8-9
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 8-9
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2544

MESSAGE SUMMARY
As we consider Numbers 8-9, we uncover important correlations between the Levitical priesthood and Jesus Christ, our High Priest and Sacrifice, and discover the beautiful portrait of Jesus provided in the Passover. We also learn how believers are like the Levites: redeemed, cleansed, and set apart to serve the Lord. We have a reason to celebrate!

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 9-10

PREVIEW: In Numbers 9-10, the Passover is commemorated and the children of Israel depart from the mountain of God and begin their wilderness wanderings led by the cloud of God.

The Second Passover - Read Numbers 9:1-14

1. The Lord spoke to Moses in the Wilderness of Sinai. What day did the Lord speak to Moses about the second Passover? (v.1) What other significant event happened in this same month? (See Exodus 40:17.) This second Passover happened a month before what other event we have studied? (See Numbers 1:1-2.)


2. The Lord instructed Moses to have His children commemorate the Passover on the fourteenth day of the first month, at twilight (vv. 3-4). What does the Passover commemorate? (See Deuteronomy 16:1-2 and Exodus 12:1-28.)



3. There were certain men who wanted to keep the Passover but could not. Why couldn’t they keep the Passover (vv. 6-7)? (See also Numbers 5:2 and 19:11-13.)


4. What did these men who could not keep the Passover do about their circumstance (v. 6)?


5. How is what these men did an example for us to follow when we have a spiritual situation in our life that we aren’t sure how to handle? (See Proverbs 11:14, 12:15, and 19:20-21.)


6. What was Moses' response to these men’s inquiry (v. 8)?


7. How is what Moses did a good example for us to follow when we need to know how to handle a spiritual situation in our life? (See Proverbs 2:3-6 and Jeremiah 29:12-13.)


8. What is the danger of not doing what these men did when they could not keep the Passover? (See Proverbs 12:15, 14:12, and 16:25.)


9. What was the Lord’s response to the men’s dilemma (vv. 9-12)?


10. Give some thought to the Lord's response. What does it tell you about His expectations concerning the keeping of the Passover?


11. The Lord instructed Moses about the keeping of the Passover and gave details to ensure that they didn't break the bones of the Passover lamb (v. 12). What is this detail prophetically picturing? (See Exodus 12:46 and John 19:36.)


12. Although the church isn’t required to keep the Passover, how are we commanded to remember what the Lord has done for us? (See Luke 22:19 and 1 Corinthians 11:23-26.)


13. What would happen to a member of the children of Israel if they were to cease to keep the Passover (v. 13)?


14. Could a stranger (a person who is not a member of the children of Israel) keep the Passover (v. 14)?


The Cloud and the Fire - Read Numbers 9:15-23

15. On the day the tabernacle was raised up, what covered it? What did it look like at from evening until morning (v. 15)?


16. What happened when the cloud was taken up from above the tabernacle (v. 17)?


17. It was at the command—or literally the mouth—of the Lord that the children of Israel would journey or camp (vv. 15-23). This guidance was provided by movement of the cloud. What is the cloud a visible manifestation of? (See Isaiah 63:10-12.)


Two Silver Trumpets - Read Numbers 10:1-10

18. The Lord spoke to Moses, instructing him to make two silver trumpets (v. 2). What was the purpose of these two silver trumpets (v. 2)?


19. What was to happen if both silver trumpets were blown (v. 3)? (See also Jeremiah 4:5 and Joel 2:15.)


20. What was to happen if only one of the silver trumpets was blown (v. 4)?


21. There was a blowing of the trumpets and the sounding of the advance (or alarm). What happened when the advance was sounded (v. 5)? When it was sounded a second time (v. 6)?


22. Who alone was allowed to blow the trumpets and sound the advance (v. 8)? (See also Numbers 31:6, Joshua 6:4, 1 Chronicles 15:24, and 2 Chronicles 13:12.)


23. When going to war, the sounding of the alarm with the trumpets initiated two things. What were they? (v. 9)?


24. The trumpets were also sounded in the days of gladness, the days when the children of Israel celebrated feasts, began new months, and made offerings. On these occasions, what was the purpose of the blowing of the trumpets (v. 10)? (See also Leviticus 23:24.)


25. The trumpets of the children of Israel were sounded for four different reasons: 1) convocation (vv. 2-4), 2) mobilization (vv. 5-8), 3) confrontation (v. 9), and 4) celebration (v. 10). There are two trumpets of God; the first was sounded in Exodus 19:16 to gather His people at Mount Sinai, and the second has yet to be sounded. What will happen at the sounding of the last trumpet of God? (See 1 Corinthians 15:52.)


Departure from Sinai - Read Numbers 10:11-36

26. The cloud was taken up from above the tabernacle on the twentieth day of the second month in the second year (v. 11). The children of Israel had been at Sinai nearly a year (see Exodus 19:1), and it had only been 20 days after being instructed about moving (Numbers 1:1). This twentieth day marked the end of what? (See Numbers 9:9-12 and Exodus 23:15.)


27. The cloud moved and so did the children of Israel. Leaving Mount Sinai, where did the cloud lead the children of Israel (v. 12)?



28. The order of march had been prescribed earlier by the Lord (Numbers 2:3-31). Apparently this was the unvarying pattern of their journey through the wilderness (v. 28). Who led the procession (v. 14)? What does this leader’s name mean? (See Genesis 29:35.)


29. Before leaving for the Land of Promise, Moses invited his brother-in-law Hobab (see Judges 4:11) to accompany them on their journey. What did Moses offer Hobab as an incentive to join them on their journey (v. 29)?


30. Hobab did not want to journey with Moses and the children of Israel (v. 30). What role did Moses offer Hobab if he would accompany them (v. 31)?


31. They departed from the mountain of God on a journey for three days (v. 33). Where was the cloud during this journey (v. 34)? What did the cloud provide for the children of Israel? (See Nehemiah 9:12, 19.)


32. The travel was undertaken only in the daylight hours; at night the cloud and the ark rested along with the people. When the day’s march began and was over, how would Moses entreat the Lord to abide among His people (vv. 35-36)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Communion is directly from the Passover meal Jesus shared with His disciples
      1. Luke 22:19
      2. He was celebrating that ancient celebration of the deliverance from slavery
    2. Numbers 8 is about lamps and Levites
      1. Menorah: seven lamps on one lampstand
      2. Levites commissioned to do the work of the ministry in the tabernacle
    3. Numbers 9 is about the Passover and the presence
      1. The ancient meal of deliverance
      2. The cloud and the pillar of fire that represented the presence of God
    4. The menorah was the only light in the tabernacle
      1. Made of pure gold; had seven lamps
      2. Confused with the hanukkiah, which has nine lamps
      3. Rabbis called the temple: "the light of the world"
        1. Jesus Christ came along and turned that rabbinical thinking on its ear
        2. John 8:12
      4. Temple Institute
        1. Sworn to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem
        2. Have reconstructed a golden menorah
  2. Numbers 8
    1. Starting in verse 5: ordination of the tribe of Levi
    2. Romans 12:1-2: the imagery in Paul's mind seemed to be of these Levites as they presented their bodies for the work in the tabernacle
    3. 1 Samuel 3:1-4: the calling of the prophet Samuel
      1. Very early in the morning—when the lamp was about to go out in the tabernacle—the Lord called him into ministry
      2. Symbolism
        1. In the darkest part of the night, the Lord was about to reveal His plan through Samuel
        2. In the darkest period of their history, when God wasn't speaking anymore and it was dark spiritually, the Lord unveiled a new plan
        3. Isaiah 9:2; Matthew 4:16
        4. No matter how dark it gets, God still has a plan
    4. The menorah is a beautiful picture of the church
      1. God's house was lit with something that symbolized His presence and truth
      2. If there's one place where the light of God's truth should never be obscured, it's in His house
      3. We should always shine without apology
      4. Psalm 119:105
    5. The Levites were to take the place of all the firstborn males in the land
      1. The number of the priests—the men in the tribe of Levi—was almost identical to the number of firstborn males in Israel
      2. Laying hands on the Levites was a gesture of identification and a transfer of obligation to do the work of the tabernacle for all of Israel
    6. Both ministry and guilt is transferred symbolically
      1. It's a beautiful picture of Jesus Christ
        1. He was the Great High Priest
        2. He was the Lamb itself; John 1:29
      2. It's also a beautiful model of ministry
    7. The firstborn rightfully belonged to God because He was the one who saved their lives through the tenth plague
      1. Exodus 12:1-30
      2. But He set apart the tribe of Levi to do His work instead of them
    8. Wave offering: offering them up to be wholly consumed with the business of God
    9. Minimum age was twenty-five; mandatory retirement at age fifty
      1. A seeming discrepancy in the Scripture; in Numbers 4:1-3, the minimum age was thirty
      2. There is ample rabbinical literature that says there was a mandatory five-year apprenticeship
      3. In Numbers 4, age thirty was when you would start to carry the tabernacle on your shoulders through the wilderness—after a five-year apprenticeship
    10. The Levites are a beautiful picture of Christian people
      1. We are redeemed, cleansed, and set apart for service
      2. We have not an earthly inheritance, but a heavenly inheritance
      3. Hebrews 11:10
    11. Age thirty to fifty is the prime of life
      1. God is saying, "I want the best years of your life"
        1. God wants the very best from us
        2. Give God your best—not just your best stuff, not just the first 10 percent of your income, but your very best energy, the prime of your life
      2. God loves with a special kind of concern and care those who serve Him
        1. He used the Levites for His purpose and glory
        2. Then, at age fifty, they just transitioned; they served Him in a different way
      3. Neither Paul nor Peter quit at age fifty
        1. But the older we get, we serve in a different capacity
        2. Those in the ministry who get older need to be training the younger generation
    12. Never be afraid of serving the Lord and abandoning yourself to His will and work
      1. He'll take care of you; He's generous
      2. He doesn't want to overburden you; Matthew 11:30
      3. If you think fatigue is next to godliness, you are carrying the wrong burden
        1. God instructed that the clothing the priests wore be made out of linen (see 1 Chron. 15:27; 2 Chron. 5:12); it was comfortable
        2. God is more interested in inspiration, not perspiration
  3. Numbers 9
    1. Numbers 9 interfaces with Exodus 12—the Passover
      1. It had been one year since the Passover
      2. Passover, to a Jewish person, is the very hinge of his or her existence
        1. It was the hinge upon which the door of freedom swung open to them
        2. It marks the very beginning of their year; Exodus 12:1-2
        3. They reckon time according to their redemption
      3. The history of the Passover
    2. Why did God have to remind them to celebrate the Passover?
      1. They weren't willingly disobedient; they were just preoccupied by life
      2. When life gets busy, people tend to marginalize spiritual things; that's why we need reminders
    3. The keeping of the Passover from this time onward took on a very strict, organized system, so that the feast is now called the Seder Feast
      1. Seder means order
      2. There is an order of service; certain things happen at certain times
    4. Communion is built on Passover
      1. Jesus Christ died on Passover
      2. Passover was both commemorative and prophetic
        1. Commemorated being released as slaves of Egypt
        2. Predicted Jesus Christ, who would be the Lamb slain for the sins of the world
        3. Further predictive of His coming again; 1 Corinthians 11:26
    5. Verse 8
      1. Moses is saying, "You know, I don't know the answer to your question, but I'll go find out"
      2. One of the most spiritual answers is, "I don't know"
    6. Verse 12 is referred to in John 19:31-37
      1. The Jewish leaders of Jesus' day wanted to discredit Jesus and show that He couldn't possibly be their Messiah
      2. This didn't happen haphazardly; Jesus' death was under the control of God
        1. He died at precisely the right moment
        2. He was not a victim; He was the victor
        3. He was calling all the shots; Matthew 27:50
    7. The Passover Plot by Hugh Schonfield
      1. The premise: Jesus staged his own death and resurrection
      2. Schonfield's story is wrong, but his premise is right
        1. The crucifixion of Jesus Christ was a plot
        2. It was not an earthly plot—it was a heavenly plot; Revelation 13:8
      3. It was hatched in heaven, meted out, and staged on the earth for all to see
    8. How are the Israelites going to move through the wilderness? GPS: God's Positioning System
    9. We're not sure where exactly the cloud and the pillar of fire were positioned
      1. If the cloud was centered in the tabernacle and covered the entire camp, it would provide a beautiful covering from the intense heat and sunlight
      2. Having a pillar of fire centering and spreading over the camp would also provide light and heat at night
    10. God doesn't always tell you how or where or how long, but He moves you
      1. When you abandon yourself wholly to the will of God, it is the most exciting adventure
      2. Much of the Israelites' journey was difficult
        1. God appointed and knew about all the difficult things that were going to happen
        2. He was still directing even though times got tough
      3. So why do we think, It's a hard time; God must not be in it?
        1. All the difficulties that happen in the wilderness were not accidental; they were providential and purposeful
        2. The Israelites had assurance because they were following that cloud and pillar
    11. This cloud and pillar of fire were the visible presence of the Lord
      1. Shekinah, or in Hebrew shekhinah, literally means residence
      2. The word is from the Targums, Aramaic commentaries on the Scripture for those in the Babylonian captivity who never learned Hebrew
      3. God was in the center of the nation; God redeems us that He may be in the center of our lives
  4. Closing
    1. We're here to celebrate; we are having a party
    2. God's people are happy people—free people are happy people
    3. Psalm 32:1

Figures referenced: Temple Institute,Hugh Schonfield

Hebrew words:seder, shekhinah

Cross references: Exodus 12; Numbers 4:1-3; 8-9; 1 Samuel 3:1-4; 1 Chronicles 15:27; 2 Chronicles 5:12; Psalm 32:1; 119:105; Isaiah 9:2; Matthew 4:16; 11:30; 27:50; Luke 22:19; John 1:29; 8:12; 19:31-37; Romans 12:1-2; 1 Corinthians 11:26; Hebrews 11:10; Revelation 13:8


Topic: Passover

Keywords: Communion, Passover, Levi, Levites, deliverance, priests, light, darkness, menorah, firstborn, redemption, ministry, retirement, crucifixion, resurrection, will of God, trials, God's presence

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 10-11
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 10-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2546

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 10-11, the nation of Israel leaves Mount Sinai and continues their journey to the Promised Land. As we study these chapters, we see the beginning of Israel's disobedience and learn how God's Word is like the manna the Lord provided.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 9-10

PREVIEW: In Numbers 9-10, the Passover is commemorated and the children of Israel depart from the mountain of God and begin their wilderness wanderings led by the cloud of God.

The Second Passover - Read Numbers 9:1-14

1. The Lord spoke to Moses in the Wilderness of Sinai. What day did the Lord speak to Moses about the second Passover? (v.1) What other significant event happened in this same month? (See Exodus 40:17.) This second Passover happened a month before what other event we have studied? (See Numbers 1:1-2.)


2. The Lord instructed Moses to have His children commemorate the Passover on the fourteenth day of the first month, at twilight (vv. 3-4). What does the Passover commemorate? (See Deuteronomy 16:1-2 and Exodus 12:1-28.)



3. There were certain men who wanted to keep the Passover but could not. Why couldn’t they keep the Passover (vv. 6-7)? (See also Numbers 5:2 and 19:11-13.)


4. What did these men who could not keep the Passover do about their circumstance (v. 6)?


5. How is what these men did an example for us to follow when we have a spiritual situation in our life that we aren’t sure how to handle? (See Proverbs 11:14, 12:15, and 19:20-21.)


6. What was Moses' response to these men’s inquiry (v. 8)?


7. How is what Moses did a good example for us to follow when we need to know how to handle a spiritual situation in our life? (See Proverbs 2:3-6 and Jeremiah 29:12-13.)


8. What is the danger of not doing what these men did when they could not keep the Passover? (See Proverbs 12:15, 14:12, and 16:25.)


9. What was the Lord’s response to the men’s dilemma (vv. 9-12)?


10. Give some thought to the Lord's response. What does it tell you about His expectations concerning the keeping of the Passover?


11. The Lord instructed Moses about the keeping of the Passover and gave details to ensure that they didn't break the bones of the Passover lamb (v. 12). What is this detail prophetically picturing? (See Exodus 12:46 and John 19:36.)


12. Although the church isn’t required to keep the Passover, how are we commanded to remember what the Lord has done for us? (See Luke 22:19 and 1 Corinthians 11:23-26.)


13. What would happen to a member of the children of Israel if they were to cease to keep the Passover (v. 13)?


14. Could a stranger (a person who is not a member of the children of Israel) keep the Passover (v. 14)?


The Cloud and the Fire - Read Numbers 9:15-23

15. On the day the tabernacle was raised up, what covered it? What did it look like at from evening until morning (v. 15)?


16. What happened when the cloud was taken up from above the tabernacle (v. 17)?


17. It was at the command—or literally the mouth—of the Lord that the children of Israel would journey or camp (vv. 15-23). This guidance was provided by movement of the cloud. What is the cloud a visible manifestation of? (See Isaiah 63:10-12.)


Two Silver Trumpets - Read Numbers 10:1-10

18. The Lord spoke to Moses, instructing him to make two silver trumpets (v. 2). What was the purpose of these two silver trumpets (v. 2)?


19. What was to happen if both silver trumpets were blown (v. 3)? (See also Jeremiah 4:5 and Joel 2:15.)


20. What was to happen if only one of the silver trumpets was blown (v. 4)?


21. There was a blowing of the trumpets and the sounding of the advance (or alarm). What happened when the advance was sounded (v. 5)? When it was sounded a second time (v. 6)?


22. Who alone was allowed to blow the trumpets and sound the advance (v. 8)? (See also Numbers 31:6, Joshua 6:4, 1 Chronicles 15:24, and 2 Chronicles 13:12.)


23. When going to war, the sounding of the alarm with the trumpets initiated two things. What were they? (v. 9)?


24. The trumpets were also sounded in the days of gladness, the days when the children of Israel celebrated feasts, began new months, and made offerings. On these occasions, what was the purpose of the blowing of the trumpets (v. 10)? (See also Leviticus 23:24.)


25. The trumpets of the children of Israel were sounded for four different reasons: 1) convocation (vv. 2-4), 2) mobilization (vv. 5-8), 3) confrontation (v. 9), and 4) celebration (v. 10). There are two trumpets of God; the first was sounded in Exodus 19:16 to gather His people at Mount Sinai, and the second has yet to be sounded. What will happen at the sounding of the last trumpet of God? (See 1 Corinthians 15:52.)


Departure from Sinai - Read Numbers 10:11-36

26. The cloud was taken up from above the tabernacle on the twentieth day of the second month in the second year (v. 11). The children of Israel had been at Sinai nearly a year (see Exodus 19:1), and it had only been 20 days after being instructed about moving (Numbers 1:1). This twentieth day marked the end of what? (See Numbers 9:9-12 and Exodus 23:15.)


27. The cloud moved and so did the children of Israel. Leaving Mount Sinai, where did the cloud lead the children of Israel (v. 12)?



28. The order of march had been prescribed earlier by the Lord (Numbers 2:3-31). Apparently this was the unvarying pattern of their journey through the wilderness (v. 28). Who led the procession (v. 14)? What does this leader’s name mean? (See Genesis 29:35.)


29. Before leaving for the Land of Promise, Moses invited his brother-in-law Hobab (see Judges 4:11) to accompany them on their journey. What did Moses offer Hobab as an incentive to join them on their journey (v. 29)?


30. Hobab did not want to journey with Moses and the children of Israel (v. 30). What role did Moses offer Hobab if he would accompany them (v. 31)?


31. They departed from the mountain of God on a journey for three days (v. 33). Where was the cloud during this journey (v. 34)? What did the cloud provide for the children of Israel? (See Nehemiah 9:12, 19.)


32. The travel was undertaken only in the daylight hours; at night the cloud and the ark rested along with the people. When the day’s march began and was over, how would Moses entreat the Lord to abide among His people (vv. 35-36)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Music is one of the most powerful influences in any society
      1. It's estimated that the average American will listen to 30,000 to 35,000 songs in one year
      2. A study in the UK showed that before a person dies, they will have listened to thirteen years' worth of music
    2. The Lord instructed Moses to make two musical instruments as sort of a musical introduction to the march of Israel through the wilderness
    3. You can divide Numbers into three sections
      1. Organization: chapters 1-9
      2. Disorganization: chapters 10-25
      3. Reorganization: chapters 26-36
  2. Numbers 10
    1. The silver trumpets formed a communication system
    2. These trumpets are different from the ram's horn, or shofar
      1. The word used here means a long tube or a stalk
      2. At least two feet long and narrow
      3. More distinct and powerful tone than the shofar
    3. The Temple Institute
      1. Bent on rebuilding the temple in Jerusalem
      2. Reconstructed these two silver trumpets from a relief on the Arch of Titus in Rome
      3. The trumpets in King Tutankhamun's tomb are very similar
    4. Why are there two trumpets?
      1. Because two is the required number of witnesses
      2. Deuteronomy 19:15
      3. Joshua sent two spies into Jericho (see Josh. 2)
      4. Only two of the spies Moses sent into Canaan said they could take the land (see Num. 13)
      5. Jesus sent people out two-by-two (see Mark 6:7; Luke 10:1)
      6. Two witnesses in Revelation 11
    5. Blowing one trumpet gathered the people together
      1. 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17
      2. Four sides of the camp around the tabernacle
        1. The first layer around the tabernacle was the Levites, then the other twelve tribes
        2. There was order in the way they marched and camped
      3. Seven blasts of the trumpet got the whole thing going in an organized fashion
    6. Trumpet judgments in the book of Revelation
      1. Seven trumpet judgments; see Revelation 8:6
      2. The tribulation: "the time of Jacob's [Israel's] trouble" (Jer. 30:7)
      3. They had trouble in the wilderness; they're going to have a lot of trouble in the wilderness of tribulation
    7. Not just for marching, but also for war and worship
      1. Special celebrations; times of peace and joy
      2. Rosh Chodesh: a small memorial at the beginning of every month
    8. Jewish life is based on the lunar calendar
      1. 29.5 days in a month x twelve months = 354 1/3 days
      2. Festivals are tied to the solar calendar
      3. Intercalate: to insert a time piece
      4. Adar, the extra month, is inserted into the calendar
    9. What went on between Mount Sinai and Paran is disorienting
      1. Everything in verses 14-28 was done decently and in order
      2. That doesn't last long
    10. Paran is the place where Ishmael settled; see Genesis 21:21
    11. Verses 29-32 are a beautiful picture of evangelism
      1. Moses was saying, "Come with us to the Promised Land; we could really use somebody like you"
      2. On your journey to heaven, please bring as many people with you as you can
      3. The height of selfishness is being content to go to heaven alone
    12. This first leg of the trip lasted three days, as compared to the year the Israelites had camped at Mount Sinai
      1. Moses acknowledged that he was going into unfamiliar territory laden with adversaries, but he marched into the land with faith
      2. He saw his future through the eyes of faith upon a promise God had given him; we should do the same
        1. When you bring God into the picture, it changes the picture
        2. Acts 4:18-31
        3. When you can't bring God into the situation, you can't see beyond the problem
        4. Keep in mind, wherever you are marching, you've got a big God who's made some substantive promises
  3. Numbers 11
    1. This is one of the most important chapters in the book of Numbers
      1. There was forty years of havoc after three days of order
      2. There were about two million Israelites
      3. Acts 6:1-2
      4. It's great when the church grows, but with growth comes adversity
    2. You can see plainly how God looks at complaining among His people; see Proverbs 6:16-19
    3. The mixed multitude
      1. Products of a mixed marriage: one parent still in Egypt and the other an Israelite
      2. They were Egyptian enough to miss Egypt, but Israelite enough to go on this journey to the Promised Land
      3. In a spiritual sense, churches are filled with a mixed multitude
        1. Somebody who likes to hang with God's people on weekends, but runs with the world during the rest of the week
        2. A carnal Christian; see 1 Corinthians 3:1-3
        3. The most dangerous people in any church
    4. Once you start looking for problems, and miss the blessings you have, it is hard to stop, and it becomes contagious
      1. You can take the boy out of Egypt, but it's hard to take the Egypt out of the boy
      2. Acts 7:39
    5. Manna
      1. Exodus 16:31
      2. It could be that the word man was Egyptian
      3. In Arabic, man describes a sweet, honey-tasting nectar that comes from shrubs in the Sinai desert
      4. Dietary experts say you have to have a balanced diet
        1. Evidently manna had imbued within it all of the necessary vitamins for a balanced diet
        2. Deuteronomy 8:4; if you eat the same thing, you can get edema
    6. Verses 10-15: if you're a worker around people or in ministry, you get this
      1. Moses had a great perspective when he went to war, but when he was at home with his own congregation, he wasn't too stoked
      2. A Fuller Seminary survey revealed 80 percent of pastors believe the ministry is detrimental to the health of their families
      3. What did Moses do with his problem? He took it to God
    7. One person, no matter how gifted, can't bear the burden of ministry
      1. It has to be spread out
      2. Exodus 18
      3. These seventy become known as the Sanhedrin
      4. A good thing can become a bad thing if it keeps you from the best thing
      5. The Jewish Sanhedrin gave the command to crucify Jesus Christ
    8. Joshua was ready to start a new denomination, but Moses didn't have a jealous bone in his body
      1. Jealousy can be a common sin in the ministry
      2. Acts 2:17
    9. Certain type of quail
      1. Passes through Egypt and the Sinai Peninsula
      2. Has short wings and, because of fatigue, will fly low to the ground
  4. Closing
    1. Manna is like the Word of God to us
      1. Supernaturally given; 2 Timothy 3:16
      2. Had to be eaten; if you didn't eat it, you would die
      3. Had to be gathered every single day
      4. Gathered in the morning, before they were consumed with other responsibilities
      5. Had to be obtained by diligence; Hebrews 11:6
      6. Had to be gathered by stooping, an act of humility and dependence
      7. Despised by the mixed multitude
    2. Psalm 34:8

Figures referenced: Temple Institute, King Tutankhamun, Fuller Seminary

Foreign words: shofar, man

Cross references: Genesis 21:21; Exodus 16:31; 18; Numbers 1-36; Deuteronomy 8:4; 19:15; Joshua 2; Psalm 34:8; Proverbs 6:16-19; Jeremiah 30:7; Mark 6:7; Luke 10:1; Acts 2:17; 4:18-31; 6:1-2; 7:39; 1 Corinthians 3:1-3; 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17; 2 Timothy 3:16; Hebrews 11:6; Revelation 8:6; 11


Topic: God's provision

Keywords: music, instruments, trumpet, organization, disorganization, war, celebration, problems, promises of God, complaining, complain, complainers, manna, providence, ministry, jealousy, Bible, Word of God

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 12:1-13:16
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 12:1-13:16
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2577

MESSAGE SUMMARY
As we consider this passage, we see Israel's continued disobedience as even Moses' own siblings spoke out against him. But rather than retaliate, Moses responded with humility and faithfulness. We learn that it's important to cultivate this attitude whenever we face difficulty.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 11-12

PREVIEW: In Numbers 11-12, the mixed multitude incites the children of Israel to cry out against the Lord for flesh, which He obliges in a miraculous, yet sobering, way. Miriam and Aaron challenge Moses’ leadership and learn a humbling lesson.

The People Complain - Read Numbers 11:1-15

1. After the three-day journey just described (see Numbers 10:33–36), the people began to complain in the hearing of the Lord. How did the Lord feel about the people’s complaining (see v. 1)? What was His response (see v. 1)?


2. Complaining about what the Lord is doing in your life amplifies the negative. It is often contagious and is displeasing to Him. What does God's Word say about complaining? (See Philippians 2:14, 1 Corinthians 3:3, 10:10, 2 Corinthians 12:20, and 1 Peter 4:9.)


3. The people cried out to Moses because of what the Lord had done, and he acted as an intercessor on their behalf. What was the result of Moses’ intercession (see v.2)?


4. Moses performed the role of priest, interceding for the people and representing them to the Lord. We are members of the royal priesthood (see 1 Peter 2:9-10). When other believers around us are complaining and grumbling, how can we do what Moses did? (See James 5:16, Colossians 1:9, Ephesians 2:18 and 3:12, and Hebrews 4:16 and 10:19-22)


5. Places on the map of the children of Israel are established by events that happened to them, often marking their failures. What does Moses call this place where the fire of the Lord burned among them (see v. 3)? What does it mean?


6. The mixed multitude (see Exodus 12:38) was comprised of non-Israelites who left Egypt with Israel in the Exodus. The word used to describe these people is ‘ereb, literally mixed company. What did the mixed multitude do (see v. 4)?


7. What did the actions of the mixed multitude cause the children of Israel to do (see v. 4)?


8. Complaining and grumbling can result from yielding to intense desires of your flesh. What else can yielding to intense desires result in? (See James 4:1-6)


9. What were the children of Israel and the mixed multitude remembering that caused them to complain and grumble () against God’s provision (see vv. 5-6)? (See also Numbers 21:5.) What was their focus on? (See Philippians 3:19.)


10. The things that the children of Israel and the mixed multitude were focused on were things of Egypt. Egypt is a type of the world. Manna is a type of Jesus Christ (see John 6:33), the Word of God (John 1:1). We too can fall into this trap. Instead, what should we make our focus? (See Colossians 3:1-10, Matthew 6:19-20, Luke 12:15, and 1 John 2:15-17.)


11. Manna, which meant “What is it?” (see Exodus 16:15), was God’s divine provision for the children of Israel. What did it look like (see v. 7)? (See also Exodus 16:14.) What did it taste like (v. 8)? (See also Exodus 16:31.)


12. What did Moses hear in the camp? Who else obviously heard this? What was their response (see v. 10)?


13. Make a careful list of what Moses’ perspective was concerning what he had heard (see vv. 11-15).


The Seventy Elders - Read Numbers 11:16-30

14. Moses was deeply and adversely affected by the complaining and grumbling of the children of Israel and the mixed multitude, and he cried out to the Lord (vv. 11-15). What solution did the Lord offer to Moses (vv. 16-17)?


15. Although it appears that the Lord acquiesced to the people, He did not. What would the month’s worth of meat be like to the children of Israel and the mixed multitude (vv. 18-21)?


16. After the Lord said He would give the children of Israel a month’s worth of meat, Moses considered only the natural provision of the flocks, herds, and fish of the sea, instead of God's supernatural abilities. This is a common thing for people to do when God says something that is seemingly impossible. Read Romans 4:3,19-22. What did Abraham not consider and not waver at? What was he fully convinced of?


17. What was the Lord’s response to Moses’ logic and reasoning, thinking that the Lord would have him slaughter all the flocks and herds in order to provide meat for the children of Israel (v. 23)?



18. Oftentimes when we look at the natural circumstances and situations in our life, we consider the commands of the Lord impossible. How can we know that what He commands is possible, despite our seemingly impossible circumstance? (See Genesis 18:14, Jeremiah 32:17, 27, Matthew 19:26, and Luke 18:27.)


