Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans

Skip Heitzig

When the wrath of God meets the righteousness of God, where does that leave us? The apostle Paul says that we are marked by sin at birth but marked righteous at salvation. In this series through Romans, Skip Heitzig explains the essentials of Christian doctrine that can transform your thoughts, words, and actions. Move from sinner to saint, and from saved to Spirit-filled as you inscribe the essence of the gospel onto your heart and soul.


 

Table of Contents

# SCRIPTURE: MESSAGE:
1 Romans 1:1-7 The Heart and Soul of the Gospel
2 Romans 1:16-17 Unashamed!
3 Romans 1:18-32 Is God Mad?
4 Romans 2:1-11 Four Mistakes Religious People Make
5 Romans 2:17-29 Hypocrisy Gets an Audit

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: The Heart and Soul of the Gospel
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:1-7
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4407

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Today we embark on a thirty-two-week journey through the book of Romans. Considered to be Paul the apostle’s magnum opus, this book is largely responsible for igniting the fires of the Protestant Reformation and the Wesleyan Revival. As Paul introduced himself to the church at Rome, he got right to the heart and soul of the matter—the gospel—the good news that presents Jesus Christ as God’s great answer to the pressing need of the human race.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 5, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"
Text: Romans 1:1-7

Path

With this teaching—"The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"—we embark on a thirty-two-week journey through the book of Romans. Considered to be Paul the apostle's magnum opus, this book is largely responsible for igniting the fires of the Protestant Reformation and the Wesleyan Revival. As Paul introduced himself to the church at Rome, he got right to the heart and soul of the matter—the gospel—the good news that presents Jesus Christ as God's great answer to the pressing need of the human race.

  1. Its Servant (v. 1)
  2. Its Source (v. 2)
  3. Its Subject (vv. 3-4)
    1. The Seed of David
    2. The Son of God
  4. Its Scope (vv. 5-7)
Points

Its Servant (v. 1) Its Source (v. 2)Its Subject (vv. 3-4)Its Scope (vv. 5-7)Practice

Connect Up: As Pastor Skip stated, prophecy is an indicator that Jesus is the Messiah. Using the texts provided, discuss how prophecy is God's means of proving His point:Connect In: Since Jesus is the subject—the overarching theme of the Bible—why is it important for the church to teach through the entire text of the Bible? Using Pastor Skip's outline, discuss how each part of the Bible gives a complete picture of the birth, life, teachings, death, and resurrection of Jesus. Connect Out: Consider Pastor Skip's sentence, "The scope of the good news wasn't just local but worldwide headlines: it affected the entire human race." Why is evangelism vital for the health of the church? Look up the following texts Pastor Skip used, discussing the implications of each in the good news:

DETAILED NOTES
"The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"
Romans 1:1-7

