Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Skip Heitzig

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.


 

Table of Contents

# SCRIPTURE: MESSAGE:
1 Genesis 1-11 Destination: Genesis 1-11
2 Genesis 12-50 Destination: Genesis 12-50
3 Exodus 1-18 Destination: Exodus 1-18
4 Exodus 19-40 Destination: Exodus 19-40
5 Leviticus 1-17 Destination: Leviticus 1-17
6 Leviticus 18-27 Destination: Leviticus 18-27
7 Numbers 1-14 Destination: Numbers 1-14
8 Numbers 15-36 Destination: Numbers 15-36
9 Deuteronomy 1-34 Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
10 Joshua 1-12 Destination: Joshua 1-12
11 Joshua 13-24 Destination: Joshua 13-24
12 Judges 1-10 Destination: Judges 1-10
13 Judges 11-21 Destination: Judges 11-21
14 Ruth 1-4 Destination: Ruth 1-4
15 1 Samuel 1-15 Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
16 1 Samuel 16-31 Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
17 2 Samuel 1-10 Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
18 2 Samuel 11-24 Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
19 1 Kings 1-22 Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
20 2 Kings 1-25 Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
21 1 Chronicles 1-29 Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
22 2 Chronicles 1-36 Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
23 Ezra 1-10 Destination: Ezra 1-10
24 Nehemiah 1-13 Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
25 Esther 1-10 Destination: Esther 1-10
26 Job 1-42 Destination: Job 1-42
27 Psalms 1-72 Destination: Psalms 1-72
28 Psalms 73-150 Destination: Psalms 73-150
29 Proverbs 1-31 Destination: Proverbs 1-31
30 Ecclesiastes 1-12 Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
31 Song_of_Solomon 1-8 Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
32 Isaiah 1-39 Destination: Isaiah 1-39
33 Isaiah 40-66 Destination: Isaiah 40-66
34 Jeremiah 1-52 Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
35 Lamentations 1-5 Destination: Lamentations 1-5
36 Ezekiel 1-48 Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
37 Daniel 1-6 Destination: Daniel 1-6
38 Daniel 7-12 Destination: Daniel 7-12
39 Hosea 1-14 Destination: Hosea 1-14
40 Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
41 Jonah 1-4 Destination: Jonah 1-4
42 Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
43 Zephaniah; Haggai Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
44 Zechariah; Malachi Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
45 Matthew, Mark; Luke Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
46 John Destination: John
47 Acts Destination: Acts
48 Romans Destination: Romans
49 1 Corinthians Destination: 1 Corinthians
50 2 Corinthians Destination: 2 Corinthians
51 Galatians Destination: Galatians
52 Ephesians Destination: Ephesians
53 Philippians Destination: Philippians
54 Colossians Destination: Colossians
55 1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18 Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
56 1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22 Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
57 Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25 Destination: Titus and Philemon
58 Hebrews Destination: Hebrews
59 James Destination: James
60 1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3 Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
61 1 John Destination: 1 John
62 2 John, 3 John; Jude Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
63 Revelation 1-11 Destination: Revelation 1-11
64 Revelation 12-22 Destination: Revelation 12-22
65 Bible from 30k Final Q&A

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Genesis 1-11
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Genesis 1-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/484

MESSAGE SUMMARY
We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

The first three words of Genesis are... "In the beginning..." Genesis is the book of beginnings. The word Genesis is a Greek word that means "origin." And it describes the origins of creation.


  1. The origin of the world - 1:1-25

  2. The origin of the human race - 1:26 - 2:25

  3. The origin of sin in the world - 3:1-7

  4. The origin of family life - 4:1-15

  5. The origin of civilization - 4:16 - 9:29

  6. The origin of the nations of the world - 10:11

  7. The origin of the Hebrew people - 12:1 - 50:26


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Unknown.....
Creation, the Flood, the Tower of Babel

c. 2166 - 1991 B.C. .....
Abraham, born in Ur of the Chaldeans, lived 175 years

TRIP PLANNER:
Genesis can be easily divided into two sections. The first section from Genesis 1:1 - 11:9 is historical in nature and covers four key events that occurred on the earth. The setting for this section of Genesis occurs primarily in the Fertile Crescent which is located in modern day Iraq.

  1. The Formation: 1:1 - 2:25

  2. The Fall: 3:1 - 5:32

  3. The Flood: 6:1 - 9:29

  4. The Fallout: 10:1 - 11:9


PLACES OF INTEREST:
Garden Of Eden - Although the exact location of the Garden of Eden is unknown we do have an idea of the general area that it could have been. Genesis 2:10-14 lists several landmarks. The Pison, Gihon, Tigris and Euphrates rivers. Also mentioned is the land of Havilah where there is gold, bdellium and onyx. This could place the location of the Garden of Eden somewhere under the waters of the Persian Gulf.

Mount Ararat - Mount Ararat is located in Eastern Turkey on the boarders of Iran, Armenia and Nachivan. The Bible describes the resting place of Noah’s ark to be in the mountains of Ararat.

Tower of Babel - The land of Shinar refers to the ancient region of Babylon in Mesopotamia. Archaeologists examining the remains of ancient Babylon have found what appears to be the foundation of a large ziggurate (a stepped pyramid) that could be the Tower of Babel.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Ham - Son of Noah. Settled southward. Descendents settled into South and Central Arabia, Egypt, the East Shore of the Mediterranean and the East Coast of Africa. Egypt was called the "Land of Ham." This would include the Amorites, the Philistines and the Hittites. Canaan, son of Ham, settled into the area that would become the land of Israel.

Japheth - Son of Noah. Settled in the regions around the Black and Caspian Seas. Descendents settled into Europe and Asia. This would include the Greeks and the Medes.

Shem - Son of Noah. Settled into the north Euphrates Valley. His descendants would become the Assyrians, Persians, Syrians and Arabians.

FUN FACTS:
CALENDAR YEAR - The Jewish calendar year is 360 days and based on a lunar cycle. Each month begins on the first sliver of light after a new moon (when the moon is completely dark). The Gregorian calendar year that we use is 365.2425 days and is based on the time it takes for the Earth to complete one orbit around the sun.

PENTATEUCH - Genesis is the first of five books referred to as the Pentateuch which means "fivefold vessels." The Jews refer to these five books as the Torah or "law." The give books include: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

COVENANT - A covenant is a binding agreement between two parties, some conditional and some unconditional. Conditional covenants were only binding when the conditions of the covenant were made. Unconditional covenants were made by a superior to someone lesser. It was based solely on the ability of the superior to fulfill the conditions of the covenant. God initiated eight covenants with man. Listed are the first three:

  1. Edenic Covenant: This Covenant was between God and Adam. (1) Populate the Earth, (2) Subdue the Earth, (3) Care for the Earth, (4) Dominion over the animal creation, (5) Refrain from eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. If the fruit is eaten, it would result in death. This covenant is conditional.

  2. Adamic Covenant: This Covenant is between God and Satan and Adam and is the result of Adam's disobedience. (1) Satan is judged, (2) Redemption is promised, (3) Pain in childbirth for women, (4) Man is the head of the woman, (5) The ground is cursed and men will toil and labor, (6) Humans will die. This covenant is unconditional.

  3. Noahic Covenant: God would never curse the ground again as He did in the garden. God would never destroy every living thing as He did with the flood. The sign of this covenant is the rainbow. This covenant is unconditional.


MAPS:

1. The Table of Nations Map

Topic: Genesis 1-11

Keywords: Creation, Formation, Flood, Fall, Adam, Eve, Serpent, Noah, Tower of Babel, origin, beginnings, Genesis

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Genesis 12-50
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Genesis 12-50
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/487

MESSAGE SUMMARY
This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.

DETAILED NOTES
Genesis is also a book of firsts. The first time things are mentioned in the Bible, special significance should be given.

Here are some examples of things that were mentioned for the first time:

1. The first time husbandry is mentioned - 4:2
2. The first time agriculture is mentioned - 4:2
3. The first time offerings are mentioned - 4:3
4. The first time murder is mentioned - 4:3
5. The first time musicians are mentioned - 4:21

THINGS TO DO:
Keep a sheet of paper and write down the first time something of significance is mentioned in the Bible. Ask yourself these questions: Why are they important enough to be included in the Bible? What is the significance from God's standpoint? How does this apply to my life?

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Unknown.....
Creation, the Flood, the Tower of Babel

c. 2166 - 1991 B.C. .....
Abraham, born in Ur of the Chaldeans, lived 175 years

c. 2091 - 2090 B.C. .....
Abraham travels to Canaan

c. 2066 B.C. .....
Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed

c. 2066 - 1886 B.C. .....
Isaac, born to Abraham and Sarah, lived 180 years

c. 2006 - 1859 B.C. .....
Jacob, born to Isaac and Rebekah, lived 147 years

c. 1991 B.C. .....
Abraham dies in Canaan

c. 1915 - 1805 B.C. .....
Joseph, born to Jacob and Rachel, lived 110 years

c. 1897 B.C. .....
Joseph sold to Egypt

c. 1886 B.C. .....
Isaac dies in Canaan

c. 1876 B.C. .....
Jacob and his family move to Egypt

c. 1859 B.C. .....
Jacob dies in Egypt

c. 1805 B.C. .....
Joseph dies in Egypt

TRIP PLANNER:
Genesis can be easily divided into two sections. The second section from Genesis 11:10 - 50:26 is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. This time is also known as the Age of the Patriarchs. The setting for this section of Genesis occurs in Canaan and Egypt. Canaan is modern day Israel.

1. Abraham: 11:10 - 25:8
2. Isaac: 25:19 - 26:35
3. Jacob: 27:1 - 36:43
4. Joseph: 37:1 - 50:26

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Salem - the ancient name for Jerusalem.

Sodom and Gomorrah - Mount Sodom is located at the south end of the Dead Sea. This is believed to be the location of the ancient cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. Archaeologists have found cities turned to ash and evidence of millions of round golf ball sized sulfur balls.

Ur - The ruins of the ancient city of Ur, the birthplace of Abraham, are located 140 miles south of Babylon in modern day Iraq near the Euphrates river. The site is now known as Tall al Muqayyar, Iraq. The great ziggurat of Ur is still standing.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Abram - Abram is the first name of Abraham. God changes Abram's name to Abraham. Abram means "exalted father." Abraham means "father of a multitude."

Ishmael - The son of Abraham and Hagar. Ishmael is a symbol of the work of the flesh in that Abram and Sarai did not believe that God would provide a son through their union. Sarai gives Abram her maidservant to bear a son. The descendents of Ishmael formed the nations from Egypt to Assyria, but were not the only tribes in the Arabian desert.

Melchizedek - The King of Salem during the time of Abram. Genesis describes Melchizedek as the priest of the most High God and Abram brings a tithe and offering to him. The mysterious appearance of Melchizedek lead most theologians to believe that this is a Theophony - an Old Testament appearance of Jesus.

FUN FACTS:

CALENDAR YEAR - The Jewish calendar year is 360 days and based on a lunar cycle. Each month begins on the first sliver of light after a new moon (when the moon is completely dark). The Gregorian calendar year that we use is 365.2425 days and is based on the time it takes for the Earth to complete one orbit around the sun.

PENTATEUCH - Genesis is the first of five books referred to as the Pentateuch which means "fivefold vessels." The Jews refer to these five books as the Torah or "law." The five books include: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

COVENANT - A covenant is a binding agreement between two parties, some conditional and some unconditional. Conditional covenants were only binding when the conditions of the covenant were made. Unconditional covenants were made by a superior to someone lesser. It was based solely on the ability of the superior to fulfill the conditions of the covenant. God initiated eight covenants with man. Listed here are five of the eight covenants:

1. Abrahamic Covenant: This covenant is between God and Abraham. There are four elements to this covenant. (1) I will bless those that bless you and curse those that curse you, (2) You will be a Father of many nations, (3) I will be Your God, (4) God gives the land of Canaan as an everlasting possession. The sign of this covenant is circumcision. This covenant is unconditional.

2. Palestinian / Canaan Covenant: This covenant is between God and the nation of Israel. God promises that Israel would live in the land of Canaan that was given to them. This covenant is unconditional provided that certain conditions were met. (1) The nation would loose the land due to unfaithfulness, (2) Israel would be restored when they repented, (3) Israel will be converted as a nation, (4) Israel's enemies will be judged, (5) Messiah will return. This covenant is unconditional with conditional elements.

3. The Mosaic Covenant: This covenant is between God and the nation of Israel. It is based on the Mosaic law. If Israel obeys, they will be blessed and cursed if they disobey. This covenant is conditional.

4. The Davidic Covenant: This covenant is between God and David. (1) David's throne is established forever, (2) One of David's descendents would rule over Israel forever, (3) The Messiah would come through David's lineage. This covenant is unconditional.

5. New Covenant: This covenant is between God and the nation of Israel. (1) God will write his law in their minds and hearts, (2) God will forgive their iniquity, (3) God will restore the land to Israel, (4) God will give a new heart and Spirit, (5) God will restore relationship with Israel and live amongst them, (6) The Gentiles will be included in this covenant. The sign of this covenant is the Messiah. This covenant is unconditional.

MAPS:

Abraham's Journey from Ur

Topic: Genesis 12-50

Keywords: Canaan, Egypt, Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph, Patriarchs, firsts, Sodom, Gomorrah

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Exodus 1-18
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Exodus 1-18
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/490

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.

DETAILED NOTES
The Hebrews refer to the book of Exodus as "We'elleh Shemoth," from the opening phrase, "Now these are the names." The Septuagint translators called it "Exodus" because this book describes the central historical event for the Israelites - their salvation from slavery in Egypt. It is possible that Exodus was written by Moses during the forty-year wilderness journey.

PARALLEL JOURNEY

The book of Exodus chronicles the history of the Israelites, but it's important to note that the story of Moses and the Israelites occurs during the reign of several Pharaohs. Pharaoh was the ruler of Egypt and was worshipped as a god. They include:

The XVII Dynasty: The Middle Kingdom (c. 2000 - 1780 B.C.)
The Hyksos Period (c. 1730 - 1570 B.C.)
XVIII Dynasty (c. 1539 - 1447 B.C.)
Thutmose I (c. 1539 - 1514 B.C.)
Thutmose II (c. 1514 - 1501 B.C.)
Queen Hatshepsut (c. 1501 - 1482 B.C.)
Thutmose III (c. 1482 - 1447 B.C.)
Amenhotep II (c. 1447 - 1421 B.C.)
Thutmose IV (c. 1421 - 1410 B.C.)
Amenhotep III (c. 1410 - 1376 B.C.)

c. 1915 B.C.
Joseph is born to Jacob and Rachel

c. 1898 B.C.
Joseph is sold into slavery

c. 1876 B.C.
Jacob and his family move to Egypt

c. 1730 - 1570 B.C.
The Israelites are enslaved in Egypt

c. 1527 B.C.
Moses is born

c. 1482 - 1447 B.C.
Moses flees to Midian

c. 1446 B.C.
Moses leads the Israelites out of Egypt
c. 1446 - 1406 B.C.
Israel wanders in the wilderness

TRIP PLANNER

Exodus is divided into two major sections. The first section from Exodus 1:1-18:27 focuses on the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness.

1. The Bondage Of Egypt: 1:1-12:36
a) Moses: 1:1-7:13
b) The Ten Plagues: 7:14-11:10
c) Passover: 12:1-13:16

2. The Barrenness of the Wilderness: 13:1-18:27
a) The Red Sea: 13:17-15:21
b) God In The Wilderness: 15:22-18:27

PLACES OF INTEREST

Egypt - Bordered by the Mediterranean Sea on the north, the Sinai Peninsula and the Gulf of Suez on the east and the Libyan Desert on the west, Egypt is a land with a rich and well-recorded history.

Midian - Midian was the desert wilderness where Moses spent 40 years. Midian is located in the territory east of the Jordan River, east of the Dead Sea and southward through the desert wilderness of the Arabah. Today it is known as the southern part of the modern country of Jordan. It was at Midian that God appeared to Moses in the burning bush.

Mount Sinai - Mountain in the south central part of the Sinai Peninsula in the northwestern end of Arabia. God made many significant revelations of Himself and His purposes to Israel there. The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire wilderness area (Lev. 7:38). Sometimes Sinai is called "the mount" (Ex. 19:2); sometimes "the mountain of God" (Ex. 3:1); sometimes "the mount of the Lord" (Num. 10:33).

The Nile River - The life blood of Egypt - Honored as a sacred river - The Nile is the basis of Egypt's wealth. It is the only river to flow northwards across the Sahara. Egypt was unique as an agricultural community in that it was not dependent on rainfall. The secret was the black silt deposited on the fields by the annual flood caused when the Blue Nile was swollen by the run-off from the winter rains in Ethiopia. If the winter rains failed, the consequent small nonexistent inundation resulted in disastrous famine: some are recorded as lasting over a number of years (compare Gen. 41).

The Red Sea - No one knows the exact location of the place where Israel crossed the "Red Sea" on their way out of Egypt. Four primary theories have been suggested as to the place of the actual crossing of the isthmus of Suez: (1) the northern edge of the Gulf of Suez; (2) a site in the center of the isthmus near Lake Timsah; (3) a site at the northern edge of the isthmus and the southern edge of Lake Menzaleh; and (4) across a narrow stretch of sandy land which separates Lake Sirbonis from the Mediterranean Sea.

Sinai Peninsula - The wilderness region in the Sinai Peninsula through which for forty years the Hebrews wanderings are generally called "the wilderness of the wanderings." This entire region is in the form of a triangle, having its base toward the north and its apex toward the south. Its extent from north to south is about 250 miles, and at its widest point it is about 150 miles broad. Throughout this vast region of some 1,500 square miles there is not a single river. The northern part of this triangular peninsula is properly the "wilderness of the wanderings" (et-Tih). The western portion of it is called the "wilderness of Shur" (Ex. 15:22), and the eastern, the "wilderness of Paran."

PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Aaron - Brother of Moses - When Moses fled from Egypt, Aaron remained to share the hardships of his people, and possibly to render them some service; for we are told that Moses pleaded with God for his bother's cooperation in his mission to Pharaoh and to Israel, and that Aaron went out to meet his brother, as the time of deliverance drew near (Ex. 4:27). While Moses, whose great gifts lay along other lines, was slow of speech (Ex. 4:10), Aaron was a ready spokesman, and became his brother's representative, being called his "mouth" (Ex. 4:16) and his "prophet" (Ex. 7:1).

Moses - A man chosen by God to lead the nation of Israel out of Egypt and to the promise land. Moses spent 40 years in the house of Pharaoh, 40 years living in the wilderness and 40 years leading God's people. He is the author of the Pentateuch, the first 5 books of the Bible - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy.

Pharaoh's daughter - The princess who rescued Moses (Ex. 2:5-10; Heb. 11:24). Probably not only one of the daughters of a Pharaoh, but also someone with a very distinguished rank. Some thought that it could have been Queen Hatshepsut.

Pharaoh - The story of Moses spans the reign of several Egyptian rulers. The Pharaoh of Exodus 1 was probably one of the Hyksos kings who descended from foreign invaders. During the childhood years of Moses the two rulers were Thutmose I and Thutmose II. Queen Hatshepsut was also in power. When Moses fled to Midian the ruler in control was Thutmose III. The Pharaoh who faced the plagues of Egypt was Amenhotep II.

FUN FACTS

God reveals Himself in Exodus

1. The "I Am" at the burning bush A covenant keeping God (Ex. 3)
2. The plagues A God of Judgment (Ex. 8-12)
3. The Passover A God of Redemption (Ex. 12)
4. The Red Sea crossing A God of Power (Ex. 14)
5. The journey to Sinai A God of Provision (Ex. 16-17)

MEANING OF THE PLAGUES

The plagues symbolized God's judgment against the false gods of Egypt.

*Water to blood: Hapi, the father of gods, was "god" of the Nile. He was the god who brought water to all Egypt for life.

*Frog: Heka, the toad goddess, wife of Knepfh who was "goddess" of the land. She was also the goddess of the resurrection and procreative power.

*Lice: Geb, "the great cackler," who was "god" of the earth or vegetation. He was the father of Osiris and husband of Nut.

*Flies: Khepfi, scarab, who was the "god" of insects. The plague of beetle, a scarab, was an emblem of Ra, the sun god.

*Diseased livestock: Apis, who was the bull "god." His counterpart was Hathor, the cow goddess. This was their chief god as the soul of their god Osiris was believed to reside in the body of the bull. Mnevis, the bull god, was symbolic of fertility.

*Boils: Thoth, "god" of medicine and intelligence or wisdom. Human sacrifices were made and the ashes were thrown into the air to bring blessing upon the people. Moses took ashes from the furnace and threw it in the air and it brought boils on the people, thus shaming Thoth.

*Hail: Nut, the sky "goddess." The hail came from the sky and destroyed all the crops of Egypt. This also shamed Seth, the Egyptian god who protected the crops.

*Locusts: Anubis, "god" of the fields. This plague finishes up the work that was started by the hail.

*Darkness: Ra was Egypt's sun god. Darkness symbolized that the sun god was dead.

*Death Of First Born: Pharaoh's first-born son, there would be no one to succeed him on the throne. Pharaoh was considered an incarnation of Ra and the death of his son symbolized the death of the gods of Egypt.

MAPS

Ancient Near East in the time of the Patriarchs

Wandering Through The Wilderness

Figure 1: Ancient Near East In The Time Of The Patriarchs

Figure 2: Wandering Through The Wilderness

Topic: Exodus

Keywords: Egypt, Pharaoh, plagues, wilderness, Moses, Aaron, Midian, Mount Sinai, wanderings, enslaved, deliverance

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Exodus 19-40
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Exodus 19-40
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/492

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.

DETAILED NOTES
Throughout the drama of Exodus God demonstrates His power to deliver through miraculous signs and wonders. It is an epic storythat portrays God as Savior and Provider of His people. At Mount Sinai God gives to Moses a series of detailed laws and instructions. This revelation from God would define Israel's national identity.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1446 B.C.
The Tabernacle is constructed

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law is given on Mount Sinai

c. 1406 B.C.
Joshua conquers Jericho

c. 1380 B.C.
Joshua's death


TRIP PLANNER

Exodus is divided into two major sections. The second section from Exodus 19:1-40:38 focuses on the identification of God's People from bondage. The setting for our journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshipped.

1. The Law: 19:1-23:33
2. The Tabernacle: 24:1-31:18
3. Israel's Response in Disobedience: 32:1-33:23
4. Israel's Response in Obedience: 34:1-40:38


PLACES OF INTEREST

Mount Sinai - Mountain in the south central part of the Sinai Peninsula in the northwestern end of Arabia. God made many significant revelations of Himself and His purposes to Israel there. The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire wilderness area (Lev. 7:38). Sometimes Sinai is called "the mount" (Ex. 19:2); sometimes "the mountain of God" (Ex. 3:1); sometimes "the mount of the Lord" (Num. 10:33).

The Tabernacle - The English word tabernacle comes from the Latin tabernaculium, meaning "tent." The Hebrew word literally means "dwelling place." The tabernacle was to provide a place where God might dwell among His people. The description of the tabernacle begins with the inside and moves to the outside signifying that God built the tabernacle from God's viewpoint out.

The Wilderness Of Sin - Located between Elim and Sinai. This was probably the narrow plain of el-Markha, which stretches along the eastern shore of the Red Sea for several miles toward the promontory of Ras Mohammed, the southern extremity of the Sinitic Peninsula. It was here that Moses received the ten commandments.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Aaron - Brother of Moses - became his brother's representative, being called his "mouth" (Ex. 4:16) and his "prophet" (Ex. 7:1). Aaron was the first high priest of Israel.
Bezalel - The designer of the tabernacle. He was filled with the Spirit of God in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship.

Moses - The central figure of the Exodus story. Moses is known as a great prophet and the "lawgiver" of Israel.


FUN FACTS

God Reveals Himself in Exodus

1. The giving of the Law - A God of Holiness (Ex. 19-24)

2. The tabernacle, priests and offerings - A God of Fellowship (Ex. 25-30)

3. The judgment for the golden calf - A God of Discipline (Ex. 32)

4. The renewal of the covenant - A God of Grace (Ex. 33)

5. The descent of God's glory - A God of Glory (Ex. 40)

The Feasts and Holy Days of Exodus


Manna

Manna translated means "what is it?"


MAPS

Major Events Of Exodus

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Leviticus 1-17
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 1-17
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/494

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.

DETAILED NOTES
Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). The English name is derived from the Latin Liber Leviticus which is from the Greek. In Jewish writings it is customary to cite the book by its first word, Vayikra, "and he called." Leviticus is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. Leviticus was probably given in a one month period between God's entering to occupy the tabernacle (Exodus 40) and the taking of the census at Sinai (Numbers 1:1-3).


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1915 B.C.
Joseph is born to Jacob and Rachel

c. 1898 B.C.
Joseph is sold into slavery

c. 1876 B.C.
Jacob and his family move to Egypt

c. 1730 B.C.
The Israelites are enslaved in Egypt

c. 1527 B.C.
Moses is born

c. 1446 B.C.
Moses leads the Israelites out of Egypt

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law is given on Mount Sinai

c. 1406 B.C.
Forty years of wilderness wandering end


TRIP PLANNER

The book of Leviticus can be divided into two sections. The first section focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins.

1. Approaching God's Presence - Leviticus 1-7

2. Laws Of Priests - Leviticus 8-10

3. Laws Of Ritual Purity - Leviticus 11-15

4. Laws of National Atonement - Leviticus 16-17


PLACES OF INTEREST

The Tabernacle: The tabernacle is the central location for the book of Leviticus. The tabernacle was the place of worship in the nation of Israel and the nation of Israel was organized with the tabernacle at the physical center of the nation. It was the temporary representation of the temple that would be built in Jerusalem. There is a great deal of symbolic meaning in the construction, furniture and utensils used in the tabernacle.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Aaron: Aaron was the firstborn son of Amram and his wife Jochebed, who were Levites (Exodus 2:1; 6:20). He was born during Israel's time in Egypt, 83 years before the Exodus, 3 years before his brother Moses, and about 10 years after his sister Miriam (Exodus 2:1,4; 6:20; 7:7). Aaron was appointed directly by God to be the first high priest. He and his sons were consecrated to continue the priesthood through time (Leviticus 8 and 9).

Nadab and Abihu: Some brothers, like Cain and Abel or Jacob and Esau, get each other in trouble. Nadab and Abihu got in trouble together. They were the two oldest sons of Aaron (Exodus 6:23) who served as priests along with their father at The Tabernacle during the Wilderness Journey. The Lord had clearly instructed them how they were to carry out their responsibilities, but Nadab and Abihu foolishly took it upon themselves to do it in a manner of their own choosing and were destroyed by fire.


FUN FACTS

Clean and Unclean Foods

"Clean" birds, animals and insects were generally those that were plant-eaters, while those "unclean" were meat or carrion eaters. For example, chickens, cattle and grasshoppers were clean, while vultures, weasels and flies were unclean. There were some exceptions that may have been due to their being common carriers of deadly bacterial, viral or parasitical infections like rats (bubonic plague), bats (rabies), and pigs (trichinosis). Clean sea creatures were apparently those that were found in fresh-flowing water (bass, trout), while those unclean tended to be bottom-dwellers (shellfish, catfish) where natural contaminants collected.

Clean

Cattle
Sheep
Goats
Chickens
Elk
Deer, Antelope
Water creatures with fins & scales

Unclean

Snakes, Lizards
Camels, Horses
Weasels, Rabbits
Pigs
Vultures, Ravens, Owls, Crows
Bats, Rats and Flies
Water creatures with no fins and scales


Sacrificial Offerings

Burnt offering - it is a voluntary act of worship, atonement for unintentional sin. It is also an expression of devotion and surrender to God. SACRIFICAL ELEMENT: Bull, ram or a male bird for the poor.

Fellowship offering - Another voluntary offering that is also an act of worship. This offering shows our thanksgiving and fellowship with God. SACRIFICAL ELEMENT: Any animal without defect, from a flock or herd, and a variety of breads.

Grain offering - also a voluntary offering as an act of worship to recognize God's provision and goodness to us and our devotion to Him. SACRIFICAL ELEMENT: Grain, fine flour, olive oil, incense, baked bread.

Sin offering - A mandatory offering for a specific unintentional sin. Also included were confession of sin, forgiveness of sin and cleansing from defilements. SACRIFICAL ELEMENT: Young bull for the high priest and congregation; male goat for the leader; female goat of a lamb for the common person; a dove or pigeon for the poor and a tenth of an ephah of flour for those who were very poor.

Trespass offering - Another mandatory offering to atone for an unintentional sin that requires restitution. SACRIFICAL ELEMENT: Ram or lamb.

Yom Kippur - The Day of Atonement (Lev. 16) was regarded as the holiest day of the year. It occurs on the tenth day of the new year. It is a day of personal mourning for any unconfessed sin of the past year. The word atonement is used only in the Old Testament and it means "to cover."It is used 52 times in Leviticus.


MAPS

Figure 1: Israelite Camp in relation to the Tabernacle
Figure 2: The Tabernacle

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Leviticus 18-27
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Leviticus 18-27
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/497

MESSAGE SUMMARY
This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.

DETAILED NOTES
Orthodox Jews believe that this entire book is the word of God, dictated by God to Moses on Mount Sinai. This was the first book of the Tanakh (Torah) taught in the Rabbinic system of education in Talmudic times. Probably due to the fact that this book goes hand in hand with their performance as priests. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - Holiness.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 1915 B.C.
Joseph is born to Jacob and Rachel

c. 1898 B.C.
Joseph is sold into slavery

c. 1876 B.C.
Jacob and his family move to Egypt

c. 1730 B.C.
The Israelites are enslaved in Egypt

c. 1527 B.C.
Moses is born

c. 1446 B.C.
Moses leads the Israelites out of Egypt

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law is given on Mount Sinai

c. 1406 B.C.
Forty years of wilderness wandering end


TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Leviticus can be divided into two sections. The second section focuses on our walk with God through Sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes.

1. Separation from Sensual and Spiritual Defilement - Leviticus 18-20
2. Separation of the Priests from the People - Leviticus 21-22
3. Separation in Worship - Leviticus 23-24
4. Separation in Land of Canaan - Leviticus 25-26
5. Separation through Consecration - Leviticus 27


PLACES OF INTEREST:

The Land Of Canaan - This was the land that God had given to the Israelites. According to Genesis 10, the territory extended from Sidon, in the direction of Gerar, as far as Gaza, and in the direction of Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah and Zeboiim, as far as Lasha. By the time of Moses it extended to all the land west of the Jordan River and the Dead Sea, including Jerusalem.

The Tabernacle - The tabernacle is the central location for the book of Leviticus. The tabernacle was the place of worship in the nation of Israel and the nation of Israel was organized with the tabernacle at the physical center of the nation. It was the temporary representation of the temple that would be built in Jerusalem. There is a great deal of symbolic meaning in the construction, furniture and utensils used in the tabernacle.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Moses - Moses or Moshe (Hebrew) is described as the greatest prophet, leader and teacher that Judaism has ever known. The name "Moses" comes from a root meaning "take out," because Moses was taken out of the river. God gives the law to Moses at Mount Sinai, but the law embraced far more than the Ten Commandments. It included regulations regarding legal and familial relationships, rituals, foreigners and the worship of God.

Priests - The priests were the descendents of Levi through the sons of Aaron and had charge of the services and sacrifices in the Temple. They were responsible to facilitate all national public worship events and acted as musicians, judges, genealogists, janitors, porters and tradesmen.


FUN FACTS:

THE FEASTS AND HOLY DAYS OF ISRAEL:
The Sabbath: Every 7th day was to be a day of rest from all work.

The Passover: The 14th day of the first month (Nisan), this festival commemorated God's deliverance of Israel from bondage in Egypt.

PROPHETIC EVENT: Jesus' sacrificial death on the cross.

The Feast Of Unleavened Bread (Hag Hamatzot): Marked the beginning of the barley harvest, immediately following Passover and lasted until the 21st day of the month. PROPHETIC EVENT: Deliverance from Egypt.

The Feast Of First Fruits: This feast accompanied the offering of the first harvested barley to God. It was celebrated on the 16th day of the first month (Nisan) and on the 6th day of the 3rd month (Sivan).

PROPHETIC EVENT: The resurrection of Jesus from the dead.

The Feast Of Weeks (Pentecost): This festival took place 50 days after the barley harvest, and involved new grain offerings to the Lord. PROPHETIC EVENT: The outpouring of the Holy Spirit and the birth of the Church.

The Feast Of Trumpets (Rosh Hashanah): The 1st day of the 7th month (Tishri) marked this occasion, which involved a Sabbath rest, the blowing of trumpets and a holy convocation. PROPHETIC EVENT: Some believe this may correspond with the Rapture of the Church.

The Day Of Atonement (Yom Kippur): Observed on the 10th day of the 7th month (Tishri), this was a day of fasting (on which no work was done) for the purpose of atoning for the sins of the year.

The Feast Of Tabernacles (Booths or Ingathering, Sukkot): This eight-day celebration lasted from the 15th to the 22nd day of the 7th month (Tishri). PROPHETIC EVENT: Some believe this may have marked the birth of Jesus.

The Sabbath Year: Every 7th year was designated as a "year of release" to allow the land to lie fallow. Israel never observed this festival.

The Year Of Jubilee: The 50th year, which followed 7 Sabbath years, proclaimed liberty to those who were servants because of debt, and returned lands to their former owners. Israel never observed this festival.

PARCHED GRAIN: A favorite food of those working in the harvest. Newly harvested heads of grain were roasted in a fire and eaten when cool.

SHEAF OF THE FIRST FRUITS: This bundle of the first harvest barley belonged to God as a special offering, acknowledging God's provision of the harvest.

WALLED CITY: A walled city indicates one of the larger cities of the land.

MAPS:

Figure 1: The Tabernacle
Figure 2: The Land Of Canaan

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Numbers 1-14
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 1-14
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/498

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.

DETAILED NOTES
Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26).

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 1527 B.C.
Moses Is Born

c. 1487 B.C.
Moses Flees Egypt For Midian

c. 1446 B.C.
The Israelites Cross The Red Sea And Arrive At Mt. Sinai

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law Is Given At Mount Sinai

c. 1445-1405 B.C.
Events In Numbers

c. 1407 B.C.
Return To The Wilderness Of Sin And The Instructions Of Deuteronomy

c. 1406 B.C.
Forty Years Of Wandering In The Wilderness

c. 1405 B.C.
Israel Enters The Promised Land Under Joshua

TRIP PLANNER:
The Book Of Numbers can be divided into two sections. The first section covers the process of organizing the wilderness march and ends with Israel refusing to enter into the Promised Land.

1. Organizing people and priesthood - Numbers 1-4
2. Consecration and obedience affirmed by God's Presence - Numbers 5-10
3. Complaint by the people, Moses, Miriam and Aaron - Numbers 11-12
4. Disbelief in the promises of God at Kadesh - Numbers 13-14

NOTE: Another way to look at the book of Numbers is by the generations. Part 1 deals with the first generation in the wilderness (1-25) and Part 2 deals with the second generation entering the Promised Land (26-36).

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Canaan - during the time of the Hebrews this was a thinly populated land with relatively prosperous agricultural communities. The Amorites occupied the hilly regions west of the Dead Sea and East of the Jordan River. The Phoenicians occupied the coastal regions.

Kadesh - the sacred city of the Hittites, on the left bank of the Orontes, about 4 miles south of the Lake of Homs.

Kibroth Hattaavah - Translated means "the graves of the longing or of lust." Located 30 miles northeast of Sinai, this is the place where the children of Israel complained regarding the way that God was providing for them. God punished them by giving them what they want - meat in the form of quail. The meat spread disease among them and a plague broke out killing many.

Wilderness Of Paran - the location of much of the wilderness wanderings. The Paran plateau contains a lot of gravel because with a lack of rain, there is no soil formation. It is located in the north-eastern section of the Sinai Peninsula with the Arabah on the east and the wilderness of Shur on the west.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
1. Caleb - From the tribe of Judah, Caleb was one of the twelve spies sent to scout the land of Canaan (Num 13). He gave an honest report, as did Joshua, and was later granted entrance into the Promised Land. When Israel did enter Canaan forty years later, Caleb was given the area around the city of Hebron.

2. Joshua - The son of Nun of the tribe of Ephraim. Of the twelve spies, Joshua and Caleb were the only two men who gave an encouraging report, and were rewarded with permission to enter Israel with the new generation of Israelites. Later, he was chosen to succeed Moses as the leader of Israel (Num 27).

3. Levi - the third son born to Jacob by Lea and a full brother of Reuben, Simeon and Judah. All the male descendants of Levi (Levites) were set apart by Moses, acting under Divine command, for the service of the sanctuary. Moses himself was a Levite. They never cultivated the soil, nor worked at trades, but were to receive one tenth as tithes from the people. Their duty was to instruct the people in the law.

4. Miriam - Miriam was the oldest sister of Aaron and Moses. According to some sources she was 7 years older than Moses. Miriam was the one who arranged for the mother of Moses to nurse and raise Moses until he was weaned.

5. Sons Of Aaron - Nadab and Abihu died before the Lord because they offered profane fire. Eleazar and Ithamar ministered as priests in the presence of Aaron.

6. Sons Of Gershon - They were responsible for transporting the curtains and the holy items of the tabernacle from place to place.

7. Sons Of Kohath - This family was in charge of setting up and taking down the tabernacle. They were part of the tribe of Levi.

8. Sons Of Merari - They were responsible for transporting the hardware for the tabernacle from place to place.

9. The Heads Of The Tribes Of Israel:
a.) Reuben
b.) Simeon
c.) Gad
d.) Judah
e.) Issachar
f.) Zebulun
g.) Joseph
h.) Manasseh
i.) Benjamin
j.) Dan
k.) Asher
l.) Naphtali

FUN FACTS:
Anointed - The verb means to wet or daub a person with olive oil. This ritual designated a person or object as set apart for God's special purposes. Kings, priests and prophets were anointed at the beginning of their service.

Cloud By Day And Fire By Night - Was this real? YES. The cloud would cover the people during the day - providing protection from the desert sun. The fire would burn in the midst of the camp providing warmth and comfort during the night.

Laying On Of Hands - This is actually an Old Testament ritual and represented that the person was being dedicated entirely to the Lord. Three things occurred: (1) Hands were physically placed on the person, (2) This symbolic act identified this person to the public as being dedicated to the Lord, (3) Prayers asking for God's divine sanction were offered publicly.

Nazarite Vow - A vow made voluntarily by those who desired to separate themselves unto the Lord for a determined season. During this time of separation the Nazarite was bound by three absolute restrictions: (1) Eat nothing made of the vine, (2) Cannot cut their hair, (3) He could not touch a dead body.

MAPS
Figure 1 The Wilderness Journey
Figure 2 The Placement Of The 12 Tribes Of Israel

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Numbers 15-36
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Numbers 15-36
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/500

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.

DETAILED NOTES
Numbers is named for the census of the Exodus generation taken at Mount Sinai (Num 1) and for the census of the generation born in the wilderness taken on the plains of Moab (Num 26). This book is of special historical interest as it furnishes us with details as to the route of the Israelites in the wilderness and their principal encampments.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 1527 B.C.
Moses Is Born

c. 1487 B.C.
Moses Flees Egypt For Midian

c. 1446 B.C.
The Israelites Cross The Red Sea And Arrive At Mt. Sinai

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law Is Given At Mount Sinai

c. 1445-1405 B.C.
Events In Numbers

c. 1407 B.C.
Return To The Wilderness Of Sin And The Instructions Of Deuteronomy

c. 1406 B.C.
Forty Years Of Wandering In The Wilderness

c. 1405 B.C.
Israel Enters The Promised Land Under Joshua


TRIP PLANNER:
The Book Of Numbers can be divided into two sections. The second section covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land. It also covers the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land.

1. Failure In the wilderness - Numbers 15-19
2. Failure on the way to Moab - Numbers 20-25
3. Israel reorganized and renumbered - Numbers 26-27
4. Seasonal offerings to be kept - Numbers 28-30
5. Land apportioned on both sides of Jordan - Numbers 31-36

NOTE: Another way to look at the book of Numbers is by the generations. Part 1 deals with the first generation in the wilderness (1-25) and Part 2 deals with the second generation entering the Promised Land (26-36).

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Cities of Refuge - In Middle Eastern culture, the taking of a life, even by accident, was to be avenged by a member of the victim's family. God established six (6) Levitical cities to be set-aside as cities of refuge. A person guilty of unintentional manslaughter could escape blood revenge by fleeing to one of these cities.

Edom - The country of Edom began at a line from the south end of the Dead Sea stretched to the Arabian Desert areas to the east. From this line, Edom claimed all the land south to the Red Sea, and farther along the east coast of the Red Sea. Today this area is called Negev, south Israel, and among the driest regions in Israel. The King of Edom refused passage through this land.

Heshbon - The city of Sihon king of the Amorites. It was here that Sihon was defeated because he declared war on Israel and refused to let them pass through his land. Later this city became a Levitical city.

Hormah - Located in the extreme South of ancient Palestine, earlier called Zephath. Here the invading Israelites were defeated by the Canaanites. Later the Israelites defeated the Canaanite king Arad.

King's Highway - In the ancient world, the King's Highway was a major trade route running from Egypt across the central Sinai Peninsula, north through what is now western Jordan, and into Syria.

Meribah - In the wilderness of Sin at Kadesh (the place where Miriam - Moses' sister - was buried). It was here that Moses struck the rock instead of speaking to the rock as God had commanded - thus misrepresenting God to the people. As a result, Moses and Aaron were not allowed to go into the Promised Land.

Mount Hor - the scene in the Bible of Aaron's death, situated "in the edge of the land of Edom." Since the time of Josephus it has been identified with the Jebel Nebi Ijarun ("Mountain of the Prophet Aaron"), a twin-peaked mountain 4780 feet above the sea-level (6072 feet above the Dead Sea) in the Edomite Mountains on the east side of the Jordan-Arabah valley.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Baal of Peor - The Moabite god who appears both as a male sun-god and a female moon-goddess. His name means "lord of Peor," referring to Mount Peor on the left bank of the river Jordan, the center of his cult. Baal is mentioned widely in the Old Testament as the primary pagan idol of the Phoenicians, which was often associated with the heathen goddess Ashtaroth. The worship of Baal was accompanied with lascivious rites (1 Kings 14:24), the sacrifice of children in the fire by parents (Jer. 19:5), and kissing the image (1 Kings 19:18; Hos 13:2).