19. What was Moses’ response to the Lord’s instructions (v. 24)? (See also Exodus 40:16.)



20. The Lord equipped 70 elders to help Moses bear the burden of the people. What did the Lord equip them with (v. 25)?



21. How is what the Lord equipped the 70 elders with the very same thing He has equipped you with to do the good works He has prepared in advance for you and called you to do? (See Ephesians 1:13-14, 2:8-10, 1 John 3:24, 4:13, 2 Corinthians 1:21-22, 5:5, and Romans 8:9, 16)



22. In addition to the 70, two other men, Eldad and Medad, received the Spirit. These men began prophesying in the camp (see v. 26). It so concerned a young man that he ran and reported it to Moses (see v. 27). What was Joshua’s response to this young man’s report (see v. 28)? What was Moses’ response to this young man’s report (see v. 29)?



The LORD Sends Quail - Read Numbers 11:31-35

23. The children of Israel and the mixed multitude cried out against the Lord for meat (see vv. 4-5). What kind of meat was provided? Where was it? How much of it did they collect (see vv. 31-32)?


24. Although the children of Israel and the mixed multitude received in exceeding abundance what they had cried out against the Lord for, what happened as they began to eat the meat (see v. 33)? Why did this happen?



25. What is the name given to the place where the wrath of the Lord was aroused against the people and they buried the people who had yielded to craving (see v. 34)? What does it mean?



Dissension of Aaron and Miriam - Read Numbers 12:1-16

26. After the children of Israel settled down at Hazeroth (see Numbers 11:35), Miriam and Aaron, Moses’ elder siblings, began to challenge his authority. Why did they speak against him (see v. 1)?


27. The fact that Miriam is listed first, as well as that the Hebrew word translated spoke is in the feminine form, indicate Miriam was the initiator of this challenge of Moses’ authority. What challenge did Miriam and Aaron present (see v. 2)?


28. Was Miriam and Aaron’s challenge accurate? (See Exodus 15:20, Micah 6:4, and Numbers 14:26.)


29. The Lord heard when Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses (vsee . 2). Why should we carefully consider this when we speak about others? (See Psalm 94:9, Proverbs 6:14, 16-19, Jude 16–19, and Ephesians 4:29.)


30. When the Lord heard Miriam and Aaron’s challenge to Moses’ authority, what did He command them to do (vv. 4-5)?


31. The Lord spoke to Miriam and Aaron about Moses (see vv. 6-8). How did the Lord differentiate Moses from all other prophets?



32. The Lord asked Miriam and Aaron why they weren’t fearful of speaking against Moses (see v. 8). (See also 2 Peter 2:10 and Jude 8.) What kind of fear were Miriam and Aaron lacking? (See Psalm 111:10 and Proverbs 1:7, 9:10, and 15:33.)


33. What became of Miriam once the visible presence of the Lord departed from above the tabernacle (see v. 10)?


34. What is the physical manifestation of Miriam’s leprosy a vivid picture of (see vv. 10-12)? Hint: Aaron used the word twice as he beseeched Moses on behalf of Miriam.


35. Moses interceded for Miriam (see v. 13) and she was healed. (See Numbers 20:1.) Although she was healed, what was required of Miriam before she was allowed to return to the camp of the children of Israel (vv. 14-15)?


36. Romans 12:15 says we are to rejoice with those who rejoice and weep with those who weep. (See also 1 Corinthians 12:26.) Moses modeled this as he rejoiced for Eldad and Medad and wept (v. 13) for Miriam. How was Moses able to do this (v. 3)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The children of Israel were out in the desert
      1. But they didn't belong there
      2. It was never God's goal for them to stay in the wilderness
    2. You're on a journey that has reason and purpose
      1. Deuteronomy 6:23
      2. God has brought us out from our past; eventually, we're going to leave this world and enjoy heaven with Him forever
    3. Whatever God starts, He finishes; see Hebrews 12:2
    4. Israel could've and should've gone directly into the Promised Land, but it took them forty years to get there
    5. We don't know much about Moses' family life
      1. We know some; see Exodus 2:1-10
      2. But what was it like to be Moses' older sister? Or Moses' big brother?
      3. Moses did not have a perfect home life; this sets us frees
  2. Numbers 12
    1. This Ethiopian woman was probably not Zipporah, Moses' first wife
      1. Exodus 18; it could be that Zipporah went home with her dad or died in the wilderness
      2. Could this Ethiopian woman be part of the mixed multitude?
      3. We just don't know
    2. Miriam and Aaron didn't like Moses' new wife
      1. The issue was about relationship, but they made the issue about leadership
      2. When you find one issue about somebody you don't like, the list will be endless
    3. It could be that this was precipitated by the events of the last chapter
      1. The elders of Israel helped bear the load with Moses; see Numbers 11:16-17
      2. Maybe Aaron felt like his leadership would be diminished and eclipsed
      3. Perhaps Miriam was threatened by this new woman
        1. Exodus 15:20; maybe she thought Moses' new wife would be seen as the female leader
        2. Acts 6:1
    4. "Has the Lord indeed spoken only through Moses?" (v. 2)
      1. Actually, no
      2. God spoke through Aaron (Urim and Thummim); see Exodus 28:30
      3. God also spoke through Miriam; she was a prophetess (see Exodus 15:20)
      4. The Lord did speak through them, but not at the same level that He was speaking through Moses
    5. Moses didn't need to defend himself because God heard it (see v. 2)
      1. If you want to go around defending yourself, go ahead
      2. But if you would rather just say, "The Lord hears it all; I'll let Him take care of it," you'll sleep better
      3. God's better at defending you than you are at defending you
      4. Let them have it by letting the Lord have it
    6. Verse 3: Moses wrote this text!
      1. Critics use this verse to say Moses didn't write the Pentateuch
      2. This actually authenticates that Moses wrote it, because nobody would say that about himself unless they were directed by the Holy Spirit
    7. Humility is being known for who you are
    8. One of the characteristics of truly great people is a sense of humility—like Billy Graham
    9. God's statement (see vv. 6-8)
      1. "Face to face" (v. 8)
        1. Hebrew: mouth to mouth
        2. Without a mediator, intimately, closely
      2. Generally, God spoke through prophets in the Old Testament
        1. Priests represented the people before the Lord
        2. Prophets represented the Lord to the people
        3. God would often speak to prophets through dreams and visions
          1. Joseph; see Genesis 40
          2. Daniel; see Daniel 2; 4
      3. Aren't you glad the Lord picks up on your faithfulness (see v. 7) more than your talent or your capability? (See also Proverbs 20:6)
      4. Exodus 33:18, 20; John 1:18
      5. What is "the form of the Lord"? (v. 8)
        1. Moses was not able to see God's person or the fullness of His glory
        2. He did see His aftereffect, afterglow
        3. This was an experience afforded to no one but Moses
      6. If Moses was God's choice—and he was—then to speak against him was to speak against God
      7. One day, you will see God face to face
        1. Job 19:27
        2. 1 John 3:1-2
        3. John 4:24
        4. There's a realm of reality beyond the physical that is spiritual
    10. Isn't it fascinating that the one disease God struck Miriam with was leprosy?
      1. Leprosy is the disease that symbolizes sin most closely (see Lev. 13-14)
        1. It begins secretly; it starts out small
        2. It spreads rapidly
        3. It affects deeply
        4. It isolates permanently
      2. Miriam experienced a physical metaphor of her sin
      3. One scholar suggested that her skin turned white because God was punishing her for her prejudice against the dark skin of the Ethiopian wife of Moses
      4. There's a greater lesson to be learned: no blow on earth goes unfelt in heaven
        1. 1 Corinthians 12:26
        2. Saul; see Acts 9:4
    11. Why was just Miriam struck with leprosy?
      1. Miriam was the first to speak (see v. 1)
        1. Hebrew word for spoke is in the feminine form
        2. Linguistically, she started it
      2. Aaron went along with her, which shows he was not a great leader
        1. He was easily swayed
        2. Exodus 32:1, 21-24
        3. This is insight into the imperfection of his character
        4. Be encouraged by the ones God chooses and uses
      3. Aaron, the High Priest, could not be struck with leprosy
        1. Otherwise the nation wouldn't have an intercessor
        2. Only the High Priest could diagnose and deal with leprosy
    12. The whole nation could not move until the week of Miriam's leprosy was over
      1. Her sin had to be dealt with publically
      2. It affected everyone else
      3. Sin is never done in isolation
        1. It always affects, to some degree, others around you
        2. Achan; see Joshua 7
  3. Numbers 13:1-16
    1. Things went from bad to really bad in the next two chapters
    2. "Ten thousand mercies are forgotten in the presence of a single, trifling privation" —C.H. Mackintosh
    3. If we don't read the whole Bible, if we don't piece it together and connect the dots, we'll be in danger of seeing myopically
    4. Sending out the spies was not God's idea
      1. He knew what the land was like
      2. Deuteronomy 1:19-23
      3. They made the plan and God said, "Okay, now enact your plan"
    5. Sending out spies was a demonstration of fear and unbelief
      1. God had already spied out the land for them
      2. He knew the trouble they would face
      3. Be careful about pushing your plans through without waiting on the Lord
      4. It could be that the Lord needs to teach you a lesson in His sovereignty and will let you go through with your plan
    6. The spies are different from the leaders of the tribes
      1. The spies are younger
      2. We only remember two names: Caleb and Joshua

Figures referenced: Billy Graham, C.H. Mackintosh

Cross references: Genesis 40; Exodus 2:1-10; 15:20; 18; 28:30; 32:1, 21-24; 33:18, 20; Leviticus 13; 14; Numbers 11:16-17; 12; 13:1-16; Deuteronomy 1:19-23; 6:23; Joshua 7; Job 19:27; Proverbs 20:6; Daniel 2; 4; John 1:18; 4:24; Acts 6:1; 9:4; 1 Corinthians 12:26; Hebrews 12:2; 1 John 3:1-2

Topic: Conflict

Keywords: family, relationships, leadership, conflict, humility, mediator, prophets, sin, Bible study, unbelief

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 13:17-14:45
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 13:17-14:45
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2595

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 13, the nation of Israel finally reached the Promised Land, and they had to make a big decision. Their lack of trust in the Lord led them to make the wrong choice, resulting in harsh consequences. In this study of Numbers 13-14, we are presented with a similar decision: do we limit ourselves with unbelief or trust God to carry out His best plans for us?

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 13-14

PREVIEW: In Numbers 13-14, spies are sent into the Promised Land and the children of Israel cry out in complaints against the LORD and the results are disastrous affecting the entire congregation.

Spies Sent into Canaan - Read Numbers 13:1-33

1.The children of Israel were camped in the wilderness of Paran. From there, God instructed Moses to send men to spy out the land of Canaan. How many men were selected as spies (see vv. 1-15)?


2.Whose plan was it to send spies into the land (see vv. 1-2)? (See also Deuteronomy 1:22-24 and 9:23)


3.For reasons not entirely clear, Moses changed the name of the son of Nun. What was his name? What did Moses change it to (see v. 16)?


4.What was the mission of the spies Moses sent to spy out the land (see vv. 17-20)?


5.Who did the spies see in the area of Hebron (v. 22)? Who were they (see v. 33)? (See also Deuteronomy 9:2.)


6.What did the spies retrieve from the Valley of Eshcol (see vv. 23-24)? What does the name of the valley mean (see v. 24)?


7.The spies returned with raving reviews about the produce of the land (see v. 27) and a solemn review of the inhabitants and their dwellings (see v. 28). If only they had remembered what the Lord promised them on the day of their departure from Egypt (see Exodus 13:5), they may have had a different perspective on the inhabitants. Why is it important for us to remember what the Lord has spoken and promised to us? (See 1 Kings 2:3, 1 Chronicles 22:13, and Romans 4:21.)


8.Caleb’s perspective was one of assured victory in taking the land (see v. 30). However, ten of the men gave a bad report to the children of Israel about the land and its inhabitants. How did these ten men perceive themselves when they considered the inhabitants of the land (see vv. 31-33)?



9.Ten of the spies were only focused on what they saw in the land they spied out, not on what God had said (see Exodus 13:5). They feared what they saw (see vv. 32-33) instead of walking by faith in obedience to what God said. How are we to walk in obedience to what God has called us to do? (See Romans 1:17, Hebrews 10:38, and Galatians 3:11.)


10.The spies saw giants in the land. The word for giants is nephilim in the Hebrew. That word is only used here and in Genesis 6:4. How did the descendants of Anak become men of mighty stature? (See Genesis 6:4 and Deuteronomy 9:2.)


Israel Refuses to Enter Canaan - Read Numbers 14:1-10

11.All the congregation lifted up their voices and cried, and the people wept that night (see v. 1). What caused all the people to lift up their voices and cry out? (See Numbers 13:31-33.)


12.Because of what the congregation had heard, believed, and focused upon, they lifted up their voices, complaining and crying out loud against Moses and Aaron. Based upon what they had heard, believed, and focused upon, what was their perspective of their situation (vv.2-3)?



13.The children of Israel’s perspective of the inhabitants of the land determined their reality. Their fear caused their hearts to fail (see Luke 21:26). Why is it extremely important that we don’t complain and grumble about what God is doing or allowing, but rather focus on God instead of what we perceive our circumstance or situation to be? (See Ephesians 4:29, Matthew 12:34, Ephesians 5:4, and Colossians 3:8.)


14.Based upon what the children of Israel believed their circumstance to be (see v. 3), what did they collectively decide to do (see v. 4)?



15.When Moses and Aaron faced the entire weeping and fearful congregation, and the evil report (see v. 37) of the land and its inhabitants by ten of the spies, how did they respond (see v. 5)?


16.Tapeinos is the Greek word for humble, it means low, not high, not rising far from the ground. It speaks of one's condition as lowly or of low degree. It described what was considered base, common, unfit, and having little value. It pictures one brought low by grief. Tapeinos is descriptive particularly of attitude and social positions. This word describes the action of Moses and Aaron in response to the people’s complaining. What does God promise to those who humble themselves? (See Job 22:29, Psalms 138:6, Proverbs 3:34, Matthew 23:12, 1 Peter 5:5, and James 4:6,10.)


17.The two spies, Joshua and Caleb, who gave a good report of the land, tore their clothes when they heard the collective decision of the congregation to select a new leader and return to Egypt. Tearing one's own clothes was usually a physical expression of extreme grief or righteous indignation; in effect, an outward equivalent of the modern-day expression "It tears me up." What was Joshua and Caleb’s perspective of the land and its inhabitants (see vv. 7-9)?


18.The key to Joshua and Caleb’s perspective was who they knew to be with them as they faced this land and its inhabitants. Who did they know was with them (see v. 9)?


19.As we face the giants and fortified cities we must conquer in our lives, we can share in the key to Joshua and Caleb’s perspective by knowing who is with us. How can we be certain of this knowledge and share in this perspective? (See Genesis 28:15, Deuteronomy 31:6, 8, Joshua 1:5, Matthew 28:20, Acts 18:10, Romans 8:9, 16, 2 Corinthians 1:21-22, Ephesians 1:13-14, Ephesians 3:20, Hebrews 13:5, and 1 John 3:24, 4:13, 5:5.)


20.What did the congregation want to do to Joshua and Caleb after they shared their faith-filled perspective (drr v. 10)?


21.What was the true source of the congregation’s problem? (See Psalm 106:21, 24-25.)


Moses Intercedes for the People - Read Numbers 14:11-25

22.The glory of the Lord appeared in the tabernacle (see v. 10). What did the Lord ask Moses, revealing His view of the children of Israel’s perspective (see v. 11)? What was the Lord’s view of their perspective (see v. 11)?


23.Why is it important to recognize and remember what the Lord has done for us (v. 11)? (See also Deuteronomy 8:11, 14 and Psalm 106:21.)



24.What did the Lord say He would do to the complaining congregation (see v. 12)? (See also Psalm 106:23.) Why would the Lord who delivered them from Egypt decide to do this? (See Psalm 106:21.)



25.Moses interceded for the people by offering an argument up to the Lord. What was the basis of Moses’ argument (see vv. 13-16)?



26.What did Moses use as the basis of his petition unto the Lord (see v. 18)? (See also Exodus 34:6-7.)



27.What was Moses’ petition unto to the Lord (see v. 19)?


28.What was the effect of Moses’ intercession for the children of Israel (see v. 20)? (See also James 5:16.)


29.Although the children of Israel were pardoned (see v. 20), there was still a consequence for their unbelief and rejection of the Lord (see v. 11). What was that consequence (see v. 23)?


30.As part of the consequence, the Lord instructed Moses and Israel to resume the journey from Kadesh but not toward the valleys where the Amalekites and Canaanites lived. They now had to take the long and circuitous route toward where (v. 25)?

Death Sentence on the Rebels - Read Numbers 14:26-38

31.The Lord said He had heard the complaints of the children of Israel and their complaints were against Him (see v. 27). He instructed Moses to say, “Just as you have spoken in My hearing, so I will do to you.” What had they spoken that would now be done unto them? (See Exodus 16:2-3, 17:3, and Numbers 14:2.)


32.Who would be affected by the consequence of what the children of Israel had spoken (see vv. 29-30)?


33.Who did the Lord say would be allowed into the land of promise (see v. 31)? Why? (See also Numbers 14:3 and Deuteronomy 1:39.)


34.What were the consequences of what the children of Israel had spoken (see vv. 32-33)? (See also Romans 6:23, 1 Corinthians 6:9-10, 10:10, Galatians 3:10, and James 1:15.)


35.How long were the children of Israel consigned to wander in the wilderness (see v. 34)? After this, what would they know by experience (see v. 34)?

36.As a preview of the coming 40 years of wandering the wilderness and as a consequence for crying out against the Lord, what happened to those who brought the evil report about the land (see vv. 36-37)? (See also 1 Corinthians 10:10 and Hebrews 3:17-18.)


A Futile Invasion Attempt - Read Numbers 14:39-45

37.The children of Israel mourned upon hearing the consequences of their complaining against the Lord and upon seeing the ten spies die (see v. 39). What did the people do in an attempt to rectify the situation (see v. 40)?


38.What did Moses tell them about their attempt beforehand (see v. 41)? What did the Lord tell them about it (see v. 42)? (See also Deuteronomy 1:44-46.)


39.Having been clearly and sternly warned that their attempt to drive out the Amalekites and Canaanites would not succeed (see v. 41) and the Lord would not be with them in their attempt (see v. 42), what did the children of Israel do (see v. 44)? What was the result (see v. 45)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Israel was called "the wife of the Lord" (see Isa. 54:5; Jer. 3:14; 31:32)
      1. Israel began to focus on some of the defects in following God
      2. It was not easy; it was a life of faith
    2. "Ten thousand mercies are forgotten in the presence of a single, trifling privation"—C.H. Mackintosh
    3. Selective memory disorder
      1. We have a problem recalling the right stuff
      2. So, too, with the nation of Israel
    4. In Numbers 13-14, Israel came to a place where a decision had to be made
      1. They sent out spies from each tribe to check out the land
      2. The nation was confronted with the decision: "God made a promise; shall we go in and take it? Or will fear keep us back, and will we wander away?"
    5. This became the threshold moment of their history
      1. Their walking turned to wandering
      2. Their marching became meandering
      3. Their witness became wailing
    6. We don't really know a lot about their forty years in the wilderness, but the incidents that were recorded become their shame
    7. Hebrews 3:19
      1. Unbelief is what they become immortalized for
      2. This lends to the authenticity and accuracy of the Scripture
        1. It is typical to want to hide the most shameful parts of a person's story
        2. But nothing is omitted: their shame and failure is displayed and will be throughout their history
  2. Numbers 13:17-33
    1. When Joshua sent spies out into Jericho, he only sent two out (see Josh. 2:1; Deut. 19:15)
    2. >Numbers 13:16
      1. Hoshea means to save
      2. Joshua means the Lord saves
        1. Yeshua is the Hebrew pronunciation and the name of Jesus
        2. Contraction of Yehoshua, which means Yahweh saves
    3. Kadesh Barnea was the port of entry into the new land
    4. Hebron (see Num. 13:22)
      1. One of the oldest landmarks of Israel: where Abraham, Sarah, and the patriarchs were buried; see Genesis 23
      2. Zoan is more famously known as Tanis
        1. A secret resort for the pharaohs; only the pharaohs and their families knew about it
        2. Whoever wrote the first five books of Moses had to have been in pharaoh's inner circle, even the royal family—as Moses was—to have known what Zoan was
      3. Joshua 14
        1. Caleb was eighty-five years old
        2. He asked to live in Hebron, even though giants still lived there
      4. The spies that went in had a daily, working knowledge of their own history
        1. They should have remembered that Hebron was important in the days of their father Abraham
        2. Genesis 14:1-16
        3. They should have been thinking, "If God could be that faithful to our great-grandfather Abraham, then certainly God will be faithful now"
    5. Eshcol means cluster (see Num. 13:23)
    6. "Milk and honey" (see Num. 13:27) is a term for abundance
      1. Good for an agrarian lifestyle (milk)
      2. Honey = syrup/extract from dates
    7. Fear will keep you from seeing the fruit; you are either filled with faith or filled with fear
    8. Numbers 13:29
      1. Amalekites settled in the southern desert regions (Negev)
      2. Hittites originated in Turkey
      3. Jebusites settled in the hill country of Jerusalem
        1. Jebus is the ancient name of Jerusalem
        2. David moved the Jebusites out of Jerusalem
      4. Canaanites were the indigenous population
    9. Is the majority always right? Not at all!
      1. And yet, so much of life is majority rules
      2. 1 John 5:19
      3. Here, the majority was wrong
    10. Giants and grasshoppers (see Num. 13:33)
      1. Grasshoppers were considered the smallest edible creature
      2. The faith of the ten spies was in the giants; Joshua and Caleb's faith was in the giant God
      3. The ten saw big people and a little God; Joshua and Caleb saw big people and a bigger God
    11. What's your perspective?
      1. 1 Samuel 17
      2. How big is your God?
    12. Numbers 13:33
      1. That's what they said; that was not the truth
      2. Joshua 2:9-11
      3. The reality is God had readied their enemies by putting a dread and fear in them
    13. At its peak under David and Solomon, Israel only occupied one-tenth of all that God promised them they would inherit
      1. Of all the promises God gives to us, how much are we claiming, walking in, and enjoying the fullness of the Spirit in our lives?
      2. "Most Christians, concerning the river of experience, are only up to the ankles; some others have waded until the stream is up to the knees; a few find it chest deep; and only a few—oh! how few!—find it to be a river to swim in, the bottom of which they cannot touch"—C.H. Spurgeon
      3. A lot depends on your attitude
  3. Numbers 14
    1. Numbers 14:1
      1. The bad report had gone into their hearts
      2. Fear is contagious, and there were more people spreading fear than faith
    2. Be careful what you wish for; Proverbs 18:21
    3. Uncontrolled emotion often leads to bad decisions
      1. Whenever the chorus of despair goes up around you, you need to pause, step back, and get the bigger picture
      2. Isaiah 6:1-3
      3. This is why worship is so important; it's a perspective-adjustment phase
    4. They used their kids as an excuse for their unbelief (see Num. 14:3)
      1. They were really saying, "We don't trust that God can take care of our children"
      2. "What comes into our minds when we think about God is the most important thing about us"—A.W. Tozer
      3. This is ironic; the children would be the ones who entered the land
    5. Nehemiah 9:17
    6. Numbers 14:7-9
      1. Clear, logical, theological thinking
      2. "If God went through all the trouble to send those plagues and those miracles and open up the sea and bring us this far, He didn't bring us here to die"
      3. Deuteronomy 6:23
    7. The Lord appeared whenever there was a rebellion or a challenge
      1. Mark 4:35-41; Matthew 8:23-27
      2. It's better to be in a storm with Jesus than anywhere else without Jesus
      3. It's better to be out in the desert facing giants in a new land with God than anywhere else without His presence
    8. "How long?" (Num. 14:11) is found often in the Bible
      1. Usually it's a question people ask God
        1. It's in the Psalms a lot
        2. It's the longing of humanity to their deity
      2. Here, it's a question that God asked
    9. It appears that God was mad, upset, and wanted to destroy His people, but Moses came in and talked God out of this plan
      1. Who did Moses understand God to be?
        1. Patient, longsuffering, and merciful
        2. God forgives again and again
        3. God is a covenant God
      2. Moses got his inspiration to pray based upon what God revealed about Himself previously
        1. The Lord said it this way to draw Moses out and inspire him to pray because God's intention was to do it all along
        2. Ezekiel 22:30
        3. God was saying, "Part of my plan includes intercessors; I look for people who will pray the kind of prayers that cooperate with My wisdom and My will, and I'm going to work through those prayers"
    10. In justice, God must punish sin; in mercy, God forgives sin and brings blessing—all because of intercession
    11. Habakkuk 2:14
    12. God has begun a work in you
      1. He's going to continue that work in you until the day of Jesus Christ
      2. He hasn't given up on you
    13. In Egypt, there were ten plagues, all designed to build up the faith of the children of Israel
      1. It's as if they used all those ten times up and complained against the Lord in unbelief
      2. Genesis 6:3
    14. Estimated 1,200,000 Israelites had to die off
      1. Average of eighty-five funerals every day
      2. Seven funerals every hour for the next thirty-eight-plus years
      3. Episodic death: Numbers 16; 25
      4. There was a constant reminder that the wages of sin is death (see Rom. 6:23)
    15. The age of accountability back then was twenty
    16. Galatians 6:7
    17. This episode was the fulcrum of their history
      1. Psalm 95:6-8
      2. This episode is called "the rebellion" and will forever be seen as that
    18. Those who are pardoned can sometimes becomes hardened
      1. God seeks to bring you up to the highest possible level and do for you at that level as much as you will allow Him to
      2. As a believer, a person can settle for second best; God will still complete His work in you, but it's not the highest
      3. Don't you want the very best that God has for you?
  4. Closing
    1. The very best God has for you begins with receiving Jesus Christ
    2. Are you in Jesus Christ?

Figures referenced: C.H. Mackintosh, C.H. Spurgeon, A.W. Tozer

Hebrew words: hoshea, joshua, yeshua, yehoshua, eshcol

Cross references: Genesis 6:3; 14:1-16; 23; Numbers 13:17-14:45; 16; 25; Deuteronomy 6:23; 19:15; Joshua 2:1, 9-11; 14; 1 Samuel 17; Nehemiah 9:17; Psalm 95:6-8; Proverbs 18:21; Isaiah 6:1-3; 54:5; Jeremiah 3:14; 31:32; Ezekiel 22:30; Habakkuk 2:14; Matthew 8:23-27; Mark 4:35-41; Romans 6:23; Galatians 6:7; Hebrews 3:19; 1 John 5:19


Topic: Unbelief

Keywords: decision, unbelief, shame, Promised Land, perspective, potential, God's promise, fear, prayer, intercession, sin, faith, death, rebellion

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 15
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 15
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2596

MESSAGE SUMMARY
After learning about some of Israel's failures in Numbers 13-14, we now consider Numbers 15, where God gives His people a fresh start. He makes a new promise to a new generation and gives a new set of laws. As we examine these laws, we learn how they can be applied to our lives. We also remember the good and perfect work of the cross as we partake in Communion.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 15
PREVIEW: In Numbers 15, the Lord gives His children laws for unintentional and presumptuous, “with a high hand,” sins. The penalty for violating the Sabbath is established and a reminder is given to help the children of Israel remember God’s ordinances.

Laws of Grain and Drink Offerings - Read Numbers 15:1-21

1.Although the adult generation of Israel had been sentenced to die in the wilderness of Paran (see Numbers 14:29), the Lord was committed to bringing His people into the Promised Land (see v. 2). What requirements of their covenant relationship with the Lord was Moses to clearly communicate to the younger generation (see v. 3)?



2.The Lord gave Moses additional details not outlined in Leviticus 2 about the offerings and sacrifices and what was to be brought with them (see vv. 4-10). These instructions applied to which types of animals being offered (see v. 11)?



3.To whom did these additional instructions about the offerings and sacrifices apply (see vv. 13-14)?



4.Egyptians, Midianites, Moabites, Edomites, or any other strangers were welcome to accompany the Israelites to the Promised Land. What governed both the children of Israel and these strangers (see vv. 15-16)? (See also Exodus 12:49, and Numbers 9:14, 15:29.)



5.How does the Lord use this same governing method for us as spirit-filled believers? (See Matthew 4:4, 5:17-20, and 2 Peter 1:2-4.)



6.The second set of regulations the Lord gave to Moses pertained to the offerings of the first fruits of the harvest in the Promised Land. What were the children of Israel to offer and how were they to offer it (see vv. 17-21)?



Laws Concerning Unintentional Sin - Read Numbers 15:22-29

7.The Lord gave Moses the laws concerning unintentional sins. How did the Lord define unintentional? (see vv. 22, 24)



8.If the whole congregation was guilty of unintentionally breaking the Lord's commandments, who made atonement for their sin? How was it made (see vv. 23-26)?



9.If an individual was guilty of unintentional sin, who made atonement for the sin? How was it made (see vv. 27-28)?



10.Once atonement was offered for their unintentional sin, what was given by the Lord to the congregation and the individual (see vv. 26, 28)?



Law Concerning Presumptuous Sin - Read Numbers 15:30-31

11.The idea behind a presumptuous sin is that this person committed his sin in an act of defiance to God’s ordinance; literally the word means with a high hand. Unlike the unintentional sin, what was not offered for the presumptuous sin? (See also Hebrews 9:22.)



12.Because this was not offered for the presumptuous sin, what was not given by the Lord? (See also Hebrews 10:26.)



13.Instead, what was done to the person who, with a high hand, committed the presumptuous sin (see vv. 30-31)?



14.The word for brings reproach is blasphemes, which means to speak of God in an irreverent, impious manner. Whom did the person with a high hand blaspheme (see v. 30)?



15.What described the heart motive of the person who committed the presumptuous sin (see v. 31)?




Penalty for Violating the Sabbath - Read Numbers 15:32-36

16.At some time during the wilderness wandering, the children of Israel found a man violating the Sabbath. What was that man doing (see v. 32)? What did those who found him do to him (see vv. 33-34)?



17.Although it was not explained what should be done to him for his violation of the Sabbath, it appears that while the man was under guard, Moses sought the once atonement was offered for their unintentional sin for direction (see Leviticus 24:12). What did the Lord instruct Moses to do with the man (see v. 35)?



18.Although the Lord's instruction to Moses may seem extremely harsh, this anecdote creates a clear illustration of what is meant by defiant, presumptuous sin. The man was obviously violating the Sabbath with a high hand by doing what he was doing. What did his presumptuous sin bring him (see v. 36)?



19.Keeping the Sabbath is the fourth commandment and was observed weekly in the camp of Israel. This man was certainly consciously aware of this command of God and presumptuously violated it. His sin led to his death. How does this anecdote apply to us today? (See Romans 6:23, 8:13, 1 John 5:16-17, Galatians 3:10, and James 1:15.)



Tassels on Garments - Read Numbers 15:32-36

20.The Lord instructed Moses to have the children of Israel make tassels on the corners of their garments (see vv. 37-38). What purpose were the tassels to serve (see v. 39-40)?