  1. Introduction
    1. Bad news tends to get more attention than good news
      1. The gospel is good news
      2. The Greek word used here is euaggelion, which is where we get the word evangelism
      3. Paul used the word gospel sixty times in the book of Romans
      4. The word gospel comes from the Anglo-Saxon godspell, which means good story; God's story is a good story
      5. The term originally came from Roman times
        1. Heralds who were sent out into the public square to proclaim news
        2. Someone who would make a favorable announcement
    2. Why do I need to hear the gospel?
      1. You probably haven't heard the bad news yet
        1. Romans 1:18
        2. Romans 3:23
      2. When you understand how bad the bad news is, you will love the gospel
      3. All have sinned, the wrath of God has been revealed, and you have to pay for that yourself—or let somebody else do it for you
    3. The book of Romans is the Christian manifesto of freedom
      1. Romans tells us that we have been set free, unshackled from the grip of sin and Satan, and that we are set free to become God's slaves—a slavery of freedom
      2. The theme of the book is the righteousness of God
      3. The book can be divided into four sections that fall under the banner of the gospel
        1. The wrath of God
        2. The grace of God
        3. The plan of God
        4. The will of God
  2. Its Servant (v. 1)
    1. Apart from Jesus, Paul was the most significant person in the New Testament
      1. Paul was born to Jewish parents in Tarsus in Silicia—modern-day southeast Turkey
      2. His name at birth was Saul, and he was probably named after King Saul
      3. His Roman name was Paulus, which means small or short
    2. Saul was a Pharisee, educated by an anti-Christian rabbi—Gamaliel
      1. Saul became the chief antagonist of the early church
      2. He was converted on the road to Damascus, and the chief antagonist of Christianity became the chief protagonist
      3. After his conversion, Paul considered himself a bondservant of Jesus Christ
        1. On the road to Damascus, Saul asked two questions:
          1. "Who are You, Lord?" (Acts 9:5)
          2. "Lord, what do You want me to do?" (Acts 9:6)
        2. The second question made him a bondservant of Christ
        3. The term bondservant should describe every believer, and every Christian should ask both of these questions
    3. As a Pharisee, Saul was separated from the Gentiles; after his conversion, Paul was "separated to the gospel" (v. 1)
      1. What are you separated to?
      2. It's not all about what you don't do—it's about what you do
      3. How do you serve the Lord?
        1. It is possible to have a saved soul but a lost life
        2. You can be right with God and believe in Jesus Christ but not ask Him what He wants you to do
  3. Its Source (v. 2)
    1. The gospel has its source in God
      1. No human would create the gospel story; nobody would write a story that says all men are condemned apart from Jesus Christ
        1. Man-made religions are about what man can do for God—the goodness of mankind
        2. The gospel is about what God has already done for man—the goodness of God
      2. The apostles didn't invent the gospel—they discovered it as it was revealed to them (see 2 Peter 1:16)
    2. The New Testament is not an addition; it has been anticipated all along
      1. Matthew 5:17
      2. "The New is in the Old contained—the Old is in the New explained" —Augustine
      3. Jeremiah 31:31-34
      4. Acts 2:16
      5. Acts 26:22
    3. The gospel is part of a continuous, progressive revelation that started in Genesis 3:15, continued through Genesis 22 and the exodus, and was predicted in Psalm 22, Isaiah 53, and about 300 other Scriptures
      1. Biblical prophecy is not just a good guess
      2. It always contains multiple contingencies that cannot be known or controlled, and this gives evidence that divine authorship is involved
      3. Luke 24:25
  4. Its Subject (vv. 3-4)
    1. Jesus Christ is the main subject of the Bible
      1. John 5:46
      2. The Old Testament is the anticipation of Jesus Christ
      3. The Gospels are the presentation of Jesus Christ
      4. The book of Acts is the continuation of the work of Jesus Christ
      5. The Epistles are the explanation and clarification of Jesus Christ
      6. The book of Revelation is the consummation by Jesus Christ
    2. The prophets had many questions themselves
      1. They wrote the prophecies but didn't know the totality of what they were writing
      2. 1 Peter 1:10-11
      3. They didn't know it when they wrote it, but it all came true in one person
    3. The Bible is about one person and two events:
      1. Jesus Christ
      2. His first coming: to deal with sin
      3. His second coming: to rule and reign with those who have been cleansed from sin
    4. Paul referred to the dual nature of Jesus Christ with two titles:
      1. The Seed of David
        1. Jesus was fully human
        2. As such, He fulfilled all of the predictions of the Messiah who would be born
      2. The Son of God
        1. Jesus was fully God
        2. Conceived by the Holy Spirit
        3. Jesus has the same nature as God
    5. The good news isn't about a good man—it's about the God-man
      1. Because He was fully man, He had the ability to substitute for mankind
      2. Because He was fully God, He had the capacity to save all mankind
  5. Its Scope (vv. 5-7)
    1. The gospel is not just local news; it's worldwide news
      1. God sent us to tell everyone everywhere the good news; it's for every people in every place at every time
      2. Romans 3:29
      3. God's plan encompasses the whole world
    2. Christianity is not a Western religion; it's no more Western than it is exclusively Middle Eastern
      1. Christianity originated in the Middle East
      2. To say that it's a Western religion defies intellect and basic knowledge of geography
      3. Matthew 28:19
      4. Luke 2:10
      5. John 3:16
      6. Acts 1:8
    3. As the gospel crosses all social and cultural barriers, so must the Christian
      1. Medicine works universally; it doesn't discriminate
      2. The world has many religions, but only one gospel
  6. Conclusion
    1. God's headline is good news
    2. The gospel is good news for two basic reasons:
      1. It tells us that God exists and that He is knowable
      2. It tells us that we can know Him through the saving work of His Son, Jesus Christ
    3. Has the gospel come to you like that?
Figures referenced: Augustine

Cross references: Genesis 3:15; 22; Psalm 22; Isaiah 53; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Matthew 5:17; 28:19; Luke 2:10; 24:25; John 3:16; 5:46; Acts 1:8; 2:16; 9:5-6; 26:22; Romans 1:18; 3:23, 29; 1 Peter 1:10-11; 2 Peter 1:16

Greek words: euaggelion

Topic: the gospel

Keywords: barriers, bondservant, Christ, good, grace, Jesus, mankind, news, plan, religions, saved, sin, will, wrath

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Unashamed!
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:16-17
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4411

