Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans

Skip Heitzig

When the wrath of God meets the righteousness of God, where does that leave us? The apostle Paul says that we are marked by sin at birth but marked righteous at salvation. In this series through Romans, Skip Heitzig explains the essentials of Christian doctrine that can transform your thoughts, words, and actions. Move from sinner to saint, and from saved to Spirit-filled as you inscribe the essence of the gospel onto your heart and soul.


 

Table of Contents

# SCRIPTURE: MESSAGE:
1 Romans 1:1-7 The Heart and Soul of the Gospel
2 Romans 1:16-17 Unashamed!
3 Romans 1:18-32 Is God Mad?
4 Romans 2:1-11 Four Mistakes Religious People Make
5 Romans 2:17-29 Hypocrisy Gets an Audit
6 Romans 3:1-8 The Advantage of Having the Bible
7 Romans 3:9-26 How Prisoners Go Free
8 Romans 4 Old Age; Young Faith
9 Romans 5:1-5 Our Benefits Package
10 Romans 5:6-11 Unrivaled Love
11 Romans 5:12-21 A One-Man Show
12 Romans 6:1-7 Don’t Look Back
13 Romans 6:11-14 Winning the War with Sin

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: The Heart and Soul of the Gospel
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:1-7
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4407

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Today we embark on a thirty-two-week journey through the book of Romans. Considered to be Paul the apostle’s magnum opus, this book is largely responsible for igniting the fires of the Protestant Reformation and the Wesleyan Revival. As Paul introduced himself to the church at Rome, he got right to the heart and soul of the matter—the gospel—the good news that presents Jesus Christ as God’s great answer to the pressing need of the human race.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 5, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"
Text: Romans 1:1-7

Path

With this teaching—"The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"—we embark on a thirty-two-week journey through the book of Romans. Considered to be Paul the apostle's magnum opus, this book is largely responsible for igniting the fires of the Protestant Reformation and the Wesleyan Revival. As Paul introduced himself to the church at Rome, he got right to the heart and soul of the matter—the gospel—the good news that presents Jesus Christ as God's great answer to the pressing need of the human race.

  1. Its Servant (v. 1)
  2. Its Source (v. 2)
  3. Its Subject (vv. 3-4)
    1. The Seed of David
    2. The Son of God
  4. Its Scope (vv. 5-7)
Points

Its Servant (v. 1) Its Source (v. 2)Its Subject (vv. 3-4)Its Scope (vv. 5-7)Practice

Connect Up: As Pastor Skip stated, prophecy is an indicator that Jesus is the Messiah. Using the texts provided, discuss how prophecy is God's means of proving His point:Connect In: Since Jesus is the subject—the overarching theme of the Bible—why is it important for the church to teach through the entire text of the Bible? Using Pastor Skip's outline, discuss how each part of the Bible gives a complete picture of the birth, life, teachings, death, and resurrection of Jesus. Connect Out: Consider Pastor Skip's sentence, "The scope of the good news wasn't just local but worldwide headlines: it affected the entire human race." Why is evangelism vital for the health of the church? Look up the following texts Pastor Skip used, discussing the implications of each in the good news:

DETAILED NOTES
"The Heart and Soul of the Gospel"
Romans 1:1-7

  1. Introduction
    1. Bad news tends to get more attention than good news
      1. The gospel is good news
      2. The Greek word used here is euaggelion, which is where we get the word evangelism
      3. Paul used the word gospel sixty times in the book of Romans
      4. The word gospel comes from the Anglo-Saxon godspell, which means good story; God's story is a good story
      5. The term originally came from Roman times
        1. Heralds who were sent out into the public square to proclaim news
        2. Someone who would make a favorable announcement
    2. Why do I need to hear the gospel?
      1. You probably haven't heard the bad news yet
        1. Romans 1:18
        2. Romans 3:23
      2. When you understand how bad the bad news is, you will love the gospel
      3. All have sinned, the wrath of God has been revealed, and you have to pay for that yourself—or let somebody else do it for you
    3. The book of Romans is the Christian manifesto of freedom
      1. Romans tells us that we have been set free, unshackled from the grip of sin and Satan, and that we are set free to become God's slaves—a slavery of freedom
      2. The theme of the book is the righteousness of God
      3. The book can be divided into four sections that fall under the banner of the gospel
        1. The wrath of God
        2. The grace of God
        3. The plan of God
        4. The will of God
  2. Its Servant (v. 1)
    1. Apart from Jesus, Paul was the most significant person in the New Testament
      1. Paul was born to Jewish parents in Tarsus in Silicia—modern-day southeast Turkey
      2. His name at birth was Saul, and he was probably named after King Saul
      3. His Roman name was Paulus, which means small or short
    2. Saul was a Pharisee, educated by an anti-Christian rabbi—Gamaliel
      1. Saul became the chief antagonist of the early church
      2. He was converted on the road to Damascus, and the chief antagonist of Christianity became the chief protagonist
      3. After his conversion, Paul considered himself a bondservant of Jesus Christ
        1. On the road to Damascus, Saul asked two questions:
          1. "Who are You, Lord?" (Acts 9:5)
          2. "Lord, what do You want me to do?" (Acts 9:6)
        2. The second question made him a bondservant of Christ
        3. The term bondservant should describe every believer, and every Christian should ask both of these questions
    3. As a Pharisee, Saul was separated from the Gentiles; after his conversion, Paul was "separated to the gospel" (v. 1)
      1. What are you separated to?
      2. It's not all about what you don't do—it's about what you do
      3. How do you serve the Lord?
        1. It is possible to have a saved soul but a lost life
        2. You can be right with God and believe in Jesus Christ but not ask Him what He wants you to do
  3. Its Source (v. 2)
    1. The gospel has its source in God
      1. No human would create the gospel story; nobody would write a story that says all men are condemned apart from Jesus Christ
        1. Man-made religions are about what man can do for God—the goodness of mankind
        2. The gospel is about what God has already done for man—the goodness of God
      2. The apostles didn't invent the gospel—they discovered it as it was revealed to them (see 2 Peter 1:16)
    2. The New Testament is not an addition; it has been anticipated all along
      1. Matthew 5:17
      2. "The New is in the Old contained—the Old is in the New explained" —Augustine
      3. Jeremiah 31:31-34
      4. Acts 2:16
      5. Acts 26:22
    3. The gospel is part of a continuous, progressive revelation that started in Genesis 3:15, continued through Genesis 22 and the exodus, and was predicted in Psalm 22, Isaiah 53, and about 300 other Scriptures
      1. Biblical prophecy is not just a good guess
      2. It always contains multiple contingencies that cannot be known or controlled, and this gives evidence that divine authorship is involved
      3. Luke 24:25
  4. Its Subject (vv. 3-4)
    1. Jesus Christ is the main subject of the Bible
      1. John 5:46
      2. The Old Testament is the anticipation of Jesus Christ
      3. The Gospels are the presentation of Jesus Christ
      4. The book of Acts is the continuation of the work of Jesus Christ
      5. The Epistles are the explanation and clarification of Jesus Christ
      6. The book of Revelation is the consummation by Jesus Christ
    2. The prophets had many questions themselves
      1. They wrote the prophecies but didn't know the totality of what they were writing
      2. 1 Peter 1:10-11
      3. They didn't know it when they wrote it, but it all came true in one person
    3. The Bible is about one person and two events:
      1. Jesus Christ
      2. His first coming: to deal with sin
      3. His second coming: to rule and reign with those who have been cleansed from sin
    4. Paul referred to the dual nature of Jesus Christ with two titles:
      1. The Seed of David
        1. Jesus was fully human
        2. As such, He fulfilled all of the predictions of the Messiah who would be born
      2. The Son of God
        1. Jesus was fully God
        2. Conceived by the Holy Spirit
        3. Jesus has the same nature as God
    5. The good news isn't about a good man—it's about the God-man
      1. Because He was fully man, He had the ability to substitute for mankind
      2. Because He was fully God, He had the capacity to save all mankind
  5. Its Scope (vv. 5-7)
    1. The gospel is not just local news; it's worldwide news
      1. God sent us to tell everyone everywhere the good news; it's for every people in every place at every time
      2. Romans 3:29
      3. God's plan encompasses the whole world
    2. Christianity is not a Western religion; it's no more Western than it is exclusively Middle Eastern
      1. Christianity originated in the Middle East
      2. To say that it's a Western religion defies intellect and basic knowledge of geography
      3. Matthew 28:19
      4. Luke 2:10
      5. John 3:16
      6. Acts 1:8
    3. As the gospel crosses all social and cultural barriers, so must the Christian
      1. Medicine works universally; it doesn't discriminate
      2. The world has many religions, but only one gospel
  6. Conclusion
    1. God's headline is good news
    2. The gospel is good news for two basic reasons:
      1. It tells us that God exists and that He is knowable
      2. It tells us that we can know Him through the saving work of His Son, Jesus Christ
    3. Has the gospel come to you like that?
Figures referenced: Augustine