21.Although tassels on their garments may seem insignificant, the purpose the tassels served was critical. What were the tassels to keep them from following (see v. 39)? What would putting into practice the purpose of the tassels lead them to (see v. 40)?


22.A mnemonic is a device, such as a formula or rhyme, used as an aid in remembering. The tassels serve as a mnemonic to remind God’s children of His commandments (see v. 40). Often when we forget, or worse, don’t know God’s commandments, we can do what we think and feel is right, like the man who gathered sticks. What does this type of action lead to? (See Proverbs 12:15, 16:25, and Romans 6:21.)


23.The tassels are mnemonic reminders that it is extremely important to remember and do what the Lord God says (v. 40). The man gathering sticks is a vivid picture of a person who knows God’s commands but with a high hand chooses not to do them. A couple of additional extremely important reminders close this chapter; what are they (v. 41)? (See also Luke 6:46 and 1 Corinthians 6:19-20.)



DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Numbers 13 and 14 are chapters of failure on the part of the Israelites
      1. The Israelites refused to enter the land of Canaan
      2. Plot twist: the Israelites are attacked, the ten doubting spies are killed by a plague, and God promises the next generation of Israelites the inheritance of the land
    2. Numbers 15 is a set of ceremonial and sacrificial laws to practice in the new land, even though the current generation of Israelites won't enter it
      1. Principle: the Israelites messed up, but God is bent on fulfilling His promise to the next generation
      2. "Mercy triumphs over judgment" (James 2:13)
      3. "Where sin abounded, grace abounded much more" (Romans 5:20)
    3. "And the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 'Speak to the children of Israel, and say to them: "When you have come into the land you are to inhabit, which I am giving to you"'" (Numbers 15:1-2)
      1. "For He knows our frame; He remembers that we are dust" (Psalm 103:14)
      2. The Lord takes the ashes and the dust of their failure and makes His promise clear through it all
  2. First Law: Burnt and Peace Offerings
    1. The new generation will be so blessed that they will be able to make abundant sacrifices back to the Lord—voluntary offerings, not sin offerings
    2. "And you make an offering by fire to the Lord, a burnt offering" (Numbers 15:3)
      1. Burnt offering = Hebrew word olah, what goes up
      2. The whole offering went up in smoke
    3. "Or a sacrifice, to fulfill a vow or as a freewill offering or in your appointed feasts, to make a sweet aroma to the Lord, from the herd or the flock, then he who presents his offering to the Lord shall bring a grain offering of one-tenth of an ephah of fine flour mixed with one-fourth of a hin of oil; and one-fourth of a hin of wine as a drink offering you shall prepare with the burnt offering or the sacrifice, for each lamb. Or for a ram you shall prepare as a grain offering two-tenths of an ephah of fine flour mixed with one-third of a hin of oil; and as a drink offering you shall offer one-third of a hin of wine as a sweet aroma to the Lord. And when you prepare a young bull as a burnt offering, or as a sacrifice to fulfill a vow, or as a peace offering to the Lord" (vv. 3-8)
      1. Peace offering = Hebrew word zevach shelamim, slaughter that brings well-being
      2. A testament of peace with God
    4. "Then shall be offered with the young bull a grain offering of three-tenths of an ephah of fine flour mixed with half a hin of oil; and you shall bring as the drink offering half a hin of wine as an offering made by fire, a sweet aroma to the Lord. Thus it shall be done for each young bull, for each ram, or for each lamb or young goat. According to the number that you prepare, so you shall do with everyone according to their number. All who are native-born shall do these things in this manner, in presenting an offering made by fire, a sweet aroma to the Lord" (vv. 9-13)
      1. Other offerings will be made with the freewill offerings: a grain offering and drink offering
      2. Drink offering—poured out on the sacrifice or on the ground; signified complete devotion; Paul said it of his own life when he was about to die (see 2 Timothy 4:6-8)
    5. "And if a stranger dwells with you, or whoever is among you throughout your generations, and would present an offering made by fire, a sweet aroma to the Lord, just as you do, so shall he do. One ordinance shall be for you of the assembly and for the stranger who dwells with you, an ordinance forever throughout your generations; as you are, so shall the stranger be before the Lord. One law and one custom shall be for you and for the stranger who dwells with you" (vv. 14-16)
      1. Stranger = a foreigner, a non-Jew; in order to become Jewish, must go through a process called proselytization, or conversion
      2. Foreshadowing of the gospel: Jew and Gentile standing before God as one people; Galatians 3:28
  3. Second Law: Cake of First Fruits
    1. "Again the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 'Speak to the children of Israel, and say to them: "When you come into the land to which I bring you, then it will be, when you eat of the bread of the land, that you shall offer up a heave offering to the Lord. You shall offer up a cake of the first of your ground meal as a heave offering; as a heave offering of the threshing floor, so shall you offer it up. Of the first of your ground meal you shall give to the Lord a heave offering throughout your generations"'" (vv. 17-21)
    2. Tithe—to express gratitude for the grain of the new land
    3. Wave offering presented with horizontal motion; heave offering presented with vertical motion
      1. Picture of our relationship with Jesus, the Bread of Life
      2. Vertical motion represents His coming and going and coming again to the earth
  4. Third Law: Sins of Omission
    1. "If you sin unintentionally, and do not observe all these commandments which the Lord has spoken to Moses—all that the Lord has commanded you by the hand of Moses, from the day the Lord gave commandment and onward throughout your generations—then it will be, if it is unintentionally committed, without the knowledge of the congregation, that the whole congregation shall offer one young bull as a burnt offering, as a sweet aroma to the Lord, with its grain offering and its drink offering, according to the ordinance, and one kid of the goats as a sin offering" (vv. 22-24)
    2. Sin is a very biblical word
      1. Hebrew shagah, normal Greek armatia, meaning to miss the mark or wander from the path
      2. Sin can be unintentional but must be atoned for; ignorance of the law is no excuse
    3. The world has a mechanistic worldview—we are merely animals and victims of outside influences; as Christians, we have a spiritualistic worldview—our guilt must be dealt with at the cross of Jesus Christ
    4. What do you do with sin and guilt?
      1. Deny it—but "he who covers his sins will not prosper, but whoever confesses and forsakes them will have mercy" (Proverbs 28:13)
      2. Admit it and try to change yourself—but you don't have the power alone
      3. The best thing is to admit it, confess it, and ask God to change you
  5. Fourth Law: Sins of Commission
    1. "But the person who does anything presumptuously, whether he is native-born or a stranger, that one brings reproach on the Lord, and he shall be cut off from among his people. Because he has despised the word of the Lord, and has broken His commandment, that person shall be completely cut off; his guilt shall be upon him" (vv. 30-31)
    2. Hebrew: whoever sins "with a high hand"—a hand raised in defiance toward God; unintentional sin is missing the mark, but intentional sin is transgression
    3. Biblical example of this sin: "Now while the children of Israel were in the wilderness, they found a man gathering sticks on the Sabbath day. And those who found him gathering sticks brought him to Moses and Aaron, and to all the congregation. They put him under guard, because it had not been explained what should be done to him. Then the Lord said to Moses, 'The man must surely be put to death; all the congregation shall stone him with stones outside the camp.' So, as the Lord commanded Moses, all the congregation brought him outside the camp and stoned him with stones, and he died" (vv. 32-36)
    4. Modern-day example: in an ultra-orthodox Jerusalem neighborhood, residents attack anyone they believe is breaking the Sabbath
    5. Under the law, to violate the Sabbath was to repudiate God's authority
    6. Old Testament equivalent of the blasphemy of the Holy Spirit (see Matthew 12:31-32); implies an overt rejection of God's solution
  6. "Again the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 'Speak to the children of Israel: Tell them to make tassels on the corners of their garments throughout their generations, and to put a blue thread in the tassels of the corners. And you shall have the tassel, that you may look upon it and remember all the commandments of the Lord and do them, and that you may not follow the harlotry to which your own heart and your own eyes are inclined, and that you may remember and do all My commandments, and be holy for your God'" (vv. 37-40)
    1. Tassels worn on the hem of the outer garment made social statements
    2. David cut the hem of Saul's robe to show how close he'd gotten to killing him (see 1 Samuel 24)
    3. These tassels (Hebrew: tsit tsit) were a tangible reminder to the Jewish people of the covenant (and 613 commandments, some positive, mostly negative) they had with God
    4. The woman with the issue of blood (see Luke 8:43-48)
    5. When you advertise that you're a Christian (like how Jews advertise they're Jewish by their tassels), it holds you publicly accountable
  7. Closing
    1. "I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, to be your God: I am the Lord your God" (v. 41)
    2. Chapter 15 is very different from the narrative that came before and the one that will come afterwards
    3. It's a message of hope: God will bring the next generation into the land
    4. Also shows the severity of the law--committing one sin makes you a sinner and brings death (see Romans 6:23)
    5. The law vs. grace
      1. Six hundred and thirteen commandments vs. two commandments (see Mark 12:29-31)
      2. John 1:17, 2 Corinthians 5:21
      3. Under the law, God demands righteousness from you; in grace, God gives righteousness to you
      4. Under the law, your righteousness was based on your good works; under grace, your righteousness is based on His good and finished work

Cross references: 1 Samuel 24, Psalm 103:14, Proverbs 28:13, Matthew 12:31-32, Mark 12:29-31, Luke 8:43-48, John 1:17, Romans 5:20, Romans 6:23, 2 Corinthians 5:21, Galatians 3:28, 2 Timothy 4:6-8, James 2:13

Greek/Hebrew words: olah, zevach shelamim, shagah, armatia, tsit tsit

Topic: The Law

Keywords: the law, grace, commandments, sin, offerings, promise, covenant

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 16
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 16
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2598

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 16, the children of Israel once again begin to complain as one of the leaders stirs up a rebellion against Moses. As the Lord's chosen leader, Moses challenges the opposition and pleads with the Lord to spare the people from destruction. As we study these events, we are challenged to search our own hearts and discover where the Lord has called us to serve Him.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 16

PREVIEW: In Numbers 16, the Lord deals with an uprising spearheaded by Korah, and immediately after that, a plague strikes the children of God for their complaining.

Rebellion Against Moses and Aaron - Read Numbers 16:1-40

1. At some unidentified time and place during the wilderness wandering, a rebellion started against Moses and Aaron. How many were involved in this rebellion? Who were they (see vv. 1-2)?


2. These rebels weren’t just common men from the congregation of the children of Israel; they were leaders of the congregation, men of renown. Renown means that these men were widely honored and acclaimed, famous men within the congregation. What was the premise of these men’s rebellion (v. 3)?


3. The rebels accused Moses and Aaron of exalting themselves above the assembly (the rest of the people) (see v. 3). Exalting means to raise in rank, character, or status; to elevate. How does Moses’ reaction to their accusation indicate just the opposite (see v. 4)?



4. Moses’ response to the rebels’ accusation was to fall on his face, to prostrate himself, to bow down, to humble himself (see also Numbers 14:6, 20:6). What happens when godly people willingly and genuinely humble themselves? (See Psalm 75:7, Proverbs 29:23, Matthew 23:12, and James 4:10.)



5. Although the rebels perceived themselves to be holy and anointed for leadership positions within the congregation (see v. 3), what did Moses say the Lord Himself would do the next morning (see v. 5)?



6. Moses instructed Korah and all his rebellious company to take censers, vessels for burning incense, and bring them before the Lord. What was the Lord’s role when all these men gathered before Him with burning censers (see vv. 6-7)?


7. Moses spoke to Korah (see vv. 8-11), giving him perspective on his call and commission to serve the Lord as a Kohathite, carrying the tabernacle’s furniture and vessels. Moses asked Korah, “Is it a small thing to you…?,” meaning that his role as a Kohathite was important and prestigious and shouldn’t have been taken lightly but rather reverently appreciated. What role was Korah seeking in his rebellious complaint against Aaron (see vv. 10-11)?



8. Although Korah and his rebellious cohorts thought they were gathered against Moses and Aaron, who did Moses say they were truly gathered against (see v. 11)?



9. When Moses attempted to address Dathan and Abiram, what was their response (see vv. 12-14)?



10. What did Dathan and Abiram accuse Moses of acting like and blame him for not doing (see vv. 13-14)?



11. Moses was angered by Dathan and Abiram’s rebellion and false accusations against him, but he didn’t argue with them. Instead, with whom did he discuss what angered him (see v. 15)?


12. Moses reminded Korah to appear with his company of 250, censers in hand, before the Lord (see vv. 16-19). They all took their censers and stood before the door of the tabernacle with Moses and Aaron (see v. 18). Then the glory of the Lord appeared before them all. Without discussion or debate, the Lord’s decision and judgment was made. What was His judgment (see vv. 20-21)?



13. How did Moses and Aaron respond to the Lord’s judgment (see v. 22)?



14. What did Moses and Aaron beseech and implore God for (see v. 22)?



15. The Lord gave Moses a stern and solemn warning; Moses then arose and communicated the warning to the congregation. What was that warning (see vv. 23, 26)?



16. How did the congregation respond to the warning (see v. 27)?



17. Moses addressed the congregation, including all the rebels, telling them, “By this you shall know that the Lord has sent me to do all these works….” What two scenarios did Moses present that indicate whom the Lord sent (see vv. 28-30)?



18. In Moses’ scenarios for determining who the Lord sent, he told the congregation that they would understand the true nature of these men’s rebellion if they went down alive into the pit. What was the true nature of these men’s rebellion (see v. 30)?



19. What became of the entire households of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram (see vv. 31-34)?



20. What became of the 250 men who also rebelled against Moses and Aaron (see v. 35)?



21. The 250 censers were holy. What did the Lord instruct Moses to tell Aaron’s son to do with them (see vv. 36-38)? Why (see v. 40)?



Complaints of the People - Read Numbers 16:41-50

22. The next day, after seeing the destruction of Korah, Dathan, Abiram and the 250 men of renown, the entire congregation complained against Moses and Aaron. What was their complaint (see v. 41)?



23. What happened while the entire congregation was complaining against Moses and Aaron (see v. 42)?



24. What did the Lord sternly and solemnly warn Moses and Aaron to do (see vv. 44-45)? What did they do (see v.45)?



25. Despite Moses and Aaron’s humility (see v. 45), what began to happen to the congregation of people (see v. 46)? How did Moses and Aaron respond (see vv. 46-48)?



26. Moses instructed Aaron, the high priest, to take a censer with fire and incense on it and take it quickly to the congregation. What is incense a picture of in the Bible? (See Psalm 141:2, Luke 1:10, and Revelation 5:8, 8:3–4.)



27. What was the effect of Aaron's offering incense on behalf of the congregation (see v. 48)? (See also James 5:16.)



28. Approximately how many rebels died in the Korah rebellion? How many complainers died (v. 49)?

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The gainsaying of Korah—Jude 11 (ASV)
    2. "Don't complain to people. When you complain to people, eighty percent of the people you tell don't care anyway, and twenty percent of the people you tell are glad you finally got what you deserve" —Mark Twain
    3. Murmur—onomatopoeic (sounds like the sound it's defining)
    4. The fifth (and sixth!) murmuring in Numbers so far
    5. Korah, a prominent Levite, leads a rebellion with 250 leaders against Moses' authority
    6. Moses criticized
      1. By his family (Aaron and Miriam) (Numbers 12)
      2. By his leaders
      3. By his congregation
    7. Rebelling against Moses is rebelling against God
    8. "The essence of all sin is rebellion against divine leadership" —A.W. Tozer
  2. Numbers 16:1-19
    1. The rebellion of Korah
    2. Moses did not take too much upon himself
      1. The Lord had to push him into ministry
      2. He was humble (Numbers 11:29)
    3. Root problem of Korah and his men's rebellion: jealousy and covetousness over Moses' and Aaron's positions
      1. Tribe of Levi divided into three family groups
      2. Korah belonged to Kohath, whose task was to transport the tabernacle's holiest of implements through the wilderness
    4. Other biblical example of jealousy: David's alienated son Absalom sitting at the city gate, stealing the hearts of Israel (2 Samuel 15)
    5. When your eyes are off the Lord, like Korah and his men, you are never, ever a happy person
    6. The blessing isn't in leading; it's in being in sync with the Leader
    7. 1 Corinthians 12
      1. There are some positions in the church that are more visible/noticeable and thus seem to be more important
      2. In real-life human anatomy, you can't live without unseen parts (liver, lungs, etc.)
    8. Discover the gifts God gave you, and you will be happy and satisfied when you function with that unction (i.e. calling/anointing)
    9. Rewriting history: Egypt being called a land "flowing with milk and honey" (v. 13)
  3. Numbers 16:19-40
    1. Whenever there's an issue, God makes Himself known
    2. "They" in v. 22 refers to Moses and Aaron; their reaction goes against human tendency
    3. "The God of the spirits of all flesh"
      1. Only used twice in Old Testament
      2. Our essence is spirit, not flesh
      3. New Testament tripartite view: body, soul, spirit
    4. The intercession of Moses and Aaron foreshadowed that of Christ; Exodus 18
    5. Korah should have repented after hearing Moses' words—but he didn't, just like Jonah (see book of Jonah)
    6. Sins of the fathers being visited on the children
      1. Numbers 14:18
      2. Similarly, blessings were visited on those who had faith and removed themselves and their children from Korah and his men
    7. Korah and his men's punishment serves as a visual aide
      1. They attempted to divide the people
      2. God judged them the same way they sinned
      3. Matthew 7:2, Galatians 6:7
    8. This is an episodic incident, not a typical one
      1. Dramatic revelation of God's anger to leave a warning and example for future generations
      2. Genesis 19: Sodom and Gomorrah
      3. Leviticus 10: Nadab and Abihu
      4. Numbers 12: Miriam and Aaron
      5. Acts 5: Ananias and Sapphira
    9. Another visual aid: using the censers from the "poser priests" to make a covering for the altar
  4. Numbers 16:40-50
    1. Moses is actually the one responsible for God sparing the nation through his intercession
    2. People get angry at the judgment of God; they can't see Him so they blame His visual representatives
    3. The cloud indicated the presence of God
      1. Not just for guidance, but for guilt and judgment
      2. You have to decide what kind of presence of God you want to enjoy
    4. Psalm 141:2
  5. Closing
    1. Discover God's plan, gifting, and purpose for your life
    2. Whatever God has called you to do, if you do it with all of your heart, you will have great enjoyment

Figures Referenced:  A.W. Tozer, Mark Twain
Cross references:  Exodus 18, Leviticus 10, Numbers 11:26; 12; 14:18; 16, 2 Samuel 15, Psalm 141:2, Jonah, Matthew 7:2, Acts 5, 1 Corinthians 12, Galatians 6:7


Topic: Rebellion

Keywords: rebellion, authority, leadership, complaining, jealousy, spiritual gifts, calling, body of Christ, intercession

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 17:1-18:23
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 17:1-18:23
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2605

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Before diving into this text, we learn why it's important to study the book of Numbers. Then looking closely at Numbers 17-18, we continue to see God reveal Himself to the children of Israel in response to their complaints and disobedience. His mercy becomes apparent as we discover that our service to Him is actually His gift to us.

STUDY GUIDE
PREVIEW: In Numbers 17-19, the Lord reconfirms His selection of the priestly leadership and clarifies the duties of the priest and their provision and tithes. The Lord establishes the laws of purification to keep His children clean from the frequent death being experienced in the wilderness.

The Budding of Aaron’s Rod - Read Numbers 17:1-13

1. Aaron’s priestly authority had been challenged (see Numbers 16). Now the Lord would make it clear to all the people whom He had chosen for the priestly ministry. What did the Lord instruct Moses to collect from each of the tribes? What were they to do with those items (see vv. 1-4)?


2. A rod is a symbol of authority and power. The rods were simply sticks, dead wood, onto which the Israelites wrote the name of each tribal representative and placed into the tabernacle of meeting. What would be the sure indication that the Lord had selected a specific man from among all the twelve representatives (see v. 5)?



3. What was the Lord’s purpose in having them place the rods before Him in the tabernacle of meeting (see v. 5)?


4. Moses spoke to the people and the leaders brought forth their rods (see v. 6). Where precisely did Moses place the rods (see vv. 4, 7)? What was significant about this position (see v. 4)? (See Exodus 25:22.)



5. The next day, Moses went into the tabernacle and Aaron’s rod had budded. Not only did it bud, but what else did this dead stick bring forth (see v. 8)?



6. Each year the almond tree is the first tree to bring forth fruit in the region of Israel. How is this rod that budded a picture of Jesus Christ? (See Isaiah 11:1-2, Matthew 12:38-40, 1 Corinthians 15:4, 20–23, and 1 Thessalonians 4:14.)



7. What became of Aaron’s rod that budded (see v. 10)? (See also Hebrews 9:4.)


8. Upon seeing the rod of Aaron, the children of Israel overreacted. What was their response (see vv. 12-13)? Why might they have reacted this way? (See Numbers 16:32, 49.)



Duties of Priests and Levites - Read Numbers 18:1-7

9. Having the role of a priest carried many blessings, but also a great deal of responsibilities. What did the Lord say to Aaron about the responsibilities that were laid upon him and his sons (see v. 1)?



10. Although the responsibility laid upon Aaron and his sons was great, they didn’t have to shoulder all the workload themselves. Who was assigned to assist them (see v. 2)?



11. All priests were Levites, but not all the Levites were priests. The entire tribe was assigned to serve the priests as the priests served the Lord by serving the people. What was the role of the Levites who were not priests (see vv. 3-4)? What was the restriction of the Levites who were not priests (see v. 3)?



12. The work of Aaron and his sons provided spiritual value to the children of Israel. What was that spiritual value (see v. 5)?



13. Aaron and his sons were assigned a significant role in the camp of the children of Israel, which came with a significant amount of responsibility and work. How were they to look upon the remainder of the Levites who were not sons of Aaron (see v. 6)?



14. How were Aaron and his sons to look upon the duties assigned to them (see v. 7)?


Offerings for Support of the Priests - Read Numbers 18:8-20

15. Although offerings made by the children of Israel were given to the Lord, to whom did the Lord give them (see v. 8)? What were they to do with them (see v. 10)?



16. The heave and wave offerings were given to the Lord, and the Lord gave them to the tribe of Levi (see v. 11). All of the best of the oil, wine, grain, fruit (see vv. 12-13), and clean animals (see v. 15)—every devoted thing—was theirs (v. 14). Who in the tribe of Levi would have been restricted from partaking of these (see vv. 11, 13)?



17. Although the firstborn of both man and unclean beasts were dedicated to the Lord and were given to Aaron and his sons, they had to be redeemed (see v. 15). Explain why they had to be redeemed. How were they redeemed (see v. 16)?



18. Cows, sheep, and goats were clean animals and were used in the offerings made to the Lord. What was done to these animals as they were offered to the Lord and given to Aaron and his sons (see vv. 17-18)?



19. A covenant of salt was symbolic of an enduring covenant because salt is durable and doesn’t break down under heat. The covenant of divine provision between the Lord and Aaron and his descendants was forever. Name and describe another covenant of salt the Lord made. (See 2 Chronicles 13:5.)


20. When the tribe of Levi entered into the Promised Land, they were not going to receive land as an inheritance (see v. 20), land which they could grow produce and cattle, and provide an income for themselves. Explain how the Lord made provision for the tribe of Levi (see vv. 8-20). What was the true inheritance for Aaron and his sons (see v. 20)?


Tithes for Support of the Levites - Read Numbers 18:21-24

21. The entire tribe of Levi was dedicated to serving in the tabernacle and would receive no land as an inheritance. Their provision would come directly from the Lord via a covenant of salt. The word salary is from the Middle English word salaire, from the Latin word salarium: a payment made in salt (sal) or for salt, from salaries, meaning pertaining to salt. What did the Levites receive as a salary for their work in the tabernacle (see v. 21)?



22. Approaching the tabernacle was restricted to the Levites alone. What would happen if a non-Levite came near to the tabernacle (see v. 22)?


The Tithe of the Levites - Read Numbers 18:25-32

23. The Levites, too, were to offer a tithe from their provision. What did their tithe consist of (see v. 27)? Where could the priests eat their offerings (see v. 31)?



Laws of Purification - Read Numbers 18:1-22

24. According to estimates, over 1,078,000 Israelites (600,000 men, 400,000 women, 45,000 Levite men, 33,000 Levite women, plus adults among the mixed multitude) died during the 38 years of wilderness wandering. Using a 360-day year, an average of 78 people died every day. Death was a constant factor in the wilderness; therefore, these laws of purification were established. What type of animal is used to establish this purification (see v. 2)?



25. Eleazar the priest took the animal outside the camp to have it slaughtered (unlike typical burnt offerings) (see v.3). What did he do with the blood of the animal (see v. 4)? What did he do with the remainder of the animal (see v. 5)?



26. Cedar wood, hyssop, and scarlet wool were added as the animal was consumed by fire. These three materials were also used in the ritual of purification of skin disease (see Leviticus 14:1–9). Although this sacrifice was intended to purify, people involved in the slaughter (see v. 7), burning (see v. 8) and collecting of ashes (see v.10) were all made unclean until evening. What was done with the ashes of the animal (see v. 9)?



27. What was the intended purpose of the ashes gathered from this animal (see v. 9)?



28. With an average of 78 people dying in the camp daily, becoming unclean by touching a dead body was likely a regular occurrence. How did the unclean person purify himself (see vv. 11-12)?



29. The penalty for not purifying oneself after becoming unclean by touching a dead body was stiff. What was that penalty (see vv. 12-13)?



30. If a person were to die in his tent, what did his dead body make unclean? How was it made clean again (see vv. 14-19)?



31. What happened if an unclean person chose not to purify himself according to the Laws of Purification (see v. 20)?



32. During the allotted time of uncleanness, what became of the objects that the unclean person touched (see v. 22)?



33. How is a follower of Christ purified from ongoing sin that results from being among the dead things of this world? (See John 13:10, 15:3, Ephesians 5:26, and 1 John 1:8-10.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The Scofield Reference Study Bible says the book of Numbers dates to 1450 B.C.
    2. Why study a 3000-year-old book?
      1. To develop a working knowledge of the biblical period
      2. To understand worship: God controls and directs it
      3. To understand the work of Old Testament priests
        1. Jesus is our High Priest
        2. Hebrews 5:4
      4. To appreciate grace—John 1:17
    3. Moses has been criticized three times so far inNumbers (chapter 12, 16)
      1. God has dealt with the complainers
      2. For now, the complaining has stopped
    4. Criticism is the lot of anybody who steps into publicministry
      1. D.L. Moody
      2. Jesus (see John 8:48; Mark 3:20-22)
      3. Paul (see Acts 26:24-25; Galatians 1:10)
    5. If you believe in the sovereignty of God, you need tolisten to criticism, whether it's true or not, and allow God to use it inyour life
  2. Numbers 17
    1. God confirms the high priesthood of Aaron by resurrection
    2. The rods
      1. Dead sticks picked up in the desert, whittled and possibly decorated
      2. Aaron's rod is as dead as all the others
    3. Buds, blossoms, and berries—life out of death
      1. The almond tree is the first to blossom in the spring in the Middle East
      2. Symbolic of and refers to Jesus
      3. 1 Corinthians 15:20; Hebrews 8:4; 7:25; 4:15-16
    4. Hebrews 9:4—three things inside the ark of thecovenant
      1. Tablets of the Law
      2. Golden pot with manna
      3. Aaron's rod
      4. These three things testify against and represent the failures of Israel
      5. On top of the ark, however, was the mercy seat, above which the presence of God dwelt and over which blood was shed to cover their failures
    5. The children of Israel are paranoid and afraid (vv.12-13)
      1. Before, they were not afraid to complain
      2. Now, fear and respect of God has returned
      3. Hebrews 10:31, 12:29
  3. Numbers 18:1-7
    1. The Lord sets apart the Levites to serve Him in thetabernacle
      1. To maintain the sanctity of the sanctuary
      2. "Fools rush in where angels fear to tread" —Alexander Pope
    2. All roads lead to God, but not all roads lead to Godsafely
      1. Only one safe way to God: through the shedding of blood by a mediator/High Priest
      2. Jesus does this for us
      3. 1 Timothy 2:5
    3. Church leaders in the New Testament were called uponto preserve the sanctity of the church
      1. I Corinthians 5:1-7
      2. Matthew 18:15-17
      3. This action of harsh isolation by bold and loving believers brings sinning people to their senses
    4. God gifts Aaron:
      1. With a team to help with the work in the tabernacle
      2. With his priesthood
  4. Numbers 18:8-24
    1. Instruction of remuneration for the Levites' ministry
      1. Priests had no land allotment
      2. Priests were supported by the nation
    2. The children of Israel always gave ten percent—atithe—of whatever they had to God
      1. How one handles money is a barometer of spiritual maturity
      2. "There are three conversions that are necessary for somebody to undergo: the conversion of the heart, the conversion of mind, and the conversion of the wallet. I have found that the first two are much simpler than the third" —paraphrased from Martin Luther
      3. 2 Corinthians 9:6
      4. "Money is like manure. Store it up and it stinks; spread it around and it helps things grow"
      5. 2 Corinthians 9:7cheerful literally means hilarious
      6. Giving money back to the Lord shows that you trust Him
    3. Covenant of salt
      1. In the ancient world, salt symbolized an indestructible, pure, and permanent agreement
      2. Salt cannot be destroyed
    4. Genesis 34, 49:5-7
      1. Jacob curses Simeon and Levi on his deathbed
      2. Why, then, do the Levites get the gift of the priesthood?

Figures Referenced: D.L. Moody, Alexander Pope, Martin Luther

Cross references: Genesis 34; 49:5-7, Numbers 12; 16; 17:1-18:24, Matthew 18:15-17, Mark 3:20-22, John 1:17; 8:48, Acts 26:24-25, 1 Corinthians 5:1-7; 15:20, 2 Corinthians 9:6, 7, Galatians 1:10, 1 Timothy 2:5, Hebrews 4:15-16; 5:4; 7:25; 8:4; 9:4; 10:31; 12:29


Topic: Leadership

Keywords: criticism, leadership, priests, priesthood, Old Testament, the Law, resurrection, life, ark of the covenant, mercy, sin, complain, complaining, Levites, mediation, mediator, sacrifice, tabernacle, sanctity, the church, tithe, tithing, money, giving

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 18:21-19:22
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 18:21-19:22
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2606

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In this study of Numbers, we continue to look into the duties of the Levitical priests and learn about the laws of purification. As we partake in Communion, we see how this text points to Christ and learn how He has fulfilled the Law.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 17-19

PREVIEW: In Numbers 17-19, the Lord reconfirms His selection of the priestly leadership and clarifies the duties of the priest and their provision and tithes. The Lord establishes the laws of purification to keep His children clean from the frequent death being experienced in the wilderness.

The Budding of Aaron’s Rod - Read Numbers 17:1-13

1. Aaron’s priestly authority had been challenged (see Numbers 16). Now the Lord would make it clear to all the people whom He had chosen for the priestly ministry. What did the Lord instruct Moses to collect from each of the tribes? What were they to do with those items (see vv. 1-4)?