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Standing up for and speaking out about our faith in Jesus Christ can sometimes feel awkward and intimidating. Often our message is not received with glad faces or with open arms by the people we work with and live next to. As Paul was planning to visit Rome, he expressed eagerness rather than hesitation to herald this message. Why was that? The apostle gives us five reasons for his readiness and enthusiasm.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 19, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Unashamed!"
Text: Romans 1:16-17

Path:

Standing up for and speaking out about our faith in Jesus Christ can sometimes feel awkward and intimidating. Often our message is not received with glad faces or with open arms by the people we work with and live next to. As Paul was planning to visit Rome, he expressed eagerness rather than hesitation to herald this message. Why? In this teaching, Pastor Skip provides five reasons for Paul's readiness and enthusiasm:

  1. Because It's Good News
  2. Because It's God's Power
  3. Because It's Given Freely
  4. Because It Gets Us Right
  5. Because It's Greatly Simple
Points:

Because It's Good NewsBecause It's God's PowerBecause It's Given FreelyBecause It Gets Us RightBecause It's Greatly SimplePractice

Connect Up: God's righteousness is taught throughout Scripture. Why is it crucial we understand that people polluted by sin cannot fellowship with God in His perfection apart from Christ (discussed in detail throughout the book of Hebrews)? 
Look up the following verses about God's holiness. What do they say about God's holiness and how believers are to respond to His holiness?  How does Hebrews 7:26 describe Christ's fulfillment of perfect holiness as our High Priest? Why is this good news?

Connect In: The Bible calls Christians to live a holy life (see 1 Peter 1:15-16). Using Scripture to back up your views, what does a holy life look like? (Consider Psalm 68:4-5; 103:1; 119:9; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Ephesians 5:3; Philippians 2:5, 14-16; Hebrews 2:14.) How is it holy to be led by the Spirit, pray, study, serve, praise God, have compassion, and live right before God? What else can you think of?

Connect Out: Although holy living can be a turnoff for unbelievers, how would you describe God's holiness to a non-Christian, the good news Pastor Skip described? And how would you explain the fact that we can't live up to God's perfection, but Christ did? How would you explain that when we receive Christ, we are covered by His righteousness? Spend time praying for unbelievers you know, asking God to open doors for you to share the good news.