Balaam - Balaam of Mesopotamia was an internationally known soothsayer and prophet who specialized in animal divination. It was believed that these prophets could manipulate the will of the gods. He was hired by Balak to influence the will of the God of Israel. God would not allow Balaam to speak against Israel and used a donkey to speak to him, mocking his ability to communicate with the gods.

Balak - King of the Moabites who hired Balaam the prophet to destroy Israel through spiritual means. He knew that Israel had defeated his friend Sihon at Heshbon and was afraid.

Dathan and Abiram - Sons of Eliab. Levite who, with his brother Abiram and with Korah, was consumed by fire from heaven.

Joshua -There were two possible candidates: Caleb and Joshua. God himself choose Joshua to succeed Moses. The qualification for the job was the presence of the Holy Spirit.

Korah - Son of Izhar, the son of Kohath, the son of Levi. Levite leader, with Dathan and Abiram, of the unsuccessful revolt in the desert against the exclusive priesthood of the Aaronic family and against the leadership of Moses; the rebels were consumed by fire and earthquake, and perhaps had duties as doorkeepers and singers in the Temple.

The Daughters of Zelophehad - Hebrew law passed on the inheritance of the father through the sons. Because Zelophehad had no sons, his daughters made a case to have the inheritance given to them. Moses took their case to the Lord and the Lord honored their request.

Zimri - A Hebrew man who became involved with a Midianite woman named Cozbi (possibly a priestess of Baal.) Their offense (possibly their marriage ceremony) was committed at the door of the tabernacle in full view of the congregation. They were killed by Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, with a javelin.

FUN FACTS:
Book of Wars of The Lord - An early collection of songs and writings known today only by it's mention in Numbers 21:14, 15. The fact that numbers draws from other early Hebrew writings shows that the ancient Hebrew people had other literature in addition to Scripture.

Bronze Serpent - Today, this is known as the symbol of the medical profession. It was a symbol of the cross. When God sent venomous snakes into the camp of Israel, anyone who looked upon the Bronze Serpent would live.

High Places of Baal - Sacred areas on hilltops, where sacrifices and rituals were held, these rural 'temples' were simple, open spaces, without idols but with a pile of stones serving as an altar. A sacred tree was not uncommon. A local priest would attend to the altar, and be supported by the locals. Some of these 'high areas' became quite popular, and the number of priests then increased.

Levite Cities - The Levites were to be separate from the rest of the population for the holy service of God. They had their own separate allotment of land and their own cities (48 total). The cities were distributed throughout the land as a symbol that God was present among His people.

Sabbath - Sabbath is derived from the Hebrew word meaning "to cease" or "to rest." The Sabbath is the seventh day in the Hebrew calendar or Saturday.

Vow - A vow to God is a voluntary commitment to do something that pleases Him or to abstain from certain practices to demonstrate devotion to Him. A vow made to the Lord is binding and must be fulfilled. The Nazarite vow is an example of this.

MAPS
The Levitical Cities
Journey from Kadesh to Moab

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Deuteronomy 1-34
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/502

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

Deuteronomy is the fifth book of the Old Testament and part of Judaism's Torah. Its Hebrew name is "Devarim" translated "words" and is taken from the opening phrase "Eleh Ha-devarim" translated "these are the words..." As with the other four books of the Pentateuch, Deuteronomy is titled after the opening words. The English name is derived from the Greek Septuagint and the Latin Vulgate "Deuteronomion," meaning "Second Law" or the repetition of the Law (from 17:18).

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1450-1400 B.C.
Egyptians build water clocks (clepsydras) and Stonehenge built.

c. 1446 B.C.
The Red Sea crossing

c. 1445 B.C.
God delivers the Law at Mount Sinai

c. 1446-1406 B.C.
Forty years of wilderness wandering

c. 1406 B.C.
Moses presents the Deuteronomic Law

c. 1405 B.C.
Moses dies; the conquest of Canaan begins

c. 1405-1380 B.C.
Joshua leads the Israelites

c. 1400 B.C.
Approximate beginning of the Late Bronze Age in Israel

TRIP PLANNER:
Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Why a second telling of the law? The first telling in Exodus was for the previous generation who were not allowed into the Promised Land because of their complaining. The second telling was for the new generation entering into the Promised Land to prepare them for the future.
1. 1st Sermon: Review of the Past - Deuteronomy 1-3
2. 2nd Sermon: Regulations for the Present - Deuteronomy 4-26
3. 3rd Sermon: Ready for the Future - Deuteronomy 27-34

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Ar - A synonym for the region of Moab.

Beth Peor - a pagan site dedicated to Baal of Peor. This was the scene of Israel's first disastrous encounter with the sexually centered worship of Baal.

Chinnereth - Another name for the Sea of Galilee.

Mount Ebal and Mount Gerizim - During the covenant renewal ceremony with the generation entering the Promised Land, the Lord used the topography of the land for visual effect. Mount Ebal and Mount Gerizim are approximately 2 miles from each other. The valley between the two peaks created a natural amphitheatre. Mount Ebal is normally a barren peak while Mount Gerizim is usually covered with vegetation. Consequently, Mount Ebal was an ideal place for the curses to be recited and Mount Gerizim was ideal for blessings.

Mount Horeb - Another name for Mount Sinai

Mount Nebo - A Mountain peak near Heshbon about 10 miles east of the northern end of the Dead Sea. This is where God instructed Moses to go and where he died.

Rabbah - Today this is the site of Amman, the modern capital of Jordan.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Amorites - An ancient tribe of Canaanites. Their name means "the high one" and refers to the mountainous region they occupied.

Anakim - Descendents of Anak, a pre-Canaanite tribe, dwelling in the hill country of Judah and in the Philistine plain. According to rabbinical tradition the Anakim are of the same Titanic race as the Rephaim, Nefilim, Gibborim, Zamzummim, and Emim. The name (as though containing the element 'anak = neck) indicates that they wore "neck-chains heaped upon neck-chains," similar to tribes in Africa. They were known for being a race of giants.

Dathan and Abiram - Rebelled against Aaron's priesthood and lost their lives.

Jeshurun - A pet name for Israel that means "Uprightness."

Joshua - One of the original spies, Joshua became the successor to Moses. He was known for his wisdom as he followed the call of God on His life.

King Og - was an ancient Amorite king of Bashan who, along with his sons and army, was slain by Moses and his men at the battle of Edrei (probably modern day Dara, Syria)

King Sihon - Amorite King who was defeated by the Israelites.

Levi - The responsibilities of the Levites included (1) caring for the ark, (2) service in offering, worship, teaching and legal matters and (3) blessing Israel.

Moses - Regarded as the greatest prophet in all of Israel. He had a face to face relationship with the Lord, he performed many signs and wonders and was a representative of God's powerful presence amongst the nations of his day.

Zamzummin - the Ammonite name for the people who by others were called Rephaim, and were described as a numerous nation of giants; perhaps the same as 'Zuzim.'

FUN FACTS:
Abomination - indicates the strongest form of revulsion and distaste.

Book of Quotes - No other book is quoted more than Deuteronomy. It is quoted 356 times in other Old Testament books and is quoted 196 times in the New Testament.

Book of The Law - Refers to the book of Deuteronomy.

Creeping Thing that Flies - Refers to insects that could not be eaten.

Cross-dressing - Deuteronomy 22:5 prohibits cross-dressing.

God's Four Spiritual Laws - In Deut. 10:12-13 we are given God's Four Spiritual Laws:
1. To fear the Lord Your God
2. To walk in all His ways and to love Him
3. To serve the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul
4. To keep the commandments of the Lord and His statutes

Jewish Calendar - Hebrew months were based on the lunar calendar and were 29 or 30 days long. Their years was 354 days. Approximately every 3 years (7 times in 19 years) an extra 29 day month, Veadar, was added between Adar and Nisan.

Names Of Months

Corresponds With

No. Of Days

Month Of Civil Year

Month Of Sacred Year

Tishri

Sept – Oct

30

1

7

Heshvan

Oct – Nov

29 or 30

2

8

Chislev

Nov – Dec

29 or 30

3

9

Tebeth

Dec – Jan

29

4

10

Shebat

Jan – Feb

30

5

11

Adar

Feb – Mar

29 or 30

6

12

Nisan (Abib)

Mar – Apr

30

7

1

Iyar

Apr – May

29

8

2

Sivan

May – June

30

9

3

Tammuz

June – July

29

10

4

Ab

July – Aug

30

11

5

Elul

Aug – Sept

29

12

6



Urim and Thummin - Translated "lights and perfections" or "light and truth," this was God's appointed instruments for deciding innocence or guilt for guiding His people. They were probably two jewels. When someone had to make an important decision, the request was made known to the high priest. He would stand before the Lampstand, holding the Urim in one hand and the Thummin in the other. As the light reflected from the Urim and the Thummin onto the stones of the Breastplate, this flash of light provided up to 24 combinations (2 x 12). Since there are 22 letters in the Hebrew alphabet, the flashes of light could produce strings of letters. As God breathed through the Ark, the Veil would move, permitting a breeze to flicker the flames in the Lampstand to momentarily alter the angle of direction of the light onto the Urim and Thummin, and thence to the Breastplate. Thus God was able to communicate directly, but not audibly, to the high priest and answer the inquiry.

MAPS
Canaan In The 14th Century

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Joshua 1-12
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Joshua 1-12
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/504

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

Joshua was the son of Nun, of the tribe of Ephraim and the successor to Moses as the leader of Israel. He was born in Egypt, and was probably of the age of Caleb, with whom he is generally associated. He shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites at their great battle against the Amalekites in Rephidim. He became Moses' minister, and accompanied him part of the way when he ascended Mount Sinai to receive the Ten Commandments. He was also one of the twelve spies who were sent on by Moses to explore the land of Canaan, and only he and Caleb gave an encouraging report.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS [BASIC TIMES AND DATES]

c. 1446-1406 B.C.
Forty years of wilderness wandering

c. 1405 B.C.
Joshua succeeds Moses

c. 1405 B.C.
The Israelites cross the Jordan into Canaan

c. 1405-1400 B.C.
Jericho and other cities are taken

c. 1398 B.C.
Canaan is apportioned to the tribes

c. 1380 B.C.
Joshua dies

c. 1375-1075 B.C.
Judges rule in Israel

c. 1050 B.C.
Saul becomes king of Israel


TRIP PLANNER

The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and can be divided into two sections. The first sections describe how Joshua conquered the land.

1. Crossing The Jordan - Joshua 1-5
2. Central Campaign - Joshua 6-8
3. Southern Campaign - Joshua 9-10
4. Northern Campaign - Joshua 11-12


PLACES OF INTEREST

Ai - One of the royal cities of the Canaanites. It was the scene of Joshua's defeat due to the sin of Achan. Later, it was the second Canaanite city taken by Israel.

Gilgal - Is a place in the plains of Jericho, located in the east border of Jericho, where the Israelites first camped out after crossing the Jordan River. Here they kept their first Passover in the land of Canaan and renewed the rite of circumcision. Here also, the twelve memorial stones, taken from the bed of the Jordan, were set up; and here also the tabernacle remained until it was removed to Shiloh.

Hazor - This was the largest city in Palestine in the days of Joshua. There may have been 40,000 people living in the city at the time of Joshua. Hazor was located about 10 miles northwest of the Sea of Galilee. King Jabin formed an alliance of kings at Hazor to fight the oncoming Israeli army led by Joshua.

Jericho - Jericho is one of the oldest archaeological cities in the world. The first excavations of the site were made by Charles Warran in 1868. They discovered that three separate settlements have existed at or near the current location for more than 11,000 years. The present city is currently under Arab control.

Jordan River - The Jordan River flows through the Great Rift Valley into the Dead Sea. Its tributaries are the Hasbani (from Lebanon), the Banias (from Banias at the base of Mount Hermon) and Dan (also at the base of Mount Hermon). The Jordan is mentioned in the Old Testament about one hundred and eighty times and in the New Testament fifteen times.

Salt Sea - Another term for the Dead Sea.

Sea of Araba - Another term for the Dead Sea. The Arabah itself is the region of the Jordan valley running from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea.

Valley of Ajalon - With reference to the valley named after the town, Joshua uttered the celebrated command, "Sun, stand still over Gibeon; and Moon, in the Valley of Ajalon."


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Achan - He was a man from the tribe of Judah who had stolen some property during the battle of Jericho. Against God's command he took an ingot of gold, a quantity of silver and a costly Babylonish garment. This caused a great defeat in the next battle due to sin in their camp. Achan was later found out and executed.

Adoni-Zedek - He is the 2nd recorded king of Jerusalem. (Melchizedek was the 1st - Gen. 14:18). His name means, "Lord of Jerusalem." He formed an alliance with four southern kingdoms to battle against the Gibeonites for their pact with Israel.

Gibeonites - Gibeon was a city in Canaan about 6 miles north of Jerusalem in the West Bank. Ambassadors from Gibeon deceived Joshua into making a treaty with them. Ancient Gibeon is thought to be the modern day Arab city of el-Jib.

Jebusite - A Canaanite tribe who inhabited the region around Jerusalem in pre-biblical times. Jerusalem was known as Jebus until King David conquered it.

Joshua - The successor to Moses who led the people into the land. The land is Canaan, the land of promise. An amazing commander in chief leading each battle.

Rahab - A prostitute who lived in the city of Jericho and came to accept the God of Israel. She hides the 2 spies. Afterwards, she married a man from Judah and became a part of the Godly line leading to Messiah.


FUN FACTS

Book of Jasher - Some believe this to be the Sefer ha Yashar - a Hebrew Midrash that covered the period from the creation of man to the first wave of the conquest of Canaan.

Commander Of The Army Of The Lord - This is believed to be a pre-incarnate appearance of Jesus referred to as a Theophony. Joshua's response of worship and the command for Joshua to take off his sandals are indicators of this.

Shekel - One of the ancient units of weight, it's value changed depending on date, domain and region. It was the chief silver coin of the Hebrews.

Stalks of Flax - When the spies came into the land, Rahab took them up onto the roof and hid them under the stalks of flax (Joshua 2:6). Flax was an important crop in Bible times. Flax was turned into yarn which was woven into linen clothes. The flax was harvested by hand. One pound of flax held about 100,000 seeds. The stalks were soaked in water for a couple of days to help break them apart. They were then placed on the rooftops to dry out before processing.

The Trumpets at Jericho - Music was a strong component of Israel's culture. Events that included music were feasts, festivals, war, worship and death. In Joshua 6, God uses music in a mighty way. Trumpets were to be carried by seven priests as they walked around the city walls. On the seventh day they were to blow the trumpets and the walls came tumbling down. The trumpet was one of the most popular instruments and there were two types: the Chatsotserah which was long and straight. It started as a narrow mouthpiece and ended with a bell shaped opening similar to a bugle. The other was called the Shophar. Probably made from an animals horn it was bent and curved in shape. Both horns were used to announce the beginning of feasts, signal a call to battle, and to proclaim a victory celebration.


MAPS

Conquest of Canaan

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Joshua 13-24
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Joshua 13-24
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/506

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

The name of the book comes from the lead character - Joshua. His name means, "Salvation of the Lord." Forty years had passed since the Israelites had left Egypt. The original generation had died in the desert and a new generation was ready to enter the Promised Land to claim it for themselves.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1446-1406 B.C.
Forty years of wilderness wandering

c. 1405 B.C.
Joshua succeeds Moses

c. 1405 B.C.
The Israelites cross the Jordan into Canaan

c. 1405-1400 B.C.
Jericho and other cities are taken

c. 1398 B.C.
Canaan is apportioned to the tribes

c. 1380 B.C.
Joshua dies

c. 1375-1075 B.C.
Judges rule in Israel

c. 1050 B.C.
Saul becomes king of Israel

TRIP PLANNER:
The high point of the book of Joshua comes when it could be said that "Joshua took the whole land" (11:23) and that he could now divide the land "for an inheritance to Israel." The first section dealt with conquering the land and the second section of the book of Joshua deals with carving up the land.

1. Tribes East of The Jordan River - Joshua 13
2. Tribes West of The Jordan River - Joshua 14-19
3. Religious Settlements - Joshua 20-22
4. Joshua's Farewell Address - Joshua 23-24

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Hebron - This is the land that was given to Caleb when the Israelites entered the land. This city still exists today about 25 miles southwest of Jerusalem. When Abraham and Lot split up, Hebron was part of the land Abraham took. Hebron is a holy city both to Islam and Judaism, as it is believed that Abraham is buried there together with his wife Sarah, their sons Isaac and Jacob, Isaac's wife Rebecca, and Jacob's wife Leah, in the Machpelah cave. Over this cave, the lbrahimi Mosque now lies. The city of Hebron is famous for its charming narrow and winding streets, houses built from stone, and the lively markets.

Kirjath Arba - The former name of the city of Hebron. It means city of Arba. Arba was the founding ancestor of the Anakim and is mentioned only in Joshua 14:15 and 15:13.

Shechem - A site with an ancient tradition of religious significance and covenant making in Israel going back to Abraham's day. Archaeological excavation has uncovered a series of temples, sanctuaries and ceremonial standing stones from almost every period of it's existence.

Shiloh - Called a place of rest, a city in Ephraim, on the north side of Bethel. Here the tabernacle was set up after the Conquest (Joshua 18:1-10), where it remained during all the period of the judges till the Ark of the Covenant was captured by the Philistines.

Valley of the Son of Hinnom - First mentioned in Joshua 15:8, it is mentioned 13 times in scripture. There seems to be no information as to who Hinnom was nor his sons. However, the meaning of the term has become interesting. Gehenna is a word tracing to Greek, ultimately from Hebrew Gai-Ben-Hinnom meaning Valley of the Son of Hinnom, and is still called Gai Ben Hinnom in Modern Hebrew, though this is sometimes shortened to Gai-Hinnom in rabbinical texts. Originally it referred to a garbage dump in a deep narrow valley right outside the walls of outside Jerusalem. It served as a garbage dump in both Old Testament times and at the time of Jesus, but there's more to the word's history. It has come to have connotations relating to the afterlife and the mysteries of the underworld.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Anakim - The descendants of Anak (Joshua 11:21; Num. 13:33; Deut. 9:2) who lived in the southern part of Palestine, in the neighborhood of Hebron (Gen. 23:2; Josh. 15:13). In the days of Abraham (Gen. 14:5-6) they inhabited the region afterwards known as Edom and Moab, east of the Jordan. They were probably a remnant of the original inhabitants of Palestine before the Canaanites, a Cushite tribe from Babel, and of the same race as the Phoenicians and the Egyptian shepherd kings. They had a formidable warlike appearance, as described by the spies sent to search the land, filled the Israelites with terror. They seem to have identified them with the Nephilim, the "giants" (Gen. 6:4; Num. 13:33) from before the flood. And, indeed, there were men of very large stature among them. There were various tribes of Anakim (Josh. 15:14). Joshua finally expelled them from the land, except a remnant that found refuge in the cities of Gaza, Gath, and Ashdod (Josh. 11:22). The Philistine giants whom David encountered (2 Sam. 21:15-22) were descendants of the Anakim.

Caleb - When Moses had sent the spies into the land from Kadesh Barnea, only Joshua and Caleb came back with a positive report. He was a brave and godly warrior. He is now 85 years old and receives his inheritance at Hebron (Joshua 14:6).

Eleazar - He was the High Priest (Aaron's son) at this time and he helps Joshua divide up the land among the twelve tribes (Joshua 19:51).

Jebusites - Inhabitants of Jerusalem before the Israelites arrive. They stubbornly held on to Jerusalem because the tribe of Judah did not follow through on its obligation to destroy them completely.

Kohathites - Descendents through Aaron and Kohath, the son of Levi. These members of the Aaronic priesthood were strategically located throughout the land to serve in the temple and in the territory that remained in the hands of the descendents of Judah.

Phinehas - Eleazar's son. He also was a priest and he helped to avoid a civil war. This would have been between the tribes living on the west side of the Jordan and those who remained on the east side (Joshua 22:30).

Simeon - The Tribe of Simeon did not get an independent inheritance, but rather inherited scattered lands within Judah's allotment. This is similar to the tribe of Levi. The two were cursed for their massacre of the inhabitants of Shechem.

FUN FACTS:
Abdi-Hiba letter - A letter written to Egypt during the time of Joshua's conquest of Canaan requesting aid.

Amarna tablets - Non-biblical historical letters written by pagan kings. One letter written during the time of Joshua's conquest reads as follows: "Let it be known to the king that there is great hostility against me and against Shuwardata. I ask the king, my lord, protect his land from the approaching 'Apiru' (Hebrews).”

Casting Lots - The practice of casting lots is mentioned 70 times in the Old Testament and seven times in the New Testament. In spite of the many references to casting lots in the Old Testament, nothing is known about the actual lots themselves. They could have been sticks of various lengths, flat stones like coins, or some kind of dice; but their exact nature is unknown. The closest modern practice to casting lots is likely flipping a coin.

Cities of Refuge - Six towns from the north to the south and on both sides of the Jordan River mentioned in the Bible given under Mosaic Law, to provide protection for anyone who had killed another by accident. They could flee and live without fear of any retaliation from the victim's relatives, who would otherwise have right of blood vengeance. The six cities were Bezer, Ramoth, and Golan, east of the Jordan River, Kedesh, Shechem, and Hebron, west of the Jordan (Num. 25 and Joshua 20).

Memorial Stones - The purpose of the memorial stones was to be a sign for future generations, to remind parents to tell their children about what God had done. For those outside, the memorial stones are there to proclaim the power of God to "all the peoples" and to generate fear among God's people (24). "Memorial Stones," providing a visual reminder of God's presence in the midst of His people.

MAPS
Division of The Tribes of Israel

Topic: Joshua

Keywords: dividing the land, canaan, tribes, Joshua

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Judges 1-10
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Judges 1-10
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/510

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

The name of the book comes from the leading characters that were of the divinely appointed office of Judge. These people were raised up from time to time to provide leadership during times of emergency between Joshua and the kingdom under Saul. The Judges had two functions: (1) To be a military leader and to deliver their people from oppression and (2) To be a civil leader, to settle disputes and maintain justice.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1405-1400 B.C.
The land of Canaan is conquered

c. 1400-1050 B.C.
Israel ruled by judges and not kings

c. 1398 B.C.
Canaan is divided amongst the tribes

c. 1380 B.C.
The death of Joshua

c. 1370 B.C.
Othniel becomes Judge over Israel

c. 1310 B.C.
Ehud is Judge over Israel

c. 1230 B.C.
Deborah's great victory over Sisera

c. 1190 B.C.
Gideon leads Israel

c. 1100 B.C.
Samson fights the Philistines

c. 1050 B.C.
Saul is anointed king of Israel


TRIP PLANNER

The book of Judges can be divided into two sections describing seven cycles of deliverance. Whereas Joshua is the story of conquest, Judges describes the process of deterioration from conquest to compromise. The nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and each cycle results in ever worsening conditions.

1. Deterioration - Judges 1-3

2. Deliverance in 7 Cycles (Five are mentioned in this first section)

a. Deborah - Judges 4-5
b. Gideon - Judges 6-8
c. Abimelech - Judges 9
d. Tola - Judges 10
e. Jair - Judges 10


PLACES OF INTEREST

Ashdod - Sat about mid way between Gaza and Joppa about 3 miles from the Mediterranean Sea. It was the chief seat of the god Dagon. Ashdod was a part of Judah but never actually came under its control. It sat on the main highway between Egypt and Palestine and was heavily fortified. One of five major cities of the Philistines Kingdom.

Ashkelon - First mentioned in Joshua 13:3, this city was 12 miles north of Gaza on the shore of the Mediterranean Sea. Ashkelon fell back into Philistine hands by the time of Samuel. It was not fully defeated until the time of Alexander the Great. One of five major cities of the Philistine Kingdom.

City of Palms - Another name for Jericho.

Ekron - About 11 miles north of Gath, this town also was assigned to the tribe of Judah and later was assigned to Dan. However, by the time of Samuel, the town was in full possession by the Philistines. When the Philistines had captured the Ark of the Covenant, Ekron was the last city they had possession before it was returned to Israel. One of five major cities of the Philistine Kingdom.

Gath - Gath was the birthplace of Goliath. David fled from Saul to the king of Gath and later conquered the city. The Ark of the Covenant brought calamity to this city also. One of five major cities of the Philistine Kingdom.

Gaza - It is one of the oldest cities in the world first mentioned in Genesis 10. The earliest citizens of this area were called Avims and they were conquered and replaced in the area by the Caphtorims who were a Philistine tribe. Gaza was the southernmost of five major cities of the Philistine Kingdom.

Midian - Located in the Arabian Peninsula, southeast of Israel and east of the Sinai Peninsula. The Midianties were descendants of Abraham through his wife Keturah. Midianties were considered enemies of Israel.

Mount Zalmon - The location of this mount is uncertain. Some scholars identify it with Mount Ebal, northwest of Schechem. Others identify it with Mount Gerizim. The snow covered Mount Zalmon mentioned in Psalms appears to be a different place.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Abimelech - From the tribe of Manessah, he was the son of Gideon by a concubine and was a wicked Judge of the land. He murdered all of his brothers in an attempt to rule Israel. He actually ruled only the city of Shecham. He was killed by a woman who crushed his skull with a millstone. This ended a time of turmoil within the nation of Israel.

Amorites - Canaanite people living in the central hill country of Canaan. They blocked the entry of Dan into the region.

Barak - From the tribe of Naphtali. He is listed in the Hebrews as one of the "Heros of the Faith." He served under Deborah as a military leader and was urged by Deborah to raise an army and defeat Sisera. This ended 20 years of oppression and started a 40-year period of peace.

Deborah - From the tribe of Ephriam, she became the 4th Judge. She was both a prophetess and a Judge and the wife of Lapidoth. Deborah along with Barak defeated Sisera's forces at the battle of Mt. Tabor. She also predicted Sisera's death at the hands of a woman. The Song of Deborah tells the story.

Eglon - The very fat Moabite king who was fatally stabbed by Ehud the Judge.

Ehud - From the tribe of Benjamin. The 2nd Judge who was left handed. He killed Eglon, the fat Moabite king. Under his jurisdiction Israel had peace for 80 years. Afterwards they were in servitude for 18 years.

Gideon - From the tribe of Manasseh, the son of Joash, he became the 5th Judge. The Angel of the Lord found him in a wine press threshing wheat. He led an army of 300 men chosen by God to defeat a massive Midianite army. Tactics used were: torch showing, pitcher breaking, trumpet blowing and a loud battle cry. Also listed in the Hall of Faith in Hebrews.

Jair - The 7th Judge of Israel and the third minor judge. He judged Israel for 22 years and lived in Gilead.

Joash - Gideon's father. He gave wise answers to a mob of angry idol worshippers and saved his son's life.

Otheniel - From the tribe of Judah. He was the nephew of Caleb and later became his son-in-law. He was the first Judge after he liberated Israel from the reign of the King of Mesopotamia. Under his jurisdiction Israel had peace for 40 years.

Shagmar - He killed 600 Philistines with an ox goad and delivered Israel. He is the 3rd Judge of Israel and the 1st minor judge. His name is not Hebrew, but his father had a Hebrew name. It is possible that he was a foreigner that God used to deliver Israel.

Sisera - While Jabin was king of the Canaanites, Sisera was the commander in chief of the army. His 900 chariots were used to keep the Israelites oppressed for 20 years. He was later defeated in battle by Deborah and Barak. Eventually, he was killed in his sleep by a woman named Jael.

Tola - The 6th Judge of Israel and the second of the minor judges. He arose to save Israel after the reign of Abimelech.


FUN FACTS

Angel of the LORD - During the accounts of the Book of Judges, the Angel of the Lord appears at least 4 times. Many think that this is a bodily appearance of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Ashtoreth - a female fertility goddess of love and war. This false god was closely associated with Baal. Also referred to as Ishtar in Mesopotamia. The Canaanites built shrines to Ashtoreth.

Baal - The Canaanite storm-god. He was the most powerful deity in Canaanite cosmology. A storm represented power, but also life giving rain. Baal-Berith means Baal of the Covenant in contrast to the covenant God of Israel.

House of Joseph - Ephraim and Manasseh who split the inheritance of Joseph their father. Each received equal portions of land to the other tribes of Israel. Combined, their portions of land would make Joseph's allotment the largest of all the tribes of Israel, thus fulfilling God's promise to bless Joseph above His brothers.

Tent Pegs - Tent pegs were used to fasten a tent to the ground. Because of the hard rocky soil in Palestine, they had to be sharp. The tents had leather cords fastened to the side walls that were pulled out to give more room on the inside. These leather straps were also held in the ground with a tent peg.

Threshing out the Wheat - The process of separating the grain from the wheat. This is also called "beating out the wheat." This was done by trampling on it or by pounding it with a heavy club. Usually animals were used to trample the wheat. After the grain was separated from the stalks, it was strained through a sieve to remove the dirt and then thrown up into the wind where the lighter unusable chaff was blown away and the heavier grain fell to the ground. The grain was ground into flour and used to bake bread.

Watchtowers - Towers that were used as fortification for a city and to watch for the approaching enemy. Some of these towers could hold hundreds of people. Many vineyards would build watchtowers of mud and stone to watch for thieves who would try to steal their crop.

Winepress - A winepress was usually built on the edge of a vineyard. The grapes were picked by women. They would carry the grapes in large baskets to the winepress which looked like a large tub made of stone. Emptied into the tub, the grapes were stomped on by men with their bare feet. The men would keep their balance by hanging onto ropes that were tied to a crossbeam above the tub. The juice was then stored in wineskins and clay jars.


MAPS

Limits of Israelite Settlement and The Land Yet To Be Conquered

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Judges 11-21
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Judges 11-21
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/512

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.

DETAILED NOTES
This second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these judges and a people who "did what was right in their own eyes." Jepthah's foolish vow, Samson's turning to his own lust, Micah's corruption of religion and the tribe of Dan not settling in their given land. The story degenerates from there to the people of Gibeah in Benjamin losing all sense of morals and raping an innocent woman followed by the near destruction of the tribe of Benjamin at the hands of other Israelite tribes. This period of time develops into a very dark period of Jewish history.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1405-1400 B.C.
The land of Canaan is conquered

1400-1050 B.C.
Israel ruled by judges and not kings

1398 B.C.
Canaan is divided amongst the tribes

1380 B.C.
The death of Joshua

1370 B.C.
Othniel becomes Judge over Israel

1310 B.C.
Ehud is Judge over Israel

1230 B.C.
Deborah's great victory over Sisera

1190 B.C.
Gideon leads Israel

1100 B.C.
Samson fights the Philistines

1050 B.C.
Saul is anointed king of Israel


TRIP PLANNER

The second part of the book of Judges continues to describe the cycles of sin and deliverance. With each cycle, Israel falls deeper into idolatry, immorality and controversy. The final chapters of Judges describes Israel in chaos and civil war.

1. Deliverance in 7 Cycles (Two are mentioned in this second section)
  a. Jephthah - Judges 11-12
  b. Samson - Judges 13-16

2. Discord amongst the tribes - Judges 17-21


PLACES OF INTEREST

Fords of The Jordan - Crossing points across the Jordan River of strategic military value. They were also referred to as the "watering places."

Gilead - Located in the northern part of the territory east of the Jordan. The Gileadites were descended from a man named Gilead.

Land of Tob - An area east of Gilead.

Temple of Dagon - Dagon was the national god of the Philistines. All throughout the land cities built temples to Dagon. Samson was held prisoner in Gaza which had one of these temples (Judges 16:23-31). The temples were of simple design and were supported by pillars made of mud and stone. Inside, priests sacrificed many things to Dagon including children. Samson in his dying effort, pulled down the pillars, destroying this temple, killing himself and 3,000 Philistines.

Timnah - A town on the northwest border of Judah. By Samson's day it was occupied by the Philistines.

Zorah - Located in the foothills about 15 miles west of Jerusalem, near Philistine territory. Originally this town belonged to the tribe of Dan, but they were forced north by the power of the Philistines who occupied territory to the west. The town that Samson's parents lived. Samson was probably born there.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Abdon - From the tribe of Ephriam, the 11th Judge. He ruled for 8 years. He had 40 sons and 30 grandsons who rode on 70 young donkeys.

Delilah - She was a woman from the Valley of Sorek who Samson fell for when he came to the city of Gaza. She was crafty, beautiful and money hungry as she led Samson into one trap after another that led to his enslavement and death.

Elon - From the tribe of Zebulun, he was the 10th Judge. He ruled for 10 years and was buried in Aijalon in Zebulun.

Ibzan - From either the tribe of Judah of Zebulun. He was from Bethlehem. He ruled for 7 years and was Israel’s 9th Judge.

Jephthah - From the tribe of Manasseh he was the son of a harlot. He was driven away from his family by his half brothers. He became the judge after 18 years of oppression and ruled for 6 years. He was a mighty warrior and he defeated the Ammorites. In the end he made a foolish vow offering up his daughter as a burnt offering. He defeated the men of Ephraim who had been complaining to him.

Manoah - Samson’s father. Prayed for the return of the Man of God to direct them about the soon to be born Samson (Judges 13:2).

Micah - He was a man from the mountains of Ephraim. He was at the heart of the nations fall into apostasy. With the help of his over indulgent mother, he became an idol worshipper and led others into a similar state (Judges 17:1).

Phinehas - The one who stopped the plague at Peor. The fact that he was still alive shows that the organization of the Book of Judges is not strictly chronological.

Samson - From the tribe of Dan, the last and strongest of all the Judges. Samson’s birth was announced by the Angel of the Lord. He was a Nazarite from his birth. Samson was the arch enemy of the Philistines.


FUN FACTS

Nazarite Vow - Whoever took the Nazarite vow was setting their life aside for total devotion and service to God. The vow could be taken for as little as 30 days or for a lifetime. One who took the Nazarite vow was not allowed to cut their hair or shave their beard. They were not to drink wine or any kind of strong drink and were not allowed to touch a dead body, even if it were a close relative.

Shibboleth OR Sibboleth - This test devised by the Gileadites to catch the Ephraimites is the most famous example in the Bible of linguistic differences between the tribes. The Gileadites chose the word because the "s" sound at the beginning was pronounced "sh" by one side and "s" by the other.

Warriors - Jephthah was called a mighty warrior or a mighty man of valor. These warriors were not ordinary soldiers. These people possessed extraordinary bravery, courage and strength. They were able to demonstrate a fearless nature and great skill in battle. King David had his own group of mighty men who were so strong and so skilled that they were able to single-handedly kill entire troops of enemy soldiers.


MAPS

Palestine in the time of Judges

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Ruth 1-4
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Ruth 1-4
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/514

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

The name of the book comes from one of the main characters, Ruth, whose name means friendship. There are two Bible books named for women and six that are named for their main characters (Joshua, Ruth, Samuel, Ezra, Nehemiah and Esther). The book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from different backgrounds. It also connects David's genealogy to Moab along with highlighting a Gentile thread running through Messiah's bloodline (Rahab the Canaanite and Ruth the Moabite).


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1446-1406 B.C.
The Israelites wander in the wilderness

1405-1400 B.C.
The conquest of Canaan

1380-1050 B.C.
The time of the Judges and the events of Ruth

1050 B.C.
Saul becomes king of Israel

1010 B.C.
David begins to reign at Hebron

1003 B.C.
David reigns all over Israel

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes King


TRIP PLANNER
In the book of Ruth we see the story of romantic Grace lived through a type of Christ called the kinsman redeemer. Ruth a Moabite woman whose husband has died. Naomi, her mother-in-law, invites her to Bethlehem at the beginning of barley harvest where she meets Boaz. The book of Ruth tells the story of how Boaz becomes her kinsman redeemer.

1. Ruth's Decision to stay with Naomi - Ruth chapter 1
2. Ruth's Devotion to Serve Naomi - Ruth chapter 2
3. Ruth's Desire to See Redemption - Ruth chapter 3
4. Ruth's Destiny to secure a Legacy - Ruth chapter 4


PLACES OF INTEREST

Bethlehem - Means "House Of Bread." The city where the story of Ruth occurs.

Ephrathites - Ephrathah was another name for the region for Bethlehem.

Moab - Is the historical name for a mountainous strip of land in modern day Jordan running along the eastern shore of the Dead Sea. In ancient times, it was home to the kingdom of the Moabites, a people often in conflict with their Israelite neighbors to the west. Moab occupied a plateau about 3,000 feet above sea level of the Mediterranean, or 4,300 feet above the Dead Sea, and rising gradually from the north to the south. It was bounded on the west by the Dead Sea and the southern section of the Jordan River; on the east by Ammon and the Arabian desert, from which it was separated by low, rolling hills; and the south by Edom.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Boaz - He had quite the family line. He was the son of Rahab, the husband of Ruth and the great grandfather of King David. Boaz was a very wealthy man who lived in Bethlehem. When a destitute Naomi returned to Bethlehem with her widowed daughter-in-law, Ruth, Ruth went into the fields of Boaz to gather scraps of grain for their table. He acted kindly towards Ruth and instructed his farm workers to leave extra sheaves of barley for her to gather. Boaz learned that Ruth's deceased husband was a distant relative of his. Ruth had another relative of her late husband who was closer than Boaz. By law, the other relative was obligated to marry Ruth, as stated in Deuteronomy 25:5-10. Boaz confronted the other relative with this law, and after the relative refused to marry Ruth, Boaz agreed to marry Ruth, and to buy the estate of Ruth's deceased husband.

Chilion - The youngest son of Elimelech and Naomi. He married Orpah, died and left her a widow. His name means "Failing."

Elimelech - Along with his family, this Jew (an Ephrathite) left the town of Bethlehem during a famine. He went to Moab where he died along with his two sons. His name means "God is King."

Mahlon - The oldest son of Elimelech and Naomi. He married Ruth in Moab. He died and left her a widow. His name means "Sickly."

Naomi - The wife/widow of Elimelech who would lose her husband and sons. She was left in a foreign land with her two daughters-in-law.

Obed - The son of Boaz and Ruth. He would become the father of Jesse and the grandfather of David. His name means "One Who Servers."

Orpha - She became the widow of Chilion. After his death, she remained in Moab.

Ruth - A woman of great love and loyalty. She was a pagan in Moab, who through God's grace would accept the God of Naomi, the God of Israel and become the great grandmother of King David, and be a part of the genealogy of Jesus Christ.


FUN FACTS

Barley fields in Bethlehem - The climate of the ancient land of Israel was a great medium for growing wild grain (wheat and barley); cool moist air from the Mediterranean stimulated early growth and maturity, before the hot dry "hamisn" winds (the same as our Santa Ana winds) from Africa and Arabia could parch their delicate forms. To enjoy the dense fields of wheat and barley, the Israelite harvesters had to be at the right place at the right time -- before the ripe ears of grain shattered at the time of maturity.

City gate in Bethlehem - Since gates were the center of city life, it is not surprising that scripture writers often described important officials as "sitting in the gate." Understanding the important role of city gates brings new light to many biblical stories: When God's angels arrived in Sodom, Lot was "sitting in the gateway," apparently serving as an influential judge in that evil city. Boaz went to the town gate to settle legal matters regarding his marriage to Ruth.

Messiah in Ruth - Messiah can be seen through Boaz who is presented as a type of kinsman redeemer. Like Jesus, he was both qualified and willing to redeem his people. The term "redeem" is used eight times in Ruth. Just as Boaz did for Ruth, Jesus became our Redeemer to pay all of our debts and our avenger who now defends us against our adversaries, our mediator to accomplish our reconciliation and He is the Bridegroom.

Near Kinsman - He was the unnamed close relative of Ruth who passed up the chance to marry her. In the King James Version, Boaz addresses him as "such a one."

Threshing floor in Bethlehem - Threshing Floors were used in the ancient world to separate grain from the chaff. It was a two-step process. First the stalks were spread on the threshing floor and crushed with either and oxen-pulled board with spikes to break the heads of grain from the stalks or with just oxen walking over it or by beating them with heavy sticks. The 2nd step was to use a pitchfork to toss the broken stalks into the air and let the wind blow the lighter chaff to the side while the grain fell directly back to the ground. The process is called winnowing.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Samuel 1-15
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/518

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

First Samuel recounts King Saul's rise to power and influence and his tragic fall. Saul's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective. But the book of First Samuel highlights Saul's tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another king - King David.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1380 - 1050 B.C.
Judges rule in Israel
1200 B.C.
Philistines occupy the Mediterranean coast

1100 - 1010 B.C.
Samuel's prophetic career

1050 B.C.
Saul becomes king of Israel

1018 B.C.
Samuel anoints David to be king

1010 B.C.
The conquest of Canaan

1003 B.C.
David's reign acknowledged throughout Israel

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes king


TRIP PLANNER
The book of First Samuel can be divided into two sections. The first section deals with the rise of Saul as King.

1. The role of Samuel:
a. Samuel called - Chapters 1-2
b. Samuel confirmed - Chapters 3-6
c. Samuel commended - Chapter 7

2. The reign of Saul:
a. Israel rejects God as King - Chapter 8
b. God chooses Saul as king - Chapters 9-12
c. God rejects Saul as king - Chapters 13-15

PLACES OF INTEREST

Ramah - Five miles north of Jerusalem. The town today lies in ruins, but was the hometown of Samuel's parents and Samuel's birthplace. It was in Mt. Ephraim, within accessible distance to Shiloh, were Samuel's parents went up from year to year to worship and to sacrifice (1:3). From Ramah as a center Samuel went on circuit annually, to judge Israel, Bethel, Gilgal, and Mizpah (1 Sam 7:16).

Ashdod - One of the five chief cities of the Philistines. The name means stronghold or fortress, and its strength may be inferred by the fact that Psammetik, of Egypt, besieged it for many years. It was still independent in the days of Samuel, when, after the defeat of the Israelites, the ark was taken to the house of Dagon in Ashdod (1 Sam 5:1).

Beth Shemesh - A town located about 8 miles east of Ekron and 15 miles west of Jerusalem. It was to Beth Shemesh that the Ark was returned to Israel. The name means "house of the sun" (1 Sam 6:12).

Kiriath Jearim - God killed many people in Beth Shemesh for looking inside the Ark. It was then moved to Kiriath Jearim. It is assumed that the location was about 10 miles west of Jerusalem, but the actual location is disputed (1 Sam. 7:1).

Gibeah - Israel's first king Saul was from Gibeah. Only three miles north of Jerusalem, it was Saul's first capital and was the headquarters for his military campaigns. The city was destroyed by the Roman commander Titus at the same time as the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. No one has lived there since (1 Sam. 1:1).

PEOPLE OF INTEREST
Elkanah - He was from the tribe of Ephraim, the husband of Hannah and the father of Samuel (1 Sam 1:1).