2. A rod is a symbol of authority and power. The rods were simply sticks, dead wood, onto which the Israelites wrote the name of each tribal representative and placed into the tabernacle of meeting. What would be the sure indication that the Lord had selected a specific man from among all the twelve representatives (see v. 5)?



3. What was the Lord’s purpose in having them place the rods before Him in the tabernacle of meeting (see v. 5)?


4. Moses spoke to the people and the leaders brought forth their rods (see v. 6). Where precisely did Moses place the rods (see vv. 4, 7)? What was significant about this position (see v. 4)? (See Exodus 25:22.)



5. The next day, Moses went into the tabernacle and Aaron’s rod had budded. Not only did it bud, but what else did this dead stick bring forth (see v. 8)?



6. Each year the almond tree is the first tree to bring forth fruit in the region of Israel. How is this rod that budded a picture of Jesus Christ? (See Isaiah 11:1-2, Matthew 12:38-40, 1 Corinthians 15:4, 20–23, and 1 Thessalonians 4:14.)



7. What became of Aaron’s rod that budded (see v. 10)? (See also Hebrews 9:4.)


8. Upon seeing the rod of Aaron, the children of Israel overreacted. What was their response (see vv. 12-13)? Why might they have reacted this way? (See Numbers 16:32, 49.)



Duties of Priests and Levites - Read Numbers 18:1-7

9. Having the role of a priest carried many blessings, but also a great deal of responsibilities. What did the Lord say to Aaron about the responsibilities that were laid upon him and his sons (see v. 1)?



10. Although the responsibility laid upon Aaron and his sons was great, they didn’t have to shoulder all the workload themselves. Who was assigned to assist them (see v. 2)?



11. All priests were Levites, but not all the Levites were priests. The entire tribe was assigned to serve the priests as the priests served the Lord by serving the people. What was the role of the Levites who were not priests (see vv. 3-4)? What was the restriction of the Levites who were not priests (see v. 3)?



12. The work of Aaron and his sons provided spiritual value to the children of Israel. What was that spiritual value (see v. 5)?



13. Aaron and his sons were assigned a significant role in the camp of the children of Israel, which came with a significant amount of responsibility and work. How were they to look upon the remainder of the Levites who were not sons of Aaron (see v. 6)?



14. How were Aaron and his sons to look upon the duties assigned to them (see v. 7)?


Offerings for Support of the Priests - Read Numbers 18:8-20

15. Although offerings made by the children of Israel were given to the Lord, to whom did the Lord give them (see v. 8)? What were they to do with them (see v. 10)?



16. The heave and wave offerings were given to the Lord, and the Lord gave them to the tribe of Levi (see v. 11). All of the best of the oil, wine, grain, fruit (see vv. 12-13), and clean animals (see v. 15)—every devoted thing—was theirs (v. 14). Who in the tribe of Levi would have been restricted from partaking of these (see vv. 11, 13)?



17. Although the firstborn of both man and unclean beasts were dedicated to the Lord and were given to Aaron and his sons, they had to be redeemed (see v. 15). Explain why they had to be redeemed. How were they redeemed (see v. 16)?



18. Cows, sheep, and goats were clean animals and were used in the offerings made to the Lord. What was done to these animals as they were offered to the Lord and given to Aaron and his sons (see vv. 17-18)?



19. A covenant of salt was symbolic of an enduring covenant because salt is durable and doesn’t break down under heat. The covenant of divine provision between the Lord and Aaron and his descendants was forever. Name and describe another covenant of salt the Lord made. (See 2 Chronicles 13:5.)


20. When the tribe of Levi entered into the Promised Land, they were not going to receive land as an inheritance (see v. 20), land which they could grow produce and cattle, and provide an income for themselves. Explain how the Lord made provision for the tribe of Levi (see vv. 8-20). What was the true inheritance for Aaron and his sons (see v. 20)?


Tithes for Support of the Levites - Read Numbers 18:21-24

21. The entire tribe of Levi was dedicated to serving in the tabernacle and would receive no land as an inheritance. Their provision would come directly from the Lord via a covenant of salt. The word salary is from the Middle English word salaire, from the Latin word salarium: a payment made in salt (sal) or for salt, from salaries, meaning pertaining to salt. What did the Levites receive as a salary for their work in the tabernacle (see v. 21)?



22. Approaching the tabernacle was restricted to the Levites alone. What would happen if a non-Levite came near to the tabernacle (see v. 22)?


The Tithe of the Levites - Read Numbers 18:25-32

23. The Levites, too, were to offer a tithe from their provision. What did their tithe consist of (see v. 27)? Where could the priests eat their offerings (see v. 31)?



Laws of Purification - Read Numbers 18:1-22

24. According to estimates, over 1,078,000 Israelites (600,000 men, 400,000 women, 45,000 Levite men, 33,000 Levite women, plus adults among the mixed multitude) died during the 38 years of wilderness wandering. Using a 360-day year, an average of 78 people died every day. Death was a constant factor in the wilderness; therefore, these laws of purification were established. What type of animal is used to establish this purification (see v. 2)?



25. Eleazar the priest took the animal outside the camp to have it slaughtered (unlike typical burnt offerings) (see v.3). What did he do with the blood of the animal (see v. 4)? What did he do with the remainder of the animal (see v. 5)?



26. Cedar wood, hyssop, and scarlet wool were added as the animal was consumed by fire. These three materials were also used in the ritual of purification of skin disease (see Leviticus 14:1–9). Although this sacrifice was intended to purify, people involved in the slaughter (see v. 7), burning (see v. 8) and collecting of ashes (see v.10) were all made unclean until evening. What was done with the ashes of the animal (see v. 9)?



27. What was the intended purpose of the ashes gathered from this animal (see v. 9)?



28. With an average of 78 people dying in the camp daily, becoming unclean by touching a dead body was likely a regular occurrence. How did the unclean person purify himself (see vv. 11-12)?



29. The penalty for not purifying oneself after becoming unclean by touching a dead body was stiff. What was that penalty (see vv. 12-13)?



30. If a person were to die in his tent, what did his dead body make unclean? How was it made clean again (see vv. 14-19)?



31. What happened if an unclean person chose not to purify himself according to the Laws of Purification (see v. 20)?



32. During the allotted time of uncleanness, what became of the objects that the unclean person touched (see v. 22)?



33. How is a follower of Christ purified from ongoing sin that results from being among the dead things of this world? (See John 13:10, 15:3, Ephesians 5:26, and 1 John 1:8-10.)


DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The new covenant of Christ is based upon the old covenant promises that the Messiah would come
      1. Communion is based on Passover, or pesach in Hebrew
      2. Passover involved the breaking of bread and drinking of wine
      3. Jesus took the element that His Jewish disciples understood and made the utmost significance out of it
      4. Luke 22:19
    2. We need to know what the old covenant says because so much of the New Testament is based upon it
    3. The Torah, or Tanakh in Hebrew
      1. Genesis is the book of beginnings and wonder
      2. Exodus is the book of witness, redemption, and revelation
      3. Leviticus is the book of worship: the way to God through sacrifice and the walk with God through sanctification
      4. Numbers is the book of wandering
        1. Almost forty years total
        2. "How to turn a two-week trip into a forty-year trial"; Deuteronomy 1:2
        3. The chronology of these forty years isn't all written down
        4. Numbers 16-19 is all about the priesthood and its validation
  2. Numbers 18:21-32
    1. Hebrews 5:4
    2. Genesis 34—the iniquity of the tribe of Levi
      1. Dinah, daughter of Jacob, violated by Shechem
      2. Levi and Simeon kill all of the males in the city of Shechem
      3. Jacob speaks on his deathbed: Genesis 49:5-7
      4. Consequently, the tribes of Simeon and Levi become two of the smallest and least significant in the nation
    3. The gold calf incident (see Exodus 32)
      1. Moses draws a line and says, "Whoever is on the Lord's side—come to me!" (v. 26)
      2. The tribe of Levi immediately goes to him
      3. The Lord makes them the priestly tribe
    4. Tithing predated the Law
      1. See Genesis 14
      2. New Testament says Jesus has a higher priesthood than Aaron—His goes back all the way to Melchizedek, to whom even Abraham gave tithes
    5. Tithing in Numbers 18:24-29
      1. Something's askew if a church staff does not tithe
      2. It's like they're saying, "You should trust the Lord with your finances; but we're not willing to trust the Lord with our finances"
      3. Main idea of a tithe: It all belongs to God, and you are recognizing that He allows you to keep ninety percent of what you make and give ten percent to Him
      4. Even the Levites who received Israel's tithe were to tithe
    6. New Testament tithing: 2 Corinthians 9:7
    7. The Levites could eat the offerings and first fruits/firstborn animals that were brought
  3. Numbers 19:1-13
    1. Law of the red heifer—singularly given while the Israelites are wandering in the wilderness
    2. Deals with the ritualistic cleansing of people who become defiled by touching a dead body
      1. This was the issue during these years of wandering in the wilderness
      2. God had promised the land to the younger generation; the older generation would all die off
      3. Numbers 17:12-13
      4. Conservatively, there were 2-3 million Israelites
        1. If the older generation was 1.2 million people, there would be on average eighty-five funerals a day, seven funerals per hour over the forty years of wandering
        2. God also plagued the people, etc.
    3. The sacrifice of the red heifer
      1. A female cow older than a calf
      2. Female = bearer of life
      3. Red = blood; it must be perfect in its redness
      4. Jesus, too, was killed outside the camp/city (see John 19:16-17)
      5. Cedar wood = not as subject to decay as other woods
      6. Hyssop
        1. Used to apply blood to the lintels and doorposts on Passover (see Exodus 12:22)
        2. Speaks of purgation and cleansing; Psalm 51
        3. Jesus on the cross given hyssop dipped in a drink (see John 19:29)
      7. Scarlet = blood and life
      8. According to tradition, some of the ashes of the very first sacrificed red heifer were added to the ashes of every sacrificed heifer since, so that there was always some of the elements of the very first red heifer in the ashes
        1. This continued until the temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in A.D. 70
        2. Rabbinical teachings said these ashes mixed with purifying water would inaugurate each new priest into the priesthood
        3. Temple Institute
        4. Asher Kaufman
    4. Numbers 19:11-12: If you don't go the way God has prescribed, you won't be cleansed
    5. How does this apply to a New Testament believer?
      1. Symbolism of these instructions: life, life perpetuated, out of death comes life, life must be sacrificed for life to continue, etc.
      2. This is a special cleansing for a certain kind of defilement: death
      3. Jesus Christ died once for all, one sacrifice for all of time
      4. However, as we walk through this world, we touch "dead" things—people, movies, music, lifestyles—and become defiled and need cleansing
      5. John 13:5-11
        1. "He who is bathed needs only to wash his feet" (v. 10)
        2. You need this kind of cleansing as you walk through the world—but you don't need to keep getting saved!
  4. Numbers 19:14-22
    1. An open container is defiled; a closed one is protected
      1. The Bible says we are vessels, clay pots (see 2 Corinthians 4:7)
      2. If you as a vessel are too open-minded in this world, you will become defiled by the death that's in the world
      3. You should be honored to be considered close-minded
      4. Be careful about being too open-minded
    2. Moses was a great mediator, but he wasn't good enough
      1. Aaron was a great priest, but he couldn't take away the people's sins—he could only cover them up
      2. Hebrews 9:11-15
    3. All the sacrifices of the Old Testament point to the cross
  5. Closing
    1. The bloodiness of Christianity bothers some people
    2. But the blood of Jesus is necessary for atonement of sins—we are not good enough (see Isaiah 64:6)
    3. God took care of the problem we could never take care of by sending His Son to be killed once for all
    4. What do we have to do? Believe that what He did was enough
    5. Do you want to see God's love for us?
      1. Look at His wounds from the cross
      2. Pilate: "Behold the Man!" (see John 19:5)
      3. John: "Behold what manner of love the Father has bestowed on us, that we should be called children of God!" (see 1 John 3:1)

Figures referenced: Temple Institute, Asher Kaufman

Greek/Hebrew words: pesach, Tanakh

Cross references: Genesis 14; 34; 49:5-7, Exodus 12:22; 32, Numbers 16-19; 17:12-13; 18:21-19:22, Deuteronomy 1:2, Psalm 51, Isaiah 64:6, Luke 22:19, John 13:5-11; 19:5, 16-17, 29, 2 Corinthians 4:7; 9:7, Hebrews 5:4; 9:11-15, 1 John 3:1


Topic: The Law

Keywords: old covenant, new covenant, Old Testament, New Testament, Communion, Passover, Levi, Levites, Levitical, priests, priestly, priesthood, tribe, Israel, children of Israel, tithing, tithe, sacrifice, red heifer, female, cow, blood, hyssop, ashes, ash, the temple, Jerusalem, life, death, defilement, defiled, defiling, cleansing, cleansed, clean, vessels, clay pots, mediator, the cross, atonement, sin

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 20
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 20
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2608

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Numbers chapter 20 picks up thirty-seven years after the events in chapter 19, and the new generation of God's chosen people have started falling into old patterns of sin. In this study, Pastor Skip unveils a typology of Christ and shares insight into how we can deal with anger and grief.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 20-21
Moses' Error at Kadesh — Read Numbers 20:1-13
1. Thirty-eight years have passed since the children of Israel were previously at Kadesh (see Numbers 14:2-3) and almost everyone who was over the age of twenty at that time has since died in the wilderness. Who now dies and is buried at Kadesh (v. 1)? Who is this person to the children of Israel? (See Exodus 15:20, Numbers 26:59, Micah 6:4)




2. When the next generation of Israelites comes to Kadesh on the border of the Promised Land, they gather together against Moses and Aaron (v. 2). What is the premise of their contention with Moses and Aaron (vv. 3-5)?




3. The congregation contends with Moses and Aaron in their characteristic way (see Exodus 17:1–2, Numbers 14:2–3). What is Moses and Aaron's response to their contention, and how is this characteristic of Moses and Aaron (v. 6)? (See Numbers 14:5, 16:4, 22, 45)




4. After Moses and Aaron fall on their faces before the Lord, the Lord responds in His characteristic manner by providing a solution to those who humble themselves before Him. What is the Lord's solution to this contention (v. 8)?



5. What does Moses say to the congregation as he and Aaron gather them together before the rock? What does his speech indicate about his attitude toward the congregation's contention (v. 10)? (See also Psalm 106:32-33)




6. What does Moses do to the rock (v. 11)? Was Moses instructed to do this (v. 8)? What happens when Moses does this (v. 11)?




7. What is the Lord's perspective on Moses' actions toward the rock (v. 12)? (See also Numbers 27:14, Deuteronomy 1:37, 3:26)




8. What are the consequences for both Moses and Aaron because of Moses' actions (v. 12)?




9. Places along Israel's journey to the Promised Land are renamed according to events that happened to them and often mark their failures. What does this place become known as (v. 13)? What does this name mean? (See also Deuteronomy 33:8, Psalm 106:32)


Passage Through Edom Refused — Read Numbers 20:14-21
10. Moses sends messengers to the king of Edom requesting safe passage through his land. What do the messengers commit to the king of Edom if he allows them safe passage (v. 17)?




11. What is the king of Edom's response to Moses' request for safe passage through his land (v. 18)?




12. The messengers make a second commitment to the king of Edom if he will allow them safe passage. What is it (v. 19)?




13. What is the physical response of the Edomites to the request for safe passage by the children of Israel (vv. 20-21)?




Death of Aaron — Read Numbers 20:22-29
14. The Lord tells Moses and Aaron that Aaron would be gathered to his people. To be gathered to his people means that he would die and join his ancestors. Why is Aaron, the high priest and brother of Moses, not going to be allowed to enter the Promised Land (v. 24)?



15. Because Aaron is going to be gathered to his people, the Lord instructs Moses to transfer the role of the high priest from Aaron to Aaron's son Eleazar. How is this accomplished (vv. 25-28)?




16. Aaron dies on the top of Mount Hor four months after his sister Miriam dies at Kadesh (Numbers 33:38). What does the congregation do for Aaron's death that they apparently didn't do for Miriam's (v. 29)?




17. Miriam and Aaron both die in the fortieth year after the children of Israel had come out of the land of Egypt. (See Numbers 33:38-39) In what year does Moses die, and how old is he when he dies? (See Exodus 7:7, Deuteronomy 34:7)




18. The phrase "Aaron shall be gathered to his people" is the usual way of describing the death of a righteous person at a ripe old age. It is used of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Aaron, and Moses. What can you infer happens to a person who dies and is "gathered to his people"? (See also Matthew 22:31-32)



Canaanites Defeated at Hormah — Read Numbers 21:1-3
19. The king of Arad fights against the children of Israel and takes some of them prisoners. What is their response to this attack (vv. 1-2)?




20. What two things does the Lord do in response to the children of Israel's vow (v. 3)?




21. Places along Israel's journey to the Promised Land are renamed according to events that happened to them and often mark their failures—though not always. After their fight with the Canaanite king, the place of Arad is renamed. What is its new name and what does this name mean (v. 3)?




The Bronze Serpent — Read Numbers 21:4-9
22. As the children of Israel are denied passage through Edom and turn to journey from Kadesh to Mount Hor (See Numbers 20:21-22), what happens to the morale of the congregation? (v. 4)?




23. In their detour by the Way of the Red Sea, the people not only complain about the delay of entering the Promised Land, they also complain, yet again, about what (v. 5)?



24. What does the Lord Himself send in response to the children of Israel's complaining (v. 6)? (See also 1 Corinthians 10:9, Deuteronomy 8:15)




25. The people come to Moses, admitting that their complaints against the Lord and him were sin. They ask Moses to pray for the Lord to take away the serpents from them. Moses prays for the people (v. 7), but does the Lord grant them their request?




26. The Lord instructs Moses to make a fiery serpent and put it on a pole, thus giving the children of Israel a way to live, despite the deadly bites of the fiery serpents. What do the children of Israel who were bitten have to do in order to live (v. 9)?




27. What becomes of the bronze serpent on a pole? (See 2 Kings 18:4)




28. Jesus uses the bronze serpent as an illustration of Himself when talking to Nicodemus. (See John 3:14-15) Name some ways that the bronze serpent on the pole is a picture of Jesus Christ.


From Mount Hor to Moab — Read Numbers 21:10-20
29. The children of Israel move several times in their fortieth year out of Egypt (vv. 10-13), after Aaron and Miriam die. When they arrive at Beer, they sing a song (vv. 17-18). Why do they sing this song (v. 16)?




King Sihon Defeated — Read Numbers 21:21-32
30. Israel sends messengers to Sihon, the king of the Amorites, requesting safe passage through the Amorite territory (vv. 21-22). What is Sihon's response to this request (v. 23)?




31. What do the children of Israel do to Sihon and the Amorites (vv. 24-26)? (See also Deuteronomy 2:32-36, Judges 11:20-22, Amos 2:10)




32. The defeat of Sihon is poetic justice since all this land south to the Arnon had originally belonged to the Moabites and had been stolen by Sihon. Sihon's former conquest had also been immortalized in poetry (vv. 27–30). According to this interpretation, Moses uses an Amorite poem ironically to describe Israel's destruction of the Amorites. In other words, a boastful Amorite song celebrating their victory over the hapless Moabites now is sung by Israel to celebrate her victory over the Amorites. What do the children of Israel do with the Amorite territory after they defeat Sihon (v. 31)?


King Og Defeated — Read Numbers 21:33-35
33. Og, the king of Bashan, goes out to war against the children of Israel at Edrei (v. 33). Og and his people are a remnant (sole survivors) of what people group? (See Deuteronomy 3:11, Joshua 13:12)




34. What does the Lord say to Moses about the ensuing battle against King Og (v. 34)?




35. What do the children of Israel do to King Og of Bashan and his people (v. 35)? (See also Deuteronomy 3:1-7)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Between Numbers 19 and 20 is a thirty-seven-year gap
    2. Israel is back at Kadesh (see Exodus 17)
      1. The old generation is, by and large, almost all gone
      2. Yet the new generation falls into old patterns
    3. Numbers 20 is the seventh murmuring of the children of Israel
    4. It has death as its bookends
      1. Opens with Miriam's death (at age 127) and closes with Aaron's death (at age 123)
      2. Moses dies at age 120 during this same year (see end of Deuteronomy)
    5. Again, there are very few incidents on record about Israel's forty-year wandering in the wilderness
      1. All the incidents take place in Numbers 13-20
      2. There's not much to say when you're wasting time
      3. Keep this is mind when you give your testimony: spend more time talking about how God has redeemed you than about how bad you used to be
    6. The next chapter goes from wandering to marching
  2. Numbers 20:1-13
    1. The last time the Israelites were at Kadesh, twelve spies were sent into the land (see Numbers 13)
      1. The ten doubting spies' fear infected the nation, who refused to enter the land
      2. They were allowed to see the beauty of the land for forty days, but because of disbelief, one year of wandering was added for each of those days
    2. "If only we had died when our brethren died before the Lord!" (see v. 3)
      1. Refers to their parents/the older generation
      2. Or could refer to Korah, Dathan, and Abiram (see Numbers 16)
    3. Verse 5: the Israelites' history is askew—they're not yet in the Promised Land
    4. New generation, same sin
    5. Human nature is frail
      1. When our needs aren't met, we can change into different people
      2. Job 2:4—Satan was correct in his observation of the human species; a person will do almost anything in order to survive
      3. If you're a complaining believer, the message you're sending is that God isn't doing a good job of taking care of you
      4. The real test of spiritual maturity is how we react when the bottom falls out of our life
    6. When people get in your face, get down on your face before the Lord
      1. 1 Peter 2:23
      2. Do you react against people or do you respond in this way?
      3. James 1:5
    7. Thirty-seven years before this incident, at the same place, God told Moses to strike the rock (see Exodus 17:1-7)
    8. Typology of the rock as Christ
      1. 1 Corinthians 10:1-5
      2. A rock is stable
        1. Psalm 61:2; 18:2
        2. Matthew 7:24-25; 16:18 (refers to Jesus)
      3. The rock was struck
        1. Moses used the same rod that became a serpent before Pharaoh (see Exodus 7:8-10)
        2. 2 Corinthians 5:21
        3. The rock only needed to be struck once
          1. Moses striking the rock twice messes up the prophetic typology of Christ as the rock
          2. Jesus only needed to be crucified once before it was finished (see John 19:30)
          3. You don't strike Jesus again; you just talk to the rock—you have fellowship with Him
    9. Moses was a meek man (see Numbers 12:3), but he had an anger issue
      1. Exodus 2:11-12
      2. Exodus 11:4-8 (see NIV, ESV, or NASB)
      3. Exodus 32:19
      4. There is a place for righteous anger
        1. Ephesians 4:26
        2. Matthew 21:12
        3. However, the way you display your anger can be a problem
      5. Psalm 39:1-3
    10. What should you do when you get angry?
      1. Prayer—Immediately commit it to prayer; turn your care into prayer; Philippians 4:6
      2. People—Get people in your life to counsel you; Proverbs 20:18
      3. Promptness—Deal with it before the day ends; Ephesians 4:26
      4. Pattern—Forgive because God forgave you; Matthew 6:12, Luke 23:34
    11. Verse 13: Meribah means contention or contending
    12. Moses flew off the handle and made a bad landing
    13. God is displeased with him for a few reasons:
      1. Moses was disobedient
      2. Moses misrepresented God
      3. Moses elevated himself to the place of God—"Must we bring water for you out of this rock?" (see v. 10; emphasis added)
    14. Consequence: Moses will not enter the Promised Land
      1. No matter how old you get, there will still be room for growth
      2. Moses did eventually get to the land—Jesus snuck him in! Matthew 17:1-3
  3. Numbers 20:14-29
    1. Edom is called the brother of Israel
      1. Edom is a descendant of Esau, the brother of Jacob
      2. Genesis 25:23
      3. Esau moved to Seir and displaced the Horites (Mount Hor)
    2. There seems to be a perpetual animosity between Edom and Israel
      1. See Ezekiel 25:12-14; 35
      2. Obadiah is basically a judgment song against the Edomites
    3. "Aaron shall be gathered to his people" (v. 24); i.e. he will die
      1. Death is a union with God and a reunion with God's people
      2. It's more accurate to say of believers, "they moved, they graduated, they've been elevated" rather than, "they died"
    4. God buries His workman, but His work goes on
    5. Israel mourned for Aaron and for Moses (see Deuteronomy 34:5-8) for thirty days
      1. Because of this, it has become standard procedure in Judaism to mark out a month to grieve for a loved one that has died
      2. Many other countries give vent to all of their human emotion at funerals; not so in America
      3. Stages of grief: denial, anger, guilt, depression, acceptance
      4. Ecclesiastes 3:4
    6. Ways they grieved
      1. Ripped garments to express outwardly what they were feeling inwardly
      2. Wore sackcloth
    7. 1 Thessalonians 4:13
      1. Our grief is mixed with hope; unbelievers grieve in a hopeless manner
      2. We do sorrow, but we sorrow differently
    8. Masculinity does not mean not crying; see John 11:35-36
  4. Closing
    1. Emotions are good as long as your emotions don't supersede your devotion
    2. Any human emotion has its place but any human emotion can get out of place
      1. 1 John 2:15
      2. Any human emotion must be kept under the proper devotion to the Lord
      3. This is where Moses and Aaron went astray

Greek/Hebrew words: Meribah

Cross references: Genesis 25:23, Exodus 2:11-12; 7:8-10; 11:4-8; 17; 32:19, Numbers 12:3; 13-20, Deuteronomy 34:5-8, Job 2:4, Psalm 18:2; 39:1-3; 61:2, Proverbs 20:18, Ecclesiastes 3:4, Ezekiel 25:12-14; 35, Obadiah, Matthew 6:12; 7:24-25; 16:18; 17:1-3; 21:12, Luke 23:34, John 11:35-36; 19:30, 1 Corinthians 10:1-5, 2 Corinthians 5:21, Ephesians 4:26, Philippians 4:6, 1 Thessalonians 4:13, James 1:5, 1 Peter 2:23, 1 John 2:15


Topic: Emotion

Keywords: generations, sins, patterns, murmuring, complaining, death, wandering, disbelief, doubt, rock, Christ, Jesus, typology, anger, temper, mourning, grieving, grief, sorrow, hope, emotions

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 21:1-22:13
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 21:1-22:13
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2615

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The deaths of Miriam and Aaron marked the end of Israel's wandering as they prepared to march to the Promised Land. Still, the people became discouraged and complained against God and Moses again. We learn about facing discouragement and are introduced to a man who will be prominent in the coming chapters.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 20-21
Moses' Error at Kadesh — Read Numbers 20:1-13
1. Thirty-eight years have passed since the children of Israel were previously at Kadesh (see Numbers 14:2-3) and almost everyone who was over the age of twenty at that time has since died in the wilderness. Who now dies and is buried at Kadesh (v. 1)? Who is this person to the children of Israel? (See Exodus 15:20, Numbers 26:59, Micah 6:4)




2. When the next generation of Israelites comes to Kadesh on the border of the Promised Land, they gather together against Moses and Aaron (v. 2). What is the premise of their contention with Moses and Aaron (vv. 3-5)?




3. The congregation contends with Moses and Aaron in their characteristic way (see Exodus 17:1–2, Numbers 14:2–3). What is Moses and Aaron's response to their contention, and how is this characteristic of Moses and Aaron (v. 6)? (See Numbers 14:5, 16:4, 22, 45)




4. After Moses and Aaron fall on their faces before the Lord, the Lord responds in His characteristic manner by providing a solution to those who humble themselves before Him. What is the Lord's solution to this contention (v. 8)?



5. What does Moses say to the congregation as he and Aaron gather them together before the rock? What does his speech indicate about his attitude toward the congregation's contention (v. 10)? (See also Psalm 106:32-33)




6. What does Moses do to the rock (v. 11)? Was Moses instructed to do this (v. 8)? What happens when Moses does this (v. 11)?




7. What is the Lord's perspective on Moses' actions toward the rock (v. 12)? (See also Numbers 27:14, Deuteronomy 1:37, 3:26)




8. What are the consequences for both Moses and Aaron because of Moses' actions (v. 12)?




9. Places along Israel's journey to the Promised Land are renamed according to events that happened to them and often mark their failures. What does this place become known as (v. 13)? What does this name mean? (See also Deuteronomy 33:8, Psalm 106:32)


Passage Through Edom Refused — Read Numbers 20:14-21
10. Moses sends messengers to the king of Edom requesting safe passage through his land. What do the messengers commit to the king of Edom if he allows them safe passage (v. 17)?




11. What is the king of Edom's response to Moses' request for safe passage through his land (v. 18)?




12. The messengers make a second commitment to the king of Edom if he will allow them safe passage. What is it (v. 19)?




13. What is the physical response of the Edomites to the request for safe passage by the children of Israel (vv. 20-21)?




Death of Aaron — Read Numbers 20:22-29
14. The Lord tells Moses and Aaron that Aaron would be gathered to his people. To be gathered to his people means that he would die and join his ancestors. Why is Aaron, the high priest and brother of Moses, not going to be allowed to enter the Promised Land (v. 24)?



15. Because Aaron is going to be gathered to his people, the Lord instructs Moses to transfer the role of the high priest from Aaron to Aaron's son Eleazar. How is this accomplished (vv. 25-28)?




16. Aaron dies on the top of Mount Hor four months after his sister Miriam dies at Kadesh (Numbers 33:38). What does the congregation do for Aaron's death that they apparently didn't do for Miriam's (v. 29)?




17. Miriam and Aaron both die in the fortieth year after the children of Israel had come out of the land of Egypt. (See Numbers 33:38-39) In what year does Moses die, and how old is he when he dies? (See Exodus 7:7, Deuteronomy 34:7)




18. The phrase "Aaron shall be gathered to his people" is the usual way of describing the death of a righteous person at a ripe old age. It is used of Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Aaron, and Moses. What can you infer happens to a person who dies and is "gathered to his people"? (See also Matthew 22:31-32)



Canaanites Defeated at Hormah — Read Numbers 21:1-3
19. The king of Arad fights against the children of Israel and takes some of them prisoners. What is their response to this attack (vv. 1-2)?




20. What two things does the Lord do in response to the children of Israel's vow (v. 3)?




21. Places along Israel's journey to the Promised Land are renamed according to events that happened to them and often mark their failures—though not always. After their fight with the Canaanite king, the place of Arad is renamed. What is its new name and what does this name mean (v. 3)?




The Bronze Serpent — Read Numbers 21:4-9
22. As the children of Israel are denied passage through Edom and turn to journey from Kadesh to Mount Hor (See Numbers 20:21-22), what happens to the morale of the congregation? (v. 4)?




23. In their detour by the Way of the Red Sea, the people not only complain about the delay of entering the Promised Land, they also complain, yet again, about what (v. 5)?