DETAILED NOTES
"Unashamed!"
Romans 1:16-17

  1. Introduction
    1. Instead of seeing the gospel as a task, we should see it as a treasure
    2. Even after all that Paul had been through up to this point because he preached the gospel, he was still eager to share the gospel again
      1. Forced to flee Damascus
      2. Stoned and left for dead in Lystra
      3. Beaten, arrested, and imprisoned in Philippi
      4. Chased out of Thessalonica
      5. Laughed to scorn in Athens
      6. Nearly torn to pieces in Jerusalem
    3. Paul was unstoppable—he was not intimidated by:
      1. The religious and political leaders of Jerusalem
      2. The intellectuals of Athens
      3. The caesars of Rome
    4. Paul was eager to engage in exactly what got him jailed, beaten, and scorned over and over because he found joy in sharing the gospel
  2. Because It's Good News
    1. Why should we be ashamed of good news?
    2. Rome was the most powerful empire in the world at that time (AD 60)
      1. Rome was the political and cultural center of the world—the heart of civilization (caput mundi in Latin)
      2. Any news that came out of Rome affected the entire world
      3. It would have been easy for Paul to be intimidated by the sheer size and power of Rome
    3. Not everyone saw the gospel as good news
      1. Most people then, like today, considered it bad news
        1. The gospel was identified with a poor Jewish carpenter who had been crucified
        2. The Romans conquered and occupied Judea; they saw the Jews as inferior
        3. The Romans imposed crucifixion only on the very worst of criminals who stood against the empire
      2. Who would put their faith in a dead Jew who had been crucified?
        1. Rome had great religions and great philosophers
        2. Romans referred to Christians as atheos—atheists, because Christians had rejected the Roman pantheon
      3. Some Romans even referred to Christians as cannibals—the result of misunderstanding the Lord's Supper
    4. The gospel is unattractive and repulsive to a natural, unsaved person
      1. The gospel speaks about man's lost condition
      2. The gospel strikes a blow to human pride and ego
    5. People tend to react adversely to the gospel because it exposes their sinful nature
      1. Because of their adverse reaction to the gospel, we tend to grow silent
      2. We become embarrassed of our message, even though it is good news
      3. Fear is probably the greatest roadblock to sharing our faith with others
        1. "The fear of man brings a snare" (Proverbs 29:25)
        2. But it's such good news that it must be shared
  3. Because It's God's Power
    1. The Romans boasted in their power
      1. At the time, the Roman legions were the most powerful fighting force in the world
      2. Rome had over 55 million subjects
      3. When Caesar Augustus ordered a census (see Luke 2:1-3), entire families returned to their hometowns because they feared Rome's power
    2. Even with all that power, Rome was still powerless to save
      1. Rome's power couldn't change one soul for all of eternity
      2. Rome was strong militarily, but weak morally
      3. The gospel is the one message that can change people's lives
    3. The gospel is the power of God—in and of itself, it's powerful enough to accomplish God's purpose in a fallen world polluted by sin
      1. Saul's transformation from the enemy of Christianity to Paul the apostle
      2. 3,000 people at Pentecost in a single day
      3. Thousands responded during the first and second Great Awakening, thousands more during the Welsh and Moravian revivals
      4. More than two million through the ministry of Billy Graham
      5. Powerful enough to convert scholars:
        1. Augustine
        2. Dr. Francis Collins
        3. Antony Flew
        4. C.S. Lewis
        5. Martin Luther
      6. Powerful enough to convert celebrities:
        1. Johnny Cash
        2. Alice Cooper
        3. Bob Dylan
        4. Brian Head Welch
      7. Powerful enough to change murderers: David Berkowitz (the Son of Sam)
    4. Not only is the gospel God's power, God also promises power to those who speak it
      1. "You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you" (Acts 1:8)
      2. God promises to meet you in that moment when you decide to speak the good news
  4. Because It's Given Freely
    1. The gospel is for everyone
      1. It's not only for a chosen people
      2. It is freely given "for everyone who believes" (v. 16)
    2. When Paul said it was "for the Jew first and also for the Greek" (v. 16), he wasn't speaking exclusively; he was speaking chronologically
      1. The gospel was promised through Jewish prophets, in Jewish Scriptures, to a Jewish nation, with a Jewish context, about a Jewish Messiah, but it is for the whole world
      2. It came to the Jews first, "for salvation is of the Jews" (John 4:22)
      3. The gospel is nondiscriminatory
    3. Paul borrowed the word debtor (see v. 14) from a Roman word used in economics
      1. It meant to borrow money from someone or to entrust money to someone for someone else
      2. Paul was in debt because he had been entrusted with the gospel by Jesus Christ for other people
      3. Jesus gave us the treasure of the gospel, and we are in debt to those people it's meant for until we deliver it to them
        1. If the gospel stops with us, it's a crime
        2. The moment we're set free from sin and death by Jesus, we're encumbered by a debt to deliver the good news to those who are still lost
  5. Because It Gets Us Right
    1. The theme of Romans is the righteousness of God
      1. How to get right with God
      2. How to make wrong people right with God
    2. This implies that we're not right with God naturally
      1. "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (v. 18)
      2. Romans 3:10
      3. God can make anyone right with Himself by conferring on them the status of His righteousness (see Romans 3:21-24)
      4. It's not something you can produce—it's something you have to receive
    3. God wrote us a letter, telling us that He was coming (the Old Testament)
      1. He constantly promised it
      2. It was fulfilled when Jesus came
      3. "He who has seen Me has seen the Father" (John 14:9)
  6. Because It's Greatly Simple
    1. What do you need to be saved?
      1. God is not asking people to behave in order to be saved—He's asking people to believe in order to be saved
      2. Romans 10:9
    2. Belief will change behavior
      1. You're not saved by behavior; you're saved by belief
      2. But if it's real belief, it will change your behavior
      3. It's not the faithfulness of Christians that saves them; it's faith in Christ that saves
  7. Conclusion
    1. Eternal life is a gift—it's not an earning
      1. It's free, not a fee
      2. Received, not produced
    2. The gospel is too simple for some
      1. That's why religion is such a big business
      2. People will accept that they're sinners, but they will not accept that they can't solve the problem themselves
Figures referenced: Augustine, David Berkowitz, Johnny Cash, Dr. Francis Collins, Alice Cooper, Bob Dylan, Antony Flew, Billy Graham, C.S. Lewis, Martin Luther, Brian Head Welch

Cross references: Proverbs 29:25; Luke 2:1-3; John 4:22; 14:9; Acts 1:8; Romans 1:18; 3:10, 21-24; 10:9

Topic: the gospel

Keywords: ashamed, believe, eternal, everyone, faith, gift, good news, power, received, righteousness, salvation, treasure

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Is God Mad?
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:18-32
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4413