Cross references: Genesis 3:15; 22; Psalm 22; Isaiah 53; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Matthew 5:17; 28:19; Luke 2:10; 24:25; John 3:16; 5:46; Acts 1:8; 2:16; 9:5-6; 26:22; Romans 1:18; 3:23, 29; 1 Peter 1:10-11; 2 Peter 1:16

Greek words: euaggelion

Topic: the gospel

Keywords: barriers, bondservant, Christ, good, grace, Jesus, mankind, news, plan, religions, saved, sin, will, wrath

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Unashamed!
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:16-17
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4411

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Standing up for and speaking out about our faith in Jesus Christ can sometimes feel awkward and intimidating. Often our message is not received with glad faces or with open arms by the people we work with and live next to. As Paul was planning to visit Rome, he expressed eagerness rather than hesitation to herald this message. Why was that? The apostle gives us five reasons for his readiness and enthusiasm.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 19, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Unashamed!"
Text: Romans 1:16-17

Path:

Standing up for and speaking out about our faith in Jesus Christ can sometimes feel awkward and intimidating. Often our message is not received with glad faces or with open arms by the people we work with and live next to. As Paul was planning to visit Rome, he expressed eagerness rather than hesitation to herald this message. Why? In this teaching, Pastor Skip provides five reasons for Paul's readiness and enthusiasm:

  1. Because It's Good News
  2. Because It's God's Power
  3. Because It's Given Freely
  4. Because It Gets Us Right
  5. Because It's Greatly Simple
Points:

Because It's Good NewsBecause It's God's PowerBecause It's Given FreelyBecause It Gets Us RightBecause It's Greatly SimplePractice

Connect Up: God's righteousness is taught throughout Scripture. Why is it crucial we understand that people polluted by sin cannot fellowship with God in His perfection apart from Christ (discussed in detail throughout the book of Hebrews)? 
Look up the following verses about God's holiness. What do they say about God's holiness and how believers are to respond to His holiness?  How does Hebrews 7:26 describe Christ's fulfillment of perfect holiness as our High Priest? Why is this good news?

Connect In: The Bible calls Christians to live a holy life (see 1 Peter 1:15-16). Using Scripture to back up your views, what does a holy life look like? (Consider Psalm 68:4-5; 103:1; 119:9; 2 Corinthians 7:1; Ephesians 5:3; Philippians 2:5, 14-16; Hebrews 2:14.) How is it holy to be led by the Spirit, pray, study, serve, praise God, have compassion, and live right before God? What else can you think of?

Connect Out: Although holy living can be a turnoff for unbelievers, how would you describe God's holiness to a non-Christian, the good news Pastor Skip described? And how would you explain the fact that we can't live up to God's perfection, but Christ did? How would you explain that when we receive Christ, we are covered by His righteousness? Spend time praying for unbelievers you know, asking God to open doors for you to share the good news.

DETAILED NOTES
"Unashamed!"
Romans 1:16-17

  1. Introduction
    1. Instead of seeing the gospel as a task, we should see it as a treasure
    2. Even after all that Paul had been through up to this point because he preached the gospel, he was still eager to share the gospel again
      1. Forced to flee Damascus
      2. Stoned and left for dead in Lystra
      3. Beaten, arrested, and imprisoned in Philippi
      4. Chased out of Thessalonica
      5. Laughed to scorn in Athens
      6. Nearly torn to pieces in Jerusalem
    3. Paul was unstoppable—he was not intimidated by:
      1. The religious and political leaders of Jerusalem
      2. The intellectuals of Athens
      3. The caesars of Rome
    4. Paul was eager to engage in exactly what got him jailed, beaten, and scorned over and over because he found joy in sharing the gospel
  2. Because It's Good News
    1. Why should we be ashamed of good news?
    2. Rome was the most powerful empire in the world at that time (AD 60)
      1. Rome was the political and cultural center of the world—the heart of civilization (caput mundi in Latin)
      2. Any news that came out of Rome affected the entire world
      3. It would have been easy for Paul to be intimidated by the sheer size and power of Rome
    3. Not everyone saw the gospel as good news
      1. Most people then, like today, considered it