24. What does the Lord Himself send in response to the children of Israel's complaining (v. 6)? (See also 1 Corinthians 10:9, Deuteronomy 8:15)




25. The people come to Moses, admitting that their complaints against the Lord and him were sin. They ask Moses to pray for the Lord to take away the serpents from them. Moses prays for the people (v. 7), but does the Lord grant them their request?




26. The Lord instructs Moses to make a fiery serpent and put it on a pole, thus giving the children of Israel a way to live, despite the deadly bites of the fiery serpents. What do the children of Israel who were bitten have to do in order to live (v. 9)?




27. What becomes of the bronze serpent on a pole? (See 2 Kings 18:4)




28. Jesus uses the bronze serpent as an illustration of Himself when talking to Nicodemus. (See John 3:14-15) Name some ways that the bronze serpent on the pole is a picture of Jesus Christ.


From Mount Hor to Moab — Read Numbers 21:10-20
29. The children of Israel move several times in their fortieth year out of Egypt (vv. 10-13), after Aaron and Miriam die. When they arrive at Beer, they sing a song (vv. 17-18). Why do they sing this song (v. 16)?




King Sihon Defeated — Read Numbers 21:21-32
30. Israel sends messengers to Sihon, the king of the Amorites, requesting safe passage through the Amorite territory (vv. 21-22). What is Sihon's response to this request (v. 23)?




31. What do the children of Israel do to Sihon and the Amorites (vv. 24-26)? (See also Deuteronomy 2:32-36, Judges 11:20-22, Amos 2:10)




32. The defeat of Sihon is poetic justice since all this land south to the Arnon had originally belonged to the Moabites and had been stolen by Sihon. Sihon's former conquest had also been immortalized in poetry (vv. 27–30). According to this interpretation, Moses uses an Amorite poem ironically to describe Israel's destruction of the Amorites. In other words, a boastful Amorite song celebrating their victory over the hapless Moabites now is sung by Israel to celebrate her victory over the Amorites. What do the children of Israel do with the Amorite territory after they defeat Sihon (v. 31)?


King Og Defeated — Read Numbers 21:33-35
33. Og, the king of Bashan, goes out to war against the children of Israel at Edrei (v. 33). Og and his people are a remnant (sole survivors) of what people group? (See Deuteronomy 3:11, Joshua 13:12)




34. What does the Lord say to Moses about the ensuing battle against King Og (v. 34)?




35. What do the children of Israel do to King Og of Bashan and his people (v. 35)? (See also Deuteronomy 3:1-7)

------------------------------
Numbers 22-25


Balak Sends for Balaam — Read Numbers 22:1-21


1. The children of Israel moved from the land of the Amorites and camped in the plains of Moab on the side of the Jordan River across from the city of Jericho (see v. 1). The king of Moab had heard reports of what they had done to the Amorites; what was his and the entire nation of Moab’s emotional response to them camping in their plains (see vv. 2-3)?



2. Knowing what the children of Israel did to Og, king of Bashan, and to Sihon, king of the Amorites, what did the king of Moab think they would do to his nation (see v. 4)?



3. Although the king of Moab wasn’t aware of what the Lord had told Moses about the king's nation, were his fears of the children of Israel justified? (See Deuteronomy 2:9.)



4. Because of his dreadful fear, the king of Moab devised a plan to deal with the children of Israel. Describe his strategy (see vv. 5-6).



5. Balak commissioned the elders of Moab and Midian to hire Balaam. What did the elders bring with them to Balaam (see v. 7)? What was Balaam’s initial response to them (see v. 8)?



6. God came to Balaam and spoke to him. What did God ask Balaam (see v. 9)? What was Balaam’s response to God (see vv. 10-11)? What was God’s answer to this response (see v. 12)?


7. What was God’s description of the children of Israel (see v. 12)? Why did God describe them this way? (See Genesis 12:3 and Psalm 32:1-2.)


8. What was Balaam’s response to the princes of Moab (see v. 13)? What did the princes of Moab do with Balaam’s response (see v.14)?


9. What did Balak attempt to do when Balaam refused to come and curse the children of Israel (see vv. 15-17)?


10. Although Balaam’s response to the more numerous and more honorable servants of Balak seems upright, this prophet saw a potential profit and wanted to inquire of God again to see if He had changed His mind. What was his response to this second attempt to hire him (see vv. 18-19)?


11. God came to Balaam at night and gave him further instructions that contained a conditional statement. What was that conditional statement (see v. 20)? Did Balaam heed the conditional statement (see v. 21)? (See also Proverbs 14:12.)


Balaam, the Donkey, and the Angel — Read Numbers 22:22-40


12. What was God’s response to Balaam departing with the princes of Moab (see v. 22)? Why (see v. 12)?


13. Who was with Balaam when the Angel of the Lord stood in the way (see v. 22)?



14. Of all those who were with Balaam, who saw the Angel of the Lord? How did they respond (see v. 23)?



15. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam once again. Where did the Angel of the Lord stand this time? What happened to Balaam (see vv. 24-25)?



16. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam a third time. What was different about this place the Angel of the Lord appeared (see v. 26)? Unaware of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do (see v. 27)?


17. Balaam struck his donkey three separate times for her actions because he was unaware of the presence and opposition of the Angel of the Lord. The Lord opened the mouth of the donkey and she argued with Balaam. What was the argument about (see vv. 28-30)? How is Balaam’s argument ironic (see v. 29)?



18. In the same way the Lord opened the mouth of the donkey, He opened the eyes of Balaam. What did Balaam see? What was his response (see v. 31)?


19. The Angel of the Lord defended the actions of Balaam’s donkey (see v. 33). What did He say about Balaam’s actions (see v. 32)? What would He have done to Balaam if it had not been for the actions of his donkey (see v. 33)?


20. Once aware of the presence of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do and commit to doing (see v. 34)?


21. What did the Angel of the Lord remind Balaam to do (see v. 35)? (See also v. 20.)



22. Balak, king of Moab, was informed that Balaam was on his way to meet Balak (see v. 36). What did Balak ask Balaam (see v. 37)? Why? What did he hope to get from Balaam?



23. What was Balaam’s response to his meeting with Balak (see v. 38)?


24. Balak offered a pagan sacrifice, not a Levitical sacrifice. What did he sacrifice? What did he do with this sacrifice (see vv. 39-40)?


Balaam’s First Prophecy — Read Numbers 22:41-23:12


25. Balak took Balaam to the high places of Baal, where they could see the camp of the children of Israel in the plains of Moab (see v. 41). This location’s association with Baal suggests that it was a high place where Canaanite cultic functions were carried out. What did Balaam ask Balak to construct for him there? Why (see vv. 1-3)?


26. There is no biblical instruction or precedent for Balaam’s offering; presumably the sacrifices were part of a pagan ritual. However, God still met Balaam on the desolate height (see v. 4). What did God put in Balaam’s mouth (see v. 5)?


27. In Balaam's first oracle, he mentioned where he is, what he sees, and why he is there (see vv. 7, 9). He also asks a question (see v. 8). What was the answer to his question? (See Numbers 22:12.)

Balaam’s Second Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:13-26


28. Balak took Balaam to another place—the top of Pisgah in the field of Zophim. What was Balak’s motive in taking Balaam here (see vv. 13-14)?


29. Once again, Balak and Balaam made a pagan sacrifice, and Balaam went off to a solitary place to hear from the Lord. Balaam returned with a word from the Lord to Balak. What was the premise of the Lord’s statement to Balak (see vv. 18-20)?


30. Despite all the grumbling, complaining, murmuring, and rising up against the Lord’s anointed leaders, what did Balaam’s second oracle reveal about the Lord’s view of His children (see v. 21)?


31. How does the Lord see us as believers in Christ? (See Ephesians 1:4; 5:27, Colossians 1:22, and 2 Peter 3:14.)


32. Balaam’s second oracle made it clear that God’s protecting grace shielded the children of Israel from what types of evil (see v. 23)?


33. Balaam’s second oracle also made it clear that rather than being overcome, the nation of Israel would do what to its enemies (see v. 24)?
Balaam’s Third Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:27-24:14



34. Yet again, Balak took Balaam to a different location in an effort to get him to curse the children of Israel (see v. 27). What did this location overlook (see v. 28)?


35. Balaam was aware that it pleased the Lord to bless Israel (see v. 1). Before giving his third oracle, what did Balaam do the same as before (see vv. 23:29-24:1)?


36. What did Balaam do differently from before (see vv. 1-2)?


37. The Spirit of God came upon Balaam (see v. 2). However, this coming of the Spirit did not prove Balaam to be a true prophet, for the Spirit of the Lord had come upon others and enabled them to prophesy (see Numbers 11:25 and 1 Samuel 10:6, 10-11). What is the difference between the Spirit coming upon a person to enable them to be used by God and the Spirit coming into a person to abide with them? (See John 7:38-39 and 14:16-17.)


38. Balaam’s third oracle began with testimony that his eyes and ears had been opened to see the children of Israel from God’s perspective. How did Balaam describe the children of Israel as he saw them encamped according to their tribes in the plain of Moab (see vv. 5-9)?


39. Balak, king of Moab, become furious with Balaam for continuing to bless the children of Israel. What did Balak blame the Lord for doing to Balaam (see v. 11)?


40. Where did Balak tell Balaam to go (see v. 11)? Who else went to this same place? (See Acts 1:25.)


41. Despite Balak's anger, Balaam told him that he would advise him about what (see v. 14)?


Balaam’s Fourth Prophecy — Read Numbers 24:15-25


42. Balaam’s fourth oracle began as his third one did—with a recognition that true knowledge comes only from God. Who do you think Balaam is referring to in this oracle (see v. 17)? (See also Matthew 2:2 and Genesis 49:10.)


43. Balaam prophesied against Moab, Edom, Amalek, and the Kenites. What did Balaam say would happen to these nations (see vv. 17-22)?



Israel’s Harlotry in Moab — Read Numbers 25:1-18


44. As the children of Israel remained in the acacia grove on the plains of Moab (see Numbers 33:49), what did they begin to do (see vv. 1-2)? (See also Psalm 106:28.) Who was responsible for this? (See Numbers 31:16.)


45. What was the Lord's response when the children of Israel joined themselves with Baal of Peor (see v. 3)?



46. What did the Lord instruct Moses to have the leaders do to those who joined with Baal of Peor (see vv. 4-5)?



47. One Israelite man had the audacity to bring a Midianite woman to the very door of the tabernacle, flaunting her in front of Moses. He then took her to his tent to commit sexual immorality with her. What did Phinehas do to this man and woman (see vv. 7-8)?


48. When the anger of the Lord was roused because of the sexual immorality of the children of Israel and the women of Moab, a plague arose. Phinehas’ actions stopped the plague (see Psalm 106:30). How many were affected by this plague (see v. 9)?



49. What did the Lord indicate might have happened if Phinehas had not stopped the plague by his zealous actions (see vv. 10-11)?



50. What did the Lord establish with Phinehas because of his zealous actions (see vv. 12-13)?


51. The name and lineage of the Israelite man and Midianite woman were recorded. Who were they (see vv. 14-15)?


52. It is likely that these names were recorded to explain the great reduction of the tribe of Simeon from 59,300 (see Numbers 1:23) to 22,200 (see Numbers 26:14). If mainly Simeonites had been involved in the immorality and idolatry of Baal, it would account for much of the difference in the totals. Additionally, the woman being the daughter of a Midianite leader would account for the Lord's instructions to do what to the Midianites (see vv. 16-18)?



53. The plague that killed a large number of Israelites (see v. 9) was a result of the counsel of Balaam (see Numbers 31:16), even though it seemed as though Balaam desired to be a part of the children of Israel. He stated that it would be a blessing to be a part of their numbering in life or death (see Numbers 23:10). How did Balaam die? (See Numbers 31:7-8.)

54. As the children of Israel camped in the plains of Moab, they likely were unaware of what was happening between Balak and Balaam. Balaam is mentioned three times in the New Testament as an example of what not to do. What is the way of Balaam? (See 2 Peter 2:15-16.)



55. What is the error of Balaam? (See Jude 11.)



56. What is the doctrine of Balaam? (See Revelation 2:14.)


DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. In any nation, the death of a statesman is often a turning point
    2. In Numbers 20, Miriam and Aaron died
      1. Marked the end of an era—wandering
      2. Marked the beginning of another era—marching
    3. For the first time, the Israelites are victorious
      1. From meandering to marching
      2. From wandering to worshiping
    4. However, they still get discouraged
    5. Even when you forsake your wandering and begin to make progress in the Lord, don't think that discouragement won't come
  2. Numbers 21:1-9
    1. Hormah means total destruction
    2. When our prayers to get rid of our enemies—the things we struggle with in the flesh—are this intense, the Lord will listen
    3. Verse 4: They were discouraged "because of the way" (KJV)
      1. "Because [of the trials] of the way" (AMP)
      2. Living in tents and staring at rocks for years on end is hard
    4. If you're in a place where your life is difficult, admit it; the road to encouragement is admitting discouragement
    5. New generation, same old sin
    6. This is the eighth and final murmuring of the children of Israel, and it's a three-fold complaint
      1. Against God—personally
        1. Ultimately, all sin is sin against God; Psalm 51:4
        2. When you complain, you are first and foremost complaining against God
        3. You are essentially saying, "What You have provided for me isn't good enough"
        4. If you complain a lot about the way God has treated you, your evangelism isn't going to be effective
      2. Against God's man—prophet
        1. God is invisible; you can shake your fist at the sky, or get angry at those who visibly represent Him, like Moses
        2. Jeremiah 1:8
      3. Against God's provision
        1. Was the bread really worthless?
        2. It kept them alive and gave them the necessary ingredients for health; see Deuteronomy 8:4
    7. The bronze serpent
      1. Speaks of judgment
      2. The altar in the outer courtyard, where animals were sacrificed and judgment took place, was bronze
      3. John 3:1-16; this incident is the context for that famous verse
      4. For a person to look at that bronze serpent required a couple things:
        1. Admission of sin and guilt
        2. Statement of faith and belief
      5. If you were in this situation and you believed you needed antivenom, it would be much easier to look at yourself to find the answer
        1. People in the world are much more apt to look to themselves to find a solution for their sinful condition
        2. Looking at Jesus would mean there's only one place and one way to look
      6. 2 Kings 18:1-4
        1. Nehushtan means a thing of brass
        2. The object they used in their history became a relic of their worship
  3. Numbers 21:10-35
    1. Book of the Wars of the Lord
      1. Didn't make it into the canon of Scripture—not considered inspired by God
      2. A war journal; a record of the victories of the children of Israel
    2. First time Israel sings in the wilderness
      1. They finally recognize God's provision
      2. They go from a funeral dirge to a praise and worship service
    3. What should you do when you feel dry and discouraged?
      1. Rather than sulking, try singing, even if you don't feel like it
      2. You'll discover that when you make a choice to sing, you become transformed
      3. Job lost everything, but rather than cursing God, he fell down on his face and worshiped Him (see Job 1:20, 2:9-10)
    4. God is smiling on you even when your life is difficult—He has a covenant relationship with you; Nehemiah 8:10
    5. Don't forget Sihon and Og; they come up in Israel's history again and again
    6. King Sihon defeated
      1. He stole land from Moab, and Israel took it back—poetic justice
      2. Poetry about this incident was preserved in some of the writings of the Amorites (see vv. 27-30)
      3. God's people took this pagan song and redeemed it
        1. Concept of taking songs or styles that are popular with the world and redeeming them
        2. People like Martin Luther and Isaac Watts took the melodies of bar songs and turned them into hymns
      4. Chemosh (see v. 29) was one of the gods of this area
        1. Solomon built a high place in Jerusalem to Chemosh (see 1 Kings 11:7)
        2. Josiah destroyed this high place (see 2 Kings 23:13)
    7. King Og defeated
      1. By verse 33, Israel effectively controlled all of the Transjordan area
        1. East of Galilee and the Dead Sea
        2. In Joshua's time, two and a half tribes of Israel will occupy this area
      2. "Do not fear him [Og]" (v. 34)—why?
        1. Deuteronomy 3:11
        2. His bed was 13 feet long by 6 feet wide
        3. God says, "I have [past tense] delivered him into your hand…" (v. 34, emphasis added)
    8. Numbers 21 begins with Israel's discouragement because of the way and ends with Israel's encouragement by the Lord of the way
      1. They go from being victims to being victors
      2. From being fearful to fearless
  4. Numbers 22:1-13
    1. Numbers 22-24 highlights a man named Balaam
      1. He's a pagan prophet, but God speaks to him
      2. One of the most beautiful messianic prophecies comes through him (see Numbers 24:17)
      3. The New Testament always speaks of him in negatives and as a false prophet
        1. Yet he's mentioned fifty-nine times in Scripture
        2. More is spoken about him than Jesus' mother Mary or the apostles
      4. He plays an important role, but he's a negative role model
    2. Balaam comes from Pethor (see v. 5)
      1. "The River" almost always refers to the Euphrates River
      2. Pethor is probably ancient Pitru in the area of Carchemish, where the Babylonians, led by Nebuchadnezzar, defeated Pharaoh of Egypt
    3. Balaam already had a reputation (see end of v. 6)
    4. Balak recognized his fight with the Israelites would have to be a spiritual battle
      1. A spiritual battle requires spiritual tools
      2. In those days, it was believed that when one kingdom defeated another kingdom, the gods of that nation defeated the inferior gods of the nation that was overcome
      3. So much of life is a spiritual battle, yet we so often resort to the weapons of the flesh to fight these battles
        1. Ephesians 6:12
        2. Get out the big guns—get on your knees and take it to a spiritual level
    5. It was said whoever Balaam blessed was blessed, and whoever he cursed was cursed, and God says, "Actually, that's My line" (see v. 6, 12)
    6. Verse 8's Lord is the tetragrammaton
      1. Yahweh, the covenant name
      2. Why did Balaam say this?
        1. He would use the name of whatever god he was calling on
        2. He was an oracle priest of Mesopotamia—a Mesopotamian baru
      3. He used God's covenant name, but because he was not part of that covenant, God spoke to him, not the Lord
    7. God says that the Israelites, the Jewish nation, is blessed
      1. Genesis 12:2-3
      2. Zechariah 2:8
  5. Closing
    1. Israel's imperfect, but God says they're blessed
    2. There are nations in this world that have reacted in the last several years to this blessing
    3. May 15, 1948: the day after the independence of Israel, seven Arab nations attacked Israel to destroy it
    4. Israel holds the key to what is going on geopolitically both now and in the future

Figures referenced: Martin Luther, Isaac Watts

Greek/Hebrew words: hormah, nehushtan, Yahweh

Cross references: Genesis 12:2-3, Numbers 20-24, Deuteronomy 3:11; 8:4, 1 Kings 11:7, 2 Kings 18:1-4; 23:13, Nehemiah 8:10, Job 1:20; 2:9-10, Psalm 51:4, Jeremiah 1:8, Zechariah 2:8, John 3:1-16, Ephesians 6:12


Topic: Discouragement

Keywords: leadership, victory, victorious, victor, discouragement, discouraged, discouraging, difficult, difficulty, trials, encouragement, complaining, complaint, complain, sin, God's provision, bronze, judgment, serpent, snake, pole, book of the wars of the Lord, sing, singing, song, worship, poetry, pagan, prophet, prophecy, false, spiritual warfare, battle, war, blessing, cursing, Israel, Israelites

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 22:10-23:30
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 22:10-23:30
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2618

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 22, we are introduced to a new character in the Bible, Balaam, who was considered a false prophet. Balak, the king of Moab, summoned Balaam to curse the nation of Israel so they would stop their advancement into Moab. As we study these events, we learn a lesson about dealing with enemies and are challenged to examine ourselves for self-righteousness.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 22-25


Balak Sends for Balaam — Read Numbers 22:1-21


1. The children of Israel moved from the land of the Amorites and camped in the plains of Moab on the side of the Jordan River across from the city of Jericho (see v. 1). The king of Moab had heard reports of what they had done to the Amorites; what was his and the entire nation of Moab’s emotional response to them camping in their plains (see vv. 2-3)?



2. Knowing what the children of Israel did to Og, king of Bashan, and to Sihon, king of the Amorites, what did the king of Moab think they would do to his nation (see v. 4)?



3. Although the king of Moab wasn’t aware of what the Lord had told Moses about the king's nation, were his fears of the children of Israel justified? (See Deuteronomy 2:9.)



4. Because of his dreadful fear, the king of Moab devised a plan to deal with the children of Israel. Describe his strategy (see vv. 5-6).



5. Balak commissioned the elders of Moab and Midian to hire Balaam. What did the elders bring with them to Balaam (see v. 7)? What was Balaam’s initial response to them (see v. 8)?



6. God came to Balaam and spoke to him. What did God ask Balaam (see v. 9)? What was Balaam’s response to God (see vv. 10-11)? What was God’s answer to this response (see v. 12)?


7. What was God’s description of the children of Israel (see v. 12)? Why did God describe them this way? (See Genesis 12:3 and Psalm 32:1-2.)


8. What was Balaam’s response to the princes of Moab (see v. 13)? What did the princes of Moab do with Balaam’s response (see v.14)?


9. What did Balak attempt to do when Balaam refused to come and curse the children of Israel (see vv. 15-17)?


10. Although Balaam’s response to the more numerous and more honorable servants of Balak seems upright, this prophet saw a potential profit and wanted to inquire of God again to see if He had changed His mind. What was his response to this second attempt to hire him (see vv. 18-19)?


11. God came to Balaam at night and gave him further instructions that contained a conditional statement. What was that conditional statement (see v. 20)? Did Balaam heed the conditional statement (see v. 21)? (See also Proverbs 14:12.)


Balaam, the Donkey, and the Angel — Read Numbers 22:22-40


12. What was God’s response to Balaam departing with the princes of Moab (see v. 22)? Why (see v. 12)?


13. Who was with Balaam when the Angel of the Lord stood in the way (see v. 22)?



14. Of all those who were with Balaam, who saw the Angel of the Lord? How did they respond (see v. 23)?



15. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam once again. Where did the Angel of the Lord stand this time? What happened to Balaam (see vv. 24-25)?



16. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam a third time. What was different about this place the Angel of the Lord appeared (see v. 26)? Unaware of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do (see v. 27)?


17. Balaam struck his donkey three separate times for her actions because he was unaware of the presence and opposition of the Angel of the Lord. The Lord opened the mouth of the donkey and she argued with Balaam. What was the argument about (see vv. 28-30)? How is Balaam’s argument ironic (see v. 29)?



18. In the same way the Lord opened the mouth of the donkey, He opened the eyes of Balaam. What did Balaam see? What was his response (see v. 31)?


19. The Angel of the Lord defended the actions of Balaam’s donkey (see v. 33). What did He say about Balaam’s actions (see v. 32)? What would He have done to Balaam if it had not been for the actions of his donkey (see v. 33)?


20. Once aware of the presence of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do and commit to doing (see v. 34)?


21. What did the Angel of the Lord remind Balaam to do (see v. 35)? (See also v. 20.)



22. Balak, king of Moab, was informed that Balaam was on his way to meet Balak (see v. 36). What did Balak ask Balaam (see v. 37)? Why? What did he hope to get from Balaam?



23. What was Balaam’s response to his meeting with Balak (see v. 38)?


24. Balak offered a pagan sacrifice, not a Levitical sacrifice. What did he sacrifice? What did he do with this sacrifice (see vv. 39-40)?


Balaam’s First Prophecy — Read Numbers 22:41-23:12


25. Balak took Balaam to the high places of Baal, where they could see the camp of the children of Israel in the plains of Moab (see v. 41). This location’s association with Baal suggests that it was a high place where Canaanite cultic functions were carried out. What did Balaam ask Balak to construct for him there? Why (see vv. 1-3)?


26. There is no biblical instruction or precedent for Balaam’s offering; presumably the sacrifices were part of a pagan ritual. However, God still met Balaam on the desolate height (see v. 4). What did God put in Balaam’s mouth (see v. 5)?


27. In Balaam's first oracle, he mentioned where he is, what he sees, and why he is there (see vv. 7, 9). He also asks a question (see v. 8). What was the answer to his question? (See Numbers 22:12.)

Balaam’s Second Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:13-26


28. Balak took Balaam to another place—the top of Pisgah in the field of Zophim. What was Balak’s motive in taking Balaam here (see vv. 13-14)?


29. Once again, Balak and Balaam made a pagan sacrifice, and Balaam went off to a solitary place to hear from the Lord. Balaam returned with a word from the Lord to Balak. What was the premise of the Lord’s statement to Balak (see vv. 18-20)?


30. Despite all the grumbling, complaining, murmuring, and rising up against the Lord’s anointed leaders, what did Balaam’s second oracle reveal about the Lord’s view of His children (see v. 21)?


31. How does the Lord see us as believers in Christ? (See Ephesians 1:4; 5:27, Colossians 1:22, and 2 Peter 3:14.)


32. Balaam’s second oracle made it clear that God’s protecting grace shielded the children of Israel from what types of evil (see v. 23)?


33. Balaam’s second oracle also made it clear that rather than being overcome, the nation of Israel would do what to its enemies (see v. 24)?
Balaam’s Third Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:27-24:14



34. Yet again, Balak took Balaam to a different location in an effort to get him to curse the children of Israel (see v. 27). What did this location overlook (see v. 28)?


35. Balaam was aware that it pleased the Lord to bless Israel (see v. 1). Before giving his third oracle, what did Balaam do the same as before (see vv. 23:29-24:1)?


36. What did Balaam do differently from before (see vv. 1-2)?


37. The Spirit of God came upon Balaam (see v. 2). However, this coming of the Spirit did not prove Balaam to be a true prophet, for the Spirit of the Lord had come upon others and enabled them to prophesy (see Numbers 11:25 and 1 Samuel 10:6, 10-11). What is the difference between the Spirit coming upon a person to enable them to be used by God and the Spirit coming into a person to abide with them? (See John 7:38-39 and 14:16-17.)


38. Balaam’s third oracle began with testimony that his eyes and ears had been opened to see the children of Israel from God’s perspective. How did Balaam describe the children of Israel as he saw them encamped according to their tribes in the plain of Moab (see vv. 5-9)?


39. Balak, king of Moab, become furious with Balaam for continuing to bless the children of Israel. What did Balak blame the Lord for doing to Balaam (see v. 11)?


40. Where did Balak tell Balaam to go (see v. 11)? Who else went to this same place? (See Acts 1:25.)


41. Despite Balak's anger, Balaam told him that he would advise him about what (see v. 14)?


Balaam’s Fourth Prophecy — Read Numbers 24:15-25


42. Balaam’s fourth oracle began as his third one did—with a recognition that true knowledge comes only from God. Who do you think Balaam is referring to in this oracle (see v. 17)? (See also Matthew 2:2 and Genesis 49:10.)


43. Balaam prophesied against Moab, Edom, Amalek, and the Kenites. What did Balaam say would happen to these nations (see vv. 17-22)?



Israel’s Harlotry in Moab — Read Numbers 25:1-18


44. As the children of Israel remained in the acacia grove on the plains of Moab (see Numbers 33:49), what did they begin to do (see vv. 1-2)? (See also Psalm 106:28.) Who was responsible for this? (See Numbers 31:16.)


45. What was the Lord's response when the children of Israel joined themselves with Baal of Peor (see v. 3)?



46. What did the Lord instruct Moses to have the leaders do to those who joined with Baal of Peor (see vv. 4-5)?



47. One Israelite man had the audacity to bring a Midianite woman to the very door of the tabernacle, flaunting her in front of Moses. He then took her to his tent to commit sexual immorality with her. What did Phinehas do to this man and woman (see vv. 7-8)?


48. When the anger of the Lord was roused because of the sexual immorality of the children of Israel and the women of Moab, a plague arose. Phinehas’ actions stopped the plague (see Psalm 106:30). How many were affected by this plague (see v. 9)?



49. What did the Lord indicate might have happened if Phinehas had not stopped the plague by his zealous actions (see vv. 10-11)?



50. What did the Lord establish with Phinehas because of his zealous actions (see vv. 12-13)?


51. The name and lineage of the Israelite man and Midianite woman were recorded. Who were they (see vv. 14-15)?


52. It is likely that these names were recorded to explain the great reduction of the tribe of Simeon from 59,300 (see Numbers 1:23) to 22,200 (see Numbers 26:14). If mainly Simeonites had been involved in the immorality and idolatry of Baal, it would account for much of the difference in the totals. Additionally, the woman being the daughter of a Midianite leader would account for the Lord's instructions to do what to the Midianites (see vv. 16-18)?



53. The plague that killed a large number of Israelites (see v. 9) was a result of the counsel of Balaam (see Numbers 31:16), even though it seemed as though Balaam desired to be a part of the children of Israel. He stated that it would be a blessing to be a part of their numbering in life or death (see Numbers 23:10). How did Balaam die? (See Numbers 31:7-8.)

54. As the children of Israel camped in the plains of Moab, they likely were unaware of what was happening between Balak and Balaam. Balaam is mentioned three times in the New Testament as an example of what not to do. What is the way of Balaam? (See 2 Peter 2:15-16.)