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The Wrath of God Is Revealed God is full of love, right? Right! That’s the good news. And Paul gets back to that theme and develops it fully in the chapters ahead. But first, there’s some bad news. Like a powerful prosecuting attorney, Paul made the case as to why we need the good news of Christ. God’s grace is necessary because of our guilt. In this section, we learn about the wrath of God—an attribute that many people can’t wrap their heads (and hearts) around.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 26, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Is God Mad?"
Text: Romans 1:18-32

Path

God is full of love, right? Right! That's the good news. And Paul gets back to that theme and develops it fully in the chapters ahead. But first, there's some bad news. Like a powerful prosecuting attorney, Paul made the case as to why we need the good news of Christ. God's grace is necessary because of our guilt. In this section, Pastor Skip taught about the wrath of God—an attribute that many people can't wrap their heads (and hearts) around:

  1. What Does It Regard?
  2. Why Is It Required?
    1. For Suppressing God's Truth
    2. For Ignoring God's Revelation
    3. For Perverting God's Glory
  3. How Is It Revealed?
Points

What Does It Regard? Why Is It Required?
For Suppressing God's Truth For Ignoring God's Revelation For Perverting God's Glory
How Is It Revealed? Practice

Connect Up: Though God is love (1 John 4:7-21), why can't Christians only focus on one attribute of God? Why is it important to see the full nature of God's attributes, including His wrath, judgment, and sovereignty? Discuss this quote by Wayne Grudem: "If God loves all that is right and good, and all that conforms to his moral character, then it should not be surprising that He would hate everything that is opposed to His moral character." (Systematic Theology)

Connect In: Judgment is a recurring theme in the Bible. In 1 Peter 4:17, Peter states that judgment begins at "the house of God." Given that Peter means the church—the visible gathering place of believers—what do you think this passage means? Using Pastor Skip's three-tiered points listed above, here are some thoughts to discuss:Connect Out: Many people have been brought to Christ through the thought of eternal judgment in hell, and recognizing that sin separates them from a holy God. Though they are saved through the thought of judgment, they soon realize it is because of His love (see John 3:16) that God uses judgment. Take a moment to discuss the connection between love and wrath. Why would a loving God show wrath or judgment? God loves the sinner but hates the sin. How would you explain this connection to an unbeliever you are trying to reach with the good news?

DETAILED NOTES
"Is God Mad?"
Romans 1:18-32

  1. Introduction
    1. The wrath of God is an attribute that some dismiss because it's too painful to consider
      1. Some people tend to be offended when the words God and wrath are used in the same sentence
      2. The idea of God's wrath can insult sensitivities and sensibilities
    2. Paul announced the bad news as well as the good news
      1. The theme of Romans is the righteousness of God, but Paul believed that you will never fully appreciate the good news until you fully apprehend the bad news
      2. You must know how bad things are before you realize how good the good news is
      3. Until mankind admits the problem of sin, they will never seek a savior
  2. What Does It Regard?
    1. God is not neutral when it comes to sin
      1. There are two Greek words used for wrath in the New Testament:
        1. Thumos
          1. A red-hot anger; overcome by rage
          2. This is impulsive, passionate anger
        2. Orgē
          1. To grow ripe
          2. This is an anger that builds up over a long period of time, the way that water collects behind a dam; it is stable, settled, and controlled
      2. God doesn't fly into a rage or lash out; He lets the water collect and controls His response, waiting for the right timing
      3. Romans 2:5
    2. The wrath of God, as Paul presented it here, is God's firm, settled, and perfect hostility toward all evil
      1. The wrath of God is parallel to the righteousness of God (see Romans 1:17)
      2. God is perfectly righteous; therefore, God is perfectly wrathful
    3. Some refuse to believe they are guilty—they want to live in a false paradise of supposed innocence
  3. Why Is It Required?
    1. For Suppressing God's Truth
      1. God put His stamp in us and His workmanship around us
        1. We can look inward through our conscience and see the testimony of God
        2. We can look around us at the cosmos and see the testimony of God
      2. To suppress means to hold down or hold back
        1. Some don't believe, not because they can't believe, but because they won't believe
        2. It's not a matter of ability, but a matter of will
    2. For Ignoring God's Revelation
      1. God, who is invisible and unknowable, has made Himself visible and knowable through His creation
        1. This is known as the teleological argument for the existence of God—the argument from design
        2. Creation is the visible disclosure of invisible God—the divine artist has revealed Himself
      2. Creation is general revelation—anybody, anywhere, at any time, can know this truth
        1. "The undevout astronomer is mad" —Johannes Kepler
        2. Psalm 19:1-3
      3. The art speaks of an artist—the design speaks of a designer
        1. The radiation of the sun is produced by the sun losing some of its energy
        2. Because it will obviously have an end at some point, it must have had a beginning
    3. For Perverting God's Glory
      1. The theory of devolution: the Bible does not teach that man started lower and climbed higher, but that man started high and sunk lower
        1. We began in familiarity with God, then moved to vanity, then went from vanity to idolatry and from idolatry to immorality
        2. Idolatry always tends toward immorality, because an errant theology will produce an errant sexuality
      2. Paul painted a picture of the downward slope of the human condition and God's settled and perfectly righteous antagonism toward those who have knowledge of the truth but suppress it in favor of a self-centered path
  4. How Is It Revealed?
    1. God's wrath is released in three different ways:
      1. Final wrath: a final reckoning at the last day
        1. The great white throne judgment
        2. This will be unlike any earthly court—no defense, jury, appeal, parole, or escape
        3. 1 Thessalonians 1:10
        4. Romans 2:5
      2. Provisional wrath: God's wrath satisfied through the judicial system
        1. Romans 13:4
        2. God uses human government to execute His wrath
      3. Permissible wrath: God gives you what you want
        1. He abandons them to their desires (see vv. 24, 26, 28)
        2. This is the quiet, non-intervention judgment of God
          1. Hosea 4:17
          2. Matthew 15:14
          3. Acts 7:42
    2. How often have we heard that God is going to judge America?
      1. God has already judged America
      2. Part of the judgment of God is abandoning us to our own wills and desires
      3. "There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, 'Thy will be done.'" —C.S. Lewis
    3. The more God lets go, the worse things get
      1. The spiritual and moral degradation around us is a judicial act of God
      2. When God gives you over to whatever you want, that's the wrath of God
  5. Conclusion
    1. If you believe, you already have everlasting life
      1. No matter what you go through, things will only get better
      2. John 3:36
    2. If you're in this world, the wrath of God already abides on you
      1. Every person in this world is sitting under the fabled sword of Damocles, waiting for the rope to break
      2. When you believe, you move to sit underneath the grace of God, and that is why the good news, set against the bad news, is really great news
Figures referenced: Damocles, Johannes Kepler, C.S. Lewis