Hannah - A Barren woman who God blessed by opening her womb to bear a child. She became the mother of Samuel whom she had dedicated to the LORD even before his birth (1 Sam 1:27).

Eli - He was the high priest at this time. He had two sons (Hophni and Phinehas) who were wicked. Samuel came to live with Eli as a young boy (1 Sam 1:3).

Hophni - The oldest son of Eli. He was wicked in his priestly duties and was later killed in battle as a divine judgment (1 Sam 4:11).

Phinehas - The younger son of Eli who was equally as wicked as his brother and also killed in battle as a divine judgment. He was the father (born after his death) of the child named Ichabod, meaning "the glory has departed out of Israel."

Samuel - He was the godly son for whom Hannah prayed. He could very well be considered a great religious statesman. He was the last of the Judges and the first of the Prophets. If you follow his travels, he was like a circuit riding preacher in the movies of the wild west (1 Sam 1:20; 7:15-17).

An unnamed man of God - A nameless prophet who warned Eli about his evil sons (1 Sam 2:27).

Phinehas' wife - When she hears the news that her husband, brother-in-law and father-in-law are dead and the Ark has been lost to the enemy, goes into labor and gives birth to a son that she names Ichabod, meaning "the glory has departed out of Israel" (1 Sam 4:19-22).

Dagon - A Philistine god, the harvest god, whose image fell to the ground in the presence of the Ark (1 Sam 5:2).

Abinadab - When the Ark was recaptured by Israel, they took it to the house of Abinadab who cared for it for 20 years (1 Sam 7:1).

FUN FACTS

The Yearly Sacrifice - Samuel's parents traveled to the tabernacle at Shiloh each year to worship God. This celebration was actually the Passover, the Feast of Unleavened Bread. All Israelites were to observe this eight-day feast and in many cases they traveled to Shiloh to do so at the Tabernacle (1 Sam 1:3; 21).

The Menorah - This Golden Lampstand in the Tabernacle. Originally carved out of acacia wood, it was covered with 96 pounds of pure gold. The Menorah had a long straight stand and six branches curved out and up from the center, three on each side, The flames were an expression of God's presence (1 Sam 3:3).

Oxcarts - Living along the flat coastal areas, carts and wagons were very useful. The Ark, which had been captured by the Philistines, was returned to Israel on an oxcart. The oxcart had to travel over bumpy, rocky areas on the return trip. When it was going to tip over after hitting a bump, Uzzah reached up to steady the Ark and was struck down by God (1 Sam 6:1-7:2 & 2 Sam 6:7).

Armor Bearer - During David's days, commanders always had an armor bearer who went into battle with them. He was a highly trusted man with great skills and courage. The armor bearer protected and defended the commander. His name comes from his other duties which were to carry any weapons that the commander needed to fight his battle (1 Sam 14:1).

Saul's Family-

a. Saul: The people of Israel demanded a king like the surrounding nations. Saul was chosen to be the first king. He was later rejected by God (1 Sam 9:2).
b. Ahinoam: The daughter of Ahimaaz and Saul's wife.
c. Jonathan: The oldest son of King Saul who becomes David's best friend. Jonathan was a brave, loyal and godly man (1 Sam 14:49).
d. Ishui: Saul's next son (1 Sam 14:49).
e. Melchi-Shua: Saul's third son (1 Sam 14:49).
f. Abinadab: Saul's fourth son (1 Sam 14:49).
g. Merab: The oldest daughter of Saul (1 Sam 14:49).
h. Michal: The younger daughter of Saul and David's first wife (1 Sam 14:49; 18:27).
i. Kish: Saul's father. When Kish had lost his donkeys, he sent Saul out to look for them. Through this event, Saul was anointed king by Samuel (1 Sam 9).
j. Ner: Saul's uncle, probably Kish's brother, and the father of Abner who would become the commander of Saul's army.

MAPS

1 Samuel

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Samuel 16-31
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/521

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.

DETAILED NOTES
Interactive Travel Guide

The first half of First Samuel deals with Saul's rise and demise. The second half of First Samuel tells the story of David. David is a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1380 - 1050 B.C.
Judges rule in Israel

1200 B.C.
Philistines occupy the Mediterranean coast

1100 - 1010 B.C.
Samuel's prophetic career

1050 B.C.
Saul becomes King of Israel

1018 B.C.
Samuel anoints David to be king

1010 B.C.
The conquest of Canaan

1003 B.C.
David's reign is acknowledged throughout Israel

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes king


TRIP PLANNER

The second section of First Samuel deals with David's rise to power and his exile into hiding.

The Making of A King
1) A King Unveiled - Chapter 16
2) A Warrior Unleashed - Chapter 17 - 20
3) A Leader Under Fire - Chapter 21 - 31


PLACES OF INTEREST

The Valley of Elah - The scene of the events of 1 Samuel 17:2 where David fought Goliath. About 15 miles west of Bethlehem, the Philistines stood upon the southern hills and the Israelites stood to the North or Northeast. There was a wide valley floor upon which David's contest with Goliath occurred. It was near Shochoh in the tribe of Judah and Azekah (17:1). It is the modern Wady es-Sunt, 1.e., "valley of the acaia" (1 Sam 17:1-2).

Nob - An ancient priestly town to which David came on his way south when he fled from Saul at Gilbeah. Nob was a town or village in ancient Israel in the vicinity of Jerusalem. It may have been located near the Mount of Olives or possibly further north. It likely belonged to the Tribe of Benjamin, as Jerusalem was the border between Benjamin and Judah (1 Sam 21:1).

The Wilderness of Moan - A wasteland beginning about five miles south of Ziph. While camping there, the Ziphites discovered David and told Saul, who chased him east towards En Gedi (1 Sam 23:19).

En Gedi - Again fleeing from Saul, David goes to En Gedi - a stronghold (inaccessible to the enemy), located in the wilderness, where they probably had a bubbling spring, rocks, sand and tremendous heat. En Gedi is located in southeastern Israel on the west bank of the Dead Sea. Because of its spring in an otherwise totally arid country, the site has been inhabited from antiquity (1 Sam 23:29).

Hill of Hakilah (Hachilah) - A barren wasteland covering an area south and east of Hebron, the exact site is unknown but was somewhere in the wilderness of Ziph. Saul and his army camped by this hill while he was pursuing David. David caught Saul asleep in a cave and stole his spear and water jug (1 Sam 26).

Ziklag - This town was probably located about 12 miles northeast of Beersheba on the eastern border of Philistine territory. Chased by Saul, David fled to Gath in Philistine territory. After gaining the trust of Achish, the king of Gath, he was allowed to headquarter in Ziklag (1 Sam 27:6).

Endor - Seven or eight miles northeast of Mount Gilboa, this is the village where the witch of Endor lived (1 Sam 28).

Gilboa - Located about 60 miles north of Jerusalem and about 20 miles southwest of the Sea of Galilee, Mount Gilboa rises out of the plains of Jezreel. Saul fought his final battle on the hillside of Mount Gilboa. There he was killed along with three of his sons (1 Sam 31).

Beth Shan - Located about 10 miles to the southwest of Gilboa, Beth Shan is the place that the Philistines took the bodies of Saul and his sons and hung them on the city walls (1 Sam 31:8-10).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

The Witch of Endor - She was a medium who was visited by Saul. Probably to her own surprise she brought up Samuel from the dead (1 Sam 28:7).

The Ziphites - While David was hiding in the hills of Judah, men from the town of Ziph discovered him and reported his location to Saul. Ziph was most likely a small town located about four miles southeast of Hebron. It was on a hillside overlooking the countryside with good vision of the valley (1 Sam 23:14-20).

Jesse's Family -

a. Jesse - He is the father of David. His own grandparents were Boaz and Ruth. The father of eight sons and two daughters (1 Sam 16:1).

b. Eliab - The oldest son of Jesse. Samuel thought for sure that Eliab would be God's anointed, but God told him "Do not look at his appearance or at the height of his stature, because I have refused him. For the Lord does not see as man sees; for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart" (1 Sam 16:6). He later became one of David's critics (1 Sam. 17:28).

c. Abinadab - The 2nd of Jesse's eight sons. He was also rejected by God (1 Sam 16:8).

d. Shammah - Jesse's 3rd son (1 Sam 16:9).

e. Shimeah - Jesse's 4th son (1 Sam 16:9). He became the father of Jonathan, a brave warrior who would kill a giant with 6 toes and 6 fingers (2 Sam 21:20-21). Shimeah other son, Amnon, helped plan the rape of David's daughter Tamar (2 Sam 13:3).

f. Zeruiah - One of Jesse's daughters and David's sister. She was the mother of Joab, the general of David's army (2 Sam 2:13).

g. David - Jesse's youngest son. He was the slayer of the giant Goliath (1 Sam 17). David was a shepherd, a great soldier, and a singer. He would later become the 2nd King of Israel and in the Old Testament history ranks with Abraham and Moses as the great men of the Bible (1 Sam 16:13). You can read more about David in 2 Samuel.


FUN FACTS

David's Anointing - As king of Israel, David was called the Lord's anointed. He was both a political and spiritual leader. and was set apart for God's work. A prophet or priest was the one who would anoint a king. The prophet Samuel anointed David with an animal horn filled with oil. It was probably a secret recipe used to anoint the priest. The oil was poured over the head of the kneeling king (1 Sam. 16:1-13).

Harps - David was a skilled musician who knew how to play the harp. The Weapon that Won the Battle at Elah - What kind of weapon did David use in his battle with Goliath? It was a sling, not as kids would use, but the kind that was used by armies for centuries during this time (Judges 20:16). With a stone in place, the sling was spun around the warrior's head several times. At the chosen moment, on end was released sending the stone towards its chosen target. Goliath may have thought it a child's toy, but soon found out it was a deadly weapon (1 Sa. 17:45-51).

Festival of the New Moon - The Israelites were a festive people. They worked hard six days each week and always looked for festive occasions. One of these festivals was celebrated each month at the new moon. Called the Festival of the New Moon, it was consecrated to the Lord by bringing special sacrifices, blowing of the trumpets and the cessation from normal work (1 Sam 20:5; 18).

The Showbread - Inside the Tabernacle was a tablet that held 12 round loaves of bread. This Holy Bread was called the showbread. It was to symbolize that God was the Bread of Life for the people of Israel. This bread was baked each Friday afternoon. Only the priests from the family of Garmu knew the recipe. These loaves were a part of the Sabbath day ceremony. The old bread was not thrown away, but divided among the priests (1 Sam 21:1-4).

Mediums (The Witch of Endor) - In spite of all of God's warnings, magicians, witches, sorcerers, and wizards continued to be popular with the people of Israel. Many people believed that evil spirits controlled their lives. They used the witches and mediums to try to see the future and alter their lives. Reading the futures, also known as divinations was what Saul sought (1 Sam. 28).

David's deliverances -
Over and over we have seen David delivered from the hand of Saul. But it's often different each time. So far, we've seen:

1) Deliverance through a peacemaker - Jonathan talked to his dad, and for a while, there was peace between Saul and David (1 Sam. 19:1-7).

2) Deliverance through running - this seems to be a major factor in David's life. When Saul sent messenger's to David's house, Michal helped David run away (1 Sam. 19:11-17). Over and over again, when God brings about a chance to escape, David runs.

3) Deliverance through God's power - when David hid with Samuel at Naioth, God's Spirit supernaturally overwhelmed each of the messengers until they all were prophesying (1 Sam. 19:18-24).

4) Deliverance through God's guidance - David enquired of the Lord and God warned David to flee from Keilah so he wouldn't be betrayed (1 Sam. 23:7-13).

5) Deliverance through encouragement - Jonathan encouraged David in the Lord - he kept David going (1 Sam. 23:16-18).

6) Deliverance though the exit - God caused Saul to get sidetracked long enough for David to make his escape (1 Sam. 23:26-29).

7) Deliverance through kindness - instead of killing Saul, David showed kindness, and Saul temporarily allowed David to go (1 Sam. 24).

8) Deliverance through confrontation - David didn't just show kindness to Saul, he confronted him about the truth (1 Sam. 24).


MAPS

I Samuel Map

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 Samuel 1-10
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/523

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.

DETAILED NOTES
The Book of 2 Samuel does not identify its author. It could not be the Prophet Samuel, since he died in 1 Samuel. Possible writers include Nathan and Gad (see 1 Chronicles 29:29). Originally, the books of 1 and 2 Samuel were one book. The translators of the Septuagint separated them, and we have retained that separation ever since. The events of 1 Samuel span approximately 100 years, from c. 1100 B.C. to c. 1000 B.C. The events of 2 Samuel cover another 40 years. The date of writing, then, would be sometime after 960 B.C.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

1230-926 B.C.
The Settlement of Canaan

1018 B.C.
Samuel anoints David to be king

1011 B.C.
Death of Saul

1010 B.C.
David begins to reign at Hebron

1005 B.C.
Jerusalem becomes the capital

1003 B.C.
David becomes king over all Israel

990 B.C.
David commits adultery with Bathsheba

980 B.C.
Absalom revolts against his father David

970 B.C.
King David dies

930 B.C.
Solomon dies and the Kingdom divides


TRIP PLANNER

After the death of Saul, David soon becomes King over all of Israel. The book of 2 Samuel can be divided into two sections. The first section covers David's Triumphs.

1. Political Triumphs - 2 Sam. 1-5
2. Spiritual Triumphs - 2 Sam. 6-7
3. Military Triumphs - 2 Sam. 8-10


PLACES OF INTEREST

Hebron - Hebron was one of the first cities built in Palestine. It was one of the first places Abraham resided upon his arrival in Canaan. David, when he became King, chose it to be his capital. By this time, the town was already old and established. Hebron is located 23 miles south of Jerusalem, 3,000 feet above sea level, in the center of the tribe of Judah, and was the largest and the most secure city. The area was rich in agriculture, surrounded by vineyards and olive groves. There was also plenty of water that would bubble up from the surrounding springs.

Jerusalem - During the time of the judges and until David's time, Jerusalem was called Jebus. This city had been occupied by the Jebusites, who were a mixed population of Canaanite people. When David was chosen King over all Israel, he chose Jerusalem to be his capital. According to one Jewish tradition, Jerusalem was founded by Shem and Eber, ancestors of Abraham. The city sits upon slopes over 2,000 feet above sea level.

Lo Debar - When Saul was killed in battle, some members of his family fled to Lo Debar. It was probably located in the Gilead region east of the Jordan River. Located three miles east of the Jordan River and about 60 miles northeast of Jerusalem, Saul's family hoped that they would be safe and able to protect Mephibosheth, where he lived with Machir until David called him to the palace (2 Sam. 9:4).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Maacah - David's fourth wife, the mother of Absalom. She was also the daughter of Talmai, the king of Geshur (2 Sam. 3:3).

Haggith - David's fifth wife, the mother of Adonijah (2 Sam. 3:4).

Abital - David's sixth wife (2 Sam. 3:4).

Eglah - David's seventh wife (2 Sam. 3:5).

Bathsheba - David's favorite wife. Bathsheba was the wife of Uriah, who was away in battle when she committed adultery with David. She was the mother of five of David's children, their firstborn having died in infancy due to David's sin. She was the mother of both Solomon and Nathan (1 Chronicles 3:5). In the genealogies of Jesus, Mary came from the line of Nathan and Joseph from the line of Solomon.

Jonathan - Saul's son. He was both a brave and godly man. He became David's best friend (2 Samuel 1:26).

Mephibosheth - He was the lame son of Jonathan. After the death of Jonathan and Saul, David brought Mephibosheth into his house to eat at the king's table like one of his own sons (2 Samuel 9:10-13).

Hanun - The King of Ammon who mistreated some of David's men and ridiculed them. He shaved off one side of their beards and cut away their clothes to expose their buttocks (2 Samuel 10:1-4).

Ish-Bosheth - He was the weak son of Saul who was put in power by Abner, who needed a puppet king. They controlled the kingdom for 7 years after Saul's death (2 Samuel 2:8).

Hadadezer - The king of Zoboah, son of Rehob. Zoboah was a land northeast of Damascus near the Euphrates River. David defeated this king twice (2 Samuel 8:3, 10:15-19).


FUN FACTS

Carpenters - When David began to rule in Jerusalem and was ready to build his palace, there were very few carpenters in the land. David had befriended Hiram, the king of Tyre, who sent him building supplies and skilled carpenters. These carpenters would have done the construction and the finishing detailed woodwork. Compared to today's power tools, their tools would seem primitive, but these were craftsmen. Wooden mallets were used as hammers, flax and reeds were used as rulers, and crushed sandstone was the sandpaper of the day (2 Samuel 5:11).

Song and Dance - Throughout their history - even to the modern age - the Israelites loved to come together and celebrate. A joyful and natural part of that was singing and dancing. Song and dance were used as an expression of worship, praise and thanksgiving. Much of their history was passed down through song. The Book of Psalms is a collection of songs telling of the nation's history (2 Samuel 6:1-5).

The Tambourine - Also called the timbrel.


MAPS

Figure 1 - Geography Of The Books Of Samuel

Figure 2 - The United Kingdom

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 Samuel 11-24
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/527

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.

DETAILED NOTES
The book of Second Samuel recounts the triumphs and defeats of King David. David took a divided and defeated Israel from his predecessor King Saul and unified the nation under God's guidance. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart."

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

1230-926 B.C.
The Settlement of Canaan

1018 B.C.
Samuel anoints David to be king

1011 B.C.
Death of Saul

1010 B.C.
David begins to reign at Hebron

1005 B.C.
Jerusalem becomes the capital

1003 B.C.
David becomes king over all Israel

990 B.C.
David commits adultery with Bathsheba

980 B.C.
Absalom revolts against his father David

970 B.C.
King David dies

930 B.C.
Solomon dies and the Kingdom divides

TRIP PLANNER:
The book of Second Samuel can be divided into two parts. The first part, chapters 1-10, recounts David's triumphs. The second part, chapters 11-24, deals with David's transgressions and the resulting trouble.

1. David's Transgressions (Adultery and Murder): 2 Samuel 11
2. David's Troubles: 2 Samuel 12-24
a. Troubles in David's House - 2 Samuel 12:1-13:36
b. Troubles in David's Kingdom - 2 Samuel 13:37- chapter 24

PLACES OF INTEREST:
The Mountain of Tears - As David was leaving Jerusalem, he went by way of the Mount of Olives. Saddened by the news of Absalom's plot, he cried as he looked down on his city. Perhaps this is the same spot that Jesus wept over Jerusalem (2 Samuel 15:30; Luke 13:34).

En Rogel - As David fled from Absalom with those who were still loyal to him, Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed back at En Rogel to spy on Absalom to learn his plans. En Rogel was a spring in the area just south of Jerusalem in the Kidron Valley (2 Samuel 17:17).

Bethlehem - This was the hometown of both David and Jesus, located in the hills of Judah about six miles southwest of Jerusalem. David grew up here, tending to his father's flocks of sheep. As a side note, Bethlehem is first noted in Scripture as the place where Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside," directly to the north of the city (Genesis 48:7). The valley to the east was the scene of the story of Ruth the Moabitess. There are the fields in which she gleaned, and the path by which she and Naomi returned to the town.

From Dan to Beersheba - When talking about the entire nation of Israel, the phrase "from Dan to Beersheba" was often used. Dan was located on the northern border and Beersheba was on the southern border. When the messengers were told to take the message "from Dan to Beersheba" it meant to all 12 tribes (Judges 20:1; 2 Samuel 3:10, 24:2).

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Abigail - David's sister; mother of Amasa (2 Sam 17:25; 1 Chronicles 2:16).

Abishai - David's nephew and one of his most loyal friends. He was the second of three brothers, Joab older and Asahel was the younger. He was the one who wanted to kill the sleeping Saul (1 Sam 26:6-9). During Absalom's revolt, he remained loyal to King David (2 Sam 16:9). He was the one who rescued David from the giant Ishbi-Benob (2 Sam 21:16).

Absalom - David's favorite son. Absalom led a terrible revolt against David and drove the king out of Jerusalem for a time (2 Sam 15:13-14).

Adino - The first of David's mighty men. Also called Josheb-Basshebeth the Tachmonite (2 Sam 23:8).

Ahithophel - David's counselor; Bathsheba's grandfather. He later joined Absalom's revolt against David. Perhaps this was in response to the way David took advantage of his granddaughter (2 Sam 11:3, 15:12, 23:34). But when his counsel was rejected, he hung himself (2 Sam 17:21).
Amasa - David's nephew, daughter of his sister Abigail and cousin to Absalom, who appointed him commander of Absalom's troops. Also cousin to Joab (2 Sam 17:25).

Barzillai - A Gileadite who along with Machir and Shobi brought food and supplies to David when he was in great need. Barzillai was 80 years old (2 Sam 17:27, 19:32).

Abiathar - When Saul killed all the priesthood at Nob, Abiathar was the sole survivor. He was the son of Ahimelech (1 Sam 22). He remained loyal to David (2 Sam 15:24) but would later turn against Solomon (1 King 2:26).

Doeg - an Edomite called "a certain man of the servants of Saul." This man caused the bloody deaths of 85 priests at Nob, because the High Priest had offered bread to David (1 Sam 21:7).

Eleazar - The second of David's mighty men. He was the son of Dodo (2 Sam 23:9).

Hushai - One of David's friends and counselor. He pretended to be on Absalom's side but gave him ridiculous advice (2 Sam 15:31-37).

Ishbi-Benob - This was a Philistine giant who was killed by Abishai as he was about to kill David (2 Sam 21:16-17).

Ittai - He was from Gath. He left his Philistine city to go live with David in Jerusalem. During Absalom's revolt and when David was driven out of the city, Ittai placed his 600-man army at David's disposal (2 Sam 15:21).

Jonadab - A nephew of David's, the son of David's brother Shimeah (2 Sam 13:3). He plotted with Amnon, David's son, to have relations with Amnon's half-sister Tamar.

Jonathan - Another nephew of David's, also the son of Shimeah who killed a giant from Gath who was defying Israel (2 Sam 21:20-21).

Machir - The caretaker for Mephibosheth before David took him to the palace. He also was David's friend during Absalom's rebellion (2 Sam 17:27).

Shobi - An Amorite, the son of Nahash (who was an enemy of Israel - 1 Sam 11:1), who befriended David and brought them provisions while he was escaping from Absalom (2 Sam 17:27).

Shammah - The third of David's mighty men, the son of Agee the Hararite (2 Sam 23:11). The Lord gave him a mighty victory as he stood his ground in defeating the Philistines.

Sheba - After the rebellion of Absalom had been put down, Sheba, a Benjamite started up his own insurrection against David (2 Sam 20:1).

Shimei - When David was being run out of town by Absalom, Shimei cursed him and threw rocks. He was later forgiven by David but held in house arrest in Jerusalem and executed by Solomon for crossing beyond the borders of Jerusalem (2 Sam 16:5-6, 19:16-23; 1 Kings 2:42).

Shimeah - David's brother (2 Sam 13:3), also known as Shammah. Solomon - David's greatest son, born to Bathsheba and also the firstborn in Jerusalem. He would become the third king in the history of Israel and the nation's most powerful. He would later build the Temple that David had wanted to build (2 Sam 12:24).

Tamar - David's daughter, defiled by her step-brother Amnon (2 Sam 13:1; 1 Chron 3:9), avenged by her brother Absalom.

Zadok - In the priesthood, Zadok was 11th in descent from Aaron. He was loyal to David (2 Sam 15:24). He shared the high office with Abiathar for a short period. Zadok anointed Solomon as king and would become the sole high priest (1 King 1:39-40).

FUN FACTS:
Bathing - Why was Bathsheba bathing in public view? Baths were a rare occasion back in those times. Water was hard to find. There was no indoor plumbing and the water had to be drawn from deep wells or saved from the rain in rock cisterns. Baths were a luxury, the weather was probably warm and she probably had the window open. Soap in those days was made from the ashes of certain burnt plants. Between baths people rubbed themselves with olive oil to cover up the body odors (2 Sam 11:2).

The Watchman - As David's small army battled the army of his son Absalom, David waited at Mahanaim to see the result. Standing on the top of the wall was the watchman whose duty was to warn the king of anyone approaching the city (2 Sam 18:24-27).

Araunah's Threshing Floor - The location of great Bible history. Mount Moriah was where Abraham offered Isaac to be sacrificed. Centuries later, David would buy Araunah's threshing floor. God had commanded David to build an altar on the site. Later, Solomon would build God's holy temple on the same location. This is the site of the temple mount in today's Israel
(2 Sam 18-25).

The Threshing Sledge - When the farmer would want to separate the kernels from the stalks of wheat, corn or barley, he would use a threshing sledge. It was made of wood planks and looked like a sled or toboggan but heavier. The bottom was covered with stones or metal. Hitched to oxen, it was dragged over the stalks of crops as men or children stood on it for extra weight (2 Sam 24:22).

MAPS:
David's wars of conquest

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Kings 1-22
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/531

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 1 Kings 1-22

1 Kings covers the history of Israel as it moves from being united under King David to divided under King Solomon. It's a story of good Kings and bad Kings, true prophets and false prophets, loyalty and disobedience to God.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

1003 B.C.
David becomes king over all Israel

988 B.C.
Solomon is born

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes King

930 B.C.
Solomon dies; Jeroboam reigns in Israel and Rehoboam reigns in Judah.

910 B.C.
Asa becomes king in Judah

909 B.C.
Baasha becomes king in Israel

874 B.C.
Ahab becomes king in Israel

872 B.C.
Jehoshaphat becomes king in Judah

865 B.C.
Elijah begins to prophesy against Ahab


TRIP PLANNER:

The Tale of Two Kingdoms - the story of 1 Kings is the story of how Israel, because of their disobedience to God's Word, moves from a powerful unified nation under King David to a divided nation under many different Kings.

1. The United Kingdom - 1 Kings 1-11

a. Rise of Solomon - 1 Kings 1-8

b. Decline of Solomon - 1 Kings 9-12


2. The Divided Kingdom - 1 Kings 12-22

a. Reign of many kings - 1 Kings 12-16:28

b. Reign of Ahab - 1 Kings 16:29-22:40

c. Reign of Jehoshaphat - 1 Kings 22:41-50

d. Reign of Ahaziah - 1 Kings 22:51-53


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Twenty Cities Given By Solomon To King Hiram - King Solomon gave King Hiram one city for each year in which he provided building supplies. The cities were located in the region of Tyre which is northeast of Jerusalem. God did not give us the names of the cities (1 Kings 9:10-13).

Samaria - Samaria became the capitol of Israel, the Northern Kingdom, some years after the country split in two, after Solomon's death. It's located on a hill about 35 miles north of Jerusalem. King Omri, the 6th King of Israel, bought the hill and named it Samaria, in honor of its former owner, Shemer, and built his palace on it. During the time of Jesus there was a continuing hostility between Jews and Samaritans, as found in John 8:48, Luke 9:52-53, and the surprise of the disciples when they found Jesus talking with a Samaritan woman at Jacob's well (John 4:7-9). The city was destroyed by the Romans in AD 66, and again rebuilt (1 Kings 16:24).

Sheba - This is a southern kingdom mentioned in the Old Testament. The actual location of the historical kingdom is disputed between Ethiopia and Yemen (1 Kings 10:1).

Solomon's Temple - Location - The Temple was probably situated upon the more easterly of the two hills which form the site of the present-day Temple Mount - Noble Sanctuary, at the center of which is the Dome of the Rock. This is the same site where Abraham was to sacrifice Isaac (Gen 22:2). Under the Jebusites the site was used as a threshing floor. 2 Sam. 24 describes its consecration during David's reign (1 Kings 5-9).

Tirzah - Tirzah was one of the Canaanite cities that were taken by the Israelites under Joshua during their God-commanded possession of the Promised Land (from Dan to Beersheba, the Jordan River to the Mediterranean Sea). Later, after the death of Solomon, when the united kingdom of the Israelites split into two separate kingdoms, Israel and Judah, Jeroboam made his residence at Tirzah, making it the capital of the northern ten tribes (1 Kings 14:7-20).

Tisbe - The birthplace of Elijah. An area in the forested mountains of Gilead. Tishbe in Gilead has long been associated with the archaeological remains at modern Listib (1 Kings 17:1).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Abijam - He ruled for 3 years beginning his reign in 913 B.C. He rebuked Jeroboam, King of the North, for leading the rebellion against Rehoboam, and then defeated him on the battlefield (1 Kings 15:1).

Adonijah - When David was on his death bed, his oldest living son, Adonijah, attempted to steal the throne from his half brother, Solomon. He was supported by Joab and Abiathar (1 Kings 1:7). He is placed on probation but is executed at a later time for again attempting to ascend to the throne by marrying Abishag who had been David's last concubine (1 Kings 1:3; 2:17, 25).

Ahab - Ahab was the seventh King of Israel. He reigned for 22 years (874-852 BC). He was the son of Omri. He married Jezebel, daughter of Ethbaal, the king of the Sidonians. Ahab, under Jezebel's influence, built a pagan temple, and allowed idols into Samaria. He was one of the most wicked of all Kings. He was often confronted by Elijah. He was killed in battle, just as Elijah had prophesied (1 Kings 16:29).

Ahaziah - He was Ahab's oldest son who made an attempt to kill the prophet Elijah for predicting that he would not recover from a severe fall he had suffered. He began his reign of 2 years in 853 B.C. (I Kings 22:1).

Asa - A ruler for 41 years, he began his rule around 911 B.C. He was Judah's first king who had a relationship with God. He led his people in a revival while at the same time he deposed his grandmother, Queen Maachah for idolatry. All during his reign, he fought with King Baasha, 3rd ruler of the North. Toward the latter part of his life Asa backslides and finally died of a foot disease for which sickness he refused to seek God's help (2 Chronicles 16:12).

Baasha - having assassinated Jeroboam, Baasha began his reign in 909 B.C. He ruled for 24 years. He had destroyed the dynasty of Jeroboam, as God had predicted, but received the same judgment prophecy upon his own family due to his own wickedness (1 Kings 15:33).

Bath-Sheba - visits her dying husband David, and arranges for Solomon, her favorite son, to be anointed by Zadok the priest (1 Kings 1:39).

Ben-Hadad I - (879 B.C.) He was bribed by the Southern King Asa to help him in his struggle against Baasha, the Northern ruler (1 Kings 15:16-18). He was later defeated by the Northern King, Ahab (l King 20).

Elah - He was the son of Baasha, beginning his rule in 886 B.C. He was the ruler for a short 2 years before being assassinated his own chariot captain, Zimri, while he was "drinking himself drunk" (1 Kings 16:8-9).

Elijah - Here is the most famous Old Testament prophet. Elijah, a Tishbite from the region of Gilead, was a prophet in Israel during the reigns of Ahab, Ahaziah and Jehoram. All his life Elijah was active in the defense of God. His teachings brought him into constant conflict with the Kings of Israel, and on one occasion had to flee for his life. He fought against the cult of Baal, and clashed frequently with Ahab's wife Jezebel, who had introduced the pagan cult in Israel. He was one who prayed for both droughts and downpours. During times of great need while doing God's work against the wicked rule of Ahab, he was fed by ravens and a starving widow. He also raised the righteous dead and killed the living wicked (1 Kings 17:1).

Jehoshaphat - A southern kingdom ruler began his rule in 873 B.C. The length of his reign was 25 years. Like his father, Jehoshaphat led his people in a great revival, but compromised his testimony when he made a political alliance with the wicked King Ahab of the North. This included giving of his son Jehoram to marry the daughter of Ahab and Jezebel, a pagan whose name was Athaliah (1 Kings 15:24).

Jeroboam - began his 22 year reign in 930 B.C. He led the rebellion against Rehoboam and instituted a false religion at both Bethel and Dan. Jeroboam was so evil that God said 21 times that Jeroboam made Israel to sin (1 Kings 12:25).

Jezebel - Jezebel was the wife of Ahab, who was king of Israel from about 874 BC to about 852 BC. She was the daughter of Ethbaal, the king of Sidon. Jezebel worshiped a pagan god called Baal and she helped to corrupt Israel with idol worship. She was evil and influential. The prophets Elijah and Elisha blamed Jezebel more than Ahab for the persecution of God's prophets during that era. Jezebel's daughter, Athaliah, became Queen of Judah, and she too was evil.

Joab - Previously the commander of the army for King David, this general is finally executed, not only for his part in Adonijah's rebellion, but for many past crimes which included the murders of Abner and Amasa (1 Kings 2:28-34).

Nadab - beginning in 910 B.C. he reigned 2 years. He was Jeroboam's son and was assassinated by Baasha to secure his throne (l Kings 15:25).

Nathan - the Prophet, who had confronted David over the affair with Bath-Sheba, now warns Bath-Sheba about Adonijah's plot to ascend to the throne ahead of Solomon (1 Kings 1:11).

Obadiah - He was in charge of King Ahab's household affairs during the ministry of Elijah. He was a backslidden Israelite believer who had hidden 100 prophets in two caves from the murderous Jezebel, but still had not taken his stand for God before Ahab and the people (1 Kings 18:3-4).

Omri - He began the 4th Northern dynasty ruling for 12 years beginning in 885 B.C. He made Samaria the new Northern Capitol, and became one of the most powerful of all the Kings (1 Kings 16:23).

Rehoboam - The son of Solomon, he began his reign in 930 B.C. and ruled for 17 years. It was because of his lack of respect and thinking of what was best for his people that he was the cause of Israel's civil war (1 Kings 12:1).

Shemei - Shimei, like Adonijah, for awhile placed on parole and limited not to cross the Brook Kidron, but he broke this trust and suffered the death penalty for it (1 Kings 2:36-46). At the execution of Shimei, David's dying request had been fulfilled by Solomon, for he had asked that justice be done to both Joab and Shimei (1 Kings 2:5,8).

Shishak (935-914 B.C.) - As Jeroboam ran into exile, he was befriended by Shishak the King of Egypt. This was during the latter part of Solomon's reign and later he led an army against Rehoboam (1 Kings 11:40; 14:25).

Solomon - Solomon, the son of King David and Bathsheba, was the third king of Israel. Solomon was renown for his wisdom, wealth and for his construction projects. Israel enjoyed an era of security, prosperity, and international political and economic importance under Solomon. Solomon was anointed king when his older brother, Adonijah, rashly tried to proclaim himself as ruler when their father, King David, became old. But Bathsheba and the prophet Nathan, with the support of others, crowned Solomon as King.

Zadok - He manifested his loyalty to the king when he espoused the cause of Solomon against Adonijah (1 Kings 1:8).

Zimri - A strange ruler began his reign in 885 B.C. He ruled for only 7 days. In that time he was able to destroy all of Baasha's descendants as God had predicted. After only a week's rule he committed suicide by remaining in a burning building (1 Kings 16:11-18).


FUN FACTS:

Baking Bread in an Oven - When Elijah asked the widow to make him some bread, how did she do it. She may have baked it on an oven called a tannur. This was shaped like a pottery jar. It was filled with sticks and lit on fire. The dough would have been put on the outside and baked. Look at 1 Kings 17:12, where she says that she was gathering sticks to bake her bread (1 Kings 17:8-16).

Cedars of Lebanon - Solomon bought these trees from King Hiram of Tyre. This was great quality wood from the finest cedar trees in the Middle East. It was ideal for use as a building material and was used for the interior of the temple. It was a dark red in color and had a special sweet smell. The logs were tied together into rafts and were floated down the seacoast to various port cities. They were then dragged overland to Jerusalem (1 Kings 5-8).

Elijah's Mantle - It was his cloak. This is very similar to an overcoat today. They were made by hand and were difficult to produce. Therefore, most people had only one. A mantle was worn as protection against the burning sun and for warmth on a cold night. It had many uses. On a warm night, it was a pillow. At meal time, it would be laid out on the ground for your special guest to sit upon. You could make a bundle to carry goods back from the marketplace. A farmer could tie it into a bag a fill it with his seeds to plant his field. A cloak was also used in a symbolic way.

a. By spreading the cloak over a woman's shoulders, you were saying you would care for her.

b. Throwing a cloak over a man's shoulders represented a transfer of power or authority. It also meant a call to discipleship (1 Kings 19:19-21).

c. A cloak was sometimes given to a lender as a pledge for a debt.

Famine - All of the areas surrounding Israel depend on rain for the growing of their crops. The old calendar was dated around the rain seasons. It was separated by the rainy season and the dry season. If October and November bring no moisture, the planting season is delayed and the harvest will be slim. Without the winter rains, the country would remain without water; parched and dry from the summer heat. The smaller the crop, the fewer seeds to plant next year which extends the famine. During Elijah's time, a rainless period of time led to famine (1 Kings 17).

Quarrying Stone - Just as the cedar wood was used for the interior; stones from the quarry were used to construct the exterior. Solomon got his stone from the quarries north of Jerusalem. Stonecutters and stonemasons worked for years in the pits crafting the stone to such perfection that they were fitted together at the construction site with very little or no mortar. When delivered to the temple area, they would be lowered on site using pulleys, rollers and sledges (1 Kings 5-8).

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 Kings 1-25
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/543

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.

DETAILED NOTES
TRIP PLANNER:

2 Kings continues the history begun in 1 Kings. The books tell the story of a nation without leadership. It describes what happens when a nation passes from affluence and influence to poverty and paralysis. Kingdoms taken captive. Many scholars feel that the author may have been Jeremiah. The book of 2 Kings can be divided into 2 sections – section one ending in the captivity of Israel and section two ending in the captivity of Judah.

1. The Divided Kingdom – 2 Kings 1-17


  1. a. The third dynasty in the Northern Kingdom – 2 Kings 1-9

  2. b. The fourth dynasty in the Northern Kingdom – 2 Kings 10-15:12

  3. c. Israel taken in captivity by Assyria – 2 Kings 15-17


2. The Southern Kingdom – 2 Kings 18-25

  1. a. The reign of Hezekiah – 2 Kings 18-20

  2. b. The reign of Manasseh & Amon – 2 Kings 21

  3. c. The reign of Josiah – 2 Kings 22-23:30

  4. d. Judah taken in captivity by Babylon – 2 Kings 23:31-chapter 25



CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

872 B.C.
Jehoshaphat becomes king in Judah

865 B.C.
Elijah begins to prophesy against Ahab

850 B.C.
Elijah is taken to heaven in a chariot of fire; Elisha prophesies

755 B.C.
Isaiah begins to prophesy in Judah

736 B.C.
Ahaz begins to reign in Judah

722 B.C.
Israel is taken captive by the Assyrians

697 B.C.
Manasseh begins to reign in Judah

640 B.C.
Josiah's reign begins in Judah

624 B.C.
The Book of the Law is found in Jerusalem

612 B.C.
Assyria's capital Nineveh falls to the Babylonians

586 B.C.
Judah is taken captive by the Babylonians

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Abana and Pharpar Rivers – Two great rivers in Syria. When Naaman was told to dip himself in the Jordan River, he referred to these great rivers in his home country. The Abana River flows through Damascus today and the Pharpar flows south of the city. (2 Kings 5:12)

Assyria – The name of an area derived from the city Asshur on the Tigris, the original capital of the country. Was originally a colony from Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom. It was a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as the high mountain range of Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains. In 738 B.C., in the reign of Menahem, king of Israel, Tiglath-Pileser III occupied Philistia and invaded Israel, imposing on it a heavy tribute (2 Kings 15:19). Ahaz, king of Judah, engaged in a war against Israel and Syria, and appealed for help to this Assyrian king by means of a present of gold and silver (2 Kings 16:8). He accordingly "marched against Damascus, defeated and put Rezin to death, and besieged the city itself."

Damascus – This was the name of the most ancient of Oriental cities. It was the capital of Syria (Isaiah 7:8, 17:3) located about 133 miles north of Jerusalem. There was a long string of wars, with varying success, between the Israelites and Syrians. Later they became allies of Israel against Judah (2 Kings 15:37). The Syrians were at length subdued by the Assyrians, the city of Damascus was taken and destroyed, and the inhabitants carried captive into Assyria (2 Kings 16:7-9; compare Isaiah 7:8). This city is memorable as the scene of Saul's conversion (Acts 9:1-25).

Jezreel – Located about 45 miles from Ramoth Gilead, this town was settled by the tribe of Issachar. The city of Jezreel is located near the southern edge of the Jezreel Valley. Under Kings Omri and Ahab, Jezreel was chosen to be the Northern Kingdom's second capital. It was also the site of a confrontation between the prophet Elijah and King Ahab.
(2 Kings 9:15)

Ramoth Gilead - Although alternate sites for the location of Ramoth Gilead have been suggested, the strongest evidence points to the site of Tel er Ramith, which is on the border of modern Syria. The city was situated in the frontier territory allotted to the tribe of Gad, in northern Gilead, near the ancient border of Israel and Syria. Ramoth Gilead's strategic location on the Transjordan Highway made it the site of several battles between the Northern Kingdom and Syria in the ninth century B.C. (2 Kings 8:28)

Samaria (the city and the region) – To the north, Samaria is bounded by the Esdraelon Valley, to the east by the Jordan River, to the west by the Carmel Ridge (in the north) and the Sharon plain (in the south), to the south by Judea (the Jerusalem mountains). Samarian hills are not very high, seldom reaching the height of over 2700 feet. Samaria's climate is more hospitable than the climate of Judea. Omri, the king of Israel, purchased this hill from Shemer its owner for two talents of silver, and built on its broad summit the city to which he gave the name of Samaria, as the new capital of his kingdom instead of Tirzah (1 Kings 16:24). This location possessed many advantages. Omri resided here during the last six years of his reign. When the land was captured by the Assyrians, they repopulated the area with captured foreigners from other lands. Later, in the time of Jesus, the Jewish people looked down on these "Samaritans."