55. What is the error of Balaam? (See Jude 11.)



56. What is the doctrine of Balaam? (See Revelation 2:14.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Making predictions is a tricky business
      1. In 1962, Decca Records turned down The Beatles
      2. In the late 1800s, Bishop Wright predicted that man would never fly; his sons Wilbur and Orville made the first flight in Kitty Hawk, NC, several years later
    2. Balaam was a prophet; Numbers 22-25 speaks about him
    3. Balak, king of Moab (the country east of the Jordan River), had real problems
      1. The victorious nation of Israel—three million people—was massing at his border
      2. He knew conventional warfare would not work on these people; he needed a spiritual weapon of mass destruction
    4. Balak summoned the well-known Balaam to call down a curse on Israel
    5. Balaam was enigmatic, but he was also definitely a false prophet—the New Testament says so
      1. Eight books of the Bible (Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Nehemiah, Micah, 2 Peter, Jude, Revelation) mention him fifty-nine different times
      2. More is written about him than Jesus' mother Mary and the apostles
      3. Though Balaam was a false prophet, God used him to turn would-be curses into blessings, even predicting God's redemptive plan for the future, including the Messiah
      4. Other people in the Bible were enigmatic, too: Cain, Judas, Esau
      5. "None sink so far into hell as those that come nearest heaven, because they fall from the greatest height" —William Gurnall
  2. Numbers 22:10-21
    1. Balaam was a Mesopotamian baru
      1. An oracle priest; one who gave prophecies, blessings, and curses
      2. Believed that the spoken word had power
      3. Read natural phenomena, including the entrails of animals, to discern the will of the gods
      4. Balaam believed Yahweh was just another deity to manipulate
      5. However, God ended up communicating to him and through him
    2. The Israelites weren't perfect; why did God say they're blessed? (see v. 12)
      1. Covenant—God made a deal with them
      2. When God says you're blessed, that's a declaration, not an observation about your behavior
    3. Balak upped the ante when Balaam refused to come, but he never mentioned silver or gold, let alone a whole house of it
      1. Why did Balaam mention it?
      2. He was playing hard to get to see how much he could raise the ante
    4. Balaam's problem was greed
      1. The Bible talks about the way of Balaam (see 2 Peter 2:15) and the doctrine of Balaam (see Revelation 2:14)
      2. Esau and Judas were greedy
      3. Naaman and Elisha (see 2 Kings 5)
        1. Naaman offered Elisha money after being healed
        2. "As the Lord lives, before whom I stand, I will receive nothing" (v. 16)
        3. Elisha's servant Gehazi asked for the money instead
    5. Verse 19—even though the Lord has already said "no"
    6. Paul prayed like this (see 2 Corinthians 12:7-9); but, there's a time to pray, and there's a time to move
      1. Sometimes you pray when you ought to be moving
        1. Moses: "Stand still, and see the salvation of the Lord" (Exodus 14:13)
        2. But in Exodus 14:15, God said, "Why do you cry to Me? Tell the children of Israel to go forward"
      2. Dr. W.A. Criswell of the First Baptist Church of Dallas: "Let's not bother the Lord with this one; just go!"
  3. Numbers 22:22-41
    1. Why did the Lord get angry? He saw the motive and heart of Balaam
    2. Barus were given the name "seers": people who could see what others couldn't see
      1. But this seer couldn't see
      2. His donkey could see better than him
    3. The angel with a drawn sword was reminiscent of the angel outside the garden of Eden (see Genesis 3:24)
    4. Never mess with an angel of the Lord
      1. Psalm 103:20
      2. A single angel of the Lord killed 185,000 Assyrian soldiers (see Isaiah 37:36)
      3. The garden of Gethsemane (see Matthew 26:51-53)
      4. In the tribulation, angels will be used to administer God's wrath and judgment (see Revelation)
    5. God can use anyone—even a donkey!
    6. It's amazing that the donkey spoke to Balaam; it's even more amazing that Balaam talked back without batting an eye
    7. It was just as much of a miracle for God to open Balaam's eyes as it was for God to open the donkey's mouth
    8. "Your way is perverse before Me" (v. 32)—see 2 Peter 2:15-16
    9. The Lord used Balaam to not curse His people and to speak a prophecy of the Messiah through him
    10. Verse 41: "high places"
      1. Ancient superstition: the higher you got, the closer you were to the gods, and thus your activity on the earth became more powerful
      2. Baal was the most prominent god in this region
    11. All this interaction between the forces of evil and good was happening behind the scenes; God's people didn't know about it
      1. That's how spiritual warfare works
      2. Job didn't know about the conversation between God and Satan (see Job 1:6-12; 2:1-7)
      3. Daniel 10
      4. What goes on in the heavenly realm affects what goes on in the earthly realm
    12. Because of His covenant, God would protect His people; Psalm 121:4
    13. From Balaam's vantage point, the camp of Israel would've looked like a cross
      1. Four camps around the tabernacle
      2. One side (on the east) longer than the others: the tribe of Judah
  4. Numbers 23:1-30
    1. Why was Balaam going through the motions of sacrifice to the Lord? Maybe to try to show Balak how genuine he was or to give him a show
    2. Jude 1:11
    3. Why would God use a false prophet?
      1. He is sovereign; He reserves the right do anything at any time with anyone
      2. He uses unbelievers for a limited purpose
        1. Caiaphus: John 11:49-52; 18:14; John said he was prophesying
        2. Balaam's donkey
        3. Matthew 7:21-23
      3. Even unbelievers can be used for specific purposes by a sovereign God
    4. God said "no" to Balaam once, but that wasn't enough for Balaam
      1. Now Balaam would have to say "No, I won't curse them" three times and "Yes, I will bless them" three times
      2. We complicate what God wants to make easy; if we just obeyed Him to begin with, we wouldn't complicate our lives
        1. Matthew 11:29-30
        2. We take the easy yoke and add stuff to it
    5. Balaam's First Oracle (vv. 7-10)
      1. Verse 10 brings to mind God's covenant with Abraham in Genesis 13:16
      2. "One-fourth" (v. 10): he was looking at the camp divided into four parts
      3. Expressed his desire to be part of the Abrahamic blessing
      4. Genesis 12:3
    6. Balaam's Second Oracle (vv. 18-24)
      1. Mount Pisgah (v. 14) was where Moses would bring Joshua and lay hands on him
      2. Verse 21: Balaam did not mean the Israelites were sinless; he was saying that their sin would not weary God's mercy or nullify His covenant with them
      3. Hebrew parallelism
        1. Ancient method of poetry that rhymes thoughts instead of words
        2. Composed of a statement followed by a second statement
          1. If the second statement agrees with the first, it's called synonymous parallelism
          2. If second statement contrasts with the first, it's called antithetical parallelism
        3. Found in the Psalms and in Balaam's oracles
    7. Balaam's Third Oracle (vv. 27-30, to be continued)
      1. There was a temple to Baal on Peor; from this temple, Baal would be successful in seducing the Israelites
      2. You would never go so far as to call down God's curse on your enemies—but it's not about the outward action; it's about the inward attitude
        1. Matthew 5:21-22
        2. Jesus was stripping His audience of self-righteousness
  5. Closing
    1. Every one of us is guilty; we need God's mercy and forgiveness
    2. God: "I will treat My Son like you should be treated so that I can treat you like My Son should be treated"
    3. This deal from God is a package deal
      1. He forgives you of everything in your past
      2. You enter a covenant relationship with Him as His child
      3. He'll take you from earth to heaven to be with Him forever
    4. God's deal is the best deal
    5. Be reconciled to God (see 2 Corinthians 5:20)

Figures referenced: The Beatles, Wilbur and Orville Wright, William Gurnall, Dr. W.A. Criswell

Cross references: Genesis 3:24, 12:3, 13:16; Exodus 14:13, 15; Numbers 22-25; 2 Kings 5; Job 1:6-12, 2:1-7; Psalm 103:20, 121:4; Isaiah 37:36; Daniel 10; Matthew 5:21-22, 7:21-23, 11:29-30, 26:51-53; John 11:49-52, 18:14; 2 Corinthians 5:20, 12:7-9; 2 Peter 2:15-16; Jude 1:11; Revelation 2:14


Topic: Prophecy

Keywords: prophet, prophecy, spiritual warfare, false prophet, curse, bless, cursing, blessing, covenant, greed, prayer, angels, sovereign, sovereignty, purpose, self-righteousness, self righteousness

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 24-25
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 24-25
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2626

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The Lord used the false prophet Balaam to bless the nation of Israel, and through Balaam's final prophecy in Numbers 24, God sealed the fate of Israel and its surrounding nations. But even though the Lord blessed His people, they still sinned, worshiping the gods of other nations. When God poured out His wrath on their sin in Numbers 25, we actually see the depth of His mercy and patience.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 22-25


Balak Sends for Balaam — Read Numbers 22:1-21


1. The children of Israel moved from the land of the Amorites and camped in the plains of Moab on the side of the Jordan River across from the city of Jericho (see v. 1). The king of Moab had heard reports of what they had done to the Amorites; what was his and the entire nation of Moab’s emotional response to them camping in their plains (see vv. 2-3)?



2. Knowing what the children of Israel did to Og, king of Bashan, and to Sihon, king of the Amorites, what did the king of Moab think they would do to his nation (see v. 4)?



3. Although the king of Moab wasn’t aware of what the Lord had told Moses about the king's nation, were his fears of the children of Israel justified? (See Deuteronomy 2:9.)



4. Because of his dreadful fear, the king of Moab devised a plan to deal with the children of Israel. Describe his strategy (see vv. 5-6).



5. Balak commissioned the elders of Moab and Midian to hire Balaam. What did the elders bring with them to Balaam (see v. 7)? What was Balaam’s initial response to them (see v. 8)?



6. God came to Balaam and spoke to him. What did God ask Balaam (see v. 9)? What was Balaam’s response to God (see vv. 10-11)? What was God’s answer to this response (see v. 12)?


7. What was God’s description of the children of Israel (see v. 12)? Why did God describe them this way? (See Genesis 12:3 and Psalm 32:1-2.)


8. What was Balaam’s response to the princes of Moab (see v. 13)? What did the princes of Moab do with Balaam’s response (see v.14)?


9. What did Balak attempt to do when Balaam refused to come and curse the children of Israel (see vv. 15-17)?


10. Although Balaam’s response to the more numerous and more honorable servants of Balak seems upright, this prophet saw a potential profit and wanted to inquire of God again to see if He had changed His mind. What was his response to this second attempt to hire him (see vv. 18-19)?


11. God came to Balaam at night and gave him further instructions that contained a conditional statement. What was that conditional statement (see v. 20)? Did Balaam heed the conditional statement (see v. 21)? (See also Proverbs 14:12.)


Balaam, the Donkey, and the Angel — Read Numbers 22:22-40


12. What was God’s response to Balaam departing with the princes of Moab (see v. 22)? Why (see v. 12)?


13. Who was with Balaam when the Angel of the Lord stood in the way (see v. 22)?



14. Of all those who were with Balaam, who saw the Angel of the Lord? How did they respond (see v. 23)?



15. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam once again. Where did the Angel of the Lord stand this time? What happened to Balaam (see vv. 24-25)?



16. The Angel of the Lord stood in opposition against Balaam a third time. What was different about this place the Angel of the Lord appeared (see v. 26)? Unaware of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do (see v. 27)?


17. Balaam struck his donkey three separate times for her actions because he was unaware of the presence and opposition of the Angel of the Lord. The Lord opened the mouth of the donkey and she argued with Balaam. What was the argument about (see vv. 28-30)? How is Balaam’s argument ironic (see v. 29)?



18. In the same way the Lord opened the mouth of the donkey, He opened the eyes of Balaam. What did Balaam see? What was his response (see v. 31)?


19. The Angel of the Lord defended the actions of Balaam’s donkey (see v. 33). What did He say about Balaam’s actions (see v. 32)? What would He have done to Balaam if it had not been for the actions of his donkey (see v. 33)?


20. Once aware of the presence of the Angel of the Lord, what did Balaam do and commit to doing (see v. 34)?


21. What did the Angel of the Lord remind Balaam to do (see v. 35)? (See also v. 20.)



22. Balak, king of Moab, was informed that Balaam was on his way to meet Balak (see v. 36). What did Balak ask Balaam (see v. 37)? Why? What did he hope to get from Balaam?



23. What was Balaam’s response to his meeting with Balak (see v. 38)?


24. Balak offered a pagan sacrifice, not a Levitical sacrifice. What did he sacrifice? What did he do with this sacrifice (see vv. 39-40)?


Balaam’s First Prophecy — Read Numbers 22:41-23:12


25. Balak took Balaam to the high places of Baal, where they could see the camp of the children of Israel in the plains of Moab (see v. 41). This location’s association with Baal suggests that it was a high place where Canaanite cultic functions were carried out. What did Balaam ask Balak to construct for him there? Why (see vv. 1-3)?


26. There is no biblical instruction or precedent for Balaam’s offering; presumably the sacrifices were part of a pagan ritual. However, God still met Balaam on the desolate height (see v. 4). What did God put in Balaam’s mouth (see v. 5)?


27. In Balaam's first oracle, he mentioned where he is, what he sees, and why he is there (see vv. 7, 9). He also asks a question (see v. 8). What was the answer to his question? (See Numbers 22:12.)

Balaam’s Second Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:13-26


28. Balak took Balaam to another place—the top of Pisgah in the field of Zophim. What was Balak’s motive in taking Balaam here (see vv. 13-14)?


29. Once again, Balak and Balaam made a pagan sacrifice, and Balaam went off to a solitary place to hear from the Lord. Balaam returned with a word from the Lord to Balak. What was the premise of the Lord’s statement to Balak (see vv. 18-20)?


30. Despite all the grumbling, complaining, murmuring, and rising up against the Lord’s anointed leaders, what did Balaam’s second oracle reveal about the Lord’s view of His children (see v. 21)?


31. How does the Lord see us as believers in Christ? (See Ephesians 1:4; 5:27, Colossians 1:22, and 2 Peter 3:14.)


32. Balaam’s second oracle made it clear that God’s protecting grace shielded the children of Israel from what types of evil (see v. 23)?


33. Balaam’s second oracle also made it clear that rather than being overcome, the nation of Israel would do what to its enemies (see v. 24)?
Balaam’s Third Prophecy — Read Numbers 23:27-24:14



34. Yet again, Balak took Balaam to a different location in an effort to get him to curse the children of Israel (see v. 27). What did this location overlook (see v. 28)?


35. Balaam was aware that it pleased the Lord to bless Israel (see v. 1). Before giving his third oracle, what did Balaam do the same as before (see vv. 23:29-24:1)?


36. What did Balaam do differently from before (see vv. 1-2)?


37. The Spirit of God came upon Balaam (see v. 2). However, this coming of the Spirit did not prove Balaam to be a true prophet, for the Spirit of the Lord had come upon others and enabled them to prophesy (see Numbers 11:25 and 1 Samuel 10:6, 10-11). What is the difference between the Spirit coming upon a person to enable them to be used by God and the Spirit coming into a person to abide with them? (See John 7:38-39 and 14:16-17.)


38. Balaam’s third oracle began with testimony that his eyes and ears had been opened to see the children of Israel from God’s perspective. How did Balaam describe the children of Israel as he saw them encamped according to their tribes in the plain of Moab (see vv. 5-9)?


39. Balak, king of Moab, become furious with Balaam for continuing to bless the children of Israel. What did Balak blame the Lord for doing to Balaam (see v. 11)?


40. Where did Balak tell Balaam to go (see v. 11)? Who else went to this same place? (See Acts 1:25.)


41. Despite Balak's anger, Balaam told him that he would advise him about what (see v. 14)?


Balaam’s Fourth Prophecy — Read Numbers 24:15-25


42. Balaam’s fourth oracle began as his third one did—with a recognition that true knowledge comes only from God. Who do you think Balaam is referring to in this oracle (see v. 17)? (See also Matthew 2:2 and Genesis 49:10.)


43. Balaam prophesied against Moab, Edom, Amalek, and the Kenites. What did Balaam say would happen to these nations (see vv. 17-22)?



Israel’s Harlotry in Moab — Read Numbers 25:1-18


44. As the children of Israel remained in the acacia grove on the plains of Moab (see Numbers 33:49), what did they begin to do (see vv. 1-2)? (See also Psalm 106:28.) Who was responsible for this? (See Numbers 31:16.)


45. What was the Lord's response when the children of Israel joined themselves with Baal of Peor (see v. 3)?



46. What did the Lord instruct Moses to have the leaders do to those who joined with Baal of Peor (see vv. 4-5)?



47. One Israelite man had the audacity to bring a Midianite woman to the very door of the tabernacle, flaunting her in front of Moses. He then took her to his tent to commit sexual immorality with her. What did Phinehas do to this man and woman (see vv. 7-8)?


48. When the anger of the Lord was roused because of the sexual immorality of the children of Israel and the women of Moab, a plague arose. Phinehas’ actions stopped the plague (see Psalm 106:30). How many were affected by this plague (see v. 9)?



49. What did the Lord indicate might have happened if Phinehas had not stopped the plague by his zealous actions (see vv. 10-11)?



50. What did the Lord establish with Phinehas because of his zealous actions (see vv. 12-13)?


51. The name and lineage of the Israelite man and Midianite woman were recorded. Who were they (see vv. 14-15)?


52. It is likely that these names were recorded to explain the great reduction of the tribe of Simeon from 59,300 (see Numbers 1:23) to 22,200 (see Numbers 26:14). If mainly Simeonites had been involved in the immorality and idolatry of Baal, it would account for much of the difference in the totals. Additionally, the woman being the daughter of a Midianite leader would account for the Lord's instructions to do what to the Midianites (see vv. 16-18)?



53. The plague that killed a large number of Israelites (see v. 9) was a result of the counsel of Balaam (see Numbers 31:16), even though it seemed as though Balaam desired to be a part of the children of Israel. He stated that it would be a blessing to be a part of their numbering in life or death (see Numbers 23:10). How did Balaam die? (See Numbers 31:7-8.)

54. As the children of Israel camped in the plains of Moab, they likely were unaware of what was happening between Balak and Balaam. Balaam is mentioned three times in the New Testament as an example of what not to do. What is the way of Balaam? (See 2 Peter 2:15-16.)



55. What is the error of Balaam? (See Jude 11.)



56. What is the doctrine of Balaam? (See Revelation 2:14.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Like the early church, we take the old covenant and seek to make application to understand the foundation for New Testament truth
    2. Balaam is one of those enigmatic, mysterious people
      1. Clearly called a false prophet in the New Testament (see 2 Peter 2:15; Jude 1:11; Rev. 2:14)
      2. More literary real estate was given to him than Mary, the mother of Jesus, or any of the twelve apostles
      3. Yet the spirit of the living God spoke through him—overriding his bad motivation and false doctrine—and miraculously used him as a vessel
    3. Take comfort in the fact that God spoke through Balaam's donkey first
      1. He can speak through anyone
      2. 2 Chronicles 16:9
    4. Even though the Lord told Balaam not to go with Balak, he went anyway
      1. He was bent on going his own way because he wanted financial remuneration
      2. But through him the Lord spoke blessing on Israel several times
  2. Numbers 24
    1. Mount Peor
      1. Eastern side of the Jordan River and Dead Sea
      2. Associated with a false god
      3. This was the very first time Israel worshiped Baal
    2. Baal
      1. The storm god; he was thought to control the rain, the sun, and all natural forces, including bringing fertility to the land
      2. Whenever there was a drought in Israel, they would be tempted to worship the false gods of those around them
    3. It was believed that fertility was the direct result of the sexual union of the gods and goddesses
      1. Worshipers would seek to imitate that
      2. The worship of Baal was very sexual and sensual
      3. Baal's cohort was Ashtoreth/Astarte—Easter
    4. Balaam was conning Balak this whole time, but now there was an overwhelming voice from the spirit of God that spoke through Balaam in a very direct, unusual manner
    5. In the Old Testament era, the nations around Israel believed in different ideas:
      1. Polytheism—many gods
      2. Henotheism—each god was assigned a specific geographical location
        1. The king of Syria, Ben-Haddad, used this an explanation of northern Israel's victory over Syria
        2. 1 Kings 20:23
      3. In the middle of all this was monotheistic Israel
    6. The third oracle
      1. Verse 3
        1. Balaam was a seer, but God opened his eyes
        2. He was compelled to go down before the Spirit of the Lord
      2. Verse 7
        1. Israel was pictured as a man carrying two buckets of water, the source of life and refreshment, then pouring it out
        2. Ironic reversal of what Pharaoh tried to do to Israel: drown the seeds (see Ex. 1:22)
        3. The imagery of a man with water was the Lord's blessing upon the Israelites to spread and grow throughout the world
      3. There are seven billion people in the world, thirteen million of which are Jewish—two-thirds of one percent
        1. Yet twenty-five to thirty-three percent of Nobel Prizes have been given to Jewish people
        2. They have become a source of great blessing
        3. Genesis 12:2-3
      4. Agag (v. 7) could be a title, not a specific name
        1. "His king" could refer to David, but it fits Jesus Christ better
        2. Isaiah 35:7; a very real part of Messiah's reign is described in verse 7
      5. Verse 9
        1. Jacob's blessing: Genesis 49:9-10
        2. It was as if Balaam knew of this prophecy, or the Spirit of God put that same thought in his heart
        3. Genesis 12:3
        4. Think about the nations who attacked Israel that are no longer world powers
        5. God's people are not His perfect people—they just happen to have a covenant with the living God
    7. The fourth (final) oracle
      1. Verse 17
        1. Revelation 22:16: Lucifer is a copy of that, a second-rate star (see Isa. 14:12)
        2. Genesis 49:10: the scepter represents the right to rule as a king
        3. Jesus will return and be the King of kings and Lord of lords (see Rev. 19:11-16)
      2. This is a prediction of Christ
        1. Matthew 2:2
        2. Magi in Nebuchadnezzar's court; Daniel 9:24
      3. Edom (v. 18)
        1. Will become bitter enemies with Israel
        2. One of the Maccabeean kings, John Hyrcanus, defeated the Edomites
        3. Herod the Great was an Idumean
      4. The Amalekites (v. 20) were the first to attack Israel when they left Egypt (see Ex. 17:8-13; Deut. 25:17-18)
      5. The Kenites (vv. 21-22) lived among the Midianites, but in the mountains
        1. Kain was the originator of the tribe
        2. Asshur refers to Assyria (Assyrian captivity in 722 BC)
  3. Numbers 25
    1. Numbers 31:16 helps explain what happened between chapters 24 and 25
      1. What Balak and Balaam failed to do by sorcery, they accomplished by seduction
      2. It was as if Balaam told Balak, "If you put them in a place where their religion mingles with another religion, and bring idolatry into the camp, then God will curse them"
    2. This compromising philosophy is the doctrine of Balaam
      1. This is Satan's principle: if you can't beat them, join them
      2. God blessed the Israelites, but they put themselves in a curse-able position
      3. When Jesus was delivered up, it was an inside job—Judas did it
    3. Verse 4: God demanded immediate surgery
    4. Phinehas was a gatekeeper of the tabernacle (see 1 Chron. 9:20)
    5. God and the Bible have been criticized because of this chapter
    6. Instead of being brutal and warmongering, God is merciful
      1. In taking away the cancer, Israel was saved
      2. God was patient with the Canaanite population
        1. Genesis 15:13-16: four hundred years
        2. Another four hundred years went by as Israel was under the bondage of the Egyptians
        3. God waited eight hundred years before He punished the Canaanites and told Israel to drive them out
    7. There comes a point when God's wrath must eclipse God's mercy—when His judgment must interact with man's sinfulness
      1. Galatians 6:7
      2. The only Canaanite who repented was Rahab (see Josh. 2:1-21)
    8. Matthew 7:13-14
      1. If you think about it, all roads lead to God; pick any road you want—you'll see God someday (see Heb. 9:27)
      2. However, the wide part of that road leads to destruction; the narrow road leads to life
  4. Closing
    1. Yes, there's only one way—but how merciful that God made a way
    2. God said, "I'll put all of your sin on one Man, so that all you have to do is trust in Him and turn to Him and you'll be saved"
    3. Last time I checked, that's a great deal!

Figures referenced: John Hyrcanus

Cross references: Genesis 12:2-3; 15:13-16; 49:9-10; Exodus 1:22; 17:8-13; Numbers 24-25; 31:16; Deuteronomy 25:17-18; Joshua 2:1-21; 1 Kings 20:23; 1 Chronicles 9:20; 2 Chronicles 16:9; Isaiah 14:12; 35:7; Daniel 9:24; Matthew 2:2; 7:13-14; Galatians 6:7; Hebrews 9:27; 2 Peter 2:15; Jude 1:11; Revelation 2:14; 19:11-16; 22:16


Topic: Prophecy

Keywords: false prophet, prophecy, doctrine, false gods, idols, worship, children of Israel, Jews, Jewish, Messiah, Jesus Christ, messianic prophecy, predictions, idolatry, mercy, patience, wrath, judgment, sin

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 26-27
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 26-27
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2632

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Numbers 26-27 covers the second census of Israel, addresses inheritance issues, and introduces the next leader of God's chosen people. As we study these chapters, we see again how God is deeply involved with His children, and we are challenged to grow by actively seeking the Lord.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 26-29
The Second Census of Israel—Read Numbers 26:1-65
1. A plague had smitten the children of Israel for their Baal worship at Mount Peor, which included sexual perversion (see Num. 25:1, 3, 8-9). How many Israelites died in the plague? (See Num. 25:9.)



2. After the plague, the Lord prepared to bring His children to their destination. What did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to do (see vv. 1-2)?



3. In previous meetings, the Lord spoke to Moses and Aaron. Why did the Lord now speak to Moses and Eleazar (see v. 1)? (See also Num. 20:22-29.)



4. The Lord instructed Moses and Eleazar to count His people because His people count to Him. An entirely new generation of the children of Israel was preparing to enter the Promised Land. Whom specifically did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to count (see vv.

2, 4)?


5. The tribes of the children of Israel were numbered because the older generation had died. Complete the chart below, which compares the numbers of the previous generation with the generation of fighting men that will enter the Promised Land.
Tribe First Census Count Second Census Count Difference
Reuben Numbers 1:21 46,500 Numbers 26:7 43,730 -2,770
Simeon Numbers 1:23 Numbers 26:14
Gad Numbers 1:25 Numbers 26:18
Judah Numbers 1:27 Numbers 26:22
Issachar Numbers 1:29 54,400 Numbers 26:25 64,300 +9,900
Zebulun Numbers 1:31 Numbers 26:27
Manasseh (Joseph) Numbers 1:35 Numbers 26:34
Ephraim (Joseph) Numbers 1:33 Numbers 26:37
Benjamin Numbers 1:37 Numbers 26:41
Dan Numbers 1:39 Numbers 26:43
Asher Numbers 1:41 Numbers 26:47
Naphtali Numbers 1:43 Numbers 26:50
Total: 12 Numbers 1:46 603,550 Numbers 26:51 601,730 -1,820

6. Which tribe gained the most fighting men? Which tribe lost the most men? Why might this tribe have suffered such a significant loss? (See Num. 25:9, 14-15.)



7. In the tribe of Reuben, the children of Korah, the rebel who died and took at least 253 others with him (see Num. 16:35), survived (see v. 11). Who were they? (See Ex. 6:24.) What significant role did these children perform later in their lives? (See 1 Chron.

26:19; 2 Chron. 20:19; and subtitle of Ps. 42; 87.)



8. The census was important for two logistical reasons. The first was for Israel to know the size of their army (see v. 2). Why is this important? (See also Luke 14:31-32.)



9. What was the second reason for numbering the people (see vv. 52-56)?



10. Among the twelve tribes of Israel numbered as fighting men, one tribe was not included. Which tribe was not included (see v. 57)? Why (see v. 62)? (See also Num. 1:45, 47-53; 2:5-7.)

11. The entire generation that had been counted in the first census failed to enter the Promised Land and died (see v. 64), except for three people. Who were those three (see v. 65)?


Inheritance Laws—Read Numbers 27:1-11
12. Zelophehad the son of Hepher, the son of Gilead, the son of Machir, the son of Manasseh, the son of Joseph had five daughters and no sons. These daughters had a problem. What was it (see vv. 1-4)?


13. How did these five daughters of Zelophehad handle their problem (see v. 2)?


14. The problem of the daughters of Zelophehad was not covered in the Law that had been given to Moses (see Deut. 31:24). How did Moses handle the problem (see v. 5)?


15. Like the daughters of Zelophehad, how should we handle a problem that might not be specifically addressed in the Word of God? (See Prov. 11:14; 12:15; 20:18.)


16. Like Moses, how should we handle a situation for which we do not know the biblical answer? (See Jer. 29:13; Luke 11:9-10; 2 Tim. 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:3-4.)
17. What did the Lord afford to the five daughters of Zelophehad (see vv. 6-7)?


18. What new statute was established based upon the problem the five daughters of Zelophehad presented to Moses and Eleazar (see vv. 8-11)?


19. This exception to the Law, many interpreters argue, may have granted the daughter of Heli an inheritance in the royal line of David. Whom would this inheritance law have affected? (See Luke 3:23.)


Joshua the Next Leader of Israel—Read Numbers 27:12-23
20. Moses and Aaron had disqualified themselves from entering the land of promise when they dishonored the Lord by striking the rock at Meribah in the Wilderness of Zin (see v. 14). What mountain did the Lord tell Moses to go up to (see Deut. 32:49)? What

would Moses see there (see v. 12)?


21. The Lord told Moses that after he saw this he would be gathered to his people (see v. 13). To be gathered to his people meant that he would die and join his ancestors. Where did Moses die? Where was he buried? (See Deut. 34:5-6.) Who argued over Moses'

body after he died? (See Jude 1:9.)

22. Rather than arguing about the Lord’s decision to have him gathered to his people, Moses was concerned about the children of Israel. What did Moses ask the Lord to do for the congregation (see vv. 15-17)?


23. What was the phrase Moses used to describe his care and concern for the children of Israel (see v. 17)? Who else shared the same concern? (See Matt. 9:36; Mark 6:34; Deut. 18:15.)


24. The Lord answered Moses’ request. Who did the Lord select? How did He describe this man (see v. 18)?


25. How was Moses to inaugurate his successor (see vv. 18-20)?


26. Moses was a man with whom the Lord spoke face to face (see Ex. 33:11; Num. 12:8). How did the Lord speak to Moses’ successor (see v. 21)?


Daily Offerings—Read Numbers 28:1-8
27. The younger generation needed to be instructed on the recurring offerings that would be appropriate for the settled, agricultural way of life they would soon be living. How many lambs were offered in the daily offering? When were they offered (see vv. 1-

8)?

Sabbath Offerings—Read Numbers 28:9-10
28. In addition to the daily offering, what was offered on the Sabbath (see vv. 9-10)?


Monthly Offerings—Read Numbers 28:11-15
29. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a burnt offering (see v. 11)?


30. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a sin offering (see v. 15)?


31. What else was done at the beginning of each month? Why? (See Num. 10:10.)


Offerings at Passover—Read Numbers 28:16-25
32. On the fourteenth day of Nisan, the first month, the Passover lambs were offered. On the fifteenth day, the Feast of Unleavened Bread began. On the first and seventh day of this feast, what were the children of Israel instructed to do and to not do (see vv.

18, 25)?

33. In addition to the daily and Sabbath offerings, there were offerings for each day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread. What was offered daily that was a sweet smelling aroma to the Lord (see v. 24)?


Offerings at the Feast of Weeks—Read Numbers 28:26-31
34. On the day of firstfruits, two bulls, one ram, and seven lambs were offered as a burnt offering and a goat kid was offered to make atonement. When was the Feast of Weeks commemorated? (See Lev. 23:15-16.)


Offerings at the Feast of Trumpets—Read Numbers 29:1-6
35. In addition to the daily offerings, the New Moon offerings, a holy convocation, and not doing any customary work, what else was done on the Feast of Trumpets (see v. 1)?


Offerings on the Day of Atonement—Read Numbers 29:7-11
36. On the tenth day of the seventh month, in addition to the daily burnt offerings and the sin offering, the children of Israel offered a bull, a ram, and seven lambs, had a holy convocation, and didn’t do any customary work. What else did the children of Israel

do on the Day of Atonement (see v. 7)? (See also Ps. 35:13; Isa. 58:5.)