Cross references: Psalm 19:1-3; Hosea 4:17; Matthew 15:14; John 3:36; Acts 7:42; Romans 1:17; 2:5; 13:4; 1 Thessalonians 1:10

Greek words: orgē, thumos

Topic: the wrath of God

Keywords: anger, artist, creation, design, glory, good news, grace, judgment, judicial, rage

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Four Mistakes Religious People Make
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 2:1-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4453

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Jesus was not a religious leader. He was a righteous leader. And He was often confronting the religious leaders of His day. Likewise Paul found many enemies among the religious elite of his day, among both Jews and Gentiles. After announcing his theme of good news in Jesus, Paul promptly plunged into the bad news of God’s wrath—a subject that religious people sometimes love (but for all the wrong reasons). Paul tells us some of their most common mistakes.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: July 7, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Four Mistakes Religious People Make"
Text: Romans 2:1-11

Path

Jesus was not a religious leader. He was a righteous leader. And He was often confronting the religious leaders of His day. Likewise, Paul found many enemies among the religious elite of his day, among both Jews and Gentiles. After announcing his theme of good news in Jesus, Paul promptly plunged into the bad news of God's wrath—a subject that religious people sometimes love (but for all the wrong reasons).

  1. Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)
  2. Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)
  3. Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)
  4. Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11)
Points

Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11) Practice

Connect Up: Echoing Leviticus 11:44, Jesus said, "Be perfect, just as your Father in heaven is perfect" (Matthew 5:48). The word Jesus used for perfect is teleios, which means complete and full. The only way to be complete and full is to be saved by the grace of Jesus Christ; as the righteousness of God (see Romans 6), Jesus secures a believer's salvation. The New Testament presented a lifestyle that is pleasing to God. Use the following verses to discuss the results of Christ's righteousness:Connect In: Discuss Pastor Skip's thought: "Jesus was not a religious person, but a righteous person." What does this mean? If you were a "religious person" before coming to Christ, share your story. If you know of a religious or self-righteous person, discuss the habits that are unbecoming (as outlined above). Take time to pray for people struggling with a self-righteous mindset, particularly those in the church.

Connect Out: Hypocrites—two-faced people—alienate non-believers, who see the falsehood of a hypocrite's life. This is one of the reasons Jesus spoke against hypocrisy. In Matthew 6:5, Jesus says not to be like the hypocrites, including drawing attention to your spirituality (how you pray, fast, etc.). How can Christians be on guard against religious hypocrisy? Discuss how to not condemn others, how to listen before talking, how to trust others—even when you disagree—and how to not live a legalistic life. Take time to pray for yourself, asking God to reveal any hypocrisy, and to replace it with love, patience, kindness, and all the fruits of the spirit (see Galatians 5).