Kir Hareseth – The capital city of Moab. Located about 11 miles east of the Dead Sea and 15 miles south of the Arnon River. (2 Kings 3:25)

Shunem – This was a small town in the land of the tribe of Issachar. It was to the north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa. In previous Israel history, it was where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Sam 28:4). In 2 Kings, it is where Elisha was treated kindly and entertained by a rich woman of the city.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Amaziah ( Southern Kingdom) - Son of Joash, he became king of Judah in 796 B.C., and ruled 29 years. He executed those who had killed his father Joash. He challenged the Northern Kingdom to battle and was badly beaten, and was also assassinated like his father. (2 Kings 14:1; 2 Chronicles 25:27)

Ahaz (Southern Kingdom) - He was the first king to hear Isaiah's prophecy about the virgin birth (see Isaiah 7:14). He began his rule in 735 B.C. at age 20 and was king in the south for 16 years. Even though he had Isaiah and Micah around as prophets, he was a wicked king who refused to hear their message. He worshipped false gods and sacrificed his own children. (2 Kings 16:1)

Ahaziah (Southern Kingdom) - Ruled the Southern Kingdom beginning in 841 B.C. upon the death of his father Jehoram. He reigned for only one year—the shortest of any king of Judah. He came from a bad family line. His grandmother was Jezebel and his mother was the equally wicked Athaliah. He was killed by Jehu. (2 Kings 8:25)

Amon (Southern Kingdom) - He began his reign in 642 B.C. and lasted only two years. Like his father Manasseh, he was wicked and his servants rose up and killed him. (2 Kings 21:19)

Ashurbanipal – One of the kings of Assyria who moved non-Israelite foreigners into the now de-populated Northern Kingdom. They would intermarry with the remaining Jews in the land. This was the beginning of the Samaritans. (2 Kings 17:24)

Athaliah (Southern Kingdom) - She was the only woman ruler of either the Northern or Southern Kingdoms. She began her six-year rule in 841 B.C. after the death of her son Ahaziah. When she assumed power, she had all of her grandchildren executed except Joash, because his mother Jehosheba, hid him. She was married to the high priest Jehoiada. Athaliah was eventually arrested and executed. (2 Kings 11:1)

Ben-Hadad II – Ruled in Damascus Syria around 801 B.C. He was the son of Hazael. He was defeated a couple of times by the Northern Kingdom. Jehoash recaptured the land from Ben-Hadad and Joash defeated him three times (2 Kings 13:24-25).

Elisha – After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets, and became noted in Israel. God granted Elisha's request for "a double portion" of Elijah's spirit (2 Kings 2:9), and for sixty years (892-832 B.C.) held the office of "prophet in Israel" (2 Kings 2:9 & 5:8).

Huldah – An unknown prophetess in the land. Her husband, Shallum, was the wardrobe keeper for King Josiah. She was the one who confirmed the genuineness of the Law of Moses when it was found by Hilkiah the priest. (2 Kings 22:14)

Ishmael – A prince of Judah, a rebel from the line of David who fled to the Ammonites when Jerusalem was destroyed by the Chaldeans. Soon after, he returned and assassinated Gedaliah the governor who had been selected by Nebuchadnezzer (2 Kings 25:25).

Jehoahaz (Southern Kingdom) - The second son of Josiah, he ruled for only three months. He was taken out of power by Egypt's Pharaoh Necho and his older brother Jehoiakim was placed on the throne. He was carried off to Egypt where he later died. (2 Kings 23:31)

Jehoahaz (Northern Kingdom) - The son of Jehu, he ruled in Israel for 17 years, beginning in 814 B.C. He repented of the sins of his fathers, but his repentance did not last long. (2 Kings13:1)

Jehoash (Northern Kingdom) - Son of Jehoahaz, he was rebuked by Elisha as he lay on his deathbed. He began his 16-year rule in 798 B.C.(2 Kings 13:10)

Jehoiachin (Southern Kingdom) - This son of Jehoiakim reigned only three months in 597 B.C. He was carried off to Babylon. A special curse was put on this king. (2 Kings 24:8)

Jehoiakim (Southern Kingdom) - Began his reign in 609 B.C. and ruled for 11 years. During this time, he became a vassel king for the invading Nebuchadnezzar. After three months in this position, he rebelled.(2 Kings 23:34)

Jehoram (Northern Kingdom) - He began his 12-year reign in 852 B.C. He was Ahab's youngest son and much took place under his reign. He was king when Naaman visited Elisha to be healed, and he was there when all of Samaria was saved through the work of four lepers. However, he was killed by Jehu, a former commander and chariot driver for Ahab.(2 Kings 3:1)

Jehosheba – She was the wife of the high priest Jehoiada. When Athaliah was killing all the heirs to the throne, she saved Joash and hid him from his power-grabbing grandmother. He would later become king due to the heroic action taken by Jehosheba. (2 Kings 11:2-3)

Jehu (Northern Kingdom) – Ruled for 28 years beginning in 841 B.C. He was the founder of the 5th and longest dynasty in the Northern Kingdom. Jehu became a very bloody leader. He executed Ahaziah while he was visiting from the Southern Kingdom, and he also killed Jehoram, Jezebel, the priest of Baal, and Ahab's 70 sons. (2 Kings 9:29)

Jezebel – The wicked wife of the wicked King Ahab, she was a Baal-worshipping princess from Phoenicia. 1 Kings 21:23 predicted her violent death and her remains being eaten by the dogs. (2 Kings 9:30-37)

Zechariah (Northern Kingdom) - He was the son of Jeroboam II and the last king to rule from the dynasty of Jehu. He reigned a short six months in 753 B.C. before being murdered by a man named Shallum. (2 Kings14:29)

FUN FACTS:

A man being lowered into his own grave – There was a group of Israelites who were in the process of burying a man when they were interrupted by a band of raiders. They threw the man's body into Elisha's tomb and ran away. When the man's body came in contact with Elisha's bones the man became alive again and jumped to his feet. He is not mentioned again (2 Kings 13:21).

The widow's oil – Olive oil was an essential ingredient in just about every aspect of daily life at this time. In cooking, olive oil was poured into a pan to prevent the meat or bread from sticking. Oil was mixed with flour to make bread dough. The lamps of most houses burned with oil-soaked wicks. Minor injuries were rubbed with light oils to help the healing process. Wealthy people would bath with oil to heal aches and pains. Women rubbed oil onto their skin to replenish moisture in the dry, hot desert climate. The kings of both Judah and Israel were anointed with oil. (2 Kings 4:1-7)

How oil was made – The most common type of oil used in Palestine was olive oil. The ripe olives were at first partially squeezed to remove the seeds. After that, to remove the remaining oil, they were pressed with a heavy stone or trampled on by foot. One olive tree yielded about 10 gallons of oil per year. Since it was so expensive, the olives were sometimes squeezed three or four times. Each time it was pressed, the oil lost some of its purity. (2 Kings 4:1-7)

A room for Elisha – Elisha was a traveling prophet always moving throughout the land. At Shunem, a woman was concerned for Elisha and set up a room that he would be able to stay in while he was in that area. This room was built on the roof of their house. This would allow the room to be cool and bright. The location also allowed for privacy. (2 Kings 4:8-17)

The life of a leper (Naaman) – Until healed, a leper lived as an outcast in a society. Though not hated, he was greatly feared. Therefore he would often be driven from town and forced to live in caves. While this seems cruel, it was the only way to protect the healthy segment of the city. Naaman, since he was not an outcast, probably had a milder form of leprosy. Sometimes it took 10 to 20 years to heal from leprosy – but most would not live that long. (2 Kings 5:1-19)

Cosmetics – Before Jezebel was killed, she went in and put on her makeup. What did she do? Women of her day painted their faces with bright colors and drew heavy dark lines around their eyes. These colors came from iron or copper ore mixed with water. Ancient fingernail polish came from a dye made from the flower of the henna plant. It was actually a stain. (2 Kings 9:30)

Rimmon, a god of Syria – In the land of Syria, just north of Israel, the people worshiped a god named Rimmon. He was known as the god of storms and rain. It was in the temple of Rimmon that Naaman would worship (2 Kings 5:18).

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Chronicles 1-29
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/545

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 1 Chronicles 1-29

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 1900 B.C.
Jacob and his family live in Canaan

c. 1400 B.C.
The Israelites conquer the Promised Land

c. 1050 B.C.
Saul becomes king of Israel

1010 B.C.
David's reign begins in Hebron

997 B.C.
The ark is brought into Jerusalem

990 B.C.
David wars against the Ammonites

972 B.C.
David stores up materials for the temple

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes king

930 B.C.
Solomon dies and the kingdom divides

TRIP PLANNER:

The book of 1 Chronicles recounts the lineage of King David and documentsGod's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David.

The book of 1 Chronicles can be divided into two sections.
1. The Royal Line Of David – 1 Chronicles 1-9
2. The Reign of David – 1 Chronicles 10-29

The rise of David – 1 Chronicles 10-12

The ark is acquired – 1 Chronicles 13-17

The victories of David – 1 Chronicles 18-20

David prepares to build the temple – 1 Chronicles 21–27

The end of David's life – 1 Chronicles 28–29

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Cave of Adullam – Located 12 miles southwest of Bethlehem, this was one of David's favorite hiding places when he was fleeing from Saul.

City Of David – Originally called Zion, David renamed the city after he conquered Zion.

Gath – The closest Philistine city to Israelite territory. This city posed the greatest threat to Israel.

Hebron - Hebron is one of most ancient cities in the Middle East, and one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. It was also an ancient Canaanite royal city. According to archaeological findings it was probably founded in the 35th century B.C. It is mentioned numerous times in the Bible. In particular, a nearby cave called the Cave of the Patriarchs is where Jews believe Abraham, Sarah, Isaac, Rebekah, Jacob, and Leah are buried.

Jebus – Another name for Jerusalem. The name was coined by the Israelites because the city belonged to the Jebusites.

Jerusalem - Built and founded by the Jebusites, it became the capital of the Jewish kingdoms of Israel, Judah and Judea in the First Temple and Second Temple periods.

Kirjath Jearim - Kirjath Jearim was mentioned as a Hivite city and is connected with the Gibeonites. It is mentioned as the place where the Ark of the Covenant was moved after being in Beth Shemesh. About 70 years afterward, the ark was moved to Jerusalem and placed in a tent outside the palace of David.

Medeba – located 20 miles southwest of Rabbah, the capital of Ammon. Today it is known as Madaba. It was here that Aramean armies and the Ammonites attacked Israel. Israel was caught in the middle.

Mount Gilboa – Gilboa is a ridge above the Valley of Jezreel in Israel. The ridge extends east-west and is west of the Jordan River. The name is sometimes referenced in the Hebrew Bible as Mount Gilboa. The ridge also lent its name to the second battle (the Battle of Gilboa) fought in the valley below, in which the Philistines defeated Saul and Israel.

Mount Moriah - Mount Moriah is the name of the elongated north-south stretch of land lying between Kidron Valley and "Hagai" Valley, between Mount Zion to the west and the Mount of Olives to the east. It would become the place where the temple was built.

Valley of Rephaim – The scene of many battles between Israel and the Philistines. The valley extended southwest from Jerusalem and marked the northern border of Judah.

Valley of Salt – Located a few miles east of Beersheba. It was here that David smote the Syrians. Amaziah also slew ten thousand Edomites.

Ziklag – Located 25 miles southwest of Gath, Ziklag became David's private possession. David made raids from Ziklag when he was hiding from Saul.

Zion – Another name for Jerusalem. The original Canaanite city was surrounded by high, thick walls and considered a stronghold.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Abishai – One of David's mighty men. He was the brother of Joab. He killed three hundred men with his sword and was the most respected of all the mighty men of David.

Asaph – Leader of the Gershonite Levites. Asaph and his sons ministered as singers and composers.

Eleazar – One of David's mighty men. The son of Dodo, he defended a field of barley from the Philistines.

Ethan – Head of the Merarite division of musicians. He composed Psalm 89 and was known as a wise man.

Heman– The grandson of the prophet Samuel, a Kohathite. He is probably the same Heman mentioned in the inscription of Psalm 88.

Hiram King of Tyre – A powerful ruler of the Phoenician city-state of Tyre. He supplied material for the construction of the temple and other buildings – including David's palace.

Ishbosheth – Saul's fourth son who survived the battle where his father took his own life. He became king of Israel five years after Saul's death.

Jashobeam – One of David's mighty men. He killed 300 men with his spear.

Jeduthun – A musician; also known as Ethan. He "prophesied with a harp."

Michal – The daughter of Saul. David married Michal at the beginning of his time of service to Saul. Saul annulled the marriage when David took flight from Saul.

Nathan – The prophet who served David and Solomon as a private chaplain or counselor.

Obed-Edom - There are two men by this name. The first is Obed-Edom whose house sheltered the ark for three months. He was also the chief door-keeper. The second was the son of Jeduthun and was also a gatekeeper.

Saul – The first king of the ancient Kingdom of Israel. According to the Bible, Saul took his own life when wounded as the battle turned against him.

Uriah The Hittite – The husband of Bathsheba. David had Joab arrange to have him killed in battle in order to marry his wife.

Uriel – The head of the Kohathite clan. David divided the Levites into three groups, the Kohathites, the Merarites and the Gershonites.

Zadok – When Solomon came into power Zadok ministered as high priest at the temple.

FUN FACTS:

A house of cedar – This was an indication of David's wealth. Cedar panelingwas too expensive to be used in ordinary homes.

Anointed Ones – Those who were set apart for God's service.

Dagon – A false god worshipped by the Philistines and other people in Syria and northwest Mesopotamia as the god of grain. The Philistines celebrated military victories by bringing a trophy of their success back to the temple of Dagon where it could displayed as tribute.

Instruments of God – Instruments used to sing songs of praise to God. Music was an important way in which the people worshipped God, their creator. It was central to the worship life of Israel.

Levites – The descendants of Levi, one of the twelve sons of Jacob. The name is related to the verb "lava" which means to join – implying the Levites were joined to God. The Levites were divided into three groups – the Kohathites, the Gershonites and the Merarites. At Mount
Sinai, God chose Aaron to be the nation's high priest. Only a descendent
of Aaron could serve as a priest, but the other branches of the Levites
shared in caring for the tabernacle. David created new duties once the
temple was constructed by instituting musicians, singers, gatekeepers,
treasurers and royal officials.

Prophets – The office of prophet as a "professional" calling began with Samuel. However, there were individuals – such as Abraham – who were known as prophets.

Satan – The first mention of the name Satan is found in 1 Chronicles. The word means "adversary" and was used as a proper name.

Sackcloth – A rough garment usually made of goat's hair and worn by mourners as an expression of grief.

Sheminith – Derived from the Hebrew word for "eight," referring to the musical scales.

MAPS:

Figure 1: The nations defeated by King David

Figure 2: David's Kingdom (at the time of his death)

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 Chronicles 1-36
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/547

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 2 Chronicles 1-36

2 Chronicles continues the history started in 1 Chronicles and picks up the story with the inauguration of Solomon as King over the United Kingdom of Israel. However, after Solomon's death the kingdom divides and Judah and Israel separate. The remainder of the book of 2 Chronicles describes the history of Judah as the nation rides a spiritual roller coaster that takes them into exile and results in the destruction of the temple.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

1010 B.C.
David's reign begins in Hebron

970 B.C.
David dies and Solomon becomes king

967 B.C.
Solomon begins construction on the temple

930 B.C.
Solomon dies and the kingdom divides

910 B.C.
Asa becomes king in Judah

872 B.C.
Jehoshaphat becomes king in Judah

755 B.C.
Isaiah begins to prophesy in Judah

722 B.C.
Israel is taken captive by the Assyrians

624 B.C.
The Book of the Law is found in Jerusalem

586 B.C.
Judah is taken captive by the Babylonians.

TRIP PLANNER:

The book of 2 Chronicles continues the story of 1 Chronicles and parallels
1 & 2 Kings. 2 Chronicles can be divided into three sections, organized
around the temple in Jerusalem.

The Building of the Temple – 2 Chronicles 1-9
The Decline of the Temple – 2 Chronicles 10-36:16
The Destruction of the Temple – 2 Chronicles 36:17-23

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Ascent of Ziz – A dry stream bed (or wadi) just north of En Gedi.

Beth Shemesh – 18 miles west of Jerusalem near the Philistine border. The ark of the covenant came here when it returned from Philistia.

Brook of Egypt – Probably the Wadi el-Arish, a seasonal stream 40 miles southwest of Gaza.

Brook Kidron – The wadi just east of Jerusalem where debris was burned.

Carchemish – One of the last strongholds of Assyria to resist the onslaughtof the rising neo-Babylonian kingdom.

City of Judah – Another name for the City of David.

Ephraim – A synonym for Israel. The cities referred to as the cities of Ephraim could include Ramah, Geba and Mizpah.

Gihon – The spring that was the main source of water for Jerusalem.

Hazazon Tamar – The western shore of the Dead Sea, a few miles south of Qumran. It was David's hiding place in the days of Saul.

Jezreel – A royal city located in the Plain of Jezreel and frequented by the kings of Israel. It is about 10 miles west of the Jordan and 25 miles west of Ramoth Gilead.

Joppa – Now known as Jaffa, the only seaport on the Israelite Mediterranean coast between Dor to the north and Philistia to the south.

Lachish – An important fortified city west of Jerusalem near the great coastal route. Its capture by Assyria would cut off access to Jerusalem from the west and would give Assyria control of the coast.

Mareshah – One of Asa's important fortified cities, about 25 miles southwest of Jerusalem. It was near the Via Maris, the coastal highway connecting Egypt and Canaan.

Mount Moriah – Also referred to as the "land of Moriah," where Abraham took Isaac to sacrifice him. David purchased this site from
Ornan to build an altar. This would become the location where the
temple would be built.

Naphtali – The most northern tribal territory of Israel, very close to Damascus.

Ramoth Gilead – Located 35 miles east of Beth Shan, it was controlled by the Arameans. It was also one of the cities of refuge.

Tarshish – A Sanscrit or Aryan word meaning "the sea coast." Located in the western Mediterranean. The name also came to represent any place far away. Ships of Tarshish were large vessels able to transport heavy cargo over long distances.

Valley of Salt – Refers to the desert south of the Dead Sea.

Valley of the Son of Hinnom – Just outside the western wall of Jerusalem. It was a dumping ground for all kinds of refuse. The valley itself became a symbol of impurity. It was also a place where
human sacrifice occurred.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Ahaziah – The son of Ahab. He succeeded his father and reigned for two years. When he was injured in a fall, he turned to the Philistine gods rather than to the Lord for healing.

Asa – Son of Abijah who reigned for 41 years until 870 B.C.

Athaliah – A woman who reigned for six years in Judah. She was not a descendent of David and therefore not listed among the kings of Judah. However, her grandson Joash remained the sole survivor in the Davidic line.

Bezalel – One of the two men especially chosen by God to build the tabernacle in the wilderness. He was a master craftsman.

Cyrus – A mighty monarch and the instrument through whom God delivered His people from exile. He was the ruler over Babylon and then eventually over Media and Persia. He commanded that Jerusalem
be rebuilt.

Hanani the seer – The father of Jehu the prophet who once challenged King Jehoshaphat of Judah.

Hezekiah – His name means "God has strengthened." He was king of Judah, the son of Ahaz and Abi (2 Kings 18:1-2) or Abijah (2 Chronicles 29:1) who reigned 29 years (2 Kings 18:2). He is also one of the kings mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew.

Hilkiah – The chief priest during the reign of Josiah.

Hiram King of Tyre – The same ruler who supplied materials for King David's palace.

Huldah the prophetess – One of four female prophets named in the Old Testament. The other three are Miriam, Deborah and Noadiah.

Jehoiada – Under King Jehoiada, Judah enjoyed a revival of the true worship of God.

Jeremiah – The famous prophet who composed the book of Jeremiah.

Jeroboam – The first king of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

Nathan the prophet – He was the prophet who rebuked David for his adultery with Bathsheba and the murder of her husband. He was also a confidant and counselor to Solomon.

Nebuchadnezzar – The son of Nabopolassar, founder of the Neo-Babylonian or Chaldean Empire. Also referred to as the King of the Chaldeans.

Rehoboam – A son of Solomon by his wife Naamah of Ammon. Rehoboam was 41 when he began to rule over Judah.

Sennacherib – Invaded Judah and eventually laid siege to Jerusalem.

Shapan – A scribe or secretary of the king. He was responsible for keeping the state records, which likely included the original temple plans and specifications.

Tiglath-Pileser – Brought Mesopotamian influence over the countries of the eastern Mediterranean to its highest point.

Zedekiah – The youngest of four sons of Josiah to rule over Judah. He was the last king to reign before Judah was led into exile.

FUN FACTS:

Arabians – From the southwestern part of the Arabian Peninsula, probably near present-day Yemen.

Blessed Be The Lord Your God – This was the language of politeness in the ancient world. It did not suggest that the person was converted. Visiting dignitaries customarily praised the god of the host nation.

Book Of The Covenant – Refers to the book of the Law.

The Book of Jehu – Jehu was the son of the prophet Hanani. He is mentioned in 1 Kings as having a connection between the kings of Israel and was a good source of information between the Northern
and Southern Kingdoms.

The Book of the kings of Israel and Judah – A reference to 1 & 2 Kings.

The Book of the Law – Refers to the five books of Moses, the Pentateuch.

Covenant of Salt – Salt was a preservative and symbolized durability.

Devices – One of the earliest references to catapults (2 Chronicles 26:15). They were primarily used as defensive weapons.

High Place – The term comes from the fact that many ancient worshippers used hills for their sacred rites, thinking that such places were good meeting points between heaven and earth.

Hittites – The peoples of the ancient nation of Hatti in central Asia Minor. They reached the height of their power around 1350–1300 B.C. They were nearly exterminated by the Sea Peoples in 1200 B.C.

Jachin and Boaz – The names Jachin and Boaz mean "He Establishes" and "In Him Is Strength." The two pillars in the temple were constant reminders of the presence and power of God.

Lying spirit – A demonic being whom the Lord allowed to deceive the prophets.

Mediums – Those who claim to have contact and consult with the dead.

Molded Images – Same as wooden images, only they were made of molded metal.

Sacred pillars – Stone posts associated with Canaanite fertility rites.

Soothsaying – Also known as divination. It is an attempt to determine the plans and purposes of the gods so as to avert their hostility or take advantage of their favors.

Spirits – "Knowing ones" whose specialty is communication with the dead with the hope of acquiring information accessible to the living.

The Testimony– A copy of the Law of Moses, part of which outlined the king's covenant privileges and duties.

Thousand – In Hebrew, the word thousand can also mean "clan" or "village." In a military context it could refer to a "company" of men.

The Wall Of Ophel – Ophel was one of the original Jebusite areas of Jerusalem. Its walls dated back hundreds of years and must have required regular maintenance.

Witchcraft – An attempt to bring about desired results by employing magical or mystical rituals. Also known as sorcery.

Wooden Images – Fashioned from live evergreen trees which were regarded as fertility symbols since their leaves remained green all year round. They were poles dedicated to the worship of Asherah, the Canaanite fertility goddess.

MAPS
Figure 1 Israel & Judah into Captivity

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Ezra 1-10
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Ezra 1-10
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/549

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Ezra 1-10

Ezra continues the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to the land He had driven them from for 70 years as they were captive in the land of Babylon. Ezra relates the stories of two returns from Babylon for the children of Israel to rebuild Jerusalem. The first was led by Zerubbabel to rebuild the Temple of God, and the second by Ezra to bring reformation to the people.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

586 B.C.
Babylonians take Judah captive

539 B.C.
King Cyrus conquers Babylon

538 B.C.
Decree made by Cyrus allowing the Jews to return to Jerusalem

536 B.C.
Construction on the Temple begins

534 B.C.
Construction on the Temple is discontinued, restarted in 520 B.C. and
completed

521-486 B.C.
Darius 1 reigns in Persia

485-465 B.C.
Ahasuerus (Xerxes 1) reigns in Persia

464-424 B.C.
Artaxerxes Longimanus reigns in Persia

458 B.C.
Ezra leads second return back from captivity

TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Ezra picks up where 2 Chronicles left off with the decree
made by King Cyrus of Persia to rebuild the House of God. Ezra tells of the
two different returns from captivity, and can be divided into two sections.

The Restoration of the Temple – Chapters 1-6
The Reformation of the People – Chapters 7-10

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Persia - Cyrus was the King of Persia. Persia is the area of present day Iran. A united kingdom that originated in the region was known as Pars (Persis) and was formed under Cyrus the Great. When you look at a map of the area, you can see the distance that the Israelites had to travel into the captivity. 70 years later, a new generation had to make the trip back.

Ecbatana - The capital of ancient Media, this city was one of four capitals of Babylon. Later it was the summer residence of kings, beautifully situatedat the foot of Mt. Elvend and NE of Behistun. In 549 B.C. it was captured by Cyrus the Great. It possessed a royal treasury and was later plundered in turn by Alexander, Seleucus, and Antiochus III. The site has never been thoroughly excavated, and today it is covered by the modern city of Hamadan, Iran. Interestingly this is where the traditional tomb of Esther (Book of Esther) is still honored by the Jewish community. Ecbatana was the Achmetha of Ezra 6.

Casiphia - A place on the way from Babylon to Jerusalem. It was the home or the headquarters of Iddo and residence of the Nethinim. Iddo was to send servants up to Jerusalem for the House of God.

Jerusalem - The central location of the book of Ezra and home of the Temple Mount bought by King David in 2 Samuel 24 from Araunah the Jebusite for 50 shekels of silver. Later the location of the first temple built by King Solomon which was destroyed in 586 B.C. by King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon. The book of Ezra chronicles the rebuilding of this Temple by the captives who returned with Zerrubabel and then later with Ezra.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Artaxerxes I - He was the son of Xerxes and he ruled the Persian Empire from 464– 424 B.C. He helped Ezra and Nehemiah with their return journeys to Jerusalem.

Cyrus, King of Persia - He began his reign over Babylon in 539 B.C. In his first year, he gave the Jews the valuables from the temple which Nebuchadnezzar had captured and brought to Babylon
in 586 B.C. He allowed the Jews to return to their home country.
Cyrus founded a dynasty that lasted until conquered by Alexander
the Great in 336 B.C.

Darius the Great - At the time that the work was stopped by Zerubbabel's enemies, it was Darius who searched in the archives to find the decree of his predecessor, King Cyrus. He found it at
Ecbatana.

Ezra - The scribe and priest who took the silver and gold valuables from Babylon and returned them to Jerusalem in 458 B.C. He had the blessing of Artaxerxes. The temple had been rebuilt, and it was
Ezra's job to teach the Law of God. This resulted in the end of pagan
marriages in which the people had been participating.

Jeshua the Priest - He was the son of Jehozadak and a priest. He along with others rebuilt and restored the altar. Later, he was the supervisor of some of the other workers on the temple.

Mithredath - Cyrus' treasurer who returned the temple
vessels (Ezra 1:8).

Rehum - A chancellor under Artaxerxes. He had a letter written to King Artaxerxes complaining about the Jews rebuilding the
temple and asking the King to have the work stopped.

Sheshbazzar - According to Ezra 1:8, Sheshbazzar was the prince (Hannasi) of Judah who Cyrus put in charge of the vessels of the
house of the Lord which Nebuchadnezzar had carried with him
out of Jerusalem and had placed in the house of his gods.
In Ezra 1:11, it is Sheshbazzar who brought these vessels with them
on their return from Babylon to Jerusalem. In Ezra 5:14, it is said
that these vessels had been delivered by Cyrus “to one named
Sheshbazzar, whom he had made governor,” and that Sheshbazzar
further laid the foundations of the house of God which was
in Jerusalem.

Shethar-Bozenai - A provincial leader who joined with Tattenai to halt the rebuilding. However, when he heard back from Darius
that the decree had been given, he helped the Jews rebuild.

Shimshai - He was the scribe, or secretary, to Rehum who actually wrote the letter to King Artaxerxes to stop the work in Jerusalem.

Tattenai - The military governor of Judea who reported to the King of Persia. Zerubbabel reported to him. He also tried to stop the rebuilding of the temple.

Xerxes - Succeeded Darius the Great as King of Persia after his death. He is better known in the book of Esther as Ahasuerus, the husband of Queen Esther. He was a weak king who ruled from 485–465 B.C.

Zerubbabel - He was the heir to the throne of Judah, but when he finally returned to Jerusalem with his entourage of about 50,000 people in 539 B.C., he was only allowed to be the governor.

FUN FACTS:

The treasures taken back to Israel - The exiles returning to Jerusalem were supported by their neighbors who provided valuables. It must have been an important event since each article was inventoried:

a. gold dishes – 30
b. silver dishes – 1,000
c. silver pans – 29
d. gold bowls – 30
e. matching bowls – 410
f. other articles – 1,000

Who returned - Ezra 2:64 begins a list totaling people and animals who returned; everything is important to God – important enough to be numbered.

a. Israelites - 42,360
b. servants - 7,337
c. singers - 200
d. horses - 736
e. mules - 245
f. camels - 435
g. donkeys - 6,720

Contemporaries of this time period - Other prominent people who lived during this time of return:

a. The Buddha – India (557-447 B.C.)
b. Confucius – China (551-478 B.C.)
c. Socrates – Greece (470-399 B.C.)

New Moons - The Jewish calendar is set by both the sun and moon. The feasts come around the different lunar cycles. They were great times. Each month of the year was consecrated to the Lord by
bringing special sacrifices and the blowing of trumpets. Most of
the observances included the cessation from normal working
activities.

Intermarriage - Being in captivity didn't mean that the Israelites were in jail. They were resettled in a foreign land. During this time, the Jews married spouses from the land in which they lived. This was against God's will for His people, as He wanted the line to stay pure and not be influenced by outside nations. In the end, Ezra had to break up these unions once the return to Jerusalem was complete.

MAPS:

Ancient Near East

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Nehemiah 1-13
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/551

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Nehemiah 1-13

The book of Nehemiah continues where Ezra leaves off. Nehemiah, the cupbearer to the king, leads the third and final return to Jerusalem. Granted permission by the king, Nehemiah leads a group to repair and rebuild the walls of Jerusalem. Nehemiah is met with much hostility and conflict, and he shows us that times of trial require strong spiritual leadership. This book combines the ideas of work and worship.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

586 B.C.
Babylonians take Southern Kingdom of Judah captive

539 B.C.
Cyrus of Persia conquers Babylon

538 B.C.
The return of the Jews to Judea begins

536-515 B.C.
Rebuilding of the Temple

464-424 B.C.
Artaxerxes Longimanus reigns in Persia

458 B.C.
Ezra leads a group of returnees

444 B.C.
Nehemiah leads a group of returnees

443 B.C.
Jerusalem's wall is reconstructed

TRIP PLANNER:

Leaving off where the book of Ezra ends, the Temple had been rebuilt and
dedicated, but the walls of the city are still in ruins. Nehemiah, the king's
cupbearer, is sent with the third and final group of returnees to Jerusalem
to rebuild the city walls. The Book of Nehemiah can be divided into two
sections.

Political Construction - Chapters 1-7
Spiritual Instruction - Chapters 8-13

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Beth Zur - A town in ancient Palestine, north of Hebron, on the Jerusalem road. Built by Rehoboam for the defense of his kingdom (2 Chronicles 11:7). Today it is the modern Khirbat Tubaygah, or the West Bank. Nehemiah, son of Azbuk was the ruler of half of this district (Neh. 3:16). During the Persian periods, it was a sparsely occupied area.

Kidron Valley - The Kidron Valley is near the city of Jerusalem and is mentioned several times in the Bible. It is named after the Kidron stream that flows through the region. The Kidron Valley runs along the eastern wall of Jerusalem, and separates the Temple Mount from the Mount of Olives. It then runs towards the east, cutting through the Judean Desert, and heads towards the Dead Sea.

The Wall of Jerusalem - The wall around a city was one of its most important features. The wall was the first line of defense for the people inside the city. It protected them during times of war and peace. Whenever the people returned to the city from the captivity, they were confronted with needed repairs at certain locations on the wall. (Neh. 1:3)

The Gates:

  1. The Valley Gate
  2. The Fountain Gate
  3. The Sheep Gate
  4. The Fish Gate
  5. The Old Gate
  6. The Refuse Gate
  7. The Water Gate
  8. The Horse Gate
  9. The East Gate
  10. The Gate of Miphkad
  11. The Gate of Ephriam
  12. The Prison Gate


Thirty-Two Cities of Judah


1. Kirjatharba17. Azekah
2. Dibon 18. Geba
3. Jekabzeel19. Michmash
4. Jeshua20. Aija
5. Moladah21. Bethel
6. Bethphelet22. Anathot
7. Hazarshual23. Nob
8. Beersheba24. Ananiah
9. Ziklag25. Hazor
10. Mekonah26. Ramah
11. Enrimmon27. Gittaim
12. Zareah28. Hadid
13. Jarmuth29. Zeboim
14. Zanoah30. Neballat
15. Adullam31. Lod
16. Lachish32. Ono


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Four Treasurers - Once all of the tithes of grain, new wine and oil were brought into the storeroom, four people were put in charge of this treasury. For accountability, four people from four backgrounds were placed in charge.
  1. Shelemiah: the Priest
  2. Zaddock: the Scribe
  3. Pedaiah: the Levite
  4. Hannan: a Layman


Eliashib - He was the high priest after the captivity. In the true spirit of being a servant of God, he led some of the rebuilding projects, doing the physical work. (Neh. 3:1)

Hanani - Nehemiah's brother who reported the poor conditions in Jerusalem to Nehemiah while he was still in Persia (Neh. 1:2). Nehemiah placed him in charge of the military protection of the restored Jerusalem (Neh. 7:2)

Nehemiah - His name means "The Lord comforts." The son of Hachaliah, Nehemiah was the re-builder of the walls of Jerusalem. He was the royal cupbearer to King Artaxexes and would later become the leader and governor of Jerusalem.

Sanballat - A Horonite and one of the chief opponents of Nehemiah as he built the walls of Jerusalem. Sanballat was also an enemy of the nation Israel and the returning Jews. His name had the meaning "sin has given him life."

Tobiah - An Amorite servant of Sanballat who ridiculed the Jewish efforts to rebuild the walls. His name means "The Lord is good."

Twenty-Five Leaders of the Provinces:


1. Athaiah14. Shemaiah
2. Masseiah15. Shabbethai
3. Sallu16. Jozabad
4. Gabbai17. Mathaniah
5. Sallai18. Bakbukiah
6. Joel19. Abda
7. Judah20. Akkub
8. Jedaiah21. Talmon
9. Jachin 22. Ziha
10. Seraiah23. Gispa
11. Adaiah24. Uzzi
12. Amashai25. Pethahiah
13. Zabdiel


FUN FACTS:

Booths - The Law stated that the people were to live in booths during the Feast of Tabernacles. These booths were simple, made of branches from all kinds of trees. They were similar to an island hut. This was to commemorate that while the Israelites were in the wilderness, they lived in temporary quarters. (Neh. 8:14)

Cupbearer to the King - The office of the royal cupbearer was a position of great honor and trust in the Persian court. One of the duties of the cupbearer was to choose and taste the wines to be sure that they were pleasurable and not poisoned. He was in the presence of the king daily and was able to watch as he directed the kingdom. This gave Nehemiah the knowledge that prepared him to lead the people back into the land.

Fasting - Fasting is part of the faith of old and new religions all over the world. Usually, the fast is to go without food for a specific period. When Nehemiah heard of the affliction of the previous group of captives who returned, he fasted. Look at the actions that surrounded his fasting. (Neh. 1:4)

High wooden platform - Ezra stood on this platform to read the Book of the Law. This was a raised stage or platform that was built specifically for this purpose. Thirteen priests stood with him on the platform. When the book was opened, the people stood and he blessed
them. (Neh. 8:4)

King's tax - The people claimed that they had to borrow money to pay the King's tax (Neh. 5:4). Very little of the King's tax was returned to the local area. It was taken back to the home country. This took coined money out of circulation and left the people in an even poorer state. When the Persians foreclosed on the land, they took coined money out of production, causing a great rate of inflation which hurt the people.

Selling sons and daughters into slavery – This heartless act was legal in order to pay a debt. On the positive side, all slaves were to be released on the Sabbath year and the year of Jubilee. Bitter feelings developed in families. For this reason, Nehemiah put an end to this practice.

Seven oppositions to rebuilding the wall - The work on the wall faced major opposition from the enemies. Our work for Christ faces similar opposition. Seven methods were used to discourage God's people:
  1. Anger (Neh. 4:1)
  2. Ridicule (4:1-3)
  3. Conspiracy and war (4:7-8)
  4. Continual threats (4:10-23)
  5. Craftiness (6:1-4)
  6. Accusation (6:5-9)
  7. Treachery (6:10-14)

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Esther 1-10
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Esther 1-10
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/555

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Esther 1-10

The Book of Esther is the last of the Historical Books of the Old Testament. Chronologically, the events of this story fall between Ezra chapters 6 and 7, after the return of Zerubbabel and before the return of Ezra to Jerusalem. In this short book we see clearly God's providence and faithfulness in dealing with His people Israel, though the name of God is not mentioned once.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

538 B.C.
The return of the Jews from captivity begins under Cyrus

521-486 B.C.
Darius 1 reigns in Persia

486-465 B.C.
Ahasuerus reigns in Persia during the time of Esther

464-424 B.C.
Artaxerxes Longimanus reigns in Persia

458 B.C.
Ezra leads a group of returnees back from captivity

TRIP PLANNER:

The purpose of the Book of Esther is the recording of the institution of the Feast of Purim and the obligation of its perpetual observation. The Book of Esther was read at the Feast of Purim to commemorate the great deliverance of the Jewish nation brought about by God through Esther.

At the center of this story is the ongoing divergence between the Jews and the Amalakites, which was recorded to have begun in the Book of Exodus. Haman's goal is the final effort recorded in the Old Testament period of the complete eradication of the Jews. His plans eventually end up with his own demise, and the elevation of his enemy Mordecai to his own position, as well as the salvation of the Jews.

The book of Esther reads much like a fairy tale. The Maiden is the fairest of them all and becomes the queen of the kingdom of Persia. The Villain Haman launches his attack to destroy the Jews, but his plot is thwarted by the Hero Mordecai and his beautiful and brave cousin-daughter, Esther who risks her life to save her people.

The Book of Esther can be divided into two parts:

The threat to the Jews (Chapter 1- 4)
The Triumph of the Jews (Chapter 5-10)

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Citadel of Shushan - The kings of Persia had more than one royal palace and more than one royal city. The events in Esther take place in Shushan (Susa), which is located in present-day southwestern Iran.

Susa (Šušim) - Ancient capital of Elam, favorite residence of the Persian king Darius I the Great. Alternate name for Shushan.

The King's Gate - The gate of a city was the main area of commerce, and the entrance was available for anyone to sit and dialogue. Other gates led to the entrance of the royal courtyard. The palace area had several outer courts with various levels of access. The King's gate was likely the closest a citizen could get to the king.

127 Provinces of the Kingdom of Persia - A description of the size and complexity of the Persian kingdom – including multiple languages and scripts (3:12). Each province acted on its own to control and service the needs of the people.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Ahasuerus - Persian king, identical with Xerxes (486-465 B.C.) and husband of Esther. He signed the decree written by Haman allowing him to destroy all the Jews within the Empire.

Bigthana & Teresh - Two eunuchs who were doorkeepers for the King. They were angry with King Ahasuerus, and Mordecai overheard their plot to overthrow him. Through Esther, the message was brought to the king and both men were executed. Mordecai is later rewarded for his heroic deed.

Esther - The main character in the book named for her. She was a
Jewish orphan adopted by Mordecai, her cousin. Also known as Hadassah, which means "myrtle." Her Persian name, Esther, means "star." She may have been named after the goddess Ishtar, or she could have been named for her glowing beauty.

Haddassah - Esther's Hebrew name.

Haman - He was the son of Hammedatha and was the chief minister of King Ahasuerus. He was known as Haman the Agagite, a descendant of Agag, king of the Amalekites. On account of his attempt to exterminate the Jews in the kingdom of Ahasuerus, he is frequently called "the persecutor of the Jews." His crimes against the Jews and his downfall
are remembered during the Jewish Feast of Purim.

Hathach - One of the king's eunuchs who was assigned to attend to Esther. He was used as a messenger between Esther inside the palace and Mordecai on the outside (chapter 4).

Mordecai - Son of Jair, son of Shimei, son of Kish, a Benjamite. When his uncle and aunt died, he raised Esther, his cousin, as his own daughter. They were Jewish exiles who continued to live in Persia. Mordecai was probably some type of lower official in the king's royal palace.

Queen Vashti - First queen of King Ahasuerus. When she refused to appear before the king and his court, she was deposed from her royal office.

Seven Chamberlains - They were ordered to present Queen Vashti with her crown and royal garments to all the people. They were:

1. Mehuman 5. Abagtha
2. Biztha 6. Zethar
3. Harbona7. Carcas
4. Bigtha


Seven wise men - The King's closest advisors. They advised the king on what to do with the disobedient Queen Vashti:
1. Carshena 5. Meres
2. Shethar6. Marsena
3. Admatha 7. Memucan
4. Tarshish


FUN FACTS:

Seven-Day Banquet - This was a feast for everyone in the Persian capital held in the court of the king's palace. It celebrated the completion of a 180-day display of the Kingdom's riches and royal splendor, showing all the dignitaries of his kingdom and surrounding areas the wealth of the Persians.

Twelve Month Beauty Treatment - Each of the women being considered as a replacement for Queen Vashti was put into a 12-month program. The first six months were for treatments with oils of myrrh, followed by six months with perfumes and preparations for beautifying the women. The text indicates that all of these women were virgins (2:19).

Gallows - Haman ordered gallows to be built upon which he inteneded to hang Mordecai. He ordered them to be built 75 feet high (50 cubits). The gallows themselves may have been built on a structure already in place to add to their height and to make it very visible as a public display.

Pur - The word is Persian for the casting of lots. They could have been sticks of various lengths, flat stones like coins, or some kind of dice; but their exact nature is unknown. The closest modern practice to casting lots is likely flipping a coin. The Pur determine a "lucky" day for Haman to exterminate the Jews.

Feast of Purim - The festival of Purim derives its name from the lots cast by Haman. This new holiday was instituted on the day Haman had designated for the Jews' destruction - which instead became their day of liberation. It is the most joyous of all Jewish holidays and involves the mutual giving of gifts of food and drink, giving charity to the poor, and a celebratory meal (9:22); other modern-day customs include drinking alcohol, wearing of masks and costumes, and public celebration.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Job 1-42
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Job 1-42
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/557

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Job 1-42

Job is the first book in the section of Poetical Books. The opening chapter of the Book of Job begins in the throne room of Heaven, where we observe a conversation between God and Satan regarding the faithfulness of a man named Job. Satan is allowed to test Job's allegiance to God by causing him to suffer the loss of his health, wealth and even family – but is forbidden to take his life. Even with the lack of comfort and support of Job's four friends – and even his wife – Job is left pondering why, yet never loses his faith.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Job is a powerful story, which in the end displays God's sovereignty. Even in the midst of Job's tragic circumstances we see that God was always in control of all that was happening. Job can be divided into three parts:

1. The Dilemma - Chapters 1-2
2. The Debate of Job and his four friends - Chapters 3-37
3. The Deliverance of Job - Chapters 38-42

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Land of Uz - This is the central location in the Book of Job. The exact location of Uz is unknown, but many have speculated that it was probably near Edom. In the beginning of the book, Job 1:3 shows us that Job lived to the east of the Jordan, and some believe Uz might have been located in Syria or northwest Mesopotamia.