Offerings at the Feast of Tabernacles—Read Numbers 29:12-40
37. The Feast of Tabernacles, which lasted from the fifteenth day of the seventh month through the twenty-second day (see Lev. 23:34), required a great number of sacrifices because it celebrated the end of the yearly harvests and was an expression of

thanksgiving to God. Complete the chart below to determine how many animals were offered during this feast.
Burnt offering Sin offering
Verse Day Bulls Rams Lambs Goat
v. 13 1
v. 17 2
v. 20 3
v. 23 4
v. 26 5
v. 29 6
v. 32 7
v. 35 8
Subtotal /
Daily /
Sabbath /
Totals /



DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. The book of Numbers
      1. The Latin Vulgate translation is numeri (numbers)
      2. The Greek term is arithmoi (arithmetic)
    2. It's called Numbers because of chapters 1 and 26, when God told Moses to number the people
      1. Chapter 1 is the numbering of the generation leaving Egypt
      2. Chapter 26 is the numbering of the generation entering the land of Canaan
      3. The first generation died as a judgment for their unbelief; Numbers 14:20-35
    3. Outline of Numbers
      1. Chapters 1-10: organization
      2. Chapters 11-25: disorganization
      3. Chapters 26-36: reorganization
    4. What's so spiritual about a census?
      1. Nothing—unless your name is in it
      2. This is God's phone book of fighting men
    5. God knows your name; you're more than a number to Him
      1. Luke 10:20
      2. Revelation 13:8; 20:12; 21:27
  2. Numbers 26
    1. Thirty-eight years before, the first generation numbered 603,550
      1. It's been a net of minus three percent
      2. That's pretty good for thirty-eight years when you consider all the plagues and death
      3. Statisticians would call this zero percent growth
        1. This was not God's intention; it shows the failure of the wilderness experience
        2. Genesis 1:28; 9:7
      4. A good question to ask ourselves is, "Are we moving or are we growing?"
      5. Some tribes experienced incredible loss, some incredible gain
    2. Why was the census given?
      1. To find out how many fighting men were available
      2. Land allotments would be given based upon the size of each of the twelve tribes
    3. 601,730 fighting men
      1. 400,000-800,000 women
      2. 200,000 senior citizens
      3. 800,000 children
      4. There were between two and three million people going from Egypt through the wilderness toward Canaan
      5. Plus the mixed multitude (part Egyptian, part Israelite)
    4. Verse 64: every single person that was numbered in the first generation has kicked the bucket—except for Caleb and Joshua
    5. The Levites didn't get land allotment, but they did get Levitical cities
      1. Their principal job was not to be fighters, but to be worshipers and maintain the tabernacle—and later on, the temple
      2. They were not part of the army because if they were around anybody who died, they would become defiled
      3. They were kept separate as the staff of the church in the center of the camp; this is a beautiful picture of the body of Christ in the New Testament
        1. 1 Corinthians 12:12-27
        2. We all have our place, gifts, and calling
  3. Numbers 27:1-11
    1. This was the first women's rights movement in history, and it was sanctioned by God
    2. Who do you pass your property on to if you don't have a son? This hadn't been dealt with in the old covenant yet
    3. Ancient cultures were male dominant; women had few rights
      1. But that wasn't the Lord—that was culture
      2. Genesis 2:23
        1. Adam didn't say, "This is my property"
        2. Adam said, "This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh"; there was a joining together—they were joint heirs
      3. Galatians 3:28
    4. These gals were bold
      1. They didn't bring this case to the law court or the counselor's office
      2. They brought it to the door of the tabernacle, the church: "Let's get God's wisdom on this"
    5. Verse 5: it's like Moses said, "I don't know what to say, but I'll pray about it"
    6. Verse 7: God stood up for the rights of women
      1. We've made pretty decent progress in this area
      2. But in other parts of the world, it's exactly like it was in ancient times
    7. Why hadn't the Lord addressed this until now?
      1. Did He forget?
      2. No; the Lord gives principles in His Word, but He wants you to seek Him for the particulars
      3. He wants you to find the wisdom of His Spirit for your situation and apply that wisdom/principle to your situation
      4. The Lord knew this day was coming, and He gave further information
  4. Numbers 27:12-23
    1. Moses would be gathered to his people
      1. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob—his forefathers
      2. Luke 16:19-31
        1. It's not a parable; it's an example of an actual situation
        2. "Abraham's bosom" (v. 22): some scholars believe that Old Testament believers were kept here until Jesus could announce His atoning death to them and then bring them with Him into heaven
    2. Verses 12-14 sound like torture
      1. If anyone deserved to be in the land, it was Moses
      2. Moses eventually got to the land—Jesus snuck him in; Matthew 17:1-4
    3. Moses was the meekest man on the face of the earth (see Num. 12:3); he accepted the will of God and then was concerned about the people
    4. "The God of the spirits of all flesh" (v. 16)
      1. The real you is your spirit
      2. The flesh is the avenue, means, or apparatus by which one spirit can relate to another spirit
      3. One day, the real you will be with the essence of who God is
      4. John 4:24
    5. Verse 17: Moses saw the people without a leader as sheep having no shepherd
      1. Matthew 9:36
      2. That's true leadership: concerned about people and their wellbeing, stability
      3. The quality of life of a sheep is determined by the quality of its shepherd
    6. Joshua is a Hebrew name
      1. The 'j' is silent: Yeshua
      2. The equivalent of that name in Greek (translated into English) is Jesus
      3. Moses couldn't bring them in, but Jesus could
        1. John 1:17
        2. What Moses failed to do, only Joshua could do
      4. This is a portrayal: as this Joshua brought them into the land, our Joshua brings us into a place of rest and completion
    7. Joshua and Caleb were the faithful men who spied out the land and the only two survivors from the previous generation
      1. You never hear Joshua talk about himself
      2. Joshua 1:1; he was Moses' assistant, or minister
      3. He learned leadership by being a servant
    8. Why lay hands on somebody?
      1. "The only thing you can communicate to someone else by the laying on of hands is disease germs" —J. Vernon McGee
      2. It signifies something: you are saying, in effect, "This hand represents God laying His hands on you; God has chosen you"
      3. It is the ratification of a previous ordination
    9. With ministry, you first need to find out if God has called you
      1. Acts 13:1-4
      2. The Holy Spirit did the identifying, calling, equipping, and sending; the leadership of the church came alongside, laid hands on them, and agreed with the Holy Spirit

Figures referenced: J. Vernon McGee

Greek/Hebrew words: numeri, arithmoi, Yeshua

Cross references: Genesis 1:28; 2:23; 9:7; Numbers 1; 12:3;14:20-35; 26-27; Joshua 1:1; Matthew 9:36; 17:1-4; Luke 10:20; 16:19-31; John 1:17; 4:24; Acts 13:1-4; 1 Corinthians 12:12-27; Galatians 3:28; Revelation 13:8; 20:12; 21:27


Topic: Ministry

Keywords: numbers, numbering, census, fighting men, generations, Levi, Levites, priests, gifts, calling, woman, women, women's rights, old covenant, ancient culture, seeking God, seeking the Lord, God's will, gathered to his people, death, Promised Land, leadership, humility, laying on of hands, laying hands, ministry

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 28-29
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 28-29
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2640

MESSAGE SUMMARY
As we study Numbers 28-29, we learn about ten sacrifices and feasts the children of Israel carried out as worship to the Lord. We can think about the enormity of their sacrifices—they sacrificed over a thousand animals every year—but God was the one who initially provided the animals for them. We should focus on the enormity of sacrifice God Himself gave—even the life of His Son.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 26-29
The Second Census of Israel—Read Numbers 26:1-65
1. A plague had smitten the children of Israel for their Baal worship at Mount Peor, which included sexual perversion (see Num. 25:1, 3, 8-9). How many Israelites died in the plague? (See Num. 25:9.)



2. After the plague, the Lord prepared to bring His children to their destination. What did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to do (see vv. 1-2)?



3. In previous meetings, the Lord spoke to Moses and Aaron. Why did the Lord now speak to Moses and Eleazar (see v. 1)? (See also Num. 20:22-29.)



4. The Lord instructed Moses and Eleazar to count His people because His people count to Him. An entirely new generation of the children of Israel was preparing to enter the Promised Land. Whom specifically did the Lord ask Moses and Eleazar to count (see vv. 2, 4)?


5. The tribes of the children of Israel were numbered because the older generation had died. Complete the chart below, which compares the numbers of the previous generation with the generation of fighting men that will enter the Promised Land.
Tribe First Census Count Second Census Count Difference
Reuben Numbers 1:21 46,500 Numbers 26:7 43,730 -2,770
Simeon Numbers 1:23 Numbers 26:14
Gad Numbers 1:25 Numbers 26:18
Judah Numbers 1:27 Numbers 26:22
Issachar Numbers 1:29 54,400 Numbers 26:25 64,300 +9,900
Zebulun Numbers 1:31 Numbers 26:27
Manasseh (Joseph) Numbers 1:35 Numbers 26:34
Ephraim (Joseph) Numbers 1:33 Numbers 26:37
Benjamin Numbers 1:37 Numbers 26:41
Dan Numbers 1:39 Numbers 26:43
Asher Numbers 1:41 Numbers 26:47
Naphtali Numbers 1:43 Numbers 26:50
Total: 12 Numbers 1:46 603,550 Numbers 26:51 601,730 -1,820

6. Which tribe gained the most fighting men? Which tribe lost the most men? Why might this tribe have suffered such a significant loss? (See Num. 25:9, 14-15.)



7. In the tribe of Reuben, the children of Korah, the rebel who died and took at least 253 others with him (see Num. 16:35), survived (see v. 11). Who were they? (See Ex. 6:24.) What significant role did these children perform later in their lives? (See 1 Chron.

26:19; 2 Chron. 20:19; and subtitle of Ps. 42; 87.)



8. The census was important for two logistical reasons. The first was for Israel to know the size of their army (see v. 2). Why is this important? (See also Luke 14:31-32.)



9. What was the second reason for numbering the people (see vv. 52-56)?



10. Among the twelve tribes of Israel numbered as fighting men, one tribe was not included. Which tribe was not included (see v. 57)? Why (see v. 62)? (See also Num. 1:45, 47-53; 2:5-7.)

11. The entire generation that had been counted in the first census failed to enter the Promised Land and died (see v. 64), except for three people. Who were those three (see v. 65)?


Inheritance Laws—Read Numbers 27:1-11
12. Zelophehad the son of Hepher, the son of Gilead, the son of Machir, the son of Manasseh, the son of Joseph had five daughters and no sons. These daughters had a problem. What was it (see vv. 1-4)?


13. How did these five daughters of Zelophehad handle their problem (see v. 2)?


14. The problem of the daughters of Zelophehad was not covered in the Law that had been given to Moses (see Deut. 31:24). How did Moses handle the problem (see v. 5)?


15. Like the daughters of Zelophehad, how should we handle a problem that might not be specifically addressed in the Word of God? (See Prov. 11:14; 12:15; 20:18.)


16. Like Moses, how should we handle a situation for which we do not know the biblical answer? (See Jer. 29:13; Luke 11:9-10; 2 Tim. 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:3-4.)
17. What did the Lord afford to the five daughters of Zelophehad (see vv. 6-7)?


18. What new statute was established based upon the problem the five daughters of Zelophehad presented to Moses and Eleazar (see vv. 8-11)?


19. This exception to the Law, many interpreters argue, may have granted the daughter of Heli an inheritance in the royal line of David. Whom would this inheritance law have affected? (See Luke 3:23.)


Joshua the Next Leader of Israel—Read Numbers 27:12-23
20. Moses and Aaron had disqualified themselves from entering the land of promise when they dishonored the Lord by striking the rock at Meribah in the Wilderness of Zin (see v. 14). What mountain did the Lord tell Moses to go up to (see Deut. 32:49)? What

would Moses see there (see v. 12)?


21. The Lord told Moses that after he saw this he would be gathered to his people (see v. 13). To be gathered to his people meant that he would die and join his ancestors. Where did Moses die? Where was he buried? (See Deut. 34:5-6.) Who argued over Moses'

body after he died? (See Jude 1:9.)

22. Rather than arguing about the Lord’s decision to have him gathered to his people, Moses was concerned about the children of Israel. What did Moses ask the Lord to do for the congregation (see vv. 15-17)?


23. What was the phrase Moses used to describe his care and concern for the children of Israel (see v. 17)? Who else shared the same concern? (See Matt. 9:36; Mark 6:34; Deut. 18:15.)


24. The Lord answered Moses’ request. Who did the Lord select? How did He describe this man (see v. 18)?


25. How was Moses to inaugurate his successor (see vv. 18-20)?


26. Moses was a man with whom the Lord spoke face to face (see Ex. 33:11; Num. 12:8). How did the Lord speak to Moses’ successor (see v. 21)?


Daily Offerings—Read Numbers 28:1-8
27. The younger generation needed to be instructed on the recurring offerings that would be appropriate for the settled, agricultural way of life they would soon be living. How many lambs were offered in the daily offering? When were they offered (see vv. 1-

8)?

Sabbath Offerings—Read Numbers 28:9-10
28. In addition to the daily offering, what was offered on the Sabbath (see vv. 9-10)?


Monthly Offerings—Read Numbers 28:11-15
29. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a burnt offering (see v. 11)?


30. At the beginning of each month, how many animals were offered as a sin offering (see v. 15)?


31. What else was done at the beginning of each month? Why? (See Num. 10:10.)


Offerings at Passover—Read Numbers 28:16-25
32. On the fourteenth day of Nisan, the first month, the Passover lambs were offered. On the fifteenth day, the Feast of Unleavened Bread began. On the first and seventh day of this feast, what were the children of Israel instructed to do and to not do (see vv.

18, 25)?

33. In addition to the daily and Sabbath offerings, there were offerings for each day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread. What was offered daily that was a sweet smelling aroma to the Lord (see v. 24)?


Offerings at the Feast of Weeks—Read Numbers 28:26-31
34. On the day of firstfruits, two bulls, one ram, and seven lambs were offered as a burnt offering and a goat kid was offered to make atonement. When was the Feast of Weeks commemorated? (See Lev. 23:15-16.)


Offerings at the Feast of Trumpets—Read Numbers 29:1-6
35. In addition to the daily offerings, the New Moon offerings, a holy convocation, and not doing any customary work, what else was done on the Feast of Trumpets (see v. 1)?


Offerings on the Day of Atonement—Read Numbers 29:7-11
36. On the tenth day of the seventh month, in addition to the daily burnt offerings and the sin offering, the children of Israel offered a bull, a ram, and seven lambs, had a holy convocation, and didn’t do any customary work. What else did the children of Israel

do on the Day of Atonement (see v. 7)? (See also Ps. 35:13; Isa. 58:5.)

Offerings at the Feast of Tabernacles—Read Numbers 29:12-40
37. The Feast of Tabernacles, which lasted from the fifteenth day of the seventh month through the twenty-second day (see Lev. 23:34), required a great number of sacrifices because it celebrated the end of the yearly harvests and was an expression of

thanksgiving to God. Complete the chart below to determine how many animals were offered during this feast.
Burnt offering Sin offering
Verse Day Bulls Rams Lambs Goat
v. 13 1
v. 17 2
v. 20 3
v. 23 4
v. 26 5
v. 29 6
v. 32 7
v. 35 8
Subtotal /
Daily /
Sabbath /
Totals /


DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. If you grew up in a solemn, religious home, as an average kid you probably didn't see a whole lot of relevance in religious expressions—there was a disconnect
    2. These two chapters are about festivals
      1. God would have feasts for His people: times of joy, remembrance, and celebration
      2. There were times of solemnity, but so often they were just to celebrate God in their daily lives; it's what He wanted from them
    3. God's commanded observances in Numbers 28-29
      1. Daily, weekly, and monthly sacrifices
      2. The great feasts
      3. There was to be a rhythm of life daily, weekly, monthly, and annually where God was at the center of their community
      4. This was God's equivalent of save the date: "Write these in your appointment calendars"
    4. All of these things were visual demonstrations
      1. In our culture, our worship is highly verbal, not visual
      2. They acted out in dramatic form some of the great truths God was trying to get through to them by these festivals
      3. It was the ancient equivalent of reality TV
    5. Why so much blood? Why so many animals killed?
      1. If you want to approach God, you've got a big problem: sin
      2. The only way to deal with sin is through atonement
        1. Vicarious atonement
        2. It means a substitute will be killed so you don't have to be killed
      3. Hebrews 9:22
      4. Either you let someone or something take your place, or you die for your own sin
    6. Leviticus 23: why does God waste pages to cover these sacrifices and offerings again?
      1. It's a new generation—they need to hear it again
      2. Every generation needs to hear the gospel; we need to be reminded of these truths
    7. These chapters talk about the occasion and what is required for the occasion
    8. We'll highlight some of these festivals—especially Passover, which Communion is based on
  2. Numbers 28
    1. The daily sacrifices (vv. 1-8)
      1. Speaks of relationship: a constant, unbroken fellowship with your Creator
      2. They began their day and ended their day focusing on a lamb; so should we
      3. Hebrews 9:26
        1. What the old covenant could never do, Jesus did once for all
        2. If you blow it, you talk to the Lamb Himself
      4. 1 John 1:9
    2. Sabbath (vv. 9-10)
      1. Speaks of rest
      2. God instituted the Sabbath for us; it was a gift to mankind
      3. It was the "maintenance law" of the Ten Commandments
        1. Exodus 20:8-11
        2. He wants you to operate at peak
      4. In Israel, the whole week builds toward the Sabbath
      5. The Sabbath, the seventh day of the week, commemorated a finished creation
        1. Sunday, the first day of the week, commemorated a finished redemption
        2. That is why the early church met on the first day of the week
      6. There's no morality attached to the commandment about the Sabbath; it has no moral component
        1. In the New Testament, all of the Ten Commandments are reiterated somewhere except for this one
        2. Are Christians commanded to keep the Sabbath? No
        3. You're free from the Law
      7. So what's the best day to worship? Every day
      8. Romans 14:5
    3. Monthly offerings (vv. 11-15)
      1. Rosh chodesh means the head of the month
      2. Speaks of routine
      3. The best form of life is a disciplined life
      4. Jewish months are lunar months, not solar
        1. Lunar calendar has 354 days
        2. Jewish month is 29-30 days
    4. Passover (v. 16)
      1. Speaks of redemption
      2. Of all the festivals in modern-day Israel, it is the one that most Jews still keep
      3. Exodus 12
      4. Jesus Christ is our Passover Lamb: when the lambs were being sacrificed in the temple, He died on the cross
      5. The Passover both commemorated and predicted redemption
      6. 1 Corinthians 5:7
      7. John 1:29
      8. Either you let the Lamb take your sin, or you have to die for your sin
    5. Feast of Unleavened Bread (vv. 17-25)
      1. Speaks of recuperation
      2. After the leaven was removed, your spiritual life was invigorated and you recuperated from all the haste of leaving Egypt
      3. The first day of the feast was Passover, but they are separate festivals
    6. Feast of Firstfruits and Feast of Weeks (Pentecost; vv. 26-31)
      1. Firstfruits was the first of the barley harvest in the spring
      2. The Feast of Weeks (Pentecost) was the end of the wheat harvest (summertime)
      3. Both speak of representation
        1. Firstfruits
          1. Speaks of the resurrection of Jesus Christ; 1 Corinthians 15:20
          2. If the firstfruits come, the rest is coming
          3. Jesus' resurrection requires your resurrection
        2. Weeks
          1. Representative of the church
          2. The church was born on the day of Pentecost; Acts 2:1-4
          3. God extended the harvest past the disciples, past the Jews, into the Gentiles
  3. Numbers 29
    1. There's a gap of about four months between the first three feasts and the next three feasts
      1. In the seventh month, Tishri, there are three festivals stuck together
      2. That gap of time possibly speaks of the church age
        1. The Jews rejected their Lamb and lost almost everything: their temple, the representation of animals being slain, etc.
        2. In the future, there will be an awakening of this
    2. Feast of Trumpets (vv. 1-6)
      1. It was a reminder that Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, was coming ten days later
      2. These ten days were days of reflection
        1. Yamim Nora'im is Hebrew for days of awe or repentance
        2. Yom Kippur is a solemn day of fasting, not feasting
      3. Passover is in the first Jewish month, Abib (Nisan), while the Jews don't celebrate their new year until the seventh month
    3. Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur; vv. 7-11)
      1. Speaks of repentance
      2. It became a time of rejoicing after fasting and the sacrifice of two goats
    4. Feast of Tabernacles (vv. 12-40)
      1. Seven days of sacrifices, then the eighth day
      2. Even today, Israelis build and live in lean-tos for a week to remember how their forefathers slept in the wilderness for forty years and God provided for them
      3. Speaks of relocation
      4. In the temple, it was the custom for one of the priests to go down from the temple mount to the Pool of Siloam
        1. The place where people could get fresh water
        2. Jesus healed a blind man and told him to wash in it; John 9:1-7
      5. The priest would take water from the pool and pour it on the courtyard of the temple, symbolizing how God provided water out of the rock in the desert; Exodus 17:1-7
      6. Then the people would sing Isaiah 12:3
      7. On the eighth day, the great day, the priest would do this twice
        1. On this day, Jesus in the temple cried out, "If anyone thirsts, let him come to Me and drink"
        2. John 7:37-39
  4. Closing
    1. Think of the enormity of these sacrifices—think of how many animals were killed in a year's time: 113 bulls, 32 rams, and 1,086 sheep
    2. Why so much sacrifice?
      1. It's really not too much to give
      2. Who provided all that they had to begin with? God did
      3. The same applies to tithing: everything is God's to begin with
    3. What we celebrate with Communion is that Jesus is the Passover Lamb
      1. Romans 8:32
      2. Whatever we give to Him, He provided it all to begin with
    4. Rather than the enormity of the sacrifices God demanded, think of the enormity of the sacrifice God Himself gave

Greek/Hebrew words: Rosh chodesh, Yamim Nora'im
Cross references: Exodus 12; 17:1-7; 20:8-11; Leviticus 23; Numbers 28-29; Isaiah 12:3;John 1:29; 7:37-39; 9:1-7; Acts 2:1-4; Romans 8:32; 14:5; 1 Corinthians 5:7; 15:20; Hebrews 9:22, 26; 1 John 1:9


Topic: The Law

Keywords: religion, religious, festivals, feasts, sacrifices, visual, sin, atonement, animals, Passover, Communion, Sabbath, worship, lamb, unleavened bread, firstfruits, resurrection, the Law

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 30-31
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 30-31
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2642

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Numbers 30-31 can be summed up in three words: vows, vengeance, and victory. In these chapters, God gives the children of Israel a set of regulations for vows, they war against the Midianites, and the Lord gives them victory. As we apply the text to our lives, we learn that our word is sacred, vengeance is the Lord's business, and God gives victory to those who are obedient.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 30-33

PREVIEW: In Numbers 30-33, the Lord gave His children the law concerning their vows, He instructed them to carry out His vengeance on the Midianites, and granted them favor to return victoriously with significant plunder. Two and a half tribes decided to settle east of the Jordan River, their wilderness wanderings were reviewed, and instructions on dividing the land and dealing with its inhabitants were given.

The Law Concerning Vows—Read Numbers 30:1-16

1. A vow and an oath are solemn promises, often invoking a divine witness; they typically involve one's future action or behavior. What is required when a person makes a vow to the Lord (vv. 1-2)? (See also Ps. 50:14; 76:11.)


2. What is the Lord's perception of not fulfilling a solemn promise made to Him? (See Deuteronomy 23:21–23.)



3. How does the Lord view a person who makes a vow to Him and fails to fulfill it? How does He respond to them? (See Hag. 5:4-7.)


4. A young woman living in her father’s house could make a vow, but because she is under her father’s headship and covering, her father could overrule her vow. Under what circumstances did he have a say in her vow (vv. 3-4)?



5. How was a daughter’s vow made binding by her father (v. 4)?



6. How was a daughter’s vow overruled by her father (v. 5)?



7. If a woman got married while bound by her vows, how would her husband make her vow stand? How would he overrule her vow (vv. 6-8)?



8. Could a widow or divorced woman have her vow overruled (v. 9)?



9. In Genesis 3:16, the Lord told the woman that her husband would rule over her. From God’s perspective, a husband is the head of his wife (see Eph. 5:23), and a father is the head of his daughter (see 1 Cor. 11:3). Being head implies responsibility, leadership, and authority (see John 14:28b). When did a husband need to voice his disagreement with his wife’s vow (v. 12)?



10. If a husband attempted to overrule his wife’s vow after the day he originally heard it, what became his responsibility (v. 15)?



11. What was to be done when a person could not fulfill a vow they had spoken rashly? (See Lev. 5:4-5.)



12. As Spirit-filled believers in Jesus, should we make vows to people? (See Matt. 5:33-37.)


Vengeance on the Midianites—Read Numbers 31:1-11

13. The Lord assigned Moses a final task on earth before he would be gathered to his people. What was that task (vv. 1-2)?



14. Vengeance is punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong. Why was vengeance to be exacted upon the Midianites? (See Num. 25:1-3; 16–18.)



15. Moses established an army to go and exact this vengeance against the Midianites. Who comprised this army (vv. 3-5)?



16. Who accompanied the army? What did he bring with him (v. 6)? Why do you think this person was specifically selected? (See Num. 25:6-13.)




17. Who was killed when the army of Israel took vengeance upon the Midianites (vv. 7-8)?




18. Who was not killed when the army of Israel took vengeance upon the Midianites (v. 9)?



19. What additional vengeance did the army of Israel exact upon Midian (vv. 9-11)?


Return from the War—Read Numbers 31:12-24

20. When the army of Israel returned victoriously from exacting vengeance upon the Midianites, they brought the booty and the spoil to Moses and Eleazer (vv. 12-13). When Moses saw the army and the booty, what was his response? (v. 14)?



21. Explain why Moses responded that way (vv. 15-16).



22. What command did Moses give the army officers concerning the spoils (v. 17)? What would be the long-term effect of this command?



23. What concession did Moses give the army officers concerning the spoils (v. 18)? Why was this an acceptable concession? (See Deut. 20:14.)



24. Every person in the army who had enacted the Lord’s vengeance upon the Midianites was to remain outside the camp for seven days (v. 19). Why? (See also Num. 5:2.)



25. All the booty and spoil from the war against the Midianites had to be purified. In what two ways were these items purified? What determined the manner in which an object was purified (vv. 21-23)?


Division of the Plunder—Read Numbers 31:25-54

26. All captives and goods were to be divided according to a strict formula. Explain the formula for diving the plunder (vv. 25-30).



27. There was a significant amount of plunder taken from the Midianites. How many people were given to the Levites from this plunder (vv. 40, 47)? What might the Levites have done with these people? (See 1 Sam. 2:22.)



28. The army officers realized that the Lord had given them favor in their battle against the Midianites. What else did they discover (vv. 48-49)?



29. After recognizing the favor of the Lord, what did every man who fought against the Midianites decide to do (vv. 50-51)?


30. The total weight of the offering made by the men of war was 16,750 shekels, 420 pounds, 6,720 ounces (v. 52). In April 2014, the price per ounce for gold is $1,303.80. What was the total value of the offering made, according to this price?




31. What was done with the offering made by the men of war (v. 54)?


The Tribes Settling East of the Jordan—Read Numbers 32:1-42

32. As the children of Israel were poised to enter the Promised Land, what did the tribes of Reuben and Gad see? Why did they want what they saw (vv. 1-4)?



33. Because of what these two tribes saw, what did they ask Moses to do and to not do for them (v. 5)?



34. Moses stated numerous serious concerns he had with the request that the tribes of Reuben and Gad. What were those concerns (vv. 6-15)?



35. A compromise is an agreement or a settlement of a dispute that is reached when both sides make concessions. The tribes of Reuben and Gad offered a compromise to Moses in order to get what they wanted. What did they offer (vv. 16-19)?



36. Moses agreed to the compromise and made promises to them if they fulfilled their end of the deal. What specifically did he promise them (vv. 20-22)?



37. Moses agreed to the compromise, but he also warned them of the danger if they did not follow through. What, specifically, did he warn them of (vv. 23-24)?



38. The tribes of Reuben and Gad confirmed their commitment to the compromise, then Moses publically reiterated their commitment before the leaders of the nation of Israel (vv. 25-29). What did Moses clearly state the tribes of Reuben and Gad would have if they did not fulfill all they promised (v. 30)?


39. Moses allotted to Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh the areas that had formerly belonged to the Amorite kings Sihon and Og. Sihon had ruled in the southern part (Gilead) and Og in the north (Bashan). What two things did these tribes do to the cities that existed in that region (vv. 33-38)?



40. What did the children of Machir have to do before possessing their cities east of the Jordan (v. 39)? How did they decide on the new names for their cities (vv. 40-41)?



Israel’s Journey from Egypt Reviewed—Read Numbers 33:1-49

41. Numbers 33 reviews the journeys of the children of Israel. Who created this record (vv. 1-2)? (See also Ex. 17:14; 24:4; 34:27)




42. Every place the children of Israel journeyed was recorded in this chapter. Why do you think the Lord considered the journeys important enough to document? (See Job 31:4; 34:21; Ps. 139:2; Prov. 5:21; 15:3; Jer. 10:23; 16:17; 17:10; 23:24, 32:19; Heb. 4:13.)



Instructions for the Conquest of Canaan—Read Numbers 33:50-56

43. The Lord spoke to Moses in the plains of Moab, giving him instructions on what the children of Israel should do once they entered the Promised Land (vv. 50-54). The New King James Version lists these instructions by using five words that begin with the letter D. What were those instructions?



44. The inhabitants of Canaan were ungodly idol-worshipers. Why was it extremely important for the children of Israel to deal with the engraved stones, molded images, and high places?



45. We, too, live in an ungodly, idol-worshiping culture. Why is it important for us to deal properly with the graven images of our culture? (See Ps. 101:2–4; Eph. 5:1-2, 1 John 2:15-16; James 4:4.)



46. How were the children of Israel to divide the Promised Land among themselves (v. 54)? (See also Num. 26:53–56.)



47. If the children of Israel did not drive out all the inhabitants of the land from before them, what did the Lord say those people would become to them (v. 55)? (See also Josh. 23:13; Judg. 2:3.)



48. If we do not get rid of the evil in our lives, what will it become to us? (See Heb.12:1; Col. 3:5-10; 1 Cor. 5:9; 5:13, 2 Cor. 6:14-7:1.)



49. What additional warning did the Lord give to the children of Israel if they would not drive out all the inhabitants (v. 56)? (See also Lev. 18:28; 20:23, Deut. 28:63; 29:28; Josh. 23:15-16.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Chapters 30-31 could be summed up by three words
      1. Vows: promises are made
      2. Vengeance: plans are made for war
      3. Victory is given by God
    2. From the personal to the national, from the private to the public
    3. Vows were given based on two criteria
      1. The recognition of human nature: it has a tendency toward lying
      2. The response to the divine nature
        1. Because God has been good to us
        2. Psalm 116:12
    4. Oaths were never commanded by God to make; but if you do make a vow, then you need to keep it
    5. Most of the vows in ancient times were verbal oaths
      1. Sometimes supplemented by the raising of a hand or the mentioning of a monarch
      2. It made it more binding and solemn
    6. Abraham, Jacob, David, Jonathan, and Paul all made oaths
      1. Even Jesus said, "Verily, verily, I say unto you" or "Most assuredly, I say unto you" (see John 3:3, 5)
      2. God Himself made an oath
        1. Genesis 22:16; Hebrews 6:13
        2. Numbers 23:19
        3. He doesn't do it to produce credibility, but to produce our loyalty
        4. God descending to that lower human level for our benefit
  2. Numbers 30
    1. No requirement is given; but if you make a vow, you keep it
      1. Ecclesiastes 5:4
      2. Matthew 21:28-31
    2. When a woman under the authority of her father or husband made a promise, it could indenture her father or husband
      1. They could be liable for her promise
      2. Hence, the father had the authority to overrule it
    3. Promises are holy and sacred, but there have been some unfortunate ones
      1. Judges 11:30-39
      2. 1 Samuel 14
    4. The husband is the head of the wife; Ephesians 5:23
    5. The Lord is saying, "It's more important that that young woman obey her father or that wife obey her husband than she fulfill any promise that was made without their agreement"
    6. This helps us understand what happened in Genesis 3
      1. Eve made a rash choice, or vow, that Adam was privy to: she saw, she was tempted, and she ate
      2. Adam also ate and was held responsible in the Scripture; his silence to what was going on made him culpable
    7. New Testament
      1. The formula for oath taking became more important than the promise itself
      2. Matthew 5:33-37
        1. A call to verbal integrity
        2. Quakers believed that this forbade oath taking, even in a court of law
        3. This is legalistic and wrong; Matthew 26:63-64
    8. A promise is holy
      1. If you tell your brother or sister you'll pray for them, pray for them
      2. "I do"; don't make that vow unless you keep it
  3. Numbers 31
    1. Verse 1: did you know that you're going to fight battles till the very end?
      1. You won't have heaven till you get to heaven
      2. Learn how to fight your battles well—they get harder sometimes when you get older
      3. David was a warrior, but when he took his ease in Jerusalem, that's when he fell (see 2 Samuel 11)
    2. This was not a political battle; it was a spiritual battle (see Numbers 25)
      1. Because of what the Midianites and Moabites did to the Israelites under the direction of Balaam—sexual immorality and idolatry
      2. 24,000 Israelites died in a plague
    3. We're called to be peacemakers; Matthew 5:9
      1. However, for the last 1,600 years, the majority of the church has followed the just war tradition, which says there are certain circumstances that justify a nation going to war
      2. Between the second and fourth centuries, Christians avoided the Roman military; it meant being involved in idolatry
      3. Then Christians were accused of helping the enemy in the fall of Rome
      4. Augustine and Aquinas developed the just war theory
        1. There has to be a just cause
        2. There must be a just intention
        3. It has to be a last resort effort
        4. There must be a formal declaration of war
        5. There must be limited objectives
        6. There must be a proportionate means
        7. Non-combatant immunity
      5. Abraham, David, and the judges all went to battle
        1. The centurion; Matthew 8:10
        2. Romans 12:18—peace is sometimes not possible
      6. "Pacifism in this poor world in which we live—this lost world—means that we desert the people who need our greatest help" —Francis Schaeffer
      7. If need be, you must use force to enforce the peace
    4. Phinehas was zealous for the Lord
      1. Numbers 25:6-13
      2. Because there was a spiritual component in this battle, a spiritual man went out to battle
    5. At the end of his first prophecy, Balaam said, "Let me die the death of the righteous, and let my end be like his!" (Num. 23:10)
      1. God didn't grant his request
      2. If you don't live the life of the righteous, you can't expect to die the death of the righteous
    6. We have difficulty with passages like this (vv. 14-19)
      1. The iniquity of the Amorites was not yet full (see Gen. 15:16)
      2. Lowest level of immorality they were operating at: heterosexual activity with prostitutes, homosexuality, bestiality, and the sacrifice of babies
      3. One commentator said, "It would've been impossible for their civilization to continue to survive with just their practices"
      4. God was patient for hundreds of years; He did the same with the flood
    7. They purified the spoils of war (vv. 19-24)
      1. This is the only example we have of purification by fire in all Scripture
      2. This was probably due to corpse contamination
    8. They divided the spoils of war equally between those who went to battle and those who stayed behind (vv. 25-27)
      1. The warriors didn't get a special status
      2. David at Ziklag; see 1 Samuel 30:21-24
    9. Not one man died (vv. 48-49)
      1. This was a supernatural battle
      2. How would you explain Jericho?
      3. Also, the Midianites were nomadic people; they were not used to warfare
    10. The men made an offering to the Lord (vv. 50-54)
  4. Closing
    1. Vows
      1. Your word is sacred—or it should be
      2. Sincere comes from two Latin words
        1. Sine, meaning without
        2. Cera, meaning wax
        3. In ancient times, dishonest dealers would take cracked works of art and fill them in with wax and powdered marble
        4. The honest dealers would certify their work by making a vow
      3. Let your words be without wax
    2. Vengeance
      1. It's the Lord's business, not yours
      2. Deuteronomy 32:35; Romans 12:19
    3. Victory
      1. God will give you the victory as you obey Him in these areas
      2. All of the victory that God gives you is for one reason: that you, like the Israelites, might come back and render Him praise and glorify Him


Figures referenced: Augustine, Aquinas, Francis Schaeffer

Latin words: sine, cera



Cross references: Genesis 3; 15:16; 22:16; Numbers 23:10, 19; 25; 30-31; Deuteronomy 32:35; Judges 11:30-39; 1 Samuel 14; 30; 2 Samuel 11; Psalm 116:12; Ecclesiastes 5:4; Matthew 5:9, 33-37; 8:10; 21:28-31; 26:63-64; John 3:3, 5; Romans 12:18, 19; Ephesians 5:23; Hebrews 6:13


Topic: Warfare

Keywords: vows, vengeance, victory, human nature, divine nature, oaths, promises, battle, fighting, warfare, spiritual, warrior, peace, war, just war, pacifism, army, military

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 32-34
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 32-34
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2644

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In Numbers 32-34, two and a half tribes refuse to enter Canaan, but in exchange for their help in the battle for the Promised Land, God gives them the land of Gilead. Then when the boundaries of the Promised Land are drawn, we find out Israel only occupied one-tenth of what God promised Abraham. In this study, we are challenged to ask ourselves: Do we sit on the sidelines while our brothers and sisters go to battle for the Lord? And are we content to forfeit the inheritance God has for us?

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 30-33

PREVIEW: In Numbers 30-33, the Lord gave His children the law concerning their vows, He instructed them to carry out His vengeance on the Midianites, and granted them favor to return victoriously with significant plunder. Two and a half tribes decided to settle east of the Jordan River, their wilderness wanderings were reviewed, and instructions on dividing the land and dealing with its inhabitants were given.

The Law Concerning Vows—Read Numbers 30:1-16

1. A vow and an oath are solemn promises, often invoking a divine witness; they typically involve one's future action or behavior. What is required when a person makes a vow to the Lord (vv. 1-2)? (See also Ps. 50:14; 76:11.)


2. What is the Lord's perception of not fulfilling a solemn promise made to Him? (See Deuteronomy 23:21–23.)



3. How does the Lord view a person who makes a vow to Him and fails to fulfill it? How does He respond to them? (See Hag. 5:4-7.)


4. A young woman living in her father’s house could make a vow, but because she is under her father’s headship and covering, her father could overrule her vow. Under what circumstances did he have a say in her vow (vv. 3-4)?



5. How was a daughter’s vow made binding by her father (v. 4)?



6. How was a daughter’s vow overruled by her father (v. 5)?



7. If a woman got married while bound by her vows, how would her husband make her vow stand? How would he overrule her vow (vv. 6-8)?



8. Could a widow or divorced woman have her vow overruled (v. 9)?



9. In Genesis 3:16, the Lord told the woman that her husband would rule over her. From God’s perspective, a husband is the head of his wife (see Eph. 5:23), and a father is the head of his daughter (see 1 Cor. 11:3). Being head implies responsibility, leadership, and authority (see John 14:28b). When did a husband need to voice his disagreement with his wife’s vow (v. 12)?



10. If a husband attempted to overrule his wife’s vow after the day he originally heard it, what became his responsibility (v. 15)?



11. What was to be done when a person could not fulfill a vow they had spoken rashly? (See Lev. 5:4-5.)



12. As Spirit-filled believers in Jesus, should we make vows to people? (See Matt. 5:33-37.)


Vengeance on the Midianites—Read Numbers 31:1-11

13. The Lord assigned Moses a final task on earth before he would be gathered to his people. What was that task (vv. 1-2)?



14. Vengeance is punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong. Why was vengeance to be exacted upon the Midianites? (See Num. 25:1-3; 16–18.)



15. Moses established an army to go and exact this vengeance against the Midianites. Who comprised this army (vv. 3-5)?



16. Who accompanied the army? What did he bring with him (v. 6)? Why do you think this person was specifically selected? (See Num. 25:6-13.)




17. Who was killed when the army of Israel took vengeance upon the Midianites (vv. 7-8)?




18. Who was not killed when the army of Israel took vengeance upon the Midianites (v. 9)?



19. What additional vengeance did the army of Israel exact upon Midian (vv. 9-11)?


Return from the War—Read Numbers 31:12-24

20. When the army of Israel returned victoriously from exacting vengeance upon the Midianites, they brought the booty and the spoil to Moses and Eleazer (vv. 12-13). When Moses saw the army and the booty, what was his response? (v. 14)?



21. Explain why Moses responded that way (vv. 15-16).



22. What command did Moses give the army officers concerning the spoils (v. 17)? What would be the long-term effect of this command?



23. What concession did Moses give the army officers concerning the spoils (v. 18)? Why was this an acceptable concession? (See Deut. 20:14.)



24. Every person in the army who had enacted the Lord’s vengeance upon the Midianites was to remain outside the camp for seven days (v. 19). Why? (See also Num. 5:2.)



25. All the booty and spoil from the war against the Midianites had to be purified. In what two ways were these items purified? What determined the manner in which an object was purified (vv. 21-23)?


Division of the Plunder—Read Numbers 31:25-54

26. All captives and goods were to be divided according to a strict formula. Explain the formula for diving the plunder (vv. 25-30).



27. There was a significant amount of plunder taken from the Midianites. How many people were given to the Levites from this plunder (vv. 40, 47)? What might the Levites have done with these people? (See 1 Sam. 2:22.)



28. The army officers realized that the Lord had given them favor in their battle against the Midianites. What else did they discover (vv. 48-49)?



29. After recognizing the favor of the Lord, what did every man who fought against the Midianites decide to do (vv. 50-51)?


30. The total weight of the offering made by the men of war was 16,750 shekels, 420 pounds, 6,720 ounces (v. 52). In April 2014, the price per ounce for gold is $1,303.80. What was the total value of the offering made, according to this price?




31. What was done with the offering made by the men of war (v. 54)?


The Tribes Settling East of the Jordan—Read Numbers 32:1-42

32. As the children of Israel were poised to enter the Promised Land, what did the tribes of Reuben and Gad see? Why did they want what they saw (vv. 1-4)?



33. Because of what these two tribes saw, what did they ask Moses to do and to not do for them (v. 5)?



34. Moses stated numerous serious concerns he had with the request that the tribes of Reuben and Gad. What were those concerns (vv. 6-15)?



35. A compromise is an agreement or a settlement of a dispute that is reached when both sides make concessions. The tribes of Reuben and Gad offered a compromise to Moses in order to get what they wanted. What did they offer (vv. 16-19)?



36. Moses agreed to the compromise and made promises to them if they fulfilled their end of the deal. What specifically did he promise them (vv. 20-22)?



37. Moses agreed to the compromise, but he also warned them of the danger if they did not follow through. What, specifically, did he warn them of (vv. 23-24)?



38. The tribes of Reuben and Gad confirmed their commitment to the compromise, then Moses publically reiterated their commitment before the leaders of the nation of Israel (vv. 25-29). What did Moses clearly state the tribes of Reuben and Gad would have if they did not fulfill all they promised (v. 30)?


39. Moses allotted to Reuben, Gad, and the half-tribe of Manasseh the areas that had formerly belonged to the Amorite kings Sihon and Og. Sihon had ruled in the southern part (Gilead) and Og in the north (Bashan). What two things did these tribes do to the cities that existed in that region (vv. 33-38)?



40. What did the children of Machir have to do before possessing their cities east of the Jordan (v. 39)? How did they decide on the new names for their cities (vv. 40-41)?



Israel’s Journey from Egypt Reviewed—Read Numbers 33:1-49

41. Numbers 33 reviews the journeys of the children of Israel. Who created this record (vv. 1-2)? (See also Ex. 17:14; 24:4; 34:27)




42. Every place the children of Israel journeyed was recorded in this chapter. Why do you think the Lord considered the journeys important enough to document? (See Job 31:4; 34:21; Ps. 139:2; Prov. 5:21; 15:3; Jer. 10:23; 16:17; 17:10; 23:24, 32:19; Heb. 4:13.)



Instructions for the Conquest of Canaan—Read Numbers 33:50-56

43. The Lord spoke to Moses in the plains of Moab, giving him instructions on what the children of Israel should do once they entered the Promised Land (vv. 50-54). The New King James Version lists these instructions by using five words that begin with the letter D. What were those instructions?



44. The inhabitants of Canaan were ungodly idol-worshipers. Why was it extremely important for the children of Israel to deal with the engraved stones, molded images, and high places?



45. We, too, live in an ungodly, idol-worshiping culture. Why is it important for us to deal properly with the graven images of our culture? (See Ps. 101:2–4; Eph. 5:1-2, 1 John 2:15-16; James 4:4.)



46. How were the children of Israel to divide the Promised Land among themselves (v. 54)? (See also Num. 26:53–56.)



47. If the children of Israel did not drive out all the inhabitants of the land from before them, what did the Lord say those people would become to them (v. 55)? (See also Josh. 23:13; Judg. 2:3.)



48. If we do not get rid of the evil in our lives, what will it become to us? (See Heb.12:1; Col. 3:5-10; 1 Cor. 5:9; 5:13, 2 Cor. 6:14-7:1.)



49. What additional warning did the Lord give to the children of Israel if they would not drive out all the inhabitants (v. 56)? (See also Lev. 18:28; 20:23, Deut. 28:63; 29:28; Josh. 23:15-16.)

DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. Numbers is named after a census of the Israelites in chapters 1 and 26
      1. God cared more about the names of the people than the numbers
      2. He wants your life to count for something
    2. The land was promised, but there were a series of delays: disappointments, disillusionment, disorganization, discontentment
    3. The generation that came out of Egypt all died; a whole new generation had to be numbered
      1. Because of a reconnaissance mission; Numbers 13:1-14:38
      2. Now, they were about to enter the land, but Moses had not died yet
  2. Numbers 32
    1. This chapter is like a rerun of a bad movie: two and a half tribes wanted to stop short of entering into the land
    2. The land of Gilead is lush and gorgeous; they saw that and thought, Why should we go any further?
      1. Your eye is the gate through which discontentment is bred and grown
        1. Eve saw the tree in the garden
          1. Genesis 3:6
          2. 1 John 2:16
        2. Lot saw the well-watered plain of the Jordan; Genesis 13:10
      2. They saw something, it looked good, and they were willing to stop short of what God had promised to them
        1. What they saw was beautiful and bountiful
        2. What they saw was not bestowed—it wasn't what God had for them
      3. Sometimes we make decisions in life solely based on what we can see
      4. You need to find out if something is what God has for you
      5. How willing are we to stop short of all that God has for us?
    3. Numbers 32:6
      1. You can understand Moses' feelings at this point
      2. As believers, we want to come to a place where we can just sit
        1. We call it retirement; the Bible calls it heaven
        2. It's our nature to sit
      3. Are we content to sit while others do the work?
      4. Will you cross over into the land?
        1. There are some fights you're going to encounter
        2. But you're going to have a lot of fun—an adventure
    4. Other times that caused discouragement for the children of Israel
      1. Numbers 13: discouraged because of the whiners
      2. Numbers 21: discouraged because of the way
      3. Here they were discouraged because of the waners
    5. Do you know what your waning could do to a young believer?
      1. There's nothing to aspire to
      2. We need strong leaders
      3. Faith is contagious; fear is contagious
    6. "We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea" —C.S. Lewis
    7. Moses struck a deal with them; Numbers 32:23
      1. Nothing is done in secret
      2. Proverbs 5:21; Hebrews 4:13
      3. "Secret sin on earth is open scandal in heaven"
    8. Problems with living in Gilead
      1. When the children of Israel were attacked by the Assyrians, the first ones to go into captivity were these tribes
        1. They were unprotected
        2. When you live on the edge, you can get picked off
      2. Because of a misunderstanding and an assumption, a civil war almost broke out and destroyed these tribes
        1. Assumption is the lowest form of communication
        2. Joshua 22
          1. They built an altar of memory
          2. The rest of Israel assumed they were starting another church
          3. Deuteronomy 12—the law of the central sanctuary: one God worshiped in one place on one altar
      3. Jesus took a boat to the shores of this area
        1. It had degraded into a pagan culture
        2. It wasn't God's original plan
    9. God promised a huge portion of land to Abraham and his progeny, so why wasn't it God's will that these tribes lived in Gilead?
  3. Numbers 33
    1. A journal of places: fifty-six names mentioned, forty-two of which are camping spots and eighteen of which we have no idea where they are
    2. What's most fascinating is not what's here, but what's not here
      1. There is no mention in this chapter of the thirty-eight years of wandering—nothing about the curses, the death, the disbelief
      2. Micah 7:19; subdue means to trample underfoot
      3. God was choosing to remember the places, not the imperfections
    3. Exodus 5:1-2
      1. Pharaoh asked this question because he was called neter nefer, the perfect god
      2. Passover; Exodus 12
      3. People ask the same question today: "Who is the Lord?"
        1. The truth that will happen to everyone: Philippians 2:10
        2. You can bow now or you can bow later, but you will bow
    4. Ezion Geber (Num. 33:35, the Gulf of Aqaba) is where Solomon will have a fleet of ships
    5. "For I have given you the land to possess" (Numbers 33:53)
      1. The right to own land and build settlements in the Middle East is hotly debated
      2. Who has the right to tell anybody who has the right to anything?
        1. God does!
        2. God gives us the right to have rights
      3. Leviticus 25:23
        1. To this day, you cannot own land in Israel
        2. You can lease it for ninety-nine years
      4. It's God's land; that's why we call it the Holy Land
      5. Ezekiel 37:1-14
  4. Numbers 34
    1. Borders for the land given
    2. These aren't the exact borders God said Abraham's progeny would be given
      1. Deuteronomy 11:24; Numbers 33:55
      2. They never took all that the Lord had for them, even though they could have
  5. Closing
    1. God promised Abraham 300,000 square miles
      1. At the zenith of Israel's history, at their maximum occupation under David and Solomon, they only occupied 30,000 square miles
      2. They only enjoyed one-tenth of what God wanted them to enjoy
    2. Do you ever wonder, Lord, could there be more that You want to do in and through my life? Am I enjoying the inheritance You have for me, or am I content to sit on the other side of the Jordan?
    3. How much more the Lord wants to do in and through us!
    4. "Most Christians, concerning the river of experience, are only up to the ankles; some others have waded until the stream is up to the knees; a few find it chest deep; and only a few—oh! how few!—find it to be a river to swim in, the bottom of which they cannot touch" —C.H. Spurgeon
    5. Ephesians 1:3
    6. God's gifts are yours if you open them, appropriate them, put the soles of your feet on the ground, and walk through them
    7. Believe God for big things
      1. Forget impossible—that's what the ten whiners said
      2. Be the two spies who said, "Our God can give it to us"
    8. If twelve fishermen in one generation spread the gospel throughout the Roman Empire, imagine what thousands of people at just one church in Albuquerque could do


Figures referenced: C.S. Lewis, C.H. Spurgeon

Foreign words: neter nefer


Cross references: Genesis 3:6; 13:10; Exodus 5:1-2; 12; Leviticus 25:23; Numbers 1; 13:1-14:38; 21; 26; 32-34; Deuteronomy 11:24; 12; Joshua 22; Proverbs 5:21; Ezekiel 37:1-14; Micah 7:19; Ephesians 1:3; Philippians 2:10; Hebrews 4:13; 1 John 2:16


Topic: Discontentment

Keywords: discontentment, God's promise, belief, provision, Promised Land, Christian living, spiritual warfare, Holy Land

 


 

SERIES: 04 Numbers - 2013
MESSAGE: Numbers 35-36
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 35-36
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/2666

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In the last two chapters of Numbers, God assigned cities for the tribe of Levi to dwell in, gave instructions for the cities of refuge, and enacted a new law concerning the marriage of female heirs. This book ends similar to how it began: with God at the center of His children's lives. As we wrap up the book of Numbers, we see God's overwhelming mercy, a prophetic picture of our High Priest and Redeemer, and God's view of the sanctity of life. Even though generations have died in the wilderness, God's plan, purpose, and work in the lives of His people are very much alive.

STUDY GUIDE
Numbers 34-36

PREVIEW: In Numbers 34-36, the boundaries of the Promised Land were clearly demarcated, leaders were appointed to apportion the land, cities were set aside for the Levites, cities of refuge were established, and the Inheritance Laws were modified and clarified.

The Appointed Boundaries of Canaan—Read Numbers 34:1-15

1.The name Canaan was derived from the man Canaan and his descendants (see Genesis 10:15-18). He was cursed by Noah for his father Ham’s actions (see Genesis 9:18-27). The land of Canaan was referred to as the Promised Land. Why? (See Genesis 17:8.)



2.The boundaries of the Promised Land were clearly demarcated by the Lord. How far south did the southern border extend? What southernmost city was incorporated into the Promised Land as an inheritance to the children of Israel (see v. 4)?



3.What was the western border of the Promised Land (see v. 6)?



4.The northern and eastern borders were delineated by geographical locations (see vv. 7-12). How was the land to be divided between the tribes (see v. 13)?



5.Although the nation of Israel comprised twelve tribes, the Promised Land was to be the inheritance of nine and one-half tribes (see v. 13). Why (see vv. 14-15)?


The Leaders Appointed to Divide the Land—Read Numbers 34:16-29

6.Two men were commissioned by the Lord to oversee the allotment assignments of the Promised Land. Who were these men (see v. 17)? What were their roles in the congregation of Israel? (See Numbers 20:28; 27:18-20.)



7.A leader from every tribe was selected to assist in the apportioning of the Promised Land. How many men were selected (see vv. 19-28)?



Cities for the Levites—Read Numbers 35:1-8

8.The Levites did not receive land as an inheritance. Why? (See Numbers 18:23-24.)




9.What was the inheritance of the tribe of Levi? (See Numbers 18:20-21.)



10.Rather than receiving a portion of land, what did the Levites receive in the Promised Land (v. 2)?



11.What was measured two thousand cubits in every direction around the cities of the Levites (see vv. 4-5)? What was its purpose (see v. 3)?



12.How many cities were designated for the Levites (see v. 7)?



13.How were cities selected for the Levites (see v. 8)?



Cities of Refuge—Read Numbers 35:9-34

14.What was the purpose of a city of refuge (see vv. 11-12)?


15.From amongst the cities designated for the tribe of Levi, how many were designated as cities of refuge (see v. 13)?



16.Where were the cities of refuge positioned (see v. 14)?



17.Only two and one-half tribes were on the east side of the Jordan, yet half of the cities of refuge were located there. Speculate: why were the cities of refuge disproportionately located?



18.Although the cities of refuge were designated for the children of Israel, who else was allowed to flee to them? Under what circumstances (see v. 15)?




19.A person could flee to a city of refuge if they accidentally killed a person (see v. 15). However, three non-accidental instances of killing were considered murder. What were those three instances (see vv. 16-18)?




20.Deuteronomy 19 gives an example of an accidental cause of death for which a person could flee to a city of refuge. What was the example? (See Deuteronomy 19:4-5.)



21.In the Promised Land, there was no prison to house murderers. Rather, justice was meted out by an avenger of blood. An avenger of blood was a family member of the murder victim. How and when was the avenger of blood to avenge his murdered relative (see v. 19)?




22.If justice was not meted out quickly, what might have happened in the Promised Land? (See Ecclesiastes 8:11.)



23.If the cause of death was truly accidental, the person at fault was still required to flee to a city of refuge. It was possible that the avenger of blood might overtake this person before they reached the city of refuge (see Deuteronomy 19:6). To avoid the avenging of the innocent, what did the Lord require be established in the Promised Land? (See Deuteronomy 19:3.)



24.There were additional murderous intentions for which the murderer would be found guilty and be put to death by the avenger of blood. What were those intentions (see vv. 20-21)?



25.Compare and contrast the murderous motives listed in verses 20-21 with the motives listed in verses 22-23. What are the similarities and differences?




26.If an intentional murder was committed and the murderer successfully made it to a city of refuge, he would be protected within the city and afforded what (see vv. 12, 24)?



27.If the murderer was found guilty, what was his judgment (see v. 21)? (See also Deuteronomy 19:12.)



28.If a manslayer was found innocent of murder, what was done to him (see v. 25)?




29.How long was the manslayer required to remain in the city of refuge (see v. 25)?




30.What could happen to the manslayer if he departed from the city of refuge (see vv. 26-28)?



31.A manslayer found guilty of murder was afforded a fair trial before the congregation. What was not sufficient to condemn him to death? What was required for condemnation (see v. 30)?



32.The Promise Land was defiled by the shedding of blood in a murderous act. What was required to atone for this defilement (see v. 33)?




33.Why was it so important to mete out quick judgment and punishment for the murderer and make atonement for the defilement of the Promised Land (see v. 34)?



Marriage of Female Heirs—Read Numbers 36:1-13

34.In Numbers 27:1-7, Zelophehad died, leaving his five daughters no inheritance in the Promised Land. Moses sought the Lord, and the Inheritance Laws were established. However, the children of Gilead pointed out an issue with these Inheritance Laws (see vv. 1-4). Explain the issue (see v. 3).



35.Did the Lord consider the issue right or wrong (see v. 5)?



36.What modifications to the Inheritance Laws did the Lord command (see vv. 6-9)?



37.Although a daughter who received the inheritance of her father’s land was allowed to marry whomever she thought best (see v. 6), what would become of her inheritance if she married outside of her father’s tribe (see v. 9)? (See also Numbers 27:8-11.)



38.Although the five daughters of Zelophehad were granted the liberty to marry whomever they thought best, what did they decide to do (see vv. 10-12)?



39.The Inheritance Laws were established because the laws the Lord gave Moses did not cover the issue. Then the children of Gilead caused modifications and clarification to these laws. We may find that situations and circumstances we face are not specifically addressed in the Word of God. Like the daughters of Zelophehad, how should we handle a problem that might not be specifically addressed in the Word of God? (See Proverbs 11:14; 12:15; 20:18.)



40.Like Moses, how should we handle a situation for which we do not know the biblical answer? (See Jeremiah 29:13; Luke 11:9-10; 2 Timothy 3:16-17; 2 Peter 1:3-4.)


DETAILED NOTES

  1. Introduction
    1. There were forty-eight cities given to the tribe of Levi for them to live in
      1. They had no tribal land allotment
      2. Six of these were cities of refuge: legal asylums in case somebody committed involuntary manslaughter
    2. Genesis 34
      1. Jacob on his deathbed:
        Genesis 49:5
        , 7
      2. Levi was scattered throughout all twelve tribes
      3. This curse turned out to be a blessing
        1. Levi got the priesthood
        2. All of the tribes had access to the Levites
    3. The Levites were the first to respond to Moses in the golden calf incident;
      Exodus 32:25-26
  2. Numbers 35
    1. Forty-eight cities, twelve tribes; larger tribes got more cities, and smaller tribes got fewer
      1. Forty-two were cities the Levites lived in
      2. Six were cities of refuge: three on the western side of the Jordan, three on the eastern side
      3. Joshua 21
    2. These cities were little camps or outposts
      1. All forty-eight Levitical cities combined filled about fifteen square miles
      2. One-tenth of 1 percent of the entire land allotment of Israel
    3. Legal cities of asylum, or cities of refuge
      1. You could have a fair trial
      2. It could restrain the vengeful impulse of the avenger of blood
      3. Safe prisons
    4. Avenger
      1. Hebrew term goel, a kinsman-redeemer (see Ruth)
      2. If you lost land, the goel could buy it back
      3. If you had to sell yourself into slavery, the goel could redeem you
      4. It was the goel's responsibility to marry their brother's widow
      5. The goel was a personal executioner
    5. This is still part of Middle Eastern culture
      1. What we read here is a far cry from the practices still going on today
      2. Honor killings in Muslim communities
      3. Very different from being judged for murder by an impartial jury of Levites
    6. If you were found guilty, you had to live in a city of refuge for as long as the high priest lived
      1. The death of the high priest had some atoning value
      2. While the high priest was alive, you were safe; once the high priest died, you were set free

      3. Hebrews 4:14
        ; a beautiful picture of Jesus Christ
    7. This chapter underscores a basic truth
      1. Life is sacred to God
      2. If you murder someone, you're saying, "I disagree with God; that person's life is not sacred"
      3. It goes directly against the intention of God in creation;
        Genesis 1:27
      4. Society's in a bad sort when it starts looking at life as dispensable
    8. Why did God command people to kill?
      1. This sort of execution was righteously administered judicial execution—
        very different from premeditated murder

      2. Exodus 20:13
      3. Life is sacred, and if a person violates that, they must pay a price for that
      4. One of the basic laws of humanity:
        Genesis 9:5-6
    9. There were eighteen different crimes God stipulated were reason enough for righteously administered judicial execution
    10. Three things about Numbers 35
      1. It's ironic
        1. The tribe that administered justice was Levi; had God played by the rules in this chapter, there would be no tribe of Levi
        2. Our church ought to be a city of refuge—
          a place filled with forgiven and forgiving people
      2. It's prophetic: speaks of Jesus Christ
      3. It's basic
        1. The basic truth that life is sacred
        2. Kicked up a notch:
          Matthew 5:21-22
      4. Brings us to a place of abject poverty before God;
        Matthew 5:3
  3. Numbers 36
    1. Numbers 27:1-11; the Zelophehad rule
    2. This is an addendum to Numbers 27
    3. Why does Numbers close with this?
      1. Dealing with land allotments
      2. Tribe of Manasseh split across the Jordan
      3. Tribal map could eventually look like a patchwork quilt
    4. Land could be lost over time: in the Year of Jubilee, every fifty years, land reverted back to original owners (see
      Lev. 25:13
      )
    5. Numbers begins and ends on a similar note
      1. Begins with organization, with God at the center of their camp and their lives
      2. Then disorganization; a whole generation died in the wilderness
      3. Then the new generation reorganized and centered on God
    6. The children of Israel were perched right on the border of the Promised Land
  4. Closing
    1. A generation was dead, but God's plan, purpose, and work weren't
    2. God buries His workman, but His work goes on
    3. There's always some future plan God has, but He's fully in charge and fully in control
    4. 1 Corinthians 10:1-11; this is why we need to study all of Scripture

Hebrew words: goel

Cross references: Genesis 1:27; 9:5-6; 34; 49:5, 7; Exodus 20:13; 32:25-26; Leviticus 25:13; Numbers 27:1-11; 35-36; Joshua 21; Ruth; Matthew 5:3, 21-22; 1 Corinthians 10:1-11; Hebrews 4:14



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