DETAILED NOTES
"Four Mistakes Religious People Make"
Romans 2:1-11

  1. Introduction
    1. The hardest people to reach with the gospel are religious people, because they can't see their own need for Christ
      1. Those who are morally bankrupt and have hit rock bottom know they need help; people who have religion and religious ceremonies often do not
      2. Religion can cover a multitude of sins; it can become a mask worn by hypocrites
    2. In Romans 2, Paul began to address the religious person—the moralist—who lives by some kind of code
      1. In chapter 1, Paul introduced the gospel and how we can get right with God
      2. Paul said that first, each person needs to know how not right with God they are—they need to hear the bad news before they can grasp and appreciate the good news
      3. The bad news, the wrath of God, was introduced in 1:18
    3. There are those who don't know the bad news; they don't think they need a doctor because they have already diagnosed themselves
      1. Who was Paul speaking to?
        1. Religious people—either Jews or very moral Greeks and Romans
        2. Romans 1:28-32
      2. Who would fit in this category today?
        1. Any unsaved person who is hiding behind religion or morality
        2. The self-righteous—those who trust in ritual observances or anything other than Christ alone for their eternal safety
        3. This person is moral, friendly, and charitable, but self-satisfied and unsaved
      3. No one can be saved until they realize we're all guilty and we all need God's solution in Christ
  2. Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)
    1. You can point your finger, but you can't pinpoint the heart
      1. All human judgment is skewed and distorted because we don't know all the details of the situation and the motives of the heart
      2. How often do we misjudge people anyway?
      3. Luke 18:9-14
    2. Only God judges according to truth
      1. Truth is part of God's nature
      2. He is omniscient—there's nothing He doesn't know
        1. Psalm 139:1-6
        2. Acts 15:8
        3. 1 Kings 8:39
        4. Revelation 2:23
      3. Rather than being fault-finders, we need to realize that God is the only one qualified to point the finger at all
  3. Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)
    1. Some pious people are experts at evaluating others
      1. They have forgotten that they are being evaluated by God
      2. "What we are often doing is seeing our own faults in others and judging them vicariously. That way, we experience the pleasure of self-righteousness without the pain of penitence" —John Stott
    2. The problem is in our thinking
      1. The Greek word for think here is logizomai, which means to estimate, evaluate, or calculate
      2. A religious person calculates, but wrongly; he's logical, but he's not theological, so his logic is skewed
        1. He evaluates people and their lifestyles, as well as his own life, but he does it falsely because he's self-righteous
        2. The self-righteous person is always underestimating God's perfection and overestimating their own
        3. Hebrews 4:13
        4. 2 Corinthians 5:10
    3. The secret hope of the hypocrite is that God will judge them by a lower standard
      1. Our fallen nature tends to justify our own sins
      2. This is not a call to suspend analytical judgment and discernment, but a reminder not to take God's place as judge, condemning others without examining yourself
      3. Romans 3:23
  4. Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)
    1. Religious people love to focus on people's badness rather than God's goodness
      1. They focus on the nature of the world rather than the nature of God
      2. Paul used the word despise, which means to scorn, look down upon, or undervalue
      3. They undervalue God's patience, which Paul described using several colorful words:
        1. Forbearance
          1. Withholding judgment; God calls a temporary truce
          2. Noah built the ark and preached to the people for 120 years
          3. God sent prophet after prophet for 800 years before the Babylonian exile
        2. Longsuffering
          1. The Greek word is makrothumeó, which means large, great anger
          2. When used in reference to God, it means that God has an incredible capacity to store up anger before He lets it spill out in judgment
        3. Goodness
          1. The English word good comes from the Anglo-Saxon word for God, which meant the good
          2. Goodness is God's nature
    2. Some people despise the goodness of God
      1. How could God ever forgive something so bad?
      2. Ted Bundy came to faith before his death, and people hated the notion that God could, or ever would, forgive such badness
      3. The religious leaders were not happy about Jesus' forgiveness
    3. Why is God so good?
      1. Paul answered this question in verse 4: to lead us to repentance
      2. 2 Peter 3:9
      3. God isn't being lenient when He waits to judge; He's being patient
      4. He's not winking at the sinner; He's waiting for them to change their mind
    4. Before you hate people's badness and the world's wickedness over loving God's goodness, ask yourself one thing: Was God patient with your ignorance and your rebellion?
  5. Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11)
    1. This passage uncovers the human tendency to be hard in our judgment of others but soft in our judgment of ourselves
      1. Sometimes, this isn't righteous indignation, but self-righteous indignation
      2. This kind of blindness—noticing others' problems and failures without acknowledging your own—reveals a hard heart
      3. The word used for hardness is sklērotēta
        1. This is where we get the word sclerosis
        2. This is the hardening of one's spiritual heart—becoming unresponsive to God, which is much worse than arteriosclerosis
        3. Most people who have arteriosclerosis don't know they have it; the first symptom is a heart attack
    2. Most people do not know their own spiritual condition
      1. Hardening of the arteries may send you to your grave
      2. The hardening of your spiritual heart will send you to hell
  6. Conclusion
    1. This is the mask religious people hide behind
      1. Paul exposed this mask because he wanted everyone to know we're saved by grace
      2. The good news is that all who call upon Him will be saved
      3. Paul was honest about his own sin (see 1 Timothy 1:15)
    2. The essence of the good news is that God extends grace to unworthy people, and we are all unworthy
      1. You can't hide behind your religious background
      2. You can't hide behind your rituals
Figures referenced: Ted Bundy, John Stott