Heaven - As the book of Job opens, we are quickly taken into the Heavenly Throne Room of God. As the angels of God came and presented themselves, Satan also came with them and had to ask permission of God to attack Job.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Job - The main character of the book that shares his name. He is characterized as being upright and blameless, one who feared God and shunned evil. Job was wealthy and the greatest of all the people of the East. Hand-picked by God, Job was allowed to be tested and tried, losing family, prosperity and his own health.

Satan - In chapter one, Satan comes with the Heavenly angels to present himself before God. Ever seeking to devour the devout, God gives permission to Satan to begin his attack on Job, hoping Job will curse God.

Job's Wife - After Job had lost his wealth, health, and his children it was his wife who asked Job the question, "Do you still hold fast to your integrity? Curse God and die."

Eliphaz the Temanite - One of Job's friends, probably a descendant of Eliphaz, son of Esau (Job 4:1), who came to comfort Job, but instead discouraged him, dogmatically telling Job that all calamity is God's judgment upon sin.

Bildad the Shuhite - Job's second friend to speak. He was descended from Shuah, son of Abraham and Keturah, whose family lived in Arabia. He picked up where Eliphaz left off, trying to convince Job the destruction that had befallen his life was a result of some hidden or covered sin.

Zophar the Naamathite - The third in order of Job's friends. He too believed Job's tragedies were a result of sin and could be divine punishment. Zophar contended with Job to turn from his ways lest a heavier judgment come upon him.

Elihu the Buzite - The youngest of Job's friends and last to speak. Elihu was assertive and approached Job giving him half the truth. He condemned Job for his self righteousness and declared the glory and majesty of God. What Elihu failed to realize is that trials and tribulations can befall even the most godly of men.

FUN FACTS:

Bear, Orion and Pleiades - Mentioned in Chapter nine and chapter 38, these were three of the great constellations of the heavens. Pleiades is also mentioned in Amos 5:8 and is poetically referred to as "the seven stars." Orion was the constellation next to Pleiades and was thought to resemble the form of a hunter. In ancient mythology, Orion was killed by the goddess Diana and placed in the sky as a constellation.

Gravity - In Job 26:7, we see the existence of gravity as Job declares that the earth hangs upon nothing. The earliest known theory of gravitation was from Aristotle in the 4th century B.C. Yet Newton didn't publish his work on the universal law of gravity until 1687--showing us that God is always one step ahead of the scientific community.

Potsherd - In chapter 2, Satan strikes Job with painful boils from his feet to his head. Job uses a potsherd, also known as a "shard," to scrape the boils from his body. A potsherd was a broken piece of pottery often found in archeological digs today.

Behemoth - The name has come to be used for any extremely large or powerful creature. The word Behemoth in Hebrew means beast, but here in Job something more specific is being talked about. Some believe what is being spoken of here is a mythological creature, and others assert that it might be a brontosaurus or some other dinosaur, although mostscholars believe behemoth is nothing more than a hippopotamus.

Leviathan - Much like Behemoth, there are many thoughts as to what this mysterious creature actually is. References to Leviathan are made in Psalm 74, Psalm 104, as well as in Isaiah 27. Some have suggested Leviathan to be a whale or dolphin while others speculate that Job is referring to a crocodile. One thing is agreed upon, and that is that Leviathan is a large creature that dwells in the water.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Psalms 1-72
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Psalms 1-72
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/559

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Psalms 1-150

The Book of Psalms is a collection of songs, prayers and poetry which expresses the deepest of human emotions. Not only do the Psalms contain more chapters than any other book, they are also the most well known in the Old Testament. These artistic masterpieces were compiled over a period of roughly 1,000 years from the time of Moses in the 15th century B.C. to the time of Ezra and the return from the Babylonian Exile in the 5th century B.C. They were used as the temple hymnbook during the Kingdom period. The Psalms are divided into 10 major types including Messianic, Historical, and Hallelujah Psalms.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

1400 B.C.
Moses writes Psalm 90

1000 B.C.
David's Psalms written

971 B.C.
Time of Solomon

931 B.C.
Kingdom divides

722 B.C.
Northern Kingdom (Israel) taken captive

586 B.C.
Southern Kingdom (Judah) taken captive

500 B.C.
Restoration

TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Psalms is filled with lyrics of heavenly music suited to every man's experience. This book of classic works is filled with words of the greatest of sorrow and depression to the most thrilling expressions of joy and gladness. One theme is constant, and that is a complete dependence on the love and power of God. The Psalms are divided into five books.

Book 1 (Psalms 1-41)
Book 2 (Psalms 42-72)
Book 3 (Psalms 73-89)
Book 4 (Psalms 90-106)
Book 5 (Psalms 107-150)

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Zion - A name applied to Jerusalem and portions thereof by King David. The original location was a Jebusite fortress located on the southeast hill of the junction of the Kidron and Tyropoean Valleys. It was taken by David in 2 Samuel 5 and renamed "The City of David." In the Psalms, Zion generally refers to the whole city of Jerusalem.

Temple - The temple is the central place of worship in Judaism. It was here that all sacrifices were made and sins were atoned for. The first temple was constructed by Solomon and destroyed by King Nebuchadnezzar in 586 B.C. The temple was later rebuilt by Zerubbabel after the return from captivity and destroyed again in 70 A.D. by the Roman legion led by Titus. The Psalms speak of both the earthly and Heavenly Temples.

Heaven - Heaven is mentioned 74 times in the Psalms. Sometimes the Psalmists speak of the stars, the sun and the moon as the heavens, but often Heaven is referred to as the dwelling place of God. The longing and hope for this heavenly dwelling place is a strong thread that runs throughout the book of Psalms.

Egypt - Egypt appears 15 times in the Psalms to commemorate the Exodus of Israel from bondage. The great signs and wonders that God executed upon Pharaoh and on behalf of His people are spoken of often and are celebrated in the Psalms.

Babylon - Psalm 137 was written about the Babylonian captivity. Babylon was the capital city of the Babylonian Empire. Its name means "The Gate of God." Judah was taken captive there in 586 B.C. Psalm 137 is written from Babylon, longing to be home in Jerusalem.

Sheol - Reference to Sheol is recorded 65 times in the Old Testament. It is translated as "grave" 31 times, "hell" 31 times and "the pit" 3 times. Sheol is generally looked upon as the place where departed spirits go, both the righteous and the unrighteous. Prior to the Cross, there were two places for the departed: Abraham's bosom for the righteous and torment for the wicked (Luke 16:19-31). After the finished work of Jesus on the Cross, He took those from Abraham's bosom to Heaven to be with Himself.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

David - The book of Psalms is often attributed to David primarily because he wrote the largest number of Psalms. Of the 150 chapters, 73 Psalms are ascribed to him in their titles, though he probably wrote more. David was called "the sweet psalmist of Israel" and had many talents, including being a shepherd, a soldier, and a king, as well as being an extraordinary musician.

Sons of Korah - Ten Psalms are attributed to this group of musicians. Korah was a grandson of Kohath the Levite and ancestor of this ancient group of worship leaders.

Asaph - Son of Berechiah, a Levite who was appointed by David as the minister of music in the center of worship which was Jerusalem. Asaph is credited with wrting Psalms 73-83 and was also a gifted musician.

Solomon - The son of David and third king of Israel. It was Solomon who built the first temple. Solomon is known for his wisdom and for the Book of Proverbs. Psalm 72 and 127 are the words of Solomon.

Ethan - Ethan was the Ezrahite spoken of in 1Kings 4:31. He was renowned for his wisdom in Solomon's time, and is the author of Psalm 89. This Psalm prophetically speaks of the unchanging covenant that God made with His servant David, establishing his throne forever.

Heman - The son of Joel and grandson of Samuel, Heman was the first of three Levites to conduct the vocal and instrumental music in the tabernacle during David's time. Referred to as "David's seer," Heman also wrote Psalm 88, one of the most melancholy of all Psalms.

Moses - Moses is known as the great deliver of Israel, the man chosen by God to lead the Jews out of Egypt to the Promised Land. Moses wrote the Book of Exodus and the giving of the Law, but Moses was also a Psalmist. He was the composer of the 90th Psalm.

The anonymous Psalms - There are 50 Psalms that do not list the author; however, it is highly likely that David wrote some of these. Psalm 2 is quoted in Acts 4:25 and said to be written by David. Psalm 1 is thought to be by the same author, and it is interesting to compare 1 Chronicles 16:7-22 with Psalm 105 and 1 Chronicles 16:23-36 with Psalm 96.

Crucifixion - Psalm 22 is known as a Messianic Psalm. It begins with the words "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?" These same words were spoken by Jesus from the cross hundreds of years later. Long before crucifixion was practiced as a legitimate form of execution, God had prophesied the way in which His Son would die hundreds of years later.

Longest and Shortest - The Book of Psalms contains both the longest and the shortest chapters in the entire Bible. Psalm 117 is the shortest chapter, with only two verses, and Psalm 119 is the longest chapter, comprised of 176 verses.The book of Psalms is itself the longest book in the canon.

Tolaath - Tolaath is the Hebrew word for worm that is mentioned in Psalm 22:6. This word is translated scarlet 34 times, worm 8 times, and crimson once. The insides of this worm, when crushed, were used to produce scarlet dye for clothing and materials. This worm before its death would climb a tree and suspend itself from one of the branches. It was there it would give birth to its young, exploding from the inside and leaving a scarlet stain upon the tree. Within days, that scarlet stain would turn white and flake away. It is a reminder to us of Isaiah 1:18, "Come now, and let us reason together," says the Lord, "Though your sins are like scarlet, They shall be as white as snow; Though they are red like crimson, They shall be as wool. "

Psalms - The meaning of the word Psalms comes from a Greek word meaning, "a song that is sung to the accompaniment of a plucked instrument." The Psalms are the inspired responses of various individuals to God's revelation of Himself in the Old Testament era.

QUOTATIONS:

Of the 283 direct quotations from the Old Testament found in the New Testament, 116 are from the Psalms.

Psalm 118 - This is the middle chapter of the entire Bible. There are 594 chapters before and after Psalm 118. The sum of these is 1188. Psalm 118:8 is the middle verse of the entire Bible: "It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in man."

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Psalms 73-150
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Psalms 73-150
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/561

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Proverbs 1-31
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Proverbs 1-31
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/564

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Proverbs 1-31

The Book of Proverbs is part of the "wisdom literature," with Job & Ecclesiastes. It is one of the most read books of the Old Testament. It is also one of the most practical, as it deals with widsom as we need it in our everyday lives. Proverbs contains more than 900 wise sayings by King Solomon and other authors. Throughout Proverbs we can find clusters of wisdom presented as the lessons of a teacher to his students pitting virtue against vice. Examples are wisdom and folly, justice and vengeance, poverty and wealth, friends and neighbors, love and lust, life and death, pride and humility, what God loves and what He hates.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

931 B.C.
Solomon's Proverbs completed

715-686 B.C.
Chapters 25-29 collected by Hezekiah

TRIP PLANNER:

The Book of Proverbs is more than just good advice or tips. It is God's words of wisdom that we need in order to live righteously. These Proverbs are universal principles that apply to all people for all times, because they speak of the character of God and the nature of man -- neither of which has changed.

Proverbs is the greatest "How to" book ever written, and those who have the good sense to take Solomon's lessons to heart will quickly discover godliness, prosperity, and contentment are theirs for the asking.

Proverbs can be divided into three parts.

  1. Commendation of Wisdom 1:1-7
  2. Counsel of Wisdom 1:8-29:27
  3. Comparisons of Wisdom 30:1-31:31

KEY VERSES:

Proverbs 1:5 - "A wise man will hear and increase learning, and a man of understanding will attain wise counsel."

Proverbs 1:7 - "The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge, but fools despise wisdom and instruction."

Proverbs 4:5 - "Get wisdom! Get understanding! Do not forget, nor turn away from the words of my mouth."

Proverbs 8:13,14 - "The fear of the LORD is to hate evil; Pride and arrogance and the evil way and the perverse mouth I hate. Counsel is mine, and sound wisdom; I am understanding, I have strength."

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Israel – The land God promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob – and to David and his throne forever. At the time of Solomon, the kingdom of Israel had not yet divided. It is here where Solomon wrote his wise sayings. It is also the central location of all prophecy.

Sheol - In Hebrew it means "The abode of the dead." Sheol was where the dead went to rest, both the righteous and unrighteous. It was separated into two compartments. One was a place of torment (Hades) and the other a place of comfort (Abraham's Bosom).

Judah - Proverbs 25 begins the proverbs of Solomon compiled by King Hezekiah of Judah, which was the Southern Kingdom after Israel was divided. Judah was the home of two of the twelve tribes, Judah and Benjamin, as well as the home of the city of God, Jerusalem.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Solomon - The son of David and Bathsheba, and the third king of Israel, but the last to rule the Unified Kingdom. Solomon reigned over Israel for forty years, during which time he wrote more than 900 proverbs. He was also referred to as Jedidiah which means "beloved of the Lord."

Hezekiah - The son of Ahaz, and one of the greatest kings to reign upon the throne of Judah. It was Hezekiah who prayed to the Lord to extend his life, and he was granted fifteen more years. Chapter 25 of Proverbs tells us it was Hezekiah who compiled the writings of Solomon and added Proverbs 25-29 to the book.

Agur - The son of Jakeh. Agur was the author of the 30th chapter of Proverbs. Some speculate that this may have been Solomon himself.

King Lemuel - The author of the 31st and final chapter of Proverbs. There is much debate as to the identity of this mysterious king. Some have suggested that it is Solomon, while others assert it is Hezekiah. Yet others believe it to be a fanciful title to represent any virtuous king.

FUN FACTS:

31 Proverbs - It is an interesting fact that Proverbs contains 31 chapters, and the longest months in our calendar have 31 days. There are many people who have formed the habit of reading one chapter for every day of the month. "A Proverb a day will keep the Devil away."

Solomon - According to 1 Kings 4:32 Solomon spoke 3,000 proverbs and wrote 1,005 songs. However, only 800 of those proverbs appear in the collection that makes up the Book of Proverbs. Solomon also authored Ecclesiastes and The Song of Solomon.

Christ in the Proverbs - In chapter 8, wisdom is personified and seen in its perfection. It is divine, the source of biological and spiritual life; it is righteous and moral and available to all who receive it. Colossians 2:3 states of Christ Jesus: "in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge."

Proverb Defined - A proverb is a short, pithy saying that usually draws a comparison between two forms of behavior in order to impart moral or religious wisdom to its receiver. The sayings in Proverbs are often addressed to young people, who are in the process of becoming wise. It is likely that the Book of Proverbs formed part of the education for
Hebrew youth after the Israelite exile and return to the promised land.

Benefits of Wisdom - Wisdom notes, "The Lord created me at the beginning of his work. . .Then I was beside him, like a master worker" (8:22–30). Wisdom also affirms, "For whoever finds me finds life, and obtains favor from the Lord" (8:35). Wisdom is the source of life, a helper in creation, and a mediator between God and humankind. By assigning Wisdom a feminine quality, Proverbs suggests that femininity, in addition to masculinity, should be an important way in which we think about the order of the world.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Ecclesiastes 1-12
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/567

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Ecclesiastes 1-12

The book of Ecclesiastes records an intense search by Solomon to find
meaning and fulfillment in life. The main theme in Ecclesiastes is
"vanity." Solomon realized that all the things this world has to offer are
empty, that life's pursuits lead only to frustration, and that life apart
from God is meaningless.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

961 - 922 B.C.
Solomon reigns over the Unified Kingdom of Israel

The dating of this book is a subject of controversy. Some believe that Solomon wrote Ecclesiastes in the early years of his life, before he was swept away into carnality by his foreign wives. Still others speculate that he wrote Ecclesiastes in the twilight of his life, as a testimony of the futility of a life lived without God.

TRIP PLANNER:

What is the meaning of life? At some point in life, everyone asks this question. The book of Ecclesiastes is a search to answer that question. Does fulfillment come through wealth, power, relationships, and wisdom? After tasting all that this world has to offer, Solomon concludes that life without God is meaningless. Ecclesiastes can be divided into three parts.

  1. Declaration of vanity: 1:1-11
  2. Demonstration of vanity: 1:12-6:12 Included here are the pursuit of knowledge, amusements,
    possessions, madness and folly, labor, philosophy, and riches. All are vanity, otherwise stated as "meaningless."
  3. Deliverance from vanity: 7:1-12:14 Without God's help, humans cannot discover what is good for them to do; and without God's revelation man does not know
    what is in the future. Conclusion: All man's efforts to find happiness apart from God are without result.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Israel - Israel is mentioned one time in Ecclesiastes. In Prov. 1:12 the author describes himself as the King of Israel over Jerusalem. During this time in the history of the kings, the Kingdom of Israel had not yet been divided. Israel was the name given to Jacob as a promise by God that He would make of his descendents a mighty nation – the Nation of Israel.

Jerusalem - Jerusalem is mentioned six times in this short book. Jerusalem was the city of the king of Israel and the center of all religious activity. It is likely that the book of Ecclesiastes was written from Jerusalem.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Solomon - Author of the book of Ecclesiastes. His title is given in 1:1, "Son of David, King in Jerusalem." Enthroned at a very young age, he was cast into leadership at a volatile time in Israel's history. I Kings 3:4-9 records that God came to Solomon at night in a dream and said, "Ask for whatever you want me to give to you." So Solomon asked God for wisdom and a discerning heart. God answered that prayer, for Solomon was known for his extraordinary wisdom. Ecclesiastes is a glimpse into the pursuit and folly of all wisdom.

FUN FACTS:

Search for Satisfaction - As Solomon drifted away from God he sought fulfillment in many things. Solomon sought after wisdom (1:12-18), pleasure (2:1-3), accomplishments (2:4-6), and possessions (2:7-17). The result of this search brought Solomon grief (1:18), vanity (2:1), and a hatred for life (2:17).

Vanity - The word literally means "breath" or "vapor." Solomon uses this word to describe wealth, power, pleasures, and fame as passing away, much as warm breath fades away in the cool, crisp air. This same word is used by Job (Job 7:7) to describe human life, and by Jeremiah (Jer. 18:15) to denounce idolatry, but nobody uses it more than Solomon in Ecclesiastes. He says that all of life is vanity without God. Ecclesiastes - The Hebrew title qoheleth is a rare term found only in Ecclesiastes. The Greek word is Ecclesiastes, which comes from two words ek "out of" and klesis "a calling," and it literally means one who speaks to an assembly or, as Solomon calls himself, "the preacher."

Example of Solomon's wisdom - Solomon's wisdom is most often recalled by a famous incident in which two women came before him with a baby, each claiming to be the mother. Solomon ordered the child be cut in half, and by observing each woman's reaction determined the true mother.

The Byrds - Ecclesiastes 3 was the inspiration to a song entitled "Turn, Turn, Turn," written in 1965 by The Byrds, a 60's rock group!

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Song_of_Solomon 1-8
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/576

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Song of Solomon 1-8
The Song of Solomon is a moving love story between Solomon and a shepherdess, set in a poetic form. Where Ecclesiastes focuses on the intellect of man, The Song of Solomon focuses on the emotions of man, specifically the emotion of love. This story tells of the intimacy and love between a bridegroom and his bride, and the passion they share in a marriage relationship.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

  1. Bride muses about her courtship days
  2. The Wedding
  3. Troubled dream of Separation
  4. Mutual love of husband and wife
  5. The seal of their love

TRIP PLANNER
Historically, the Song of Solomon depicts the wooing and wedding of a country girl to King Solomon and the emotions that ensue in their wedded lives. Many believe The Song of Solomon depicts more than Solomon and his bride, and allegorically speaks of Israel being espoused to God and the Church espoused to Christ. Just as human life finds its highest fulfillment in the love of a man and woman, so does spiritual life find its greatest joy in the love of God for His people and Christ for His church. The Song of Solomon can be divided into two parts.
  1. The beginning of love 1:1- 5:1
  2. The broadening of love 5:2- 8:14

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Jerusalem - In the Bible, Jerusalem is described as the city of God. It was the city in which the temple was built and the center of the Jewish religion. It was from Jerusalem that Solomon reigned as the king of Israel, and Jerusalem is the setting of the Song of Solomon.

En Gedi - En Gedi is the largest Oasis on the western shore of the Dead Sea. The abundant springs and temperate climate provided a perfect atmosphere for agriculture, and in The Song of Solomon, Solomon compared his lover to "a cluster of henna blossoms from the vineyards of En Gedi." En Gedi was also where David fled when escaping from King Saul in 1 Samuel 23. The name literally means "the spring of the kid."

The Banquet House - The banquet house spoken of in Chapter 2:4 is also referred to as the "House of Wine." The banquet house symbolizes the vineyard where Solomon took his bride.

Lebanon - A country in southwest Asia on the Mediterranean Sea. Lebanon is bordered by Syria on the north and the east and Israel on the south. Lebanon is referred to seven times throughout the Song. It is sometimes mentioned symbolically, and at other times it appears to be a literal reference.

Tirzah - The name Tirzah means "she is friendly." Tirzah was a mound of extraordinary size located 7 miles northeast of Shechem. It held an important road and thus controlled all the traffic between Beth Shan and Shechem. In the Song of Solomon, Solomon compares her beauty to that of Tirzah.

Mount Carmel - The 1500-foot high limestone mountain impeded armies and merchants traveling to the Jezreel Valley. It holds great significance as the location where Elijah destroyed the prophets of Baal. In the Song of Solomon, he praises his love saying "your head crowns you like Mount Carmel."

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Shulamite - The Shulamite woman mentioned in The Song of Solomon is the love interest of King Solomon. She is not mentioned by name anywhere, but we see the beauty she possessed on the inside as well as the outside. The name is probably derived from a place called Shunem, located a short distance from Jezreel in the plain of Meggido.

The Beloved - The beloved is mentioned 32 times in The Song of Solomon. In this song, most believe the beloved to be Solomon himself. The name comes from the Hebrew word "dod" which is a variation of the name David, which means "Beloved One."

The Daughters of Jerusalem - The daughters of Jerusalem speak six times throughout this short song. Their identity is not disclosed, but they were most likely companions of the bride. They were perhaps attendants in the king's palace or may have just been casual onlookers.

FUN FACTS:
The Song in the Hebrew Bible - In our English Bible, this book appears as the final book in the Wisdom or Poetic Literature, but in Hebrew it is actually the first of the five rolls. The order was:
  1. The Song of Solomon
  2. Ruth
  3. Lamentations
  4. Ecclesiastes
  5. Esther
Portions of it were sung at the great feasts. The Hebrews likened Proverbs to the outer court of the temple, Ecclesiastes to the Holy Place, and the Song of Solomon to the Holy of Holies.

Title of the Book - In verse 1 the title of the book is given "The Song Of Songs, which is Solomon's." This is the Hebrew way of expressing the superlative; that is, of the 1,005 songs that Solomon wrote, this was his best or most important.

The Shulamite - There is question how a man with a harem of 1000 women could speak of one woman as though she were his only bride. It may be that the love that he experienced with the Shulamite was the only true love Solomon ever had. The majority of his marriages were all political arrangements. It is significant that this woman was a vineyard keeper of no great social stature.

Myrrh - Derived from the word "mara," it describes a taste that is bitter. Myrrh is made from the gum or sap of an Arabian balsa tree. The resin was pressed and mixed with oil to make perfume, incense, and lotion. Chapter 3:6 depicts Solomon's arrival "perfumed with myrrh and frankincense." Myrrh was also used as a gift at Jesus' birth and an embalming spice at His burial.

MAPS:

Figure Image 1

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Isaiah 1-39
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Isaiah 1-39
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/578

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Isaiah 1-66

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

930 B.C.
Northern and Southern Kingdoms divide

792 B.C.
Uzziah becomes king in Judah

755 B.C.
Isaiah begins to prophesy in Judah

752 B.C.
Jotham's reign begins in Judah

736 B.C.
Ahaz begins his reign in Judah

734 B.C.
Israel and Syria make war against Judah

732 B.C.
Damascus falls to the Assyrians

729 B.C.
Hezekiah becomes King in Judah

722 B.C.
The Northern Kingdom is taken captive by the Assyrians


TRIP PLANNER:
Of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah is thought by many to be the greatest of all. His ministry lasted for around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other prophet. It was early in his ministry that Isaiah saw the Lord high and lifted up upon His throne and was called into ministry. Isaiah can be divided into two sections:

  1. Prophecies of Condemnation Ch. 1-39
  2. Prophecies of Comfort Ch. 40-66

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Jerusalem - The City of God and center of the southern Kingdom of Judah. Jerusalem was the pulse of religious Judaism and the home of the Temple of God. It was from Jerusalem that the kings of Judah reigned. In Isaiah's prophecy, he voices the Lord's displeasure with this city and pronounces judgment upon it.

Judah - When the kingdom divided in 930 B.C., the Southern Kingdom took the name of Judah. Judah was inhabited by two of the twelve tribes, Benjamin and Judah. In his prophecy, Isaiah foretells of the destruction of Judah for their disobedience to God. Judah would fall to the armies of King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in the year 586 B.C.

Israel - Israel was the new name of the Patriarch Jacob and is representative of all the twelve tribes of Jacob. However, when the kingdom split the northern ten tribes took the name of Israel. Israel is mentioned 93 times within the prophecies of Isaiah, sometimes referring to the Northern Kingdom and other times referring to all of Israel. The Northern Kingdom was defeated in 722 B.C. by the Assyrians and taken captive.

Babylon - The great empire of the east. It was Babylon, led by King Nebuchadnezzar, that defeated the Assyrian Empire in 609 B.C. and ruled the earth for 70 years until they were defeated by the Medo-Persian Empire in 539 B.C. Babylon attacked and defeated Judah, destroying their temple and carrying their people away captive, in the year 586 B.C. Isaiah speaks of their rise and fall in his prophecy.

Damascus - Damascus is mentioned seven times in the book of Isaiah. Damascus was and is the capital city of Syria. This great city has the unique distinction of being the oldest continually inhabited city on earth. Isaiah speaks of its utter destruction in his book.

Assyria - The Assyrian Empire's supremacy lasted from 1365-609 B.C. This great empire is spoken of 38 times by name in Isaiah. It was Assyria that attacked the Northern Kingdom of Israel and defeated them in 722 B.C., taking their men, women and children captive back to Assyria. Their judgment is also spoken of in Isaiah.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Isaiah - Isaiah is the human author of the book that bears his name. Isaiah was the son of Amoz and has been called the "Saint Paul of the Old Testament." Isaiah was apparently an educated man, as seen in his style of writing. His ministry spanned the reigns of four kings in Judah, and he was very influential in the reforms of King Hezekiah. Tradition records that Isaiah's life was ended as he was sawn in two.

King Uzziah - King Uzziah began to rule in Judah at the age of sixteen and reigned as king for 52 years. He was a good king, bringing many reforms, but in his old age he began to steal the spotlight from God, entering the Temple to burn incense, and was confronted by 81 priests. It was then that Uzziah was struck with leprosy, from which he never recovered, living out the rest of his days in solitude. It was in the year that he died that Isaiah saw the Lord upon His throne.

King Ahaz - Ahaz was a wicked king who squandered all that had been left by his father Jotham and grandfather Uzziah and offered his son as a burnt offering for Molech (a Canaanite god). Ahaz worshipped idols, turned to other gods, and turned the Southern Kingdom to Assyria for a time. Isaiah came to him with a word, assuring him that Syria and Israel would not defeat Judah, but he refused to trust God and bought the help of the Assyrians, which made Judah their servants.

King Hezekiah - Hezekiah was a great and good king who introduced reforms throughout Judah. He cleansed the land of idol worship and removed the brazen serpent from Jerusalem. It was Hezekiah who rebelled against Sennacherib, the king of Assyria. In chapters 36-39, Isaiah records part of the story of Hezekiah's life. As Hezekiah was about to die, he asked God for longer life, which God granted him, and he lived for 15 years longer. In that time Manasseh was born to him, and became one of the most wicked kings to reign in Judah.

Sennacherib - Sennacherib was the son of Sargon, King of Assyria. Isaiah speaks of Sennacherib in reference to the rebellion led by King Hezekiah of Judah. The biblical account tells us that as Sennacherib came to sack Jerusalem, as they were camped, the angel of the Lord went forth into their camp and killed 185,000 Assyrians. Sennacherib returned to Nineveh and as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch, his god, he was struck dead by his two sons.

FUN FACTS:
Satan's fall - In chapter 14 of Isaiah, he makes reference to the fall of Satan from heaven. Isaiah speaks of the ultimate destruction of Lucifer and his dwelling in Sheol. The fall of Satan was due to pride; he wanted to exalt his throne above God. The details are found in chapter 14:12-21.

Seraphim - These angelic creatures are above the throne of God in chapter six of Isaiah. They had six wings. With two they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they flew, and they sang to each other these lyrics: "Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord of Hosts."

Immanuel Prophecy - It is the prophet Isaiah who speaks of the virgin birth of the Messiah. This well-known prophecy is found in chapter 7:14. His name was to be called Immanuel - which literally means "God is with us."

Contribution to Scripture - Isaiah is quoted far more in the New Testament than any other prophet. Isaiah is mentioned by name 21 times, and chapter 53 alone is quoted or eluded to some 85 times.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Isaiah 40-66
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Isaiah 40-66
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/580

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Isaiah 1-66

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

930 B.C.
Northern and Southern Kingdoms divide

792 B.C.
Uzziah becomes king in Judah

755 B.C.
Isaiah begins to prophesy in Judah

752 B.C.
Jotham's reign begins in Judah

736 B.C.
Ahaz begins his reign in Judah

734 B.C.
Israel and Syria make war against Judah

732 B.C.
Damascus falls to the Assyrians

729 B.C.
Hezekiah becomes King in Judah

722 B.C.
The Northern Kingdom is taken captive by the Assyrians


TRIP PLANNER:
Of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah is thought by many to be the greatest of all. His ministry lasted for around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other prophet. It was early in his ministry that Isaiah saw the Lord high and lifted up upon His throne and was called into ministry. Isaiah can be divided into two sections:

  1. Prophecies of Condemnation Ch. 1-39
  2. Prophecies of Comfort Ch. 40-66

PLACES OF INTEREST:
Jerusalem - The City of God and center of the southern Kingdom of Judah. Jerusalem was the pulse of religious Judaism and the home of the Temple of God. It was from Jerusalem that the kings of Judah reigned. In Isaiah's prophecy, he voices the Lord's displeasure with this city and pronounces judgment upon it.

Judah - When the kingdom divided in 930 B.C., the Southern Kingdom took the name of Judah. Judah was inhabited by two of the twelve tribes, Benjamin and Judah. In his prophecy, Isaiah foretells of the destruction of Judah for their disobedience to God. Judah would fall to the armies of King Nebuchadnezzar of Babylon in the year 586 B.C.

Israel - Israel was the new name of the Patriarch Jacob and is representative of all the twelve tribes of Jacob. However, when the kingdom split the northern ten tribes took the name of Israel. Israel is mentioned 93 times within the prophecies of Isaiah, sometimes referring to the Northern Kingdom and other times referring to all of Israel. The Northern Kingdom was defeated in 722 B.C. by the Assyrians and taken captive.

Babylon - The great empire of the east. It was Babylon, led by King Nebuchadnezzar, that defeated the Assyrian Empire in 609 B.C. and ruled the earth for 70 years until they were defeated by the Medo-Persian Empire in 539 B.C. Babylon attacked and defeated Judah, destroying their temple and carrying their people away captive, in the year 586 B.C. Isaiah speaks of their rise and fall in his prophecy.

Damascus - Damascus is mentioned seven times in the book of Isaiah. Damascus was and is the capital city of Syria. This great city has the unique distinction of being the oldest continually inhabited city on earth. Isaiah speaks of its utter destruction in his book.

Assyria - The Assyrian Empire's supremacy lasted from 1365-609 B.C. This great empire is spoken of 38 times by name in Isaiah. It was Assyria that attacked the Northern Kingdom of Israel and defeated them in 722 B.C., taking their men, women and children captive back to Assyria. Their judgment is also spoken of in Isaiah.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Isaiah - Isaiah is the human author of the book that bears his name. Isaiah was the son of Amoz and has been called the "Saint Paul of the Old Testament." Isaiah was apparently an educated man, as seen in his style of writing. His ministry spanned the reigns of four kings in Judah, and he was very influential in the reforms of King Hezekiah. Tradition records that Isaiah's life was ended as he was sawn in two.

King Uzziah - King Uzziah began to rule in Judah at the age of sixteen and reigned as king for 52 years. He was a good king, bringing many reforms, but in his old age he began to steal the spotlight from God, entering the Temple to burn incense, and was confronted by 81 priests. It was then that Uzziah was struck with leprosy, from which he never recovered, living out the rest of his days in solitude. It was in the year that he died that Isaiah saw the Lord upon His throne.

King Ahaz - Ahaz was a wicked king who squandered all that had been left by his father Jotham and grandfather Uzziah and offered his son as a burnt offering for Molech (a Canaanite god). Ahaz worshipped idols, turned to other gods, and turned the Southern Kingdom to Assyria for a time. Isaiah came to him with a word, assuring him that Syria and Israel would not defeat Judah, but he refused to trust God and bought the help of the Assyrians, which made Judah their servants.

King Hezekiah - Hezekiah was a great and good king who introduced reforms throughout Judah. He cleansed the land of idol worship and removed the brazen serpent from Jerusalem. It was Hezekiah who rebelled against Sennacherib, the king of Assyria. In chapters 36-39, Isaiah records part of the story of Hezekiah's life. As Hezekiah was about to die, he asked God for longer life, which God granted him, and he lived for 15 years longer. In that time Manasseh was born to him, and became one of the most wicked kings to reign in Judah.

Sennacherib - Sennacherib was the son of Sargon, King of Assyria. Isaiah speaks of Sennacherib in reference to the rebellion led by King Hezekiah of Judah. The biblical account tells us that as Sennacherib came to sack Jerusalem, as they were camped, the angel of the Lord went forth into their camp and killed 185,000 Assyrians. Sennacherib returned to Nineveh and as he was worshipping in the house of Nisroch, his god, he was struck dead by his two sons.

FUN FACTS:
Satan's fall - In chapter 14 of Isaiah, he makes reference to the fall of Satan from heaven. Isaiah speaks of the ultimate destruction of Lucifer and his dwelling in Sheol. The fall of Satan was due to pride; he wanted to exalt his throne above God. The details are found in chapter 14:12-21.

Seraphim - These angelic creatures are above the throne of God in chapter six of Isaiah. They had six wings. With two they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they flew, and they sang to each other these lyrics: "Holy, Holy, Holy is the Lord of Hosts."

Immanuel Prophecy - It is the prophet Isaiah who speaks of the virgin birth of the Messiah. This well-known prophecy is found in chapter 7:14. His name was to be called Immanuel - which literally means "God is with us."

Contribution to Scripture - Isaiah is quoted far more in the New Testament than any other prophet. Isaiah is mentioned by name 21 times, and chapter 53 alone is quoted or eluded to some 85 times.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Jeremiah 1-52
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/582

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Jeremiah 1 - 52

The Book of Jeremiah is the second in the Prophetical Series and part of the Major Prophets. It is a series of "oracles" transcribed by his scribe Baruch and written over a period of 50 or more years during the reign of three kings in the Southern Kingdom of Judah: Josiah, Jehoiakim, and Zedekiah. The author is the prophet Jeremiah, which means "Yahweh establishes" or "throws/lays a foundation," with the assistance of his servant and companion, Baruch. The book was likely assembled from the notes of Baruch at some point after the final exile.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

650 - 582 B.C.
Jeremiah's prophetic years

641-609 B.C.
Josiah reigns 31 years as King over Judah, the Southern Kingdom

609 B.C.
Josiah killed by Pharoah Necho of Egypt

609 B.C.
Jehoahaz becomes king of Southern Kingdom

609 B.C.
Pharoah Neco imprisons Jehoahaz and appoints Jehoiakim

598 B.C.
Jehoiachin becomes king

598-597 B.C.
Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon defeats Egypt

597 B.C.
Nebuchadnezzar appoints Zedekiah as king in Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:
Jeremiah has been divided into three oracles or writings:

Book 1: Chapters 2-25
Decries Israel's faithlessness, calls people to repentance, warnings of God's impending judgment, and bold sermons about the spiritual complacency of the people.

Book 2: Chapters 30-31
Jeremiah prophesies that the destruction of Israel will not be permanent, and offers hope and restoration and a new covenant not written on tablets of stone. Here, God promises a new relationship with His people.

Book 3: Chapters 46-31
This section deals with oracles against the surrounding nations - and particularly the fall of the kingdom of Babylon. In between each "book" are personal glimpse into Jeremiah's life, affirming
the validity of his role as God's prophet, and his emotional, graphic, and sometimes bizarre illustrations of the message God was speaking through him.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Judah - The remnant of the tribes of Israel known as the Southern Kingdom. Jerusalem was the capital city.

Jerusalem - Capital city of the Southern Kingdom of Judah, also known as the city of David, and focal point of Jeremiah's prophecy.

Anathoth - Birthplace and home of Jeremiah. Because of his unpopularity due his prophecies, he was forced to move to Jerusalem, and of no teacher did the saying prove truer that "a prophet has no honor in his own country."

Assyrian Empire - Captured the Northern Kingdom and took them to live in exile in Nineveh, the capital. Nineveh was destroyed in 612 B.C., and the Assyrian army was defeated in 609 B.C. at Haran.

Egypt - Attempted to expand its presence into Palestine with Assyria's troubles, so joined forces with Assyria to fight the Babylonians at Haran. Josiah tried to stop Egypt's advance, and was killed in that battle. Ruled Judah for a brief period before Nebuchadnezzar routed them and laid siege to Jerusalem.

Babylonian Empire - Under the rule of Nebuchadnezzar, fully conquered the southern kingdom of Judah in 586 B.C. They devastated the city of Jerusalem, looted and burned the original Temple of God built by Solomon, and took the people captive into exile in Babylon.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jeremiah - A Benjamite, son of the priest Hilkiah. His first message from the Lord came during Josiah's 13th year as king. His second prophecy was given by the Lord during Jehoiakim's reign; and a third at the end of Zedekiah's reign in Jerusalem. Known as the "weeping prophet," his messages were gloom and doom for the kingdom of Judah. He foresaw the imminent and total destruction of Jerusalem, but also foretold of the return from exile. Zedekiah labeled him a traitor and placed him in detention until the destruction of Jerusalem. He remained in Jerusalem after the destruction of the city, but was taken to Egypt by the remnant Jews who refused to submit to Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah died in Egypt, reportedly stoned to death by his own countrymen.

Baruch - Jeremiah used a scribe named Baruch, the son of Neriah, to write down his dictation.

Josiah - Good king of Judah. Became king at the age of 8 and ruled for 31 years. Implemented religious reforms within the kingdom, reinstated Passover, and destroyed false gods and high places. Killed during battle against Pharaoh Necho. Jeremiah was about 20 years old when he received his first message from the Lord, at the time when Josiah was about 21. It appears they were contemporaries and friends, as Josiah offered protection to Jeremiah.

Pharaoh Necho - Ruler of Egypt who attempted to align with Assyria to defeat Babylon. When Judah tried to stop him, he killed Josiah the king, and ruled over Judah for a short time.

Jehoahaz - Assumed the throne of Judah for three months until imprisoned by Pharaoh Necho; his brother, Jehoiakim, became king.

Jehoiakim - Persecuted Jeremiah and rejected his message. When Jeremiah was forbidden to enter the temple precinct, he sent Baruch as his spokesman to give prophecies which he dictated to him. King Jehoiakim destroyed Jeremiah's dictated prophecies.

Jehoiachin - Reigned only three months as king in Judah when Nebuchadnezzar placed Jerusalem under siege, captured Jehoiachin, and led the first group of nobles, officials, and temple treasures into exile. He was held in prison 37 years until Nebuchadnezzar died and the new king, Evil-Merodach (Amel Marduk), released him and allowed him to live in the palace with him the rest of his life.

Zedekiah - Allowed the nobles to arrest Jeremiah as a traitor urging the nation to submit to Babylon. Zedekiah was also fearful of Jeremiah because of the fulfillment of his past prediction of the Chaldean invasion of 598, so he rescued him and kept him safely hidden until the fall of Jerusalem. At the end of his reign, the remaining Jews were carried into exile and the city was burned.

Gedaliah - Appointed as governor over the poorest of the poor remaining in the land of Judah. Gedaliah was assassinated because the people did not want to serve the king of Babylon. Then all the people left the area and went to Egypt.

Nebuchadnezzar - Oldest son of Nabopolassar, the founder of the Chaldean Empire. After serving as commander of the army, Nebuchadnezzar became king upon his father's death. By marrying the daughter of Cyaxares, he united the Median and Babylonian dynasties. He wasn't just a warlord, he was also skilled in politics. God used Nebuchadnezzar to mete out His judgment on His people for their wickedness.


FUN FACTS:

Jeremiah's call - Jeremiah's call came in about 627 B.C., in the 13th year of the reign of the young King Josiah, and in the same year that Assyria's last great king, Ashurbanipal, died leading to the establishment of an independent Babylonian state which would grow to overtake Judah.

Contemporaries -

      Ezekiel was among the second group of Jews to be deported to Babylon into exile.
      Daniel was one of the young leaders taken captive during the first exile under King Nebuchadnezzar.
      Micah is mentioned in the book of Jeremiah as a prophet of God.

A Parable - Jeremiah 18:1-23 contains the familiar parable of the potter and the clay.

Prophecies and Types - There are 28 prophecies and types in Jeremiah that are fulfilled in Jesus Christ and His Church.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Lamentations 1-5
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Lamentations 1-5
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/584

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Lamentations 1 - 5

The Book of the Lamentations of Jeremiah is the 25th book in the Old Testament. It is written by Jeremiah as a "lament" over the destruction of Jerusalem. The writing style is metrically precise, poetic in nature - a form called qinah, known as a special "elegiac meter," used to express deep grief and giving a melancholy tone to the reading. The dominant message in the book of Lamentations is that sin always has its consequences. And when consequences come, there is never any reason to blame God. Chapter five is a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 650 - 582 B.C.
Jeremiah's prophetic years

c. 586-580 B.C.
Jeremiah writes the book of Lamentations

TRIP PLANNER:
There are 5 chapters, each containing a eulogy to the Kingdom of Judah.