Cross references: 1 Kings 8:39; Psalm 139:1-6; Luke 18:9-14; John 8:11; Acts 15:8; Romans 1:18, 28-32; 3:23; 2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 Timothy 1:15; Hebrews 4:13; 2 Peter 3:9; Revelation 2:23

Greek words: logizomai, makrothumeó, sklērotēta

Topic: the wrath of God

Keywords: bad news, bitter, blame, blind, brash, forgive, hard, heart, judgment, good news, mask, religion, sin

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Hypocrisy Gets an Audit
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 2:17-29
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4455

MESSAGE SUMMARY
All businesses, corporations, and individuals have blind spots. Auditors can help by giving a clear and unbiased reading of practices and procedures, and then give appropriate recommendations for change. Here, Paul played the role of auditing the hypocrite—the one who has spiritual style but no substance. Let’s consider the assets, the deficits, and the net appraisal of the one who wears a spiritual disguise.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: July 14, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Hypocrisy Gets an Audit"
Text: Romans 2:17-29

Path

All businesses, corporations, and individuals have blind spots. Auditors can help by giving a clear and unbiased reading of practices and procedures, and then give appropriate recommendations for change. Here, Paul played the role of auditing the hypocrite—the one who has spiritual style but no substance.

  1. The Assets
    1. The Right Background (v. 17)
    2. The Right Book (v. 18)
    3. The Right Business (vv. 19-20)
  2. The Deficits
    1. The Wrong Practice (vv. 21-23)
    2. The Wrong Prominence (v. 24)
    3. The Wrong Perspective (vv. 25-28)
  3. The Net Appraisal (v. 29)
Points

The AssetsThe DeficitsThe Net Appraisal (v. 29)Practice

Connect Up: Jesus criticized the Jewish religious leaders for hypocrisy—their failure to put their knowledge and privilege as God's chosen people into true practice in their hearts and lives. It's important to ask God to show us any ways in which we have been hypocritical. How can we know a true believer from a counterfeit? Here are some key ways to spot a true believer:1Connect In: It's important to make sure that we are living what we teach before we address any sin outside the church. Remember what Jesus said about removing the plank from your own eye before you tell someone about the speck in theirs (see Matthew 7:3-5). As Peter said about Christian house cleaning, "The time has come for judgment to begin at the house of God" (1 Peter 4:17). Let grace be the rule as you deal with what you see in God's house.

Connect Out: Christianity is not invalidated by the bad behavior of a few members—Jesus is the standard of integrity. Rather than looking for hypocrisy in others, take a serious look at your own behavior this week. Is there something you have been doing that might cause unbelievers to disregard God? Consider the areas Paul warned about: being self-righteous or criticizing someone for something you've done yourself. Ask God for the opportunity to make things right, and wisdom in how to make things right.


1 Tom Hicks, "How to Distinguish a True Christian from a Hypocrite," https://www.biblestudytools.com/blogs/founders-ministries-blog/how-to-distinguish-a-true-christian-from-a-hypocrite.html, accessed 07/15/2019.

OUTLINE


  1. The Assets

    1. The Right Background (v. 17)

    2. The Right Book (v. 18)

    3. The Right Business (vv. 19-20)

  2. The Deficits

    1. The Wrong Practice (vv. 21-23)

    2. The Wrong Prominence (v. 24)

    3. The Wrong Perspective (vv. 25-28)

  3. The Net Appraisal (v. 29)


Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans | CalvaryABQ.org/series398
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