  • Chapter 1 - Jerusalem Personified
  • Chapter 2 - The Acts of the Lord Proclaimed
  • Chapter 3 - The Voice of the Prophet
  • Chapter 4 - The Emptiness of Possessions
  • Chapter 5 - The Lament of the People

Each chapter contains 22 verses, each verse alphabetically corresponding with the Hebrew alphabet - except Chapter 5; while it has 22 verses it is not alphabetical in arrangement and each has only two lines. And in chapter 3 there are 66 verses; each letter of the alphabet has three verses.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Jerusalem - Capital city of the Southern Kingdom of Judah, also known as the city of David, now reduced to rubble and ravaged by fire.

Zion - The mountain of the Lord where the temple stood; referred to as the dwelling place of the Lord

Land of Uz - Mentioned in Lamentations 4:21 as a specific target of God's judgment for its sin. Also the home of Job.

Edom - According to Psalm 137:7, the Edomites played a strategic role in tearing down the walls of Jerusalem. The land of Edom is located to the south and west of Jerusalem, across the Dead Sea. Modern-day Petra is located there. Jeremiah prophesied its destruction in Jeremiah 49:7-22: "Edom shall become a horror; every one who passes by it will be horrified and will hiss because of all its disasters..." An interesting tidbit is that the New Testament views the conflict between the flesh and the spirit as typified by the conflict between Jacob and Esau.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jeremiah - A Benjamite, son of the priest Hilkiah. He remained in Jerusalem after the destruction of the city, but was taken to Egypt by the remnant Jews who refused to submit to Nebuchadnezzar. Jeremiah died in Egypt, reportedly stoned to death by his own countrymen.

Edomites - Sons of Esau; a nation continually at war with the Israelites. Their destruction was foretold by Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and Malachi. In Malachi 1:1-4 the LORD of hosts says of Edom, "They may build, but I will tear down, till they are called the wicked country, the people with whom the LORD is angry forever."

Teman - Ruler of Edom specifically mentioned in Jeremiah 49:7. Also a place with this name in the land of Edom.

FUN FACTS:

The Scrolls - Lamentations is one of the "Five Scrolls" (megillot) in the Hebrew Bible. (The others are Esther, Song of Songs, Ruth, and Kohelet, also known as Ecclesiastes.) Each of these scrolls is read in synagogue on a different Jewish holiday.

Destruction of Jerusalem - The Temple, the palace, and all of the houses of Jerusalem were burnt, the walls of the city were torn down, and the remaining treasures from the Temple were taken to Babylon (II Kings 25:8-17). The extent of destruction by the Babylonians went far beyond the walls of Jerusalem.

Sin and Rebellion - Lamentations makes it clear that sin and rebellion were the causes of God's wrath being poured out. Lamenting is appropriate in a time of distress, but it should quickly give way to contrition and repentance.

Forewarning - Read Deuteronomy 28 and compare to the actual events in Lamentations to see the fulfillment of God's promise of judgment if His people failed to obey His commands. They were forewarned!

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Ezekiel 1-48
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/590

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Ezekiel 1-48

The book of Ezekiel was written by Ezekiel, a priest, the son of Buzi. Ezekiel was one of those deported during the second deportation. He would begin his prophetic ministry five years later. He lived in Tel Aviv beside the Kebar River, in Babylon. He was 30 when he was called into ministry in a dramatic vision by the Kebar River. His contemporaries were Daniel, Jeremiah, Habakkuk, and Obadiah. He was married to 'the delight of his eyes,' who died suddenly in Babylon.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

593 B.C.
Chariot Vision

593 B.C.
Call to be a Watchman

592 B.C.
Temple Vision

591 B.C.
Discourse with Elders

588 B.C.
Second Siege of Jerusalem

587 B.C.
Judgment on Tyre

585 B.C.
Lament over Pharaoh

585 B.C.
Fall of Jerusalem

573 B.C.
New Temple Vision


TRIP PLANNER:

Ezekiel can be divided into halves. The major units of the book follow the chronological flow of Ezekiel's life and naturally relate to the message of the books:

  1. The Pronouncements: Chapters 1-33
  2. The Promise of Restoration and Blessing: Chapters 34-48

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Tel Aviv - Or Tel Abib; the name "Tel Abib" is a transliteration of an Akkadian term meaning "mound of the flood," i.e., an ancient mound. It is not to be confused with the modern city of Tel Aviv in Israel.

River Chebar - Also known as Kebar, a canal of the Euphrates river near Nippur. Some say it could be the same as the river Habor, the Chaboras, or modern Khabour, which falls into the Euphrates at Circesium.

Babylon - The capital of the Babylonian empire and the location from which the book of Ezekiel was written.

Egypt - Much of Ezekiel's prophecy against Israel's enemies is directed at Egypt.

Jerusalem - The north door of the inner gate and of the court is at the entrance to the temple. This is the very entrance to the holy of holies where the leaders erected idols and "played the harlot" before the Lord, inciting His wrath and the withdrawal of His presence from the people.

Gog, of a land called Magog - A figure used in Ezekiel who leads a great horde of armies to attack and destroy Israel. There are two places in the Bible where the words Gog and Magog are cited: Ezekiel 38-39 and Revelation 20 (plus Gen.10:1-2, where Magog is mentioned as a son of Japeth).

"A very high mountain" - A place where God in a vision took Ezekiel in chapter 40 and showed him the structure of the city and the new temple. Possibly Mount Moriah.

FUN FACTS:

Phrases repeated in Ezekiel:
  • 7 times - "The hand of the Lord came upon me"
  • 121 times - "Thus says the Lord GOD"
  • 94 times - "Son of man"


Tammuz - A corruption of Dumuzi, the Accadian sun-god (the Adonis of the Greeks), the husband of the goddess Ishtar. In the Chaldean calendar there was a month set apart in honor of this god, the month of June to July, the beginning of the summer solstice. At this festival, which lasted six days, the worshippers, with loud lamentations, bewailed the funeral of the god; they sat "weeping for Tammuz."

Definition of a Prophet - "'But the prophet who presumes to speak a word in My name, which I have not commanded him to speak, or who speaks in the name of other gods, that prophet shall die.' "And if you say in your heart, 'How shall we know the word which the LORD has not spoken?'--"when a prophet speaks in the name of the LORD, if the thing does not happen or come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD has not spoken; the prophet has spoken it presumptuously; you shall not be afraid of him." (Deut. 18:20-22)

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Daniel 1-6
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Daniel 1-6
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/592

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Daniel 1-6

The book of Daniel was written by Daniel between 536-530 B.C. It has been placed under both the Prophetic and Historic sections of Scripture. Chronologically, it links the period between the kings in II Chronicles and the restoration of Jerusalem in Ezra. According to the Jewish definition of 'prophet' the book of Daniel is considered writings of prophecy about future events, not intended to be proclaimed but to be written down for future generations. The beginning of the book is written in Hebrew and Aramaic, the language of the day, then reverts back to Hebrew as Daniel records his visions in the first-person. It begins with the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon and ends with Daniel's vision of 70 weeks.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

606 B.C.
The fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim

605-585 B.C.
Daniel's exile in Babylon

586 B.C.
Fall of Jerusalem

598-597 B.C.
Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, defeats Egypt

October 16, 539 B.C.
City of Babylon captured by Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great

539 B.C.
Daniel in the lion's Den

538 B.C.
Edict of Cyrus permits the Jews to return to Jerusalem, ending the time of exile


TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Daniel can be divided into two sections:

  1. Daniel the prophet - Biographical section written as seven historical narratives dealing with prophetic history as related primarily to the Gentiles.
  2. Daniel's dreams - Four prophetic visions, written in the first-person in Hebrew, interpreted by the angel of the Lord and relating primarily to the Hebrews.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Land of Shinar (Babylonia) - Nimrod was the first monarch in this region over four cities: Babel (Babylon), Erech, Accad, and Calneh, which later included all of the Assyrian Empire. After the flood, it was to this plain that the descendents of Ham (Noah's son) drifted and where the tower of Babel was built. Here God thwarted their building plan and confused the one-language world, and here the beginning of multiple languages began, scattering the people across the earth.

Babylonian Empire - Under the rule of Nebuchadnezzar, fully conquered the southern kingdom of Judah in 586 B.C. They devastated the city of Jerusalem, looted and burned the original Temple of God built by Solomon, and took captive the people into exile in Babylon.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jehoiakim - King of Judah at the time Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, laid siege to and conquered Jerusalem.

Daniel (Belteshazzar) - Belteshazzar means 'prince of Bel,' or 'Bel protect the king.' Taken to Babylon as a teen and groomed for the King's service, he served in the court of four kings: Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar, Darius the Mede, and Cyrus the Persian. Daniel was a man of integrity and great wisdom, and had the gift of interpreting dreams. Probably heard and observed much of Jeremiah's exhortations and forewarnings as a child.

Ashpenaz - The chief official in the court of Nebuchadnezzar who selected and trained the magicians and wise men for his personal service.

Hananiah (Shadrach), Mishael (Meshach), Azariah (Abednigo) - Along with Daniel, three young Israelites of noble birth chosen from the young men in the empire who met the qualifications to serve in the King's court. These included without any physical defect, handsome, showing aptitude for every kind of learning, well informed, and quick to understand. All four opted out of the king's diet and regimen, and after 10 days were found to be healthier than all the others. God gave them knowledge and intelligence in very branch of literature and wisdom so that after three years of training were found to be “10 times better than all the magicians and wise men in the kingdom."

Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar was the oldest son and successor of Nabopolassar, who delivered Babylon from its dependence on Assyria and laid Nineveh in ruins. Sources claim he married the daughter of Cyaxares, and thus the Median and Babylonian dynasties were united.

Belshazzar - It was to Belshazzar that the handwriting on the wall appeared. Daniel interpreted the handwriting, and "in that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain" by his own sons, who later fled. He was succeeded by Darius the Mede.

Chaldeans - Members of the class of the magi: astrologers, sorcerers, enchanters and magicians who constituted the ranks of the advisors to the Babylonian court. Daniel and his three Jewish companions were evaluated and chosen for their intellect and beauty, to be trained and indoctrinated as Chaldeans.

Darius the Mede -The son of Ahasuerus, of Median descent, who was made king over the kingdom of the Chaldeans. He was 62 when he took over the kingdom (5:31). The Medes are credited with the foundation of Iran as a nation and empire, and established the first Iranian empire, the largest of its day until Cyrus the Great established a unified empire of the Medes and Persians. Under Darius, Daniel became commissioner over 'satraps,' who governed the vast empire.

Cyrus, king of Persia - Great-grandson of Cyaxares (great ruler of Persia formed the original alliance with Babylon) who, through marriage to Mandane of Media, unified the two separate Iranian kingdoms. Cyrus himself entered the city of Babylon and arrested Nabonidus. He then assumed the titles of "king of Babylon, king of Sumer and Akkad, king of the four sides of the world." It was Cyrus who issued the decree that ended the exile of the Jews and allowed them to return to Jerusalem.


FUN FACTS:

Medes and Persians - Cyrus the Persian reigned subordinate to Darius the Mede as to dignity, though exercising more real power. After Darius' death, the order is "the Persians and Medes."

Decree, that it be not changed - This immutability of the king's commands was unique to the Medes and Persians; it was due to their regarding him to be infallible as the representative of the god Ormuzd. It was not so among the Babylonians.

Fiery Furnace - A Babylonian form of capital punishment for anyone caught disobeying the king's command.

Den of Lions - An underground cave or pit, covered with a stone. This was the preferred means of punishment for the Persians, as they were fire-worshippers, which the Babylonians were not.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Daniel 7-12
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Daniel 7-12
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/594

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Daniel 7-12

The book of Daniel was written by Daniel between 536-530 B.C. It has been placed under both the Prophetic and Historic sections of Scripture. Chronologically, it links the period between the kings in II Chronicles and the restoration of Jerusalem in Ezra. According to the Jewish definition of 'prophet' the book of Daniel is considered writings of prophecy about future events, not intended to be proclaimed but to be written down for future generations. The beginning of the book is written in Hebrew and Aramaic, the language of the day, then reverts back to Hebrew as Daniel records his visions in the first-person. It begins with the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon and ends with Daniel's vision of 70 weeks.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

606 B.C.
The fourth year of the reign of Jehoiakim

605-585 B.C.
Daniel's exile in Babylon

586 B.C.
Fall of Jerusalem

598-597 B.C.
Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, defeats Egypt

October 16, 539 B.C.
City of Babylon captured by Persian Empire under Cyrus the Great

539 B.C.
Daniel in the lion's Den

538 B.C.
Edict of Cyrus permits the Jews to return to Jerusalem, ending the time of exile


TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Daniel can be divided into two sections:

  1. Daniel the prophet - Biographical section written as seven historical narratives dealing with prophetic history as related primarily to the Gentiles.
  2. Daniel's dreams - Four prophetic visions, written in the first-person in Hebrew, interpreted by the angel of the Lord and relating primarily to the Hebrews.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Land of Shinar (Babylonia) - Nimrod was the first monarch in this region over four cities: Babel (Babylon), Erech, Accad, and Calneh, which later included all of the Assyrian Empire. After the flood, it was to this plain that the descendents of Ham (Noah's son) drifted and where the tower of Babel was built. Here God thwarted their building plan and confused the one-language world, and here the beginning of multiple languages began, scattering the people across the earth.

Babylonian Empire - Under the rule of Nebuchadnezzar, fully conquered the southern kingdom of Judah in 586 B.C. They devastated the city of Jerusalem, looted and burned the original Temple of God built by Solomon, and took captive the people into exile in Babylon.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jehoiakim - King of Judah at the time Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, laid siege to and conquered Jerusalem.

Daniel (Belteshazzar) - Belteshazzar means 'prince of Bel,' or 'Bel protect the king.' Taken to Babylon as a teen and groomed for the King's service, he served in the court of four kings: Nebuchadnezzar, Belshazzar, Darius the Mede, and Cyrus the Persian. Daniel was a man of integrity and great wisdom, and had the gift of interpreting dreams. Probably heard and observed much of Jeremiah's exhortations and forewarnings as a child.

Ashpenaz - The chief official in the court of Nebuchadnezzar who selected and trained the magicians and wise men for his personal service.

Hananiah (Shadrach), Mishael (Meshach), Azariah (Abednigo) - Along with Daniel, three young Israelites of noble birth chosen from the young men in the empire who met the qualifications to serve in the King's court. These included without any physical defect, handsome, showing aptitude for every kind of learning, well informed, and quick to understand. All four opted out of the king's diet and regimen, and after 10 days were found to be healthier than all the others. God gave them knowledge and intelligence in very branch of literature and wisdom so that after three years of training were found to be “10 times better than all the magicians and wise men in the kingdom."

Nebuchadnezzar - Nebuchadnezzar was the oldest son and successor of Nabopolassar, who delivered Babylon from its dependence on Assyria and laid Nineveh in ruins. Sources claim he married the daughter of Cyaxares, and thus the Median and Babylonian dynasties were united.

Belshazzar - It was to Belshazzar that the handwriting on the wall appeared. Daniel interpreted the handwriting, and "in that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain" by his own sons, who later fled. He was succeeded by Darius the Mede.

Chaldeans - Members of the class of the magi: astrologers, sorcerers, enchanters and magicians who constituted the ranks of the advisors to the Babylonian court. Daniel and his three Jewish companions were evaluated and chosen for their intellect and beauty, to be trained and indoctrinated as Chaldeans.

Darius the Mede -The son of Ahasuerus, of Median descent, who was made king over the kingdom of the Chaldeans. He was 62 when he took over the kingdom (5:31). The Medes are credited with the foundation of Iran as a nation and empire, and established the first Iranian empire, the largest of its day until Cyrus the Great established a unified empire of the Medes and Persians. Under Darius, Daniel became commissioner over 'satraps,' who governed the vast empire.

Cyrus, king of Persia - Great-grandson of Cyaxares (great ruler of Persia formed the original alliance with Babylon) who, through marriage to Mandane of Media, unified the two separate Iranian kingdoms. Cyrus himself entered the city of Babylon and arrested Nabonidus. He then assumed the titles of "king of Babylon, king of Sumer and Akkad, king of the four sides of the world." It was Cyrus who issued the decree that ended the exile of the Jews and allowed them to return to Jerusalem.


FUN FACTS:

Medes and Persians - Cyrus the Persian reigned subordinate to Darius the Mede as to dignity, though exercising more real power. After Darius' death, the order is "the Persians and Medes."

Decree, that it be not changed - This immutability of the king's commands was unique to the Medes and Persians; it was due to their regarding him to be infallible as the representative of the god Ormuzd. It was not so among the Babylonians.

Fiery Furnace - A Babylonian form of capital punishment for anyone caught disobeying the king's command.

Den of Lions - An underground cave or pit, covered with a stone. This was the preferred means of punishment for the Persians, as they were fire-worshippers, which the Babylonians were not.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Hosea 1-14
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Hosea 1-14
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/597

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Hosea 1-14

Hosea means "salvation." He was the son of Beeri. Hosea was called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam (and during the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, over the Kingdom of Judah). Sources vary as to the date of the writing (between 750 and 715 B.C.), but his message was clear: they had rejected God and thus they would be sent into exile and become wanderers in other nations.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

760-720 BC
Lifespan of the Prophet Hosea

KINGS OF ISRAEL DURING HOSEA'S LIFE:

793-752 B.C.
Jeroboam II

753-752 B.C.
Zechariah

752 B.C. (one month)
Shallum

752-742 B.C.
Menahem

724-740 B.C.
Pekahiah

752-732 B.C.
Pekah

732-722 B.C.
Hoshea


TRIP PLANNER:

The first three chapters of Hosea give a picture of Hosea's private family life and the agony of living with an unfaithful wife. This picture lays a graphic foundation for God's message through Hosea to the nation of Israel and her unfaithfulness to God in the remaining chapters 4-14. Hosea addresses the primary sins of Israel as adultery, drunkenness, idolatry, and licentiousness.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Valley of Jezreel - A plain situated to the north of Jezreel between the ridges of Gilboa and Moreh. It was here that Gideon was chosen by the Lord to defeat the Midianites and the Amelekites (Judges 6:3). Two centuries later, the Israelites were defeated here by the Philistines, and Saul and Jonathan were killed (1 Samuel 31:1-6). The ancient city of Megiddo is located in the south and west of the valley.

Valley of Achor - Means "trouble" in Hebrew. It is the name of a literal valley in the vicinity of Jericho, but is used by both Isaiah & Hosea in a proverbial sense to refer to the valley of trouble, a place for herds to lie down in (Isaiah 65:10), the valley of trouble for a door of hope (Hosea 2:15).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Hosea the son of Beeri - The name Hosea means "salvation." It comes from the same Hebrew root (hoshea) as the names Joshua and Jesus. Throughout the book, Hosea will show us that salvation is found in turning to the LORD and away from our sin. We also know that he had a wife named Gomer (Hosea 1:3) and two sons and a daughter (Hosea 1:4, 1:6, 1:9). His contemporaries were Amos, Isaiah, Jonah and Micah.

Gomer - Means "complete." The root word is gamar (Strong's # 01584), and it is a verb. In addition to complete, gamar means to perfect or to finish. The harlot wife of the prophet Hosea whom God commanded him to marry. She bore him three children, then left the family to live a life of harlotry and eventually was "redeemed" by Hosea and was reconciled to him.

Jezreel - means "God will scatter/sow." First-born son of Hosea and his wife Gomer. Jezreel refers to the Valley of Jezreel, where Jehu - the founder of the dynasty that put Jeroboam II on the throne - massacred all the descendants of Ahab, thus establishing his throne (2 Kings 10:11). God directed Hosea to name his son Jezreel to confirm His promise to avenge the bloodshed of Jezreel by judging the house of Jehu. In the end will be the uniting factor between Israel & Judah (v. 11).

Lo-Ruhamah - Means "no mercy; not loved." Second child, a daughter, born to Hosea and a constant reminder to him and everyone else of coming judgment and exile. Her mercy and love would be given to another (the nation of Judah).

Lo-Ammi - Means "not my people." Third child born to Hosea and Gomer. This child was a constant reminder that the people of Israel had pushed away the Lord God, and should no longer be considered His people.

Kings of Judah ... king of Israel - Hosea's ministry spanned the years 760 to 720 B.C., during the days of the divided monarchy. This was after the days of David and Solomon, when the people of God divided in a civil war, creating two nations: Israel in the north, and Judah in the south. This is some 250 years after the time of King David, and some 650 years after Israel came into the Promised Land.

Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah - Used by Hosea as a reference point for the days of his ministry according to the kings of Judah.

Jeroboam ... king of Israel - Jeroboam I was the first king of a divided Israel, leading a popular revolt against the high taxation of Rehoboam, son of Solomon (1 Kings 12).

Jeroboam II - followed in the wicked footsteps of Jeroboam I. Hosea began his ministry in the days of Jeroboam II who, from a political and economic standpoint, was a successful and good king (2 Kings 14:23-29). Israel prospered politically and materially under his reign, but it was a time of significant spiritual and moral decay. The terrible result of this decay wouldn't become evident until the days of Jeroboam II were finished.

10 Tribes of Israel - the recipients of Hosea's judgment message from the Lord. They include:

  1. Reuben
  2. Simeon
  3. Issachar
  4. Zebulun
  5. Dan
  6. Naphtali
  7. Gad
  8. Asher
  9. Ephraim (son of Joseph)
  10. Manasseh (son of Joseph)

FUN FACTS:

Dramatic consequences of Jeroboam's sins - Of the six kings who followed Jeroboam II during the time of Hosea's ministry, four were violently overthrown and one died as a conquered exile in Assyria.

Break the bow of Israel - "The bow was a symbol of power in a day when it was the principal instrument of warfare. Thus, a broken bow symbolized the loss of power." (Hubbard)

Harlotry - Synonyms are "prostitution, whoredom, vice crime;" most often used as "offering sexual intercourse for pay."

Sow the wind and reap the whirlwind - Origin of this saying is Hosea 8:7.

Shekel - Refers to one of many ancient units of weight and currency. The shekel was originally derived from the weight of 180 grains (one grain weighs about 0.047 grams). A coin is money that is stamped with an official seal to certify its weight. Coins were invented by the early traders who stamped their own marks so that they would not have to weigh it again each time it was used. In Hosea's purchase of Gomer of 15 sheckels, it equaled about 6 ounces of silver.

A homer and a lethek of barley - Homer or Cor was an ancient Hebrew unit of measurement equal to 10 epah (or 12 bushel). One lethek is equal to 5 epah.

Hosea 2:23 - Only other mention of Hosea in the Bible is in the Apostle Paul's reference to this prophecy fulfilled in Romans 9:24-26.


MAPS:
The Divided Kingdoms

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/598

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Joel 1-3

Joel sees the massive locust plague and severe drought devastating
Judah as a harbinger of the "great and dreadful day of the Lord" (2:31).
Confronted with this crisis, he calls on everyone to repent. He describes
the locusts as the Lord's army and sees in their coming a reminder that
the Day of the Lord is near. He does not voice the popular notion that
the Day will be one of judgment on the nations but deliverance and
blessing for lsrael. lnstead-with lsaiah (2:10-21), Jeremiah (4:5-9),
Amos (5:18-20) and Zephaniah (1 :7-18) - he describes the Day as one
of punishment of unfaithfullsrael as well. Restoration and blessing will
come only after judgment and repentance.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

835 - 796 Be
The Reign of Joash

TRIP PLANNER:

I. The present chastisement and it removal: 1:1-2:27

  1. Introduction: 1:1-3
  2. Desolation by locusts: 1:4-13
  3. Desolation by starvation and drought: 1: 14-20
  4. The victorious invading host from the north, Assyria: 2: 1-11
  5. Repentance the only escape from invasion: 2: 12-17
  6. Deliverance promised if Israel repents: 2: 18-27


II. The promise of the Spirit: 2:28-29

III. The future deliverance in the coming Day of the Lord: 2:30-3:21
  1. The signs preceding the Day of the Lord: 2:30-32
  2. The restoration of lsrael: 3: 1
  3. Judgment of Gentile nations: 3:2-17
  4. Final restoration: full blessing: 3:18-21



MEGA THEMES:

Punishment - Like a destroying army of locusts, God's punishment for sin is overwhelming, dreadful, and unavoidable. When it comes, there will be no food, no water, no protection, and no escape. The day for settling accounts with God for how we have lived is fast approaching.

Forgiveness - God stood ready to forgive and restore all those who would come to him and turn away from sin. God wanted to shower his people with his love and restore them to a proper relationship with him.

Promise of the Holy Spirit - Joel predicts the time when god will pour out his Holy Spirit on all people. It will be the beginning of new and fresh worship of God by those who believe in him, as well as the beginning of judgment on all who reject him.

PLACES OF lNTEREST:

Tyre - Aseaport and commercial center on the east coast of the Mediterranean Sea (in general history known as a Phoenician city). ln Old Testament times it was a city-state with its own king. From Tyre, ships went all over the Mediterranean world to trade and establish colonies. One of the chief products of Tyre was a dye known as Tyrian purple, made from shellfish.

Sidon - Acity on the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea, about 25 miles north of Tyre, with which it is often named in both the Old and New Testaments. Sidon was an old city before the time of the lsraelites. Like Tyre, it was a commercial city and port for fleets of trading ships that went to all parts of the world of that time. It reached the height of its prosperity about the time of Solomon. Today the city is called. Saida.

Philistia - Aregion in the southwest of ancient Palestine, comprising a coastal strip along the Mediterranean and a portion of southern Canaan. The chief cities of Philistia were Gaza, Ashqelon, Ashdod, Ekron, and Gath; strategically located on the great commercial route from Egypt to Syria, they formed a confederacy.

PEOPLE OF lNTEREST:

Joel - Aprophet of the Southern Kingdom of Judah; his name means "Jehovah is God." Nothing is known of him, apart from what is in the book.

The people of Judah - Joel's message was of impending judgment, along with a call for repentance. He assured the people of the forgiveness of God, followed by the coming of the Holy Spirit.

MAPS:
Image 1


DESTINATION: Amos 1-9

The name Amos comes form the Hebrew word meaning "to lift a burden, carry." His name means "burden" or "burden-bearer." He lived in Judah but was given the burden of carrying a message of warning to the Northern Kingdom of Israel against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 767-753 B.C.
Ministry of Amos

c. 790-739 B.C.
Uzziah, King of Judah

c. 793-753 B.C.
Jeroboam, son of Joash, King of Israel


TRIP PLANNER:
"Prepare to meet your God, O Israel." The divine message given to Amos was primarily one of judgment, although it ends with words of hope. First, Amos records God's words against the Gentile nations surrounding Israel and Judah. Second, Amos is asked to deliver God's words of judgment against Israel. And third, God gives Amos visions of how He will mete out His judgment on the people. Yet, in a final word from the Lord, a promise of hope to the faithful remnant is given.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Tekoa (or Tekoah) - Means "pitching of tents, fastening down." It was a Biblical town of Judah, about 12 miles south of Jerusalem, and visible from the city. This was also the birthplace of the prophet Amos (Amos 1:1).

Six surrounding regions of judgment - Damascus, Philistia, Tyre, Edom, Ammon, Moab.

Judah - The Southern Kingdom (2 tribes) of the divided nation of Israel.

Israel - The Northern Kingdom (10 tribes) of the divided nation of Israel.

Bethel - Southern-most city of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

Gilgal - A holy place of sacrifice and remembrance, on the west bank of the Jordan where the Israelites first camped after crossing over into the promised land. "The Lord said to Joshua, ‘Today I have rolled away the reproach of Egypt from you.' Therefore the name of that place is called Gilgal to this day" (Joshua 5:9).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Amos - Amos was a herdsman and a tender of sycamore fruit from the village of Tekoa, which was located near Bethlehem, about ten miles south of Jerusalem. Although he was a farmer and rancher, he was very familiar with the Word of God. Amos should not be confused with Amoz, the father of Isaiah. Amos was a contemporary of Isaiah, Micah and Hosea.

Uzziah of Judah - Also known as Azariah; king for 52 years over Judah. He was one of the sons of Amaziah whom the people appointed to replace his father. He is the one the kings mentioned in the genealogy of Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew.

Jeroboam - The son of Nebat, "an Ephrathite." He was the son of a widow of Zereda, and while still young was promoted by Solomon to be chief superintendent of forced laborers. On the death of Solomon, the ten tribes revolted and invited him to become their first king; he reigned over them for 22 years. He rebuilt and fortified Shechem as the capital of his kingdom, and erected at Dan and Bethel (the two extremities of his kingdom) "golden calves," which he set up as symbols of God. Therefore, the people would go to either place to bring their offerings to the shrines he had erected instead of at Jerusalem.

Amaziah - Priest at Bethel, loyal to Jeroboam. Likely present when Amos prophesied against Jeroboam. He did not have a pleasant ending, either!


FUN FACTS:

Sycamore Fruit - A fruit normally eaten by the poor. It must be pierced with a knife and mashed to make it edible. Besides shepherding, this was Amos's job—to pick, cut and sell the fruit in the marketplace, leaving him with stained hands.

Mount Arbel - A mountain in Lower Galilee near Tiberias in Israel that has split in two after an earthquake (unspecified date). Mt. Arbel is also the term for one half of the split mountain; the other half's name is Mt. Nitai (a possible result of the earthquake mentioned).

Earthquake - Also referred to in Zechariah 14:5 as "the earthquake in the days of Uzziah king of Judah." Josephus, the Jewish historian, believed that the earthquake happened at the same time as Uzziah's seizure of the role of High Priest and his subsequent bout with leprosy.

Visions of God's judgment - Devouring locusts, destruction by fire, a plumb line, and a basket of summer fruit.

Christ as seen in Amos - Amos presents Christ as our "burden bearer," the One who will rebuild David's dynasty, and as the one who will restore His people.


DESTINATION: Obadiah 1

Obadiah is fourth in the listing of the Old Testament Minor Prophets,
and the shortest. Chronologically, it was possibly the earliest of the
prophetic writings, written c. 840 B.C., though some commentators
place the writing in the 6th century B.C. Obadiah means "worshipper
of Jehovah."


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 853-841 B.C. Most agree this is the likely timeframe of Obadiah

930 B.C. Division of the Kingdom of Israel

c. 875-797 B.C. Ministries of Elijah and Elisha

c. 825-796 B.C. Joel's ministry in Judah

c. 760-740 B.C. Amos's ministry in Israel

c. 753-715 B.C. Hosea's ministry in Israel

722 B.C. Exile of Israel

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:

Obadiah's vision from the Lord was directed to Edom, also known as Esau (after
the brother of Jacob, son of Isaac). It was given as a warning against pride
and retaliation against the Lord's chosen people, and that ultimately possessions
and position will mean nothing in the "day of the Lord."


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Mount of Esau – This is modern day Petra; leading into the dwelling place
of Esau, one must travel through a narrow gorge that leads to a tiny winding
valley, eventually leading to walls with hundreds of tombs and dwellings
carved in the face of them. From there, the Edomites looked down on the
world around them. This was the "pride of thy heart" and "his hidden
treasures," referred to in verses 3 and 4.

Mount Zion – Also Jerusalem. The place from which the Lord established
His earthly Kingdom and restored the inheritance of His people.

House of Jacob - All of the nation of Israel.

Shephelah - Meaning "lowland." It is a geographical term for the lowlands
or low hilly country between the coastal plain of Israel and the higher
central mountains; the region is about 50 mi (80 km) north to south
and about 10 mi (16 km) wide west to east. The sites of many ancient cities
named in the Shephelah have been identified. They all lie within the strip of
hill country that runs along the western base of the mountains of Judah,
terminating in the north at the Valley of Aijalon.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Obadiah – The name Obadiah in Hebrew means "servant of the Lord." A dozen
or so individuals in the Old Testament have this name, none of whom may be
safely identified with the author of this book. In reality we know very little about
this prophet with regard to his exact identity or historical circumstances. However,
of worthy note is the Obadiah in 1 Kings 18. As a prophet, he had a significant
role in hiding and saving the lives of 100 prophets from the murderous King
Ahab and Jezebel.

Edom – Also known as Esau. Twin brother of Jacob (Israel), sons of Isaac &
Rebekah. Esau sold his birthright to Jacob for a bowl of porridge, and
Jacob stole the ancestral blessing by deception, setting the stage for two
nations in constant opposition. ‘Edom' refused to let the Israelites pass
through its mountains to get to Canaan. David fought and won a battle
against the Edomites when Saul first became king and they became
servants to David (2 Samuel 8:14). When Nebuchadnezzar destroyed
Jerusalem in 586 B.C., Edom was a willing ally and stood by in derision as
the people of Judah were plundered and exiled.

They of the South (Negev) – The people of Israel who lived in the southern
part of the Kingdom. To them it was prophesied that they would inherit
and live in the Mount of Esau (Petra).

Teman – One of the chiefs of the sons of Esau (Genesis 36:15).
The name of an Edomite clan, and the name of the region where
they lived (Gen 36:11, 15, 34); in Jeremiah 49:7, 20 it is used
poetically for all of Edom. The inhabitants of Teman seem to have
been famous for their wisdom (Jeremiah 49:7; Obadiah 1:8). Eliphaz
the Temanite was chief of the comforters of Job (Job 2:11).

They of the Lowland (foothills) – Also known as Shephelah, it is the
western portion of the land of Israel where the Philistines – lifelong
enemies of Israel – would be destroyed. The people of Israel
would inherit their land all the way to the mountains of Ephraim
situated NE of Jerusalem and Samaria, which represents the central
portion of Palestine.

Benjamin 'shall possess' Gilead - Benjamin was the youngest son of
Jacob, and the smallest of the tribes of Egypt. The tribe of Benjamin
was famous for its archers (1 Samuel 20:20, 36; 2 Samuel 1:22;
1 Chronicles 8:40; 12:2) and slingers (Judges 20:6). Though the tribe
was small, Israel's first king, Saul, was from Benjamin.


FUN FACTS:

Gilead was the mountainous region representing all the region east
of the Jordan River situated in the modern day nation of Jordan.
It comprised the possessions of the tribes of Gad and Reuben and the
south part of Manasseh. Known for its production and exportation of
aromatic spices and gums. The old Negro Spiritual "There is a Balm in
Gilead" speaks to the healing power of Christ Jesus as the balm "to
make the wounded whole" and "to heal the sin-sick soul."

Field of Samaria – Jerome records in his commentary on Obadiah that
Samaria was the burial place of Elisha, Obadiah, and John the Baptist.

Zarephath - A Phoenician city on the Mediterranean coast between
Sidon and Tyre in modern day Lebanon. It was noted by Obadiah as
the northernmost boundary of Israel. This is the site where Elijah
multiplied the meal and oil of the widow of Zarephath (Sarepta) and
raised her son from the dead.

Sepharad – Mentioned only once in the Bible by Obadiah. The exact
location is unknown. However, after the second century it was
identified with the Iberian Peninsula. The descendants of the Iberian
Jews are still called Sephardim, and Sepharad is the modern Hebrew
for Spain. Popularly taken to mean all those who are scattered abroad
in all the boundaries and regions of the earth.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Jonah 1-4
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Jonah 1-4
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/600

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Jonah 1-4

Jonah is different from other prophetic books. It narrates a prophet's
story rather than focusing on his prophecies. The only verse that
summarizes his message is 3:4. The book teaches the lesson that God's
grace goes beyond the boundaries of Israel to embrace all nations.
Jonah is a historical story, and is also mentioned by Jesus—the book is a
picture of His death and resurrection.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

793 B.C. During reign of Jeroboam II, Jonah receives call to go

760 B.C. Amos becomes a prophet

722 B.C. Israel falls to Assyria


TRIP PLANNER:

In the book of Jonah, we see a classic example of what God can do in the life
of a prophet. Jonah was told to go and preach to Nineveh, but he chose to
be disobedient and flee to Tarshish. In spite of his disobedience, God redirected
his path and brought Jonah to repentance through a unique sojourn in the
stomach of a fish. As a result, Jonah preached to Nineveh, and repentance
was the result, which brought glory to God.

  1. Jonah Forsakes His Calling (Chap. 1)
    • Jonah's flight to Tarshish (1:3)
    • The storm at sea (1:4)
    • Jonah is thrown overboard & swallowed by the great fish (1:11-17)
  2. The Deliverance of Jonah (Chap. 2)
    • The prophet prays (2:1-9)
    • God answers (2:10)
  3. God Declares His Message to Nineveh Through Jonah (Chap. 3)
    • The threat of judgment (3:1-4)
    • City-wide repentance (3:5-9)
    • Judgment averted (3:10)
  4. The Displeasure of Jonah (Chap. 4)
    • Jonah's complaining prayer (4:1-3)
    • God's searching question (4:4)
    • The lesson of the plant (4:6-11)

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Tarshish (Jon 1:3) – Believed by many to have been a seaport or region in southern Spain.

Joppa (Jon 1:3; see Acts 9:42) – The only natural harbor in Israel south of Acco, and probably the closest one available to the fleeing prophet.

Nineveh – Capital of the ancient Assyrian Empire; population 120,000 Jon 4:11).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jonah – Son of Amittai ("true to God"). His home was in Gath Hepher in Galilee. He prophesied during the days when Assyria was threatening the Northern Kingdom of Israel.


FUN FACTS:

Tarshish - was believed to be at the end of the world. So, Jonah was actually trying to get as far away as possible from God's will for his life.

Jonah - means "dove."

Famine – God may have used famines in Assyria in 765 and 759 B.C. to prepare the hearts of the Ninevites for Jonah's evangelistic ministry.

Total Eclipse – June 15, 763 B.C. God may also have used this natural phenomenon to prepare Nineveh for Jonah's message.

MAPS:
Image 1

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/602

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Micah

Micah was written by the Prophet Micah to the leaders of Samaria and Jerusalem during the reigns of three kings of Judah: Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. Micah the prophet is remembered as the prophet of authentic worship/service to God and social justice.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 760 – 715 B.C. Ministries of Amos and Hosea in Israel

c. 750 – 735 B.C. Reign of Jotham, King of Judah

c. 735 – 715 B.C. Reign of Ahaz, King of Judah

c. 715 – 686 B.C. Reign of Hezekiah, King of Judah

c. 740 – 681 B.C. Isaiah's ministry in Judah

c. 740 – 710 B.C. Ministry of Micah to Jerusalem & Samaria

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength


TRIP PLANNER:

Micah spoke out against the oppression of the people by both spiritual (prophets and religious leaders) and secular leaders. Selfish coveting is for Micah the source of all sorts of evil. He describes Injustice primarily in three activities: in coveting what belongs to others, in perverting justice, and in hypocritical religiosity. Micah can be divided into three sections:

Section 1 – Chapters 1-3. After pronouncing doom on the capital cities of Samaria and Jerusalem, and the peril of continuing to ignore living faithfully in response to God while still claiming to be God's people, he exposes their sins and ultimate destruction.

Section 2 – Chapters 4-5. Micah predicts the future restoration after the destruction, including the expectation of a new Davidic king who would usher in a period of peace and security.

Section 3 – Chapters 6-7. Micah ends with predictions of hope to and redemption through the promised Messiah, in the form of a prayer and confession of sin from the people.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Morashtite or Moresheth – A small town near Gath about 25 miles southwest of the royal capital in the beautiful hill country of Judah, commanding a broad view across the coastal plain to the
Mediterranean. Judean kings maintained five fortress cities within a
radius of less than six miles round about Moresheth.

Samaria – Capital city of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

Jerusalem – Capital city of the Kingdom of Judah.

Mountain of the Lord (3:12) – Also referred to as Mount Zion; the place where the Lord will establish His kingdom on earth. (See also Zechariah 8:3.)

Bethlehem Ephrathah (5:2) – The predicted place of Jesus' birth, the city is located in the "hill country" of Judah, and was originally called Ephrath (Gen. 35:16, 19; 48:7; Ruth 4:11). It was also called Bethlehem Ephratah (Micah 5:2), Beth-lehem-judah (1 Sam. 17:12), and "the city of David" (Luke 2:4). It is first noticed in Scripture as the place where Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside," directly to the north of the city (Gen. 48:7). The valley to the east was the scene of the story of Ruth the Moabitess. There are the fields in which she gleaned, and the path by which she and Naomi returned to the town.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Micah – The prophet's name, in its long form "Micaiahu," is commonly translated "Who is like the Lord?" And his pursuit of the ministry in response to this question continued the prophetic tradition of calling the people of God into a closer walk with Him. Little is known of Micah, the prophet, other than he was from the
town of Morashtite and he prophesied during the reigns of 3 kings of Judah: Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. What holds true for all the prophets holds true for Micah: His life has disappeared behind the word which he was sent to proclaim.

Deliverers - God reminds Israel in Chapter 6 of His deliverance through Moses, Aaron, and Miriam, and reminds them of His
righteousness through the counsel of Balak and Balaam.


FUN FACTS:

Micah uses a play on words to describe the Assyrian triumph through
the nation in Chapter 1:

Beth Aphrah – Literally "House of Dust" ... "roll yourself in the dust"

Shaphir – Literally "pleasantness" ... "Pass by in naked shame"

Zaanan – Literally "going out" ... "the inhabitant...does not go out"

Beth Ezel - Literally house of removal ... "Its place to stand is taken away from you"

Maroth – Literally "bitterness" ... Becomes weak waiting for good

Lachish – Literally "the beginning of sin"; the rebellion of Jacob

Moresheth Gath – Literally "possession of Gath; inheritance"

Achzib – Literally "lie" ... "shall be a lie to the kings of Israel"

Mareshah – Literally "inheritance" ... "I will yet bring an heir to you, O inhabitant of Mareshah"


Familiar Passages in Micah


  • 4:1-5 They shall beat their swords into plowshares, And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation shall not lift up sword against nation,
    Neither shall they learn war anymore. (3)


  • 5:2-4 But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me
    The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old,
    From everlasting." (2)


  • 6:1-8 He has shown you, O man, what is good;
    And what does the LORD require of you
    But to do justly,
    To love mercy,
    And to walk humbly with your God? (8)


  • 4:5 For all people walk each in the name of his god,
    But we will walk in the name of the LORD our God
    Forever and ever. (cf Zech 10:12; Josh 24:15)



DESTINATION: Nahum

Nahum means "Prophet of Comfort." He is the seventh of the twelve
Minor Prophets. His prophecy, received by a vision, was of God's
wrath and judgment against the Assyrians for rejecting the previous
generation's example of repentance as a result of Jonah's message,
and returning to their evil practices. The result was punishment and
ultimate destruction for their treatment of Israel.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

c. 790-770 B.C. Jonah's ministry to Nineveh

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c.742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

c. 640 -621 B.C. Zephaniah's ministry in Judah

c. 663-609 B.C. Life & ministry of Nahum in Israel to Ninevah

c. 626-585 B.C. Jeremiah's ministry in Judah

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:

Nahum was a poet and wrote lyrically. Nahum's original poem is recorded in Chapters 2 and 3. It is a book about judgment, as can be seen in each of the three chapters:
  • Nahum 1: Judgment Is Announced: God is Righteous
  • Nahum 2: Judgment Is Executed: Nineveh is Destroyed
  • Nahum 3: Judgment's Reason: Nineveh's Guilt

Nahum's writing testifies to his belief in the righteousness of God. The
Assyrians had been used as God's "rod of mine anger, and the staff in
their hand is mine indignation" (Isaiah 10:5).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Nahum – Little is known about this minor prophet other than he was an Elkoshite. Most historians agree that likely he came from Elkesei beyond Jordan toward Begabor and was of the tribe of Simeon. He was a poet who possessed a remarkable style of writing and who described in unforgettable language the fall of Nineveh, the capital of the Assyrian empire, in 612 B.C. His contemporaries were Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk. He was likely influenced by the prophecies of Isaiah (compare 1:15 and Isaiah 52:7).

Assyrians – People from a region on the Upper Tigris River, named for its original capital, the ancient city of Assur in modern-day Iraq. The Assyrian kings controlled a large kingdom at three different times in history. The most powerful and best-known nation of these periods is the Neo-Assyrian kingdom, 911-612 B.C. The Assyrians were one of the first groups to convert to Christianity, along with the Armenians and Ethiopians. They went on and played a big role in spreading Nestorian Christianity to the Far East. In the beginning of the 20th century, the Ottoman empire was collapsing, and during World War I, the Assyrians, like the Armenians, claim a genocide was committed against its people during the period of 1914-1922. After the
creation of Iraq, the Assyrians refused to sign loyalty to the Iraqi monarchy, and demanded to be recognized as a nation within a nation. Eventually, this led to the Iraqi government committing its first of many massacres against its people.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Nineveh - Nineveh was the capital of the Assyrian empire. Its founder was Nimrod, who lived shortly after the flood (Gen. 10:8-12). Nineveh reached great importance around 900 B.C. Shalmaneser III of Assyria defeated King Ahab of Israel in the battle of Carcar around the year 843 B.C. Jonah was sent to Nineveh around 800 B.C. to turn them from their cruel ways. In 722 B.C. the whole northern kingdom of Israel was brought into Assyrian captivity under Shalmaneser and Sargon (2 Kings 17). Finally, the great city was conquered and totally destroyed in 612 B.C. by the Medes under Cyaxares (king of Media; modern-day Iran) and the Babylonians under Nabopolassar (father of Nebuchadnezzar II).


FUN FACTS:

There was rivalry between Assyria and Babylon from the very
beginning. Babylon is the picture of worldly might in a religious
garment. Assyria pictures the haughty, cruel and high-handed world,
which knows nothing but her own importance. They became allies
in 614 B.C. after the Medes destroyed the city of Assur. The alliance
was sealed by the marriage of Nebuchadnezzar to the daughter of
Cyaxares.

A few of Nahum's prophecies:

Nahum 1:8-9, 3:19
Nineveh's destruction would be permanent - In 612 B.C. (about
2600 years ago), a coalition of Babylonians, Scythians and Medes
conquered the heavily fortified city. It ceased to be an important city
from that point on.

Nahum 1:10
Ninevites would be drunk in their final hours – Fulfilled 612 B.C.
According to the ancient historian Diodorus Siculus, "The Assyrian
king gave much wine to his soldiers. Deserters told this to the enemy,
who attacked that night."

Nahum 1:14
Ninevites would be wiped out - Nineveh's destruction in 612 B.C.
marked a permanent end to the Assyrian Empire. The city itself
never again rose to any significant importance. Today, Nineveh is an
archaeological site in Iraq.

Nahum 2:6
Nineveh would be hit with a flood - According to the Greek historian
Diodorus Siculus, who lived in the First Century B.C., heavy rains had
caused the Tigris River to overflow and flood part of Nineveh. The
flooding destroyed some of Nineveh's protective walls. That might
have helped the attacking forces conquer Nineveh.

Nahum 3:12
Nineveh's fortresses would be easily captured - Ancient Babylonian
records say the fortified towns around Nineveh began to fall in 614
B.C., about two years before the total defeat of the Assyrian empire.

Nahum 3:15
Nineveh would be destroyed by fire - Archaeologists unearthed the site
during the 1800s and found a layer of ash covering the ruins.

Nahum 3:17
Nineveh's army officers would desert - Babylonian records claim that
Assyrian army members did flee from the battle.


DESTINATION: Habakkuk

Habakkuk is the eighth of the twelve minor prophets and the last of
the five prophets who are known to have prophesied in the Southern
Kingdom of Judah before the exile. It was written during a time
when Judah was in blatant rebellion against God and the strength of
Babylon was rising around them. Three of the five prophets, Isaiah,
Zephaniah, and Jeremiah, focused the majority of their message and
ministry on Judah and Jerusalem. The fourth prophet, Micah, focused
more on the common people "living in the western foothills of Judah."
Habakkuk was the only one of the five who didn't prophesy directly
against Judah, but encouraged people to "live by faith in the dark days
ahead."


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c.742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

c. 612 – 598 Time of Habakkuk's life and ministry in Judah

605 B.C. First exile of Jews to Babylon

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Habakkuk was written to assure God's people that evil does not endure forever. It is the only minor prophet who did not address the people directly. It is written more as a journal of Habakkuk's questions of God and God's answers. The book can be divided into four sections:
  1. The Burden (Chapter 1)
  2. The Watch (Chapter 2:1)

  3. The Vision (Chapter 2:2-20)
  4. The Prayer (Chapter 3)
PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Habakkuk – No personal information is known about Habakkuk. His name means "embrace" – in the comforting sense. Scholars have placed him possibly as a temple prophet or a guardian to the Temple of Solomon. His contemporaries were Nahum and Zephaniah. He was likely one of the first group to be taken into exile in 605 B.C.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Judah
– One of the 12 tribes of Israel, and one of two tribes that comprised the Southern Kingdom of Israel. Its capital was Jerusalem.

Babylon – Also known as Chaldea. The nation of Babylon was at its peak of power during Habakkuk's writing. He watched as they invaded and conquered all the surrounding regions and eventually captured and destroyed Jerusalem and the kingdom of Judah.


FUN FACTS:

Watch and Wait - The pivotal verse in Habakkuk is Chapter 2:1: "I will stand at my watch and station myself on the ramparts. I will look to see what he will say to me and what answer I am to give to this complaint."

Lessons from Habakkuk -
  1. God can handle all of our questions but He may answer only a few.
  2. The bottom line of faith is not to silence all of our doubts so that we never struggle again, but to make us sure of God and confident of His care.
  3. Waiting strengthens our patience and lengthens our perspective.*Chuck Swindoll, Insight for Living

Verse to claim in times of difficulty -
Though the fig tree do not blossom,
nor fruit be on the vines,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
I will joy in the God of my salvation.
God, the Lord, is my strength (Hab. 3:17-19a RSV)

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Zephaniah; Haggai
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/609

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Zephaniah 1-3

Zephaniah, a "prince of the royal house of Judah," was the prophet
during the reign of King Josiah. The book addresses the social injustice
and moral decay of Judah and her neighbors. The theme of Zephaniah
is the coming Day of the Lord and His wrath upon the nations,
including Israel. The book opens with sorrow and closes
with rejoicing.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

640 B.C. Amon becomes king of Judah

641 B.C. Josiah becomes king of Judah

c. 640-625 B.C. Time of Zephaniah's life and prophecy in Judah.


TRIP PLANNER:

  1. Judgment against Judah (1:2-2:3)
  2. Judgment on the surrounding nations (2:4-15)
  3. Jerusalem's corruption (3:1-5)
  4. The Lord's purifying judgment (3:6-20)

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Fish Gate - Situated on the east of the Lower city. It was named for the fish market that was nearby. Through it passed those who had caught fish in the Lake of Tiberias and the River Jordan.

Second Quarter – A district of Jerusalem; scholars differ on its location.

Maktesh – Market district of Jerusalem; name means "mortar."


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Zephaniah – The great-great grandson of Hezekiah, the twelfth king of Judah (716-687 B.C.). Zephaniah means "Yahweh has hidden/protected."

Josiah – The king whom Zephaniah served. He became king at the age of eight after his father, Amon, was assassinated. At the age of 16, Josiah "sought the Lord" and destroyed much of the evil practices that were instituted by his grandfather. It is likely that Zephaniah had an influence on the spiritual life of Josiah.

Ethiopia, Philistia, Moab, Ammon, and Assyria – These surrounding nations were used by God as instruments of punishment for Israel's wickedness, but God would ultimately punish them for the wrongs they inflicted upon His people.


FUN FACTS:

Nahum and Jeremiah - were contemporaries of Zephaniah.

Baal – A fertility god, and the principal god of the Canaanites. King Josiah purged Baal worship from the Southern Kingdom of Judah (2 Kings 23).

Molech – The national god of the Ammonites. It was a consuming and destroying fire to whom children were sacrificed. It was also known as Milcom and Malcham. Among the Moabites, the god was known as Chemosh.


DESTINATION: Haggai

Haggai means "a festival." The book of Haggai is the tenth of the twelve minor prophets. Haggai was sent by God to preach to the restored community of Jews in Jerusalem after their return from exile in Babylonia. He encouraged his fellow Jews to finish rebuilding the Temple, which had been destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 B.C. Haggai 1:1 dates it in the "second year of Darius the king." This is Darius I, (522-486 B.C.), so the prophecy is dated in the year 520 B.C.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c. 742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

605 B.C. First exile of Jews to Babylon

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem

536 B.C. Zerubbabel leads 50,000 Jews back to Jerusalem

520 B.C. Haggai prophesies

520-518 B.C. Zechariah prophesies

457 B.C. Ezra leads second group of Jews back to Jerusalem

445 B.C. Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem; rebuilds the walls


PLACES OF INTREST:

Jerusalem - The most famous city in the world. It's located in the Judean Hills of Israel, with the Hinnom and Kidron valleys as part of its borders. Its elevation is 2600 feet above sea level. Also known as the "city of David." It was the capital city for the Southern Kingdom until
586 B.C. when the city was conquered and the Temple was destroyed
by Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonian army.

The Temple - The Temple was the holy place of worship, located on Mount Moriah. It was built to be God's house here on earth. It was the main place of worship for the Israelites. The first Temple was built by King Solomon, after his father King David had acquired most of the materials needed. The construction of the Temple was started in the
fourth year of Solomon's reign and completed in the eleventh year.
The Babylonians destroyed the Temple in 586 B.C. The second Temple
was constructed by Zerubbabel, and re-consecrated in 516 B.C., but
was profaned by the Syrians in 167 B.C. The Temple was finished in
four years, and dedicated with great pomp and rejoicing (Ezra 6:16).
Historians designated the second Temple as "Zerubbabel's Temple."
However, it was destroyed a second time by the Roman army in 70
A.D. This time it was completely destroyed, "With not one stone left on
top of another," as prophesied by Jesus, in Matthew 24:2.


FUN FACTS:

The rebuilt Temple (also known as the second Temple) lasted 5 centuries until it was rebuilt by Herod the Great in 20 B.C. The prophecy of Haggai is second only to that of Obadiah in brevity among OT books.

Temple dimensions - The foundation of the first Temple was 90 feet by 30 feet, the roof was 180 feet high. The space covered by the Temple and its courts was about 585 by 6100 feet. The Holy of Holies
measured 30 square feet, and was closed off by a veil of blue and crimson fine-spun linen (it was this veil, or curtain, that was torn in half during the Crucifixion of Christ).


TRIP PLANNER:

This book consists of only two chapters containing four brief oracles, all
occuring within a four-month period. His primary message: Rebuild the
Temple.

Haggai was sent as a motivator and edifier - Get your priorities right! Put
God first, and He'll take care of your other needs. Haggai teaches us that
faithfulness and material blessings are directly connected; that "when a
goodwork is awaiting its accomplishment, the time to do it is now" (Farrar);
"discouragement, however profound, is not an adequate reason for
neglecting duties, even when they seem to be encompassed with difficulty."
It can be simply outlined:
  1. Chapter 1 - Rebuild the Temple
  2. Chapter 2:1-9 - The Lord's Glory Will Fill the Temple
  3. Chapter 2:10-37 - A Curse Turned to Blessing


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Haggai – There is no personal information about him. It is very likely Haggai returned to Jerusalem as a child with the first group of 50,000 persons led by Zerubbabel in 536 BC. It is also possible he did some writing of psalms during this time. The Septuagint (the Greek version
of the OT, which was made around 250 B.C.) credits him as being the
author/co-author of several psalms (Psalms 138, 146-149). Haggai
was the first prophet in Jerusalem after the return from Babylonian
captivity. He began to preach in 520 B.C. after the work to rebuild the
Temple had ceased due to opposition. Haggai was a contemporary of
Zechariah, and also of Confucius (557-479 B.C.).

Zerubbabel – Son of Shealtiel. He was governor of the tribe of Judah during the time of the return from the Babylon exile. He was
the grandson of Jehoiachin, the last king of Judah taken captive to
Babylon (1 Chr. 3:17). A descendant of David, he was in the direct line
of the ancestry of Jesus (Luke 3:27; Matt. 1:12). He led the first group
of captives back to Jerusalem and was the prime builder of the second
Temple.

Joshua – The high priest. With the blessing of Cyrus (Ezra 1:1-2), Zerubbabel and Joshua led the first band of captives back to
Jerusalem. They also returned the gold and silver vessels that
Nebuchadnezzar had removed from the Temple.

Zechariah, the prophet - A prophet from 520 B.C. to 518 B.C. inJ erusalem. He was the son of Berechiah and grandson of Iddo, who along with Haggai was instrumental in inspiring his fellow Jews to rebuild the Temple (see Ezra 6:14). After rebuilding the Temple foundation the first two years, construction came to a standstill for 17 years, because of, among other things, opposition from settlers in Samaria.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Zechariah; Malachi
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/611

MESSAGE SUMMARY
We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Zechariah

Zechariah means "Jehovah my righteousness" or "remembered of the Lord." The book of Zechariah is the 11th book of the twelve minor prophets. It was written by Zechariah the Prophet, son of Berechiah and grandson of Iddo, born in Babylonia to the Jews who had returned from Babylon with Zerubbabel to rebuild the temple.
Whereas Haggai’s short book exhorts the people to complete the work on the second temple, Zechariah expands on the message and encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah from that very temple.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib’s invasion of Judah

c. 742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

605 B.C. First exile of Jews to Babylon

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem

536 B.C. Zerubbabel leads 50,000 Jews back to Jerusalem

520 B.C. Haggai prophesies

520-518 B.C. Zechariah prophesies

457 B.C. Ezra leads second group of Jews back to Jerusalem

445 B.C. Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem; rebuilds the walls


TRIP PLANNER:

The first eight chapters relate to the rebuilding of the temple while the
remaining chapters, nine through fourteen, look to the future and are
thought to have been written thirty years later. This book outlines God’s
program for His people during the Times of the Gentiles and as a
preparation for their deliverance through the coming Messiah.

  • Chapter 1-6 - Zechariah’s eight visions encouraging the rebuilding of the Temple
  • Chapter 7-8 - Requirement of the Law and the Restoration and Enlargement of Israel
  • Chapter 9-14 - Two burdens and visions of the Messianic Kingdom

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Zechariah, the prophet - He was the son of Berechiah and grandson of Iddo, born in Babylonia. With Haggai, he was instrumental in inspiring his fellow Jews to rebuild the Temple (see Ezra 6:14). After rebuilding the Temple foundation the first two years, construction came to a standstill for 17 years, because of, among other things, opposition from settlers in Samaria. He was a member of the Great
Synagogue. Zechariah was a contemporary of Haggai the prophet,
Zerubbabel the Governor and Joshua the high priest -- and also of Confucius (557-479 B.C). Matthew 23:35 records that he was "murdered between the temple and the altar."

Joshua – The high priest; son of Jehozadak. With the blessing of Cyrus (Ezra 1:1-2), Zerubbabel and Joshua led the first band
of captives back to Jerusalem. They also returned the gold and silver vessels that Nebuchadnezzar had removed from the Temple. Zechariah makes a crown for Joshua, which is but a figure of one to come - a typification of the Great High Priest.
Heldai, Tobijah and Jedaiah - Three of the returning exiles from
Babylon who brought with them silver and gold as an offering for the
house of the Lord, from which Zechariah was instructed to make a
crown "and set it on the head of the high priest, Joshua."

Zerubbabel - He was the son of Shealtiel and governor of the tribe of Judah during the time of the return from the Babylonian exile. He was the grandson of Jehoiachin, the last king of Judah taken captive to Babylon (1 Chr. 3:17). A descendant of David, he was in the direct line of the ancestry of Jesus (Luke 3:27; Matt. 1:12). He led the first group of captives back to Jerusalem and was the prime builder of the second Temple, "having laid the foundation." The Lord said of him, "and I will make you like my signet ring, for I have chosen you" (Haggai 2:21). A key prophecy often quoted: "This is the word of the LORD
to Zerubbabel: ‘Not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit,’ says the
LORD Almighty."


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Jerusalem - The most famous city in the world. It is located in the Judean Hills of Israel, with the Hinnom and Kidron valleys as part of its borders. Its elevation is 2600 feet above sea level. Also known as the "city of David." It was the capital city for the Southern Kingdom until 586 B.C. when the city was conquered and the Temple was destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonian army.

The Temple - The first Temple was built by King Solomon, after his father King David had acquired most of the materials needed. The construction of the Temple was started in the fourth year of
Solomon’s reign and completed in the eleventh year. The Babylonians
destroyed the Temple in 586 B.C. The second Temple was constructed
by Zerubbabel, and re-consecrated in 516 B.C., but was profaned by the Syrians in 167 B.C. The Temple was finished in four years, and dedicated with great pomp and rejoicing (Ezra 6:19). Historians designated the second Temple as "Zerubbabel’s Temple." However, it was destroyed a second time by the Roman army in 70 A.D. This time it was completely destroyed, "With not one stone left on top of another," as prophesized by Jesus, in Matthew 24:2.


FUN FACTS:

Zechariah is known as the "major Minor Prophet" and is the longest of the Minor Prophets, with 14 chapters (or 211 verses). It is second only to Isaiah among the prophets in messianic passages.

Zechariah is a popular name of the Old Testament, shared by at least 29 Old Testament characters.

Headstone - When the Headstone is placed at the top turning point in an arch, it is called a "Keystone." It bears the weight and holds the arch together as all the other stones lean on it. This is an excellent symbol of Christ, who bore the weight of all our sins on the Cross at Golgotha.

Great Synagogue – A group of priests and leaders that collected and preserved the canon of revealed scripture.

Prophecy – A promise about the future. A prophecy is a revelation from God given to a prophet (see Deuteronomy 18:22). Grant Jeffrey, in his book, "The Signature of God," concludes that: "The Bible contains 1,817 individual predictions concerning 737 separate subjects found in 8,352 verses. These numerous predictions comprise 27 percent of the 31,124 verses in the whole of the Scriptures."


DESTINATION: Malachi

The Book of Malachi is the 39th of the 66 books of the Bible and the last book of the Minor Prophets – and of the Old Testament. Malachi means "my messenger." There appears to be some debate as to whether Malachi was a prophet or a title, but it is largely accepted that the prophet Malachi wrote this book of exhortation to people who had resettled in Jerusalem and had slid back into sinful practices. It was written about 100 years after the temple had been completed and sacrifices had been reinstituted, and it is the prelude to 400 years of prophetic silence.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

605 B.C. First exile of Jews to Babylon

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem

536 B.C. Zerubbabel leads 50,000 Jews back to Jerusalem

520 B.C. Haggai & Zechariah prophesy in Jerusalem to rebuild the temple

457 B.C. Ezra leads second group of Jews back to Jerusalem

445 B.C. Nehemiah returns to Jerusalem; rebuilds the walls

432-425 B.C. Nehemiah in Persia

c. 420–400 B.C. Malachi prophesies


TRIP PLANNER:

Malachi picks up where Ezra and Nehemiah left off, with a series of
rebukes to the priests for the neglect of their duties to the LORD, their
carelessness in their worship, and their return to former practices.
The book ends with the prophecy of the coming of the Lord and John the Baptist: "I will send my messenger, and he will prepare the way before Me." (3:1)
Malachi can be divided into three sections:
  1. The Privilege of the Nation (1:1-1:5)
  2. The Pollution of the Nation (1:6-3:15)
  3. The Promise to the Nation (3:16-4:6)

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Malachi - A prophet in the days of Nehemiah. No personal data is known about Malachi. He is also believed to be part of the Great Synagogue - a group of priests and leaders who collected and preserved the canon of revealed scripture.

Esau - A twin son of Isaac and Rebekah; Jacob’s elder twin brother, also a people, the Edomites (and nation) descended from Esau.

Edom - Another name for Esau, son of Isaac and brother of Jacob (Gen. 25:30); the name came to be used for Esau’s descendants and the land where they lived, a rugged mountainous area south and east of the Dead Sea. A "brother" nation to Israel, it represented a classic model of hostility toward Israel and God.

Jacob - The second son of a pair of twins born to Isaac and Rebecca; ancestor of the 12 tribes of the nation of Israel. Purchased Esau’s birthright and blessing with a bowl of porridge and by trickery. He wrestled with God upon his return to his family where God changed his name to Israel – father of many nations – and bestowed on him the promise He had made to Abraham and Isaac.

Israel - Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance lists it as:
  1. The name given to the patriarch Jacob (and borne by him in addition to his former name)
  2. The family or descendants of Israel; the nation of Israel
  3. Christians, the Israel of God (Ga 6:16), for not all those who draw their bodily descent from Israel are true Israelites, i.e., are those whom God pronounces to be Israelites and has chosen to salvation.

In addition, it is the name of the nation until the death of Solomon and the split, the name used and given to the Northern Kingdom consisting of the 10 tribes under Jeroboam (the Southern Kingdom was known as Judah) and the name of the nation after the return from exile.

Levi - The third son of Jacob by Leah. The tribe of Levi was specifically set apart by God as ministers of religion. Being wholly consecrated to the service of the Lord, they had no territorial possessions. Jehovah was their inheritance, and for their support it was ordained that they should receive from the other tribes the tithes of the produce of the land. The Levites and priests were those to whom God directed many of the prophecies and it is of them that Malachi 3:3 prophesies God’s forgiveness and restoration.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Jerusalem - The most famous city in the world. It’s located in the Judean Hills of Israel, with the Hinnom and Kidron valleys as part of its borders. Its elevation is 2600 feet above sea level. Also known as the "city of David." It was the capital city for the Southern Kingdom until 586 B.C. when the city was conquered and the Temple was destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonian army.


FUN FACTS:

Malachi contains 4 chapters and 55 verses.

Curse - The last word of the Old Testament!
The Refiner’s Fire was used to purify metal and refine it by melting it and allowing the dross, which floated to the top, to be scooped off.

Storehouse - refers to a kind of temple warehouse described more fully in Nehemiah (where the term "great chamber" is used) as a place for storing grain, frankincense, temple vessels, wine, and oil (Neh. 13:5).

Plague - "The eater," a general term for any kind of threat to crops and livelihood. This is understood as a reference to a locust plague.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Matthew, Mark; Luke
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/613

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Matthew

The Gospel of Matthew was written by Matthew, a Jewish tax collector called by Jesus to be one of His disciples. The exact date is unknown but traditionally accepted to be between 38-70 A.D. Matthew presents Jesus Christ as the true Messiah and King of the Jews. It was written in Aramaic, likely to the Jews scattered abroad who had no access to the apostles' teaching. Matthew's skill at being a record keeper made him quite capable of drawing together the facts of Jesus' life and the Old Testament references to Him. So that the Jews would become convinced of Jesus' authority as their King, he proves that Jesus was the Messiah by quoting their prophets.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

37 B.C.
Herod the Great begins to rule

c. 5 B.C.
Jesus is born

5/4 B.C.
Escape to Egypt

4 B.C.
Herod the Great dies

6 A.D.
Judea becomes a Roman province

c. 26 A.D.
Jesus begins His Ministry

c. 30 A.D.
Jesus' crucifixion

TRIP PLANNER:

Matthew organized his gospel into five sections, each of which ends with the phrase "When Jesus had finished..."

  1. Background of the Messiah.

  2. Appearance of Jesus in Galilee, declaring the spiritual and ethical principles of the Messianic Kingdom.

  3. Proofs of the Messiah's power over disease, nature, and death that established the program of His Messianic kingdom.

  4. The Parables of Jesus, intended both to reveal (to those ready for it) and conceal (to the rebellious) the kingdom of heaven using figures taken from everyday life.

  5. The events leading to His death on the cross emphasized four times by the relation of the Messianic death to prophecy.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Galilee – Region in the north of Palestine where Jesus spent most of his life and ministry. He called his disciples, many of them fishermen on the Sea of Galilee, in this area.

Capernaum – Jesus' base of operations, on the north side of the Sea of Galilee. Here, Jesus healed the servant of the centurion and the mother-in-law of Peter.

Caesarea Philippi – A town in the northern part of Palestine, near the source of the Jordan River, where Jesus asked his disciples, "Who do you say that I am?"

Judea – Region in the southern part of Israel where Jerusalem is situated.

Jerusalem – Also known as the City of David. Site of the Temple, and of the events in the last week of Jesus' life on earth.

Mount of Olives – Situated just east of Jerusalem. The Garden of Gethsemane is at its base.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Matthew – One of the 12 disciples of Jesus Christ; a Jewish tax collector from the tribe of Levi.

The Magi – "Wise men from the east" who came seeking the King of the Jews. They were perhaps the first gentile worshippers of Jesus.

Simon, Andrew, James and John – Four fishermen who became disciples of Jesus.

Pontius Pilate – Roman governor of Judea in A.D. 26-36. He wanted to release Jesus, but finally submitted to the will of the mob and ordered His execution.

Mary Magdalene – A woman out of whom Jesus cast seven demons. She was the first to see the resurrected Christ.

Caiaphas – High priest who falsely pronounced Jesus guilty of blasphemy.

Judas Iscariot – Disciple who betrayed Jesus to the chief priests for 30 pieces of silver.

FUN FACTS:

Matthew is the only Gospel that includes the stories of the visit of the wise men, and the flight of Mary and Joseph to Egypt (chapter 2).

Matthew was probably placed first in the four Gospels because at an early date it was received as authentic.

Matthew uses more Old Testament quotations and allusions than any other New Testament book.

The phrase "the kingdom of heaven" appears 32 times in Matthew, and nowhere else in New Testament.



DESTINATION: Mark

The theme of Mark is 'Christ the Servant.' This thrust is shown in 10:45, "For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and give His life a ransom for many." The two themes of this verse, service and sacrifice, are unfolded throughout the book of Mark. Also, since Mark presents Jesus as the Worker and the Servant of the Lord, the book focuses on the activity of Christ as a faithful Servant effectively going about His work.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
Caesar Augustus rules the Roman Empire

c. 5 B.C.
Birth of Jesus Christ

4 B.C. – 39 A.D.
Herod Antipas rules Palestine

14-37 A.D.
Tiberius rules as Caesar

25 A.D.
Pilate becomes Roman governor of Judea

c. 26 A.D.
Jesus Christ's ministry begins

c. 30 A.D.
Jesus' crucifixion

TRIP PLANNER:

The purpose of the gospel of Mark is simply to announce the words and works of Jesus Christ the Servant. At 16 chapters, it is the briefest of all the gospels, which would have suited the simple, straightforward approach that was favored by the Romans. Mark's gospel is filled with action and focuses heavily on the final three weeks of the life of Jesus. The book of Mark can be broken down into five sections:

The Servant's introduction (1:1-8)
The Servant's identification (1:9-11)
The Servant's initiation (1:12-13)
The Servant's illumination through works and words (1:14-13:37)
The Servant's impassioned sacrifice (14:1-16:20)

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Galilee – Region north of Samaria which included the cities of Capernaum, Tiberius and Nazareth.

Capernaum – Jesus' 'home base,' of the Sea of Galilee. Five of Jesus' disciples were from here: Peter, James, John, Andrew and Matthew.

Judea – Region in the southern part of Israel where Jerusalem is situated.

Jerusalem – Also known as the City of David. Site of the Temple, and of the events in the last week of Jesus' life on earth.

Bethany - A village on the southeastern slope of the Mount of Olives, less than two miles from Jerusalem.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

John the Baptist – The forerunner of Jesus Christ. He and his mission were foretold by Isaiah (Isa. 40:3) and by Malachi (Mal. 3:1).

Herod Antipas – Ruler of Palestine in the time of Jesus. Jesus called him a "fox" (Luke 13:32).

Pontius Pilate – Roman governor of Judea in A.D. 26-36. He wanted to release Jesus, but finally submitted to the will of the mob and ordered His execution.

Mary Magdalene – A woman out of whom Jesus cast seven demons. She was the first to see the resurrected Christ.

Pharisees – A Jewish group who were looked upon as the most accurate interpreters of the Laws of Moses. They added many regulations to the Law.

Sadducees – A Jewish group that believed only in the written law. They rejected the tradition of the elders, and did not believe in a resurrection of the body.

FUN FACTS:

Mark, the gospel of action – Mark uses the word 'and' 1,331 times, showing that he was likely a busy man writing to busy people about a busy Person. Mark also uses the action word 'immediately' numerous times throughout the book.

A streaker in the garden – Mark may have been writing about himself when he wrote of the naked young man fleeing from the Garden of Gethsemane. This account is not mentioned in the other gospels, which may indicate that Mark had special knowledge of this event.

Mark is addressed primarily to the Roman or Gentile reader. As a result, the genealogy of Jesus is omitted, along with the Sermon on the Mount.

Mark uses the Greek euqus, "immediately, at once," or "then, so then," 42 times in his Gospel. Another illustration of this active focus is his prominent use of the historic present to describe a past event, which was evidently done for vividness.


DESTINATION: Luke

Bible scholars generally agree that the Gospel of Luke was written around 70 A.D. It was specifically addressed to an individual named Theophilus, a Gentile, and is a complete account of Jesus Christ from His birth and ministry to His crucifixion and resurrection. The third and longest of the Synoptic Gospels, Luke focuses on Christ's teachings about salvation and His fulfillment of Old Testament prophecies regarding the coming Messiah--in logical order.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

27 B.C. - 14 A.D.
Caesar Augustus rules the Roman Empire

c. 5 B.C.
Birth of Jesus Christ

4 B.C. - 39 A.D.
Herod Antipas rules Palestine

c. 7 A.D.
Jesus visits Jerusalem as a child

14-37 A.D.
Tiberius rules as Caesar

25 A.D.
Pilate becomes Roman governor of Judea

c. 26 A.D.
Jesus Christ's ministry begins

c. 30 A.D.
Jesus' crucifixion

51-64 A.D.
Luke's ministry

TRIP PLANNER:

The specific emphasis of Luke is on Christ's humanity, and as God's Son. Luke also stresses Christ's kindness toward the weak, suffering and outcast. The Gospel of Luke gives us specific details so we can trust the reliability of the history of Christ's life on earth. Luke 2:11 announces Jesus as "Savior, who is Christ the Lord." Savior identifies His mission; Christ the Lord identifies Him as the Messiah of Judaism.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Galilee – Region north of Samaria which included the cities of Capernaum, Tiberius and Nazareth.

Capernaum – Built along the edge of the Sea of Galilee, it was Jesus' 'home base.' Five of Jesus' disciples were from here: Peter, James, John, Andrew and Matthew. Capernaum is one of the three cities cursed by Jesus for its lack of faith.

Bethsaida – A seaside village on the northeastern shore of the Sea of Galilee where Jesus directed His disciples to go on ahead of Him after the miracle of the feeding of the 5,000.

Caesarea Philippi – Located 25 miles north of the Sea of Galilee at the base of Mt. Hermon; the location of one of the largest springs feeding the Jordan River.

Judea – Region in the southern part of Israel where Jerusalem is situated.

Jerusalem – Also known as the City of David. Site of the Temple, and of the events in the last week of Jesus' life on earth.

Bethany - A village on the southeastern slope of the Mount of Olives, less than two miles from Jerusalem.

Mount Hermon – Historically, it served as the northern boundary of the Promised Land. Jesus' Transfiguration occurred here.

Mount of Olives – Situated just east of Jerusalem. The Garden of Gethsemane is at its base.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Luke – A physician and artist, he was Paul's traveling companion and close associate. He wrote the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts.

John the Baptist (or Baptizer) – The forerunner of Jesus Christ. John's mother was a cousin of Mary, the mother of Jesus. John was imprisoned and beheaded by Herod Antipas.

Mary, mother of Jesus – Mary may have been around 15 years old when she was betrothed to Joseph. After the birth of Jesus, Mary and Joseph had other sons and daughters (mentioned in Matthew 13:55-56 and Mark 6:3).

Simeon – A devout Jew who had been promised by the Holy Ghost that he would not die until he had seen the Savior.

Anna – A prophetess who "never left the temple but worshiped night and day, fasting and praying."

Zacchaeus – A tax-gatherer who was so short that he had to climb a tree to see Jesus in a crowd.

FUN FACTS:

Luke's name is mentioned only three times in the New Testament; in one of these he is referred to as the beloved physician.

Luke was the only Gentile to contribute to the New Testament.

Luke wrote more words in the New Testament than Paul did.

The name Theophilus means "lover of God," so the book could have addressed to a specific person or to anyone who fits that description.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: John
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: John
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/617

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: JOHN

The Gospel According to John was written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. It is the most spiritual of all the Gospels, and fully one third of its content is dedicated to the last week of Jesus' life. The spiritual depth of this work sets it apart from the other gospels and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

27 B.C. – 14 A.D.
The Roman Empire is ruled by Caesar Augustus

c. 5 B.C.
Birth of John the Baptist

c. 5 B.C.
Birth of Jesus Christ

c. 30 A.D.
Crucifixion of Jesus Christ

c. 80-90 A.D.
From Ephesus, John writes his gospel

TRIP PLANNER:

John 20:31 states the purpose of the Gospel According to John, "But these things have been written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that, by believing, you might have life in His name." John presents Jesus claim to deity through seven miraculous signs that lead up to the Resurrection and seven "I AM" statements which the hearers would have understood as Jesus claim to equality with God. John sets forth the miracles of Jesus as proof of His messiahship and not solely as acts of mercy. John uses many colorful terms to describe Jesus as the Bread of Life, the Light of the World, The Good Shepherd, the Truth, the Way, the Life, and the Vine.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Bethany – A small town on the east slope of the Mount of Olives that was home to Lazarus, Martha and Mary

Bethsaida – A city in Galilee on the northeast coast of the Sea of Tiberias (Sea of Galilee).

Galilee – The northwest providence of Palestine. It was fifty by twenty-five miles in area. It was one of the places that was prominent in Christ's ministry.

Jerusalem – Known as "David's City," it is the "holy city" for three great world religions: Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. The capital city of Israel.

River Jordan - It begins at Mount Hermon, flows through the Sea of Galilee to its end in the Dead Sea.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Jesus - the Word of God who came into the world, fully God and fully man.

John the Baptist - He was the forerunner of Jesus Christ. He was related to Jesus; their mothers were cousins. He was imprisoned by Herod Antipas and eventually beheaded.

The Disciples - Peter, Andrew, James, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James, Thaddeus, Simon, and Judas Iscariot. These men were chosen by Jesus to aid in His earthly ministry.

Mary - The sister of Lazarus who believed Jesus and anointed Him before His death.

Martha - The sister of Lazarus and Mary. She is known for her hospitality. Her faith in Jesus grew when He raised her brother from the dead.

Lazarus - Jesus friend whom He raised from the dead.

Pilate - Roman governor who ordered the crucifixion of Jesus.

Mary Magdalene - The first person to see Jesus after His resurrection.

FUN FACTS:

John refers to himself as "the disciple whom Jesus loved."

Tradition states that during the persecution of Christians under Domitian, John was taken to Rome and thrown into boiling oil which had no power to hurt him. He survived miraculously.

John was exiled by Domitian to the isle of Patmos, where he wrote the book of Revelation.

John was the Theologian; Matthew was the teacher, Mark the storyteller, and Luke the Historian.

Over 90% of the content of the Gospel of John is original to his Gospel and not found in the Synoptic Gospels.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Acts
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Acts
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/619

MESSAGE SUMMARY
On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Acts

Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:
c. 37 A.D.
Paul's conversion on the Road to Damascus

c. 47-49 A.D.
Paul's first missionary journey

c. 50-53 A.D.
Paul's second missionary journey

c. 53-57 A.D.
Paul's third missionary journey

c. 62 A.D.
Paul under house arrest in Rome

c. 63-64 A.D.
Writing of the book of Acts


TRIP PLANNER:
Acts presents the history of a dynamic, growing community of believers from Jerusalem to Syria, Africa, Asia, and Europe. The apostles witnessed to their faith in Christ by personal testimony, preaching, and defense before authorities. They told the gospel story with boldness and courage, even when faced with imprisonment, beatings, plots, and riots. The persecution, by both Jews and Gentiles, became a catalyst for the spread of Christianity. Beginning with chapter 13, the Book of Acts focuses almost exclusively on the missionary journeys of Paul, and his trip to Rome as a prisoner.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Judea – Area that includes Jerusalem, where the church began.

Samaria – Area north of Judea where Phillip met the man from Ethiopia.

Syria – Country north of Palestine; capital is Damascus.

Cyprus– Island in the Mediterranean; first stop on Paul's first missionary journey with Barnabas.

Jerusalem – Site of a special council between Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians over the matter of keeping the law, with delegates from the churches in Antioch and Jerusalem.

Macedonia – Area of northern Greece where the Holy Spirit directed Paul on his second missionary journey.

Achaia – Area of Greece that contains Athens and Corinth.

Ephesus – A major city in Asia Minor.

Caesarea – City on the Mediterranean Sea where Paul was held before he went to Rome.

Rome – The capital of the Roman Empire, and the long-awaited destination of Paul.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Theophilus – Person to whom the book of Acts is written. He may have been a Jew of Alexandria or a converted Roman official. Because the word means "lover of God," one tradition maintains it refers to anyone who fits that description.

Philip – One of the twelve disciples of Jesus. To escape persecution in Jerusalem, Philip fled to Samaria, where he converted an Ethiopian official.

Stephen – The first man martyred for faith in Jesus Christ. He boldly proclaimed Jesus to the very Jewish leaders who rejected and crucified Him.

Peter – Most prominent of the twelve disciples of Jesus. He was one of the leaders of the church after Jesus' resurrection, and preached the first Gospel sermons on and after the day of Pentecost.

Paul – A young Jewish rabbi who persecuted the church but turned into its most powerful spokesman after his encounter with the risen Christ on the road to Damascus. Formerly named Saul.

Barnabas – A compassionate and sensitive Christian who sponsored Paul in Jerusalem, and accompanied him on his first mission journey.


FUN FACTS:
Jesus is referred to by a score of different names and titles, including the Holy One and the Just, the Judge of the living and the dead, and the hope of Israel.

Early on, the book was called "The Acts," "The Gospel of the Holy Spirit," and "The Gospel of the Resurrection." The title "Acts of the Apostles" was given to the book at a later date.


MAPS:
Paul's First Journey

Paul's Second Journey

Paul's Third Journey

Paul's Voyage to Rome

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Romans
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/621

MESSAGE SUMMARY
We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Romans

Paul wrote this letter to the church at Rome to prepare the way for a visit he hoped to make. He presented the basic system of salvation to a church that had not received the teaching of an apostle before. He also explained the relationship between Jew and Gentile in God's overall plan of redemption, because the Jewish Christians in Rome were being rejected by the larger Gentile group because the Jewish believers still felt constrained to observe dietary laws and sacred days.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

54 A.D.
Nero becomes ruler of the Roman Empire

c. 53-57
Paul's third missionary journey

c. 57 A.D.
Writing of the book of Romans


TRIP PLANNER:

Paul's primary theme in Romans is the basic gospel, God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. Its theme can be stated broadly as "righteousness from God," which includes justification by faith, and also such related ideas as guilt, sanctification and security.

Romans is most systematic of Paul's letters; it reads more like an elaborate theological essay than a letter. It strongly emphasizes Christian doctrine, including sin and death, salvation, grace, faith, righteousness, justification, sanctification, redemption, resurrection and glorification. Paul makes widespread use of Old Testament quotations, sometimes using them to carry along his argument. He expresses a deep concern for Israel, its present status, relationship to the Gentiles and final salvation.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Rome -- The capital of the ancient world, with over a million people. Christians in the city were numerous, as the Roman historian Tacitus calls them "an immense multitude" by 64 A.D.

Corinth -- A major city in Greece where Paul probably wrote the book of Romans.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul -- An apostle of Jesus Christ and the preeminent theologian of the early church.  Paul wrote much of the New Testament.

Tertius -- Secretary who wrote down Paul's words.  He makes some greetings at the end of the letter.

Gaius -- Paul's host; Paul wrote Romans in his home.


FUN FACTS:

When Paul wrote this letter, he was probably on his third missionary journey.

Since Paul had not yet been to Rome when he wrote the book of Romans, he was not acquainted directly with the church, and he says little about its problems.

Paul did not immediately to go Rome because he felt he must personally deliver the money given by the Gentile churches for the poverty-stricken Christians of Jerusalem.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 Corinthians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Corinthians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/623

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 1 Corinthians

This Epistle was written at Ephesus while Paul was engaged in his three-year ministry in that city. Corinth was a commercial crossroads and a melting-pot full of devotees of various pagan cults and marked by a measure of moral depravity not unusual in a great seaport. "To live like a Corinthian" meant to live in gross immorality, and the many pagan temples in Corinth encouraged a life of licentiousness through temple prostitution. Corinth was filled with many nationalities, and tens of thousands of slaves.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 35-67 A.D.

Ministry of Paul

c. 53-57 A.D.

Paul's third missionary journey

c. 56 A.D.

Writing of 1 Corinthians

TRIP PLANNER:

1 Corinthians is one of a number of letters Paul sent to the Christians at Corinth. In this letter Paul takes up a series of issues confronting the congregation. Factions in the congregation exhibited arrogance and misplaced confidence, but Paul declares that the message of the Cross makes foolish the wisdom of the world. He calls the Cross a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, yet through it God's power is revealed.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Corinth – A city located in southern Greece about 50 miles from Athens. It was a major seaport and crossroads in the ancient world.

Ephesus – The chief commercial city of Asia Minor and the fourth greatest city in the ancient world, after Rome, Alexandria and Antioch.

Philippi – Ancient city in northern Greece where Paul preached the Gospel on European soil for the first time.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul – A rabbi who studied Jewish Law under Gamaliel. He was present at the death of Stephen, the first Christian martyr. Later he was converted on the road to Damascus and thereafter zealously proclaimed that Jesus is the Christ.

Barnabas – The name may be translated "son of exhortation." Barnabas accompanied Paul on his first missionary journey, to Cyprus and Asia Minor (Turkey).

Aquila and Priscilla – Husband and wife in Corinth who were tentmakers like Paul. They may have been Christians when they met Paul, or they might have been converted through his preaching.

FUN FACTS:

Synagogue – A Greek word referring to a gathering of people. It was applied to the local assemblies of Jews who gathered to pray and read from the Scriptures.

Gentiles – The word "Gentiles" means "nations." Israel was called by God to be a people who were set apart from other nations, and to worship the one true God. God promised that He would bless the nations through Abraham and his descendants (Gen 12:3).

Corinth is situated on an isthmus less than four miles wide that separates two major harbors. In ancient days small ships were dragged across the isthmus on a paved road from one harbor to the other.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2 Corinthians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 Corinthians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/627

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 2 Corinthians

Between the writing of 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians, the church at Corinth was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul because they thought he was unqualified as an apostle of Jesus Christ. Paul sent Titus as his representative to deal with them, and the majority of the church repented of their actions. Paul later wrote 2 Corinthians to express his joy at the turnaround, and to appeal to the church to accept his authority.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 35-67 A.D.

Ministry of Paul

c. 53-57

Paul's third missionary journey

c. 57 A.D.

Writing of 2 Corinthians

TRIP PLANNER:

Paul speaks more about himself in this letter than in any other. He explains his ministry in the first seven chapters, then talks about the collection for the saints (chapters 8-9), and in the last four chapters he defends his claim to be an apostle. Several times, he refers to the many hardships he has suffered for the Gospel, especially in the argument called the "fool's speech" in the latter part of the book. He mocks the Corinthians for their preoccupation with showy spiritual gifts by contrasting it with his weaknesses and the hardships he has faced.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Corinth – A city located in southern Greece about 50 miles from Athens. It was a major seaport and crossroads in the ancient world.

Macedonia – North part of Greece, where Paul wrote 2 Corinthians during is third missionary journey.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul – Paul tells us more about himself in this book than in any other

Corinthians – The believers in the church at Corinth were swayed by false teachers to rebel against Paul's authority as an apostle.

Titus – Paul's emissary to the church at Corinth.

Timothy – Paul's partner on his third missionary journey.

FUN FACTS:

  • 2 Corinthians was written 6-18 months after 1 Corinthians.

  • Scholars speculate that Paul wrote four letters to the church at Corinth, only two of which survive, as 1 and 2 Corinthians.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Galatians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Galatians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/629

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Galatians

This book is the only letter of Paul specifically addressed to a number of churches. It is a classic statement of the doctrine of justification by grace through faith, written to counter false teachers who believed a person must keep the Jewish law in order to be right with God.  Like the epistle to the Romans, Galatians has played a strategic role in the history of the Christian church. Both Martin Luther and John Wesley recorded the crucial impact of this epistle on their lives.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 41 A.D.
Claudius becomes the Roman emperor.

c. 47 A.D.
Paul’s first missionary journey

c. 50 A.D.
Paul begins his second Missionary Journey

c. 57 A.D.
Paul writes Galatians

 
TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Galatians has been called the "Magna Carta of Christian liberty." It addresses problems raised by the oppressive theology of certain Jewish legalizers who had caused some of the believers in Galatia to trade their freedom in Christ for bondage to the law. Paul writes this forceful epistle to do away with the false gospel of works and demonstrate the superiority of justification by grace through faith. Paul defends the gospel and his apostleship, then teaches about the differences between law and grace, and finally explains practical applications.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Galatia - At the time of Paul's visits and writing it was a Roman province in what is known today as Turkey.

Antioch, Iconium, Lystra, and Derbe - Cities of Galatia where Paul started churches.

Arabia - Generally, the desert area south and east of Palestine. Paul spent time there after his conversion.

Cilicia - Another Roman province just to the south of Galatia; part of present-day Turkey.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Judaizers - A party of Jewish Christians in the early church. They adopted Jewish religious practices or sought to influence others to do so.


FUN FACTS:

Paul and Peter's disagreement - In Galatians, Paul tells the story of his confrontation with Peter concerning Jewish Christians not eating with Gentile Christians.

The name "Galatians" was given to this Celtic people because they originally lived in Gaul before they migrated to Asia Minor.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Ephesians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Ephesians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/631

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Ephesians

Second only to the book of Romans, the book of Ephesians is the most thoughtfully written work of Christian theology in the New Testament. It is addressed to a group of believers who are ignorant of their wealth in Jesus Christ, so they are living as impoverished beggars. Paul wrote to motivate them to draw upon that wealth in their daily living. The themes of this letter have to do with spiritual bodybuilding in the Body of Christ. Paul speaks of the purpose of God, Jesus as the center of everything and the focus of history, the Living Church, the New Family, and Christian conduct.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 62 A.D.
Paul imprisoned in Rome

c. 63 A.D.
Paul writes Ephesians


TRIP PLANNER:

Paul explains the awesome things we have in Christ. He speaks of the body being a bride, a temple, and a soldier. This shows unity and how the whole body must work together in order to achieve a common goal. As a part of the body we should try to help and not hinder. We should try to eliminate all backbiting, gossip, negative criticism, envy, anger, and bitterness, because these things hurt the body.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Ephesus - The strategic commercial center of Asia Minor (Turkey), and a religious center famous for the temple of Diana (Artemis).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul - The apostle formerly known as Saul, who persecuted the Christians before he met the risen Jesus Christ. Tradition has it that Paul was beheaded outside the walls of Rome in 69 A.D.

Tychicus - Paul's "beloved brother and faithful minister in the Lord" whom he sent to Ephesus to update them on Paul's affairs.


FUN FACTS:

Ephesians is one of four "Prison Epistles," along with Philippians, Colossians and Philemon.  Paul probably wrote all four of these epistles during his first Roman imprisonment.

Some scholars have debated whether this epistle was specifically written to the Ephesians or if it was written as a circular letter intended to be circulated throughout the churches of Asia, but there is no way to be sure.

On his third missionary journey, Paul stayed at Ephesus for nearly three years, longer than anywhere else he stayed.  His ministry flourished there and hurt the local economy, which trafficked in idols and magic, in turn causing an uproar at the huge Ephesian theater.

The church in Ephesus was the first church Jesus spoke to in Revelation 4.


MAPS:

Ephesus

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Philippians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Philippians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/637

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.

DETAILED NOTES

DESTINATION: Philippians


The church in Philippi might never have happened, except for a vision to Paul that called him to Macedonia (Acts 16:9). Philippians is a very personal letter from Paul to a caring and generous church for which he had a special affection.  In this Letter, Paul shows his joy in spite of his imprisonment, his love for the church, his overwhelming devotion to Christ, and his concern that the Philippians will drift away from all they have been taught.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 50 A.D.

Paul establishes the church at Philippi


c. 62 A.D.

Paul writes the book of Philippians from prison in Rome


TRIP PLANNER:


Philippians has been called "the epistle of joy."  The word "joy" appears five times in the letter, and "rejoice" occurs 11 times.  Paul says that his main concern is that the gospel is preached, whatever happens to him.  He preaches unity, humility and prayer, and he exhorts the Philippians to have joy in suffering and joy in service to Christ. He also encourages them to have the mind of Christ, the knowledge of Christ and the peace of Christ.  And he reminds them that their true home is in heaven.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Philippi – The first city in Europe where Paul established a church. 


 


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Timothy – Paul's traveling companion and fellow laborer.  He was a resident of Lystra, apparently, whose father was a Greek and mother a Jew.


Epaphroditus – A man sent by the church to bring Paul gifts, and to take care of his needs.


Euodias and Syntyche – Two women who had served nobly in the cause of the gospel.  By the time Philippians was written, the two former friends had had falling out.


Clement – A loyal worker with Paul in the cause of the gospel. He may have been the same man as Clement of Rome, an important church leader after Paul's time.


Lydia – A wealthy Asian with no Jewish ancestry but a deep interest in religion who was deeply impressed by Paul's message and became a Christian.


FUN FACTS:


Epaphroditus was a common slave name.  Paul's friend may have been a freedman who had once been a slave.


There is a lot of ancient Philippi left, and it is today the most important archaeological site of eastern Macedonia.


Battle of Philippi – The most dramatic event in Philippi's history came in 42 B.C., when the forces of Mark Antony and Octavian clashed in a final, decisive battle with the forces of Cassius and Brutus, just outside the walls of the city.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Colossians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Colossians
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/650

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Colossians


The church at Colosse was a young church that had become the target of heretical attack.  The "Colossian Heresy," which this book was written to counteract, included ceremonialism, asceticism, angel worship, the depreciation of Christ, secret knowledge, and the reliance on human wisdom and tradition.  These elements seem to fall into two categories, Jewish and Gnostic. It is likely, therefore, that the Colossian heresy was a mixture of an extreme form of Judaism and an early stage of Gnosticism.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 60 A.D.

Writing of Colossians


TRIP PLANNER:


The theme of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. Paul's purpose is to refute the Colossian heresy. To accomplish this goal, he exalts Christ as the very image of God, the Creator, the preexistent sustainer of all things, the head of the church, the first to be resurrected, the fullness of deity in bodily form, and the reconciler. Thus Christ is completely adequate. We "have been given fullness in Christ." On the other hand, the Colossian heresy was altogether inadequate. It was a hollow and deceptive philosophy, lacking any ability to restrain the old sinful nature.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Colosse -- City of Asia Minor where a church was founded,


Laodicea and Hierapolis -- Two cities nearby to Colosse. Laodicea is mentioned by Christ in Revelation 3.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Timothy -- One of Paul's most constant companions on his missionary journeys; he was with Paul when Paul wrote to the Colossians from prison in Rome.


Epaphras -- A teacher in the church at Colosse, whom Paul calls a "bondservant for Christ."


Aristarchus -- A missionary along with Paul, and a fellow prisoner with him in Rome.


Tychicus -- Paul's emissary to Colosse, and a traveling companion on his third missionary journey.


Onesimus -- A former runaway slave who was saved by Christ and then became a messenger for Paul.


FUN FACTS:


Located on a great east-west trade route, Colosse had once been a leading city in Asia Minor (present-day Turkey). By the first century A.D., it was a second-rate market town.


Colossians was probably written in the same year as Ephesians and Philemon.


The Prison Letters (Ephesians, Colossians, Philippians and Philemon) are so called because Paul wrote them from jail in Rome.

Keywords: ceremonialism, asceticism, angel, worship, depreciation, knowledge, wisdom, tradition, Jewish and Gnosticism

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/657

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.

DETAILED NOTES

DESTINATION: 1 Thessalonians


The letter of First Thessalonians had several purposes behind it: (1) to encourage and confirm the new believers in the things of Christ; (2) to answer false charges made against Paul and his ministry; (3) to explain that the Christian dead would participate in the second coming of Christ; (4) to warn the Christians against pagan immorality; (5) to remind the church members to honor and follow their spiritual leaders; and (6) to warn believers who had given up their jobs and were idle because they thought Christ would soon return.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 50 A.D.

Paul writes the letter of 1 Thessalonians, probably from Corinth


TRIP PLANNER:


The occasion of the writing was the return of Timothy from Macedonia, bearing tidings from Thessalonica regarding the state of the church there (Acts 18:1-5; 1 Thess. 3:6). While Timothy's report was mostly encouraging, it also showed that errors and misunderstandings about Paul's teaching had crept in. Paul addresses these things in this letter to correct the errors, and to exhort the Thessalonians to purity of life, reminding them that their sanctification was the great end desired by God.


Themes in 1 Thessalonians


1. The coming of Christ in the air for the church

2. The present age of grace

3. The Spirit's working in the church

4. Reminder of what Paul had taught


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Thessalonica - The capital of ancient Macedonia, and the site of an important church established by Paul.


Macedonia - The northern region of ancient Greece, as divided by the Romans.


Achaia - The southern region of ancient Greece.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Paul - The apostle to the gentiles, and the author of nearly one-half of the books in the New Testament.


Timothy - A half-Greek, half-Jewish convert to Christianity who traveled with Paul on some of his missionary journeys.


Silvanus - A traveling companion of Paul who conveyed the letter of 1 Peter to the churches; may be the same person as Silas.


FUN FACTS:


Located on the great road (Via Egnatia) that connected Rome with the whole region north of the Aegean Sea, Thessalonica was an invaluable center for the spread of the gospel.


Thessalonica was the capital city of ancient Macedonia, and was nearly on the same level as Corinth and Ephesus as a center of commerce.


The remains of the ancient agora (marketplace) are visible in the center of modern Thessalonica.


 


DESTINATION: 2 Thessalonians


The epistle of Second Thessalonians was written because the persecutions against the church were getting worse and the people needed encouragement. The "idlers" in the church had not gone back to work. To make matters worse, the people were confused about the Day of the Lord (the Tribulation), thinking that they were already in it. It is possible that the church had received a counterfeit epistle, claiming to be from Paul and teaching that the Day of the Lord had already begun. Paul wrote 2 Thessalonians to: (1) encourage the church to persevere in spite of testing; (2) explain the events leading up to the Day of the Lord; (3) warn the busybodies to get back to work. In 2 Thes. 3:17-18, Paul gives his personal "trademark" so that the people could easily detect any forged letters in the future.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 50 A.D.

Paul writes 2 Thessalonians, probably from Corinth


TRIP PLANNER:


The occasion of the writing of this epistle was the arrival of tidings that the tenor of the first epistle had been misunderstood, especially with reference to the second advent of Christ. The Thessalonians had embraced the idea that Paul had taught that "the day of Christ was at hand", that Christ's coming was just about to happen. This error is corrected (2 Thess. 2:1-12), and the apostle prophetically announces what first must take place. "The apostasy" was first to arise. Various explanations of this expression have been given, but that which is most satisfactory refers it to the Church of Rome.


Themes in 2 Thessalonians


1. The coming of Christ to the earth with His church

2. The future day of the Lord

3. Satan's working in the world ("mystery of iniquity")

4. Correction of false teachings they had heard


 


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Thessalonica - The capital of ancient Macedonia, and the site of an important church established by Paul.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Paul - The apostle to the gentiles, and the author of nearly one-half of the books in the New Testament.


Timothy - A half-Greek, half-Jewish convert to Christianity who traveled with Paul on some of his missionary journeys.


Silvanus - A traveling companion of Paul who conveyed the letter of 1 Peter to the churches; may be the same person as Silas.


FUN FACTS:


2 Thessalonians was written only a few months after 1 Thessalonians.


The city of Thessalonica was originally called Therma, because of some hot springs in the area.


The city was renamed Thessalonica about 300 years B.C., to honor the sister of Alexander the Great.

Topic: Encouragement

Keywords: encouragement, exhortation

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/659

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: First Timothy


Paul, the experienced apostle, writes to young pastor Timothy, who is facing a heavy burden of responsibility in the church at Ephesus. The task is challenging: false doctrine must be erased, public worship safeguarded, and mature leadership developed. In addition to the conduct of the church, Paul talks pointedly about the conduct of the minister. Timothy must be on guard so that his youthfulness doesn't become a liability, rather than an asset to the gospel. He must be careful to avoid false teachers and greedy motives, pursuing instead righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance, and gentleness as befitting a man of God.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 58 A.D.

Paul sent to Rome for two years


c. 63 A.D.

Paul writes the epistle of 1 Timothy


c. 64 A.D.

Severe persecution of Christians begins


c. 67 A.D.

Peter and Paul martyred by Nero


 


TRIP PLANNER:


Paul had four purposes in writing this letter to Timothy.  First, he wanted to encourage Timothy to oppose false teaching.  Also, he wanted to furnish Timothy with written credentials authorized by himself.  Further, he wanted to instruct him in the management of church affairs. Finally, he wanted to exhort him to be diligent in his pastoral duties.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Macedonia - The northern part of Greece located between the Adriatic and Aegean Seas.


Ephesus - A city on the west coast of Asia Minor where Paul established a major church.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Timothy - A traveling companion of Paul. He was the son of a Jewish mother and a Gentile father. His mother, Eunice, and grandmother, Lois, were believers in Jesus.


Paul - Known as Saul before he became a Christian. Born in Tarsus in Asia Minor, he studied Jewish tradition under the elder Gamaliel, becoming a zealous Pharisee.


Hymenaeus and Alexander - Blasphemers whom Paul "delivered to Satan."


 


FUN FACTS:


Paul may have dictated this book to a secretary, possibly Luke.


1 Timothy is one of three "pastoral epistles," 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus.


 


DESTINATION: 2 Timothy


Paul wrote this epistle from a Roman dungeon to his young protégé, Timothy.  This was his second letter to Timothy, and the epistle was the final letter written by Paul. In it, Paul encourages Timothy to stand strong for the faith, to endure hardship, and to preach the Word.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 33 A.D.

Saul's conversion on the road to Damascus


c. 67 A.D.

Paul's second imprisonment in Rome


c. 67 A.D.

Paul writes 2 Timothy, his final epistle


TRIP PLANNER:


The book of 2 Timothy consists of Paul's final instructions to his "beloved son," a young pastor in Ephesus. The letter can be broken down as follows: Stand up for the faith - Chapter 1. Stand up in all you do - Chapter 2. Stand up in the battle - Chapter 3. Stand up until the end - Chapter 4.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Ephesus - The most important city in the Roman province of Asia, on the west coast of what is now Turkey. It was where Timothy was a minister and also where Paul sent Tychicus.


Thessalonica - This city was situated at the intersection of two major Roman roads, which led to it being highly prominent.  Demas headed here after leaving Paul.


Galatia - A Roman province Paul visited on his first missionary journey.  Crescens headed here after leaving Paul.


Dalmatia - A Roman province in the mountainous region east of the Adriatic Sea.  It is also called Illyricum in Romans 15:19.  This is where Titus headed after leaving Paul.


Corinth - A port city of Greece that was a center of trade and industry.  Paul mentions that Erastus stayed there.


Miletus - Part of the Roman province of Asia.  Trophemus stayed here because he was ill.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Aquila and Prisca/Priscilla - A leather worker and his wife who were good friends with Paul.  This couple helped Apollos come to a fuller understanding of the gospel.


Crescens - Companion of Paul serving in Galatia.


Demas - A co-laborer with Paul; Paul mentions that he deserted him because of his love for the present world.


Erastus - An assistant of Paul who helped in Timothy's mission to Macedonia so that Paul could continue to work in Ephesus.


Eunice - Timothy's Jewish mother who was noted for her faith and raised Timothy in the Scriptures from childhood.


Hermogenes - Asian Christian who turned away from Paul.


Lois - Timothy's grandmother noted for her faith.


Onesiphorus - His name means "profit-bringer;" he brought Paul refreshing when Paul was in chains.


Philetus - A teacher representative of those undermining the Christian doctrine of the resurrection.


Trophemus - An Ephesian Christian who likely accompanied Paul to Europe after the Ephesian riot.  Paul had to leave him in Miletus because he was ill.


Tychicus - He went with Paul to Jerusalem with the collection.  He likely was the one who took the letters to the Colossians and the Ephesians.


FUN FACTS:


Soldier, athlete, farmer - Paul uses these as pictures of the Christian life.


Christian math (multiplication) - In 2:2 Paul tells Timothy to share what he's learned with faithful men so that they'll tell their friends and so on, and so on...


With a little help from my friends - Paul mentions 15 of his friends in the closing passages of the book.

Keywords: false, doctrine, leadership, conduct, teachers, righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance, gentleness

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Titus and Philemon
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/661

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: TITUS


The letter itself identifies Paul as its author. The letter was probably written in the summer of a.d. 66, after Paul's return from Spain in the spring of that year, or perhaps in AD. 63 from Corinth. He probably wrote Titus before traveling to Nicopolis, where he spent the winter. Paul's letter to Titus was designed to establish the basic elements of church order and witness. It achieves this by emphasizing the need for purity in leadership and soundness in doctrine.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 63-66 A.D. – Letter written to encourage Titus


TRIP PLANNER:


This brief letter focuses on Titus' role and responsibility in the organization and supervision of the churches in Crete. Throughout the letter Paul stressed the importance of sound doctrine. The letter is structured around three different appearances of God's grace, each one of these appearances functions as the basis for instruction and behavior. Considering the smallness of the book, Paul mentioned "good deeds" many times.


 


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Crete – Fourth largest island in the Mediterranean. When Paul went to Rome as a prisoner, the ship sought refuge from a storm at Fair Havens on Crete. Paul may have visited the island after his imprisonment in Rome.


Nicopolis – Name means "Victory City." Paul directed Titus to go there after leaving Crete. Of the nine cities by that name, Paul probably meant the one situated northwest of the Gulf of Corinth.


 


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Paul – Born around 10 A.D., a Jew in a family of Pharisees and a Roman citizen as well. Paul was a very zealous in his persecution of the church until he met Jesus on the Damascus road. He had two hearings before Caesar Nero.


Titus – Joined Paul's ministry about 50 A.D. He was a Gentile Christian who didn't observe Jewish traditions. He delivered Paul's letters and helped solve church problems when Paul was not available.


Artemas – Christian coworker with Paul, whom the apostle considered as a replacement for Titus on the island of Crete.


Tychicus – A "beloved brother" who accompanied Paul in his trip to collect and deliver the offering for the Jerusalem church. He served as the courier for Paul's letters to Ephesus, Philemon, and the Colossians. Paul mentioned Tychicus twice in his later letters, first sending him to Crete to be with Titus, and later mentioning to Timothy that he had sent Tychicus to Ephesus.


Zenas the Lawyer – Lawyer whom Paul requested Titus to help with his travels in Crete.


Apollos – A Christian Jew from Alexandria who was an eloquent preacher at the time of Paul's missionary journeys. Paul described him as waterer of the seed that Paul had planted as the founder of the church.


FUN FACTS:


Church Historian Eusebius, who wrote about three hundred years after Paul wrote, said Titus stayed on Crete and became the island's first bishop.


MAPS:


Titus


DESTINATION: Philemon


This, the fourth of the personal letters of Paul, differs from the other three, as well as from all other epistles of Paul, in that it is neither doctrinal, nor intended for general church instruction. It is an example of the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. It is written to Philemon, an active Christian of Colosse and a convert of Paul, in behalf of a runaway slave of Philemon, who came under Paul's instruction during his first Roman imprisonment and had been brought to Christ.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 60 or 61 A.D.

Paul writes the epistle of Philemon


TRIP PLANNER:


This epistle is the only private letter of Paul which has been preserved, and the only one in the New Testament besides 3 John. Onesimus, a slave, had run away from his master, Philemon of Colosse, and had hidden himself in Rome, where Paul converted him to Christianity. In his loyalty to the civil law, Paul felt that Onesimus, in fulfillment of his Christian duty, should return to his master. He had probably robbed Philemon, and should make restitution.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Colosse – City located in western Turkey, about 100 miles east of Ephesus. At one time it was as important as Laodicea and Hierapolis, but at the time Paul wrote this letter it was a small, fairly unimportant town.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Philemon – A man from Colosse who held a prominent place in the Christian community for his piety and beneficence. He is called a "fellow-laborer," so he probably helped in spreading the gospel.


Apphia – A Christian woman of Colosse; may have been the wife of Philemon.


Archippus – A "fellow-soldier" of Paul, whom he exhorts to renewed activity.  He was a member of Philemon's family, probably his son.


Onesimus – Name means "useful." A slave who robbed his master Philemon at Colosse and fled to Rome, where he was converted by Paul. Paul sent him back to Philemon with the epistle which bears his name.


Epaphras – A distinguished disciple, and probably the founder of the Colossian church. Spoken of by Paul as "his dear fellow-servant," and "a faithful minister of Christ."


Demas – A companion and fellow-laborer of Paul during his first imprisonment at Rome. When the love of the world mastered him, and he deserted the apostle.


FUN FACTS:


Philemon is the most personal of all of Paul's letters, and is sometimes referred to as the "polite epistle."  It was one of the few writings of the New Testament that was not challenged in regards to it belonging in the canon of scripture.


 

Keywords: doctrine, application, brotherhood

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Hebrews
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Hebrews
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/663

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Hebrews


The author of this Epistle is unknown. Many think it was Paul, but others believe it was someone else. We know the author was a Jew born and educated in the Greek-speaking world. He had an excellent Greek vocabulary and was obviously trained in logic and rhetoric. It appears that he attended the finest schools of the first century. He had a well organized mind that was capable of ordering numerous details to produce a well reasoned argument.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 65 A.D.

Writing of the book of Hebrews


TRIP PLANNER:


The Book of Hebrews was written because many of the early Jewish believers were slipping back into the rites and rituals of Judaism in order to escape the mounting persecution. This letter, then, is an exhortation for these persecuted believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Rome - The capital city of the Roman Empire was home to over a million people. It had scores of temples to pagan gods, and it was a symbol of paganism and idolatry in the New Testament.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Paul - A rabbi born in Tarsus who studied Jewish Law under Rabbi Gamaliel. He is one of the possible writers of Hebrews.


Timothy - A young disciple who was Paul's companion on many of his journeys. His mother, Eunice, and his grandmother, Lois, are mentioned as eminent for their piety.


Melchizedek - In the Old Testament, he was the King of Salem and priest of the most high God. In Hebrews 6:20 and 7:17, Jesus is called a high priest of the order of Melchizedek.


The "Hall of Fame of Faith" - Hebrews 11 lists over a dozen people in biblical times who were commended for their faith, including Abel, Noah, Abraham, Moses, Rahab, Gideon, and Samuel.


FUN FACTS:


Messiah - A Hebrew word meaning "anointed one." In Greek, the word is "Christos" or "Christ." Jews expected a king or political leader who would bring peace and prosperity. Christians know Him as the spiritual deliverer who sets His people free from sin and death. Christ is therefore not Jesus' last name but his title.


Covenant - A mutual agreement betwen two or more persons, to do or to forbear some act or thing; a contract. A covenant is created by deed in writing, sealed and executed; or it may be implied in the contract.


Tabernacle - A movable building, designed to be easily taken apart and reconstructed, so the Israelites could carry it in the wilderness. It was rectangular, 45 feet by 15 feet, and 15 feet high. The interior was divided into two rooms by a veil or curtain, and it was covered with four different spreads or carpets.

Keywords: grace, persecution, believers, judaism, exhortation

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: James
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: James
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/666

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: James

This letter is distinctive from some of the other epistles because of its unmistakably Jewish nature. It emphasizes vital Christianity, characterized by good deeds and a faith that works (genuine faith must and will be accompanied by a consistent lifestyle). Its organization is simple, and it shows a familiarity with Jesus’ teachings preserved in the Sermon on the Mount. It also exhibits a similarity to Old Testament wisdom writings such as Proverbs.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 47-62 A.D.
Writing of the epistle of James

c. 62 A.D.
James is martyred


TRIP PLANNER:

Some scholars have seen an apparent contradiction between James' emphasis on works (2:24) and Paul’s emphasis on faith (Romans 3:28, Ephesians 2:8-9). Yet, their purposes were different: Paul was addressing legalists, and James was attacking those who said that a Christian’s conduct is irrelevant to salvation.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

No geographical locations are mentioned in the book of James.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

James – One of several brothers of Jesus, probably he oldest. At first he did not believe in Jesus and even challenged him and misunderstood his mission, but later he became very prominent in the church.

The Twelve Tribes – The recipients of this letter are called "the twelve tribes scattered among the nations." This might mean Christians in general, but the term is more naturally applied to Jewish Christians.


FUN FACTS:

The Jewish nature of the letter and some of its wording lead some scholars to date it before 50 A.D. If this is correct, James is the earliest of all the New Testament writings—with the possible exception of Galatians.

Keywords: lifestyle, christianity, jewish, works, faith dead

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/667

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 1 Peter


First Peter was written to Christians who were experiencing various forms of persecution, men and women whose stand for Jesus Christ made them aliens and strangers in the midst of a pagan society. Peter exhorted these Christians to steadfast endurance and exemplary behavior. The warmth of his expressions combined with his practical instructions make this epistle a unique source of encouragement for all believers who live in conflict with their culture.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 64 A.D.

Writing of 1 Peter


TRIP PLANNER:


This epistle could be understood as a handbook written for ambassadors to a hostile foreign land. Knowing persecution would arise, Peter carefully prescribed conduct designed to bring honor to the One they represented. The purpose of 1 Peter was to encourage Christians to face persecution so that the true grace of Jesus Christ would be evidenced in them (5:12), and to lift their eyes from present problems and trials to wait for an inheritance that can never perish, spoil, or fade.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Babylon - Peter refers to his location as "Babylon" in 5:13.  He may have been in Rome and wished to conceal his true location.  However, some scholars say he was in the literal city of Babylon, where a Jewish community then flourished.


Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia and Bithynia - Five Roman provinces of Asia Minor (modern Turkey). The churches in those provinces were made up of both Jews and Gentiles.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Peter - The Jewish leaders considered him "uneducated and untrained" (Acts 4:13), but they were astonished by his confidence and the power of his Spirit-controlled personality.


Silas - Also called Silvanus. He was a Jerusalem Christian and a Roman citizen who served as Peter's secretary. He may have had great facility in the Greek language.


FUN FACTS:


Since Peter warns that greater persecution is imminent, some believe that the church was not yet facing an organized Roman persecution when 1 Peter was written.


DESTINATION: 2 Peter


The Apostle Peter, seeing that false teachers were beginning to infiltrate the churches, calls on believers to grow and become strong in their faith so that they might detect and combat the spreading apostasy. Second Peter focuses on the authenticity of God's Word and the sure return of the Lord Jesus Christ.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 65 A.D.

Peter writes the book of 2 Peter


54-68 A.D.

Reign of Nero


c. 68 A.D.

Peter is martyred


TRIP PLANNER:


Knowing that these churches faced immediate danger, Peter challenges believers to become more mature in their faith by adding specific Christians virtues, and becoming effective and productive in their knowledge of Jesus Christ. Peter exhorts them to withstand the false teachers that had crept in and adversely affected the churches. He describes the conduct of these false teachers, and also the fact that they ridiculed the Lord's Second Coming. For the Christians, Peter taught that the Second Coming is the incentive for holy living.


 


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No geographical places are mentioned in the book of 2 Peter.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Peter - One of the "inner circle" of Jesus' disciples. Peter started out as a fisherman, but later became a leader of the early church.


FUN FACTS:


It is interesting that Peter mentions the writings of the Apostle Paul (3:15-16). He comments on Paul's writings saying that there are things in them that are hard to understand.


Tradition holds that Peter was crucified upside down.

Keywords: exhorts, exhortation, christians, steadfast, faith, persecution, false, teachers, discernment, apostasy, encouragement

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 1 John
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 1 John
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/669

MESSAGE SUMMARY
In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 1 John


First John is a general letter telling people to live the Christian life through faith in Jesus Christ, and in accordance with the Gospel they have been taught. John warns his readers about the ways of the world and false teachers, and proclaims the preeminence of love--God's love for us, and in response, our duty to love each other.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 85-95 A.D.

Epistle of 1 John written


TRIP PLANNER:


John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. The name given to the heresy which John addressed was Gnosticism, from the Greek word for "knowledge." Gnosticism taught that only the spiritual was good and matter was evil. This was a direct attack on the person and work of Christ, because if matter was evil Jesus could not become a physical man, and so the Gnostics denied the incarnation.

In contrast, John sets forth the deity of Jesus Christ as the Son of God. The theme is best described in 1 John 5:13: "These things have I written unto you that believe on the name of the Son of God; that ye may know that ye have eternal life, and that ye may believe on the name of the Son of God."


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Ephesus - Located on the west coast of Asia Minor. It hosted one of the seven churches of Asia, addressed in the Book of Revelation. The city was famed for the Temple of Artemis.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


This book is unique in that it doesn't mention anyone by name.


FUN FACTS:


First John is a "circular letter" to the church at large.


Only in John among the biblical writers does the word "antichrist" occur. It is mentioned in 1 John 2:18, 22; 4:3 and 2 John 7. Anti means "one who takes the place of, or opposes or stands against."

Keywords: nature, christ, church, christian, life, world, gnosticism, son, eternal, life, antichrist

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: 2 John, 3 John; Jude
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/671

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: 2 John


Second John has much in common with First John, including a warning about the danger of false teachers who deny the incarnation of Jesus Christ. John encourages the readers to continue walking in love but exhorts them to be discerning in their expression of love. He cautions them about receiving heretics into their homes or churches.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 85-95 A.D. - 2 John written


TRIP PLANNER:


Second John is addressed to an "elect lady" and her children. Some scholars believe the address should be taken literally to refer to a specific woman and her children, while others prefer to take it as a figurative description of a local church.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No specific geographical places are mentioned in 2 John.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


The Elect Lady -- This may have been a particular Christian woman and those who met in her house to worship God. If so, this is a more personal letter than First John.


FUN FACTS:


If the "chosen lady" is a figurative way of designating a particular church, then the "chosen sister" of v.13 would mean a different church, or "sister" congregation.



DESTINATION: 3 John


Third John was written because of reports from an Asian church that a man named Diotrephes has seized power, had rejected the teachers sent out by John, and was expelling those in his church who wanted to receive them.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 85-95 A.D. - 3rd John written


TRIP PLANNER:


Third John stresses the theme of enjoying and continuing to have fellowship with fellow believers, especially full-time Christian workers. The truth and servanthood of Gaius, who had shown hospitality to John’s teachers, is contrasted with the error and selfishness of Diotrephes, whose arrogance and lack of hospitality were evidence of blindness to God.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No specific geographical places are mentioned in 3 John.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Gaius -- He is spoken of as "the beloved," "walking in the truth," and doing "a faithful work."


Diotrephes -- Mentioned in as contentiously resisting the writer's authority and forbidding others from exercising the Christian hospitality which he himself refused to show.


Demetrius -- Nothing is known about him, other than Paul writes he is well spoken of.


DESTINATION: Jude


Jude wrote this letter in an effort to remind the church of the need for constant vigilance--to keep strong in the faith and to oppose heresy. He wrote to motivate Christians everywhere to action, to recognize the dangers of false teaching, to protect themselves and other believers, and to win back those who had already been deceived. He was writing against godless teachers who were saying that Christians could do as they pleased without fear of God's punishment.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 66-90 A.D. - Writing of the epistle of Jude


TRIP PLANNER:


Jude warns against false teachers and leaders who reject the lordship of Christ, undermine the faith of others, and lead them astray. He also warns against apostasy, the turning away from Christ. Those who do seek to know the truth in God's Word are susceptible to apostasy. Christians must guard against any false teachings that would distract them from the truth preached by the apostles and written in God's Word.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


No geographical places are mentioned in Jude.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Jude -- The epistle is titled as written by "Jude, a servant of Jesus Christ and a brother of James" (NRSV). If taken literally this means that the author claims to be a brother of Jesus, an attribution which is now increasingly considered as the most probable.


FUN FACTS:


The debate has continued over the author's identity as the apostle, the brother of Jesus, both, or neither. The author does not identify himself as an apostle, so some argue that he cannot be the Jude who is listed as one of the twelve. Others draw exactly the opposite conclusion, i.e., as Jude was an apostle, he would not have made such a claim on his own behalf. The writer is sometimes identified as another Jude, named as a brother of Jesus (Matthew 13:55; Mark 6:3).

Topic: Encouragement

Keywords: encouragement, discernment, fellowship, elect, literally, hospitality, selfishness, vigilance, faith, godlessness

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Revelation 1-11
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Revelation 1-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/679

MESSAGE SUMMARY
With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Revelation


The Revelation of Jesus Christ was given to John to show His servants what must soon take place. This book is filled with prophecies of things to come. It is the final warning that the world will surely end and judgment will be certain. It gives us a tiny glimpse of Heaven and all of the glories awaiting the faithful. It takes us through the great tribulation with all its woes, and the final fire that all unbelievers will face for eternity. The book reiterates the fall of Satan and the doom in store for him and his angels.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 90-95 A.D.

Writing of the Book of Revelation


TRIP PLANNER:


A simple outline for the Book of Revelation is found in Revelation 1:19. Christ tells John to "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." The things John had already seen are recorded in chapter 1. The "things which are" (that were present in John's day) are recorded in chapters 2-3 (the letters to the churches). The "things that will take place" (future things) are recorded in chapters 4-22.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Patmos - An island off the coast of Asia Minor in the Aegean Sea, where John received the Revelation of Jesus Christ.


Ephesus - One of the four largest cities in the Roman Empire and a center of culture and trade. Its large amphitheater, capable of holding 24,000 people, was the scene of the riot against Paul described in Acts 19:21-41.


Smyrna - A port city on the Aegean. It was the center of the imperial cult which worshipped the Emperor. Today the city is called Izmir.


Pergamum - A city of 180,000, it contained notable pagan temples. It probably was the official center of the Roman government and was also noted for its practice of emperor worship.


Thyatira - Located on the road from Pergamum to Sardis, it held temples to Apollo and Hellios, but it was more noted as a center of trade guilds and commerce. Association in such trade guilds often involved eating "food sacrificed to idols" (2:20).


Sardis - Located at the junction of the imperial highways linking Pergamum, Smyrna, and Ephesus. It was the capital of the wealthy Croesus, and suffered a devastating earthquake in 17 A.D.


Philadelphia - Even more devastated by the earthquake of 17 A.D. Today it is known as Alasehir.


Laodicea - A very prosperous city whose wealth and reputation were based on its wool and linen industry that produced black cloth, and its manufacture of an eye ointment. Its liability was its limited and foul tasting water supply.


Armageddon - The word occurs only once in the Bible (Revelation 16:16) where it is used to locate the place where the last battle will be fought. The word comes from the Hebrew "Har Megiddo," meaning, the Mount of Megiddo. Because of its strategic location, many battles were fought there in ancient times.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


John - The last survivor of the 12 disciples, who received the Revelation of Jesus Christ.


FUN FACTS:


Some who say this book was written before the fall of Jerusalem in 70 AD since the fall of Jerusalem is not mentioned in the book.


666 - Many have speculated what this number (in Revelation 13:17-18) means. Both Hebrew and Greek use their alphabets for counting, so it’s possible to add up the value of the letters of a person’s name and arrive at a sum. Everyone from Nero to Adolph Hitler has been suggested.


Apocalypse, apocalyptic - A Greek word meaning uncovering or revealing. It is the first word of the last book of the New Testament, and hence the book is sometimes called "The Apocalypse."


Eschatology - Eschatos is a Greek word meaning "last." Eschatology, therefore, is a general way of referring to beliefs or teachings regarding the "last things," that is, events that happen in the end times.

Keywords: revelation, prophecy, prophecies, judgment, tribulation, eternity, eschatology, apocalypse

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Destination: Revelation 12-22
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Revelation 12-22
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/681

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.

DETAILED NOTES
DESTINATION: Revelation


The Revelation of Jesus Christ was given to John to show His servants what must soon take place. This book is filled with prophecies of things to come. It is the final warning that the world will surely end and judgment will be certain. It gives us a tiny glimpse of Heaven and all of the glories awaiting the faithful. It takes us through the great tribulation with all its woes, and the final fire that all unbelievers will face for eternity. The book reiterates the fall of Satan and the doom in store for him and his angels.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 90-95 A.D.

Writing of the Book of Revelation


TRIP PLANNER:


A simple outline for the Book of Revelation is found in Revelation 1:19. Christ tells John to "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." The things John had already seen are recorded in chapter 1. The "things which are" (that were present in John's day) are recorded in chapters 2-3 (the letters to the churches). The "things that will take place" (future things) are recorded in chapters 4-22.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Patmos - An island off the coast of Asia Minor in the Aegean Sea, where John received the Revelation of Jesus Christ.


Ephesus - One of the four largest cities in the Roman Empire and a center of culture and trade. Its large amphitheater, capable of holding 24,000 people, was the scene of the riot against Paul described in Acts 19:21-41.


Smyrna - A port city on the Aegean. It was the center of the imperial cult which worshipped the Emperor. Today the city is called Izmir.


Pergamum - A city of 180,000, it contained notable pagan temples. It probably was the official center of the Roman government and was also noted for its practice of emperor worship.


Thyatira - Located on the road from Pergamum to Sardis, it held temples to Apollo and Hellios, but it was more noted as a center of trade guilds and commerce. Association in such trade guilds often involved eating "food sacrificed to idols" (2:20).


Sardis - Located at the junction of the imperial highways linking Pergamum, Smyrna, and Ephesus. It was the capital of the wealthy Croesus, and suffered a devastating earthquake in 17 A.D.


Philadelphia - Even more devastated by the earthquake of 17 A.D. Today it is known as Alasehir.


Laodicea - A very prosperous city whose wealth and reputation were based on its wool and linen industry that produced black cloth, and its manufacture of an eye ointment. Its liability was its limited and foul tasting water supply.


Armageddon - The word occurs only once in the Bible (Revelation 16:16) where it is used to locate the place where the last battle will be fought. The word comes from the Hebrew "Har Megiddo," meaning, the Mount of Megiddo. Because of its strategic location, many battles were fought there in ancient times.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


John - The last survivor of the 12 disciples, who received the Revelation of Jesus Christ.


FUN FACTS:


Some who say this book was written before the fall of Jerusalem in 70 AD since the fall of Jerusalem is not mentioned in the book.


666 - Many have speculated what this number (in Revelation 13:17-18) means. Both Hebrew and Greek use their alphabets for counting, so it’s possible to add up the value of the letters of a person’s name and arrive at a sum. Everyone from Nero to Adolph Hitler has been suggested.


Apocalypse, apocalyptic - A Greek word meaning uncovering or revealing. It is the first word of the last book of the New Testament, and hence the book is sometimes called "The Apocalypse."


Eschatology - Eschatos is a Greek word meaning "last." Eschatology, therefore, is a general way of referring to beliefs or teachings regarding the "last things," that is, events that happen in the end times.

 


 

SERIES: Bible from 30,000 Feet, The
MESSAGE: Bible from 30k Final Q&A
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/683

MESSAGE SUMMARY
We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.

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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The | CalvaryABQ.org/series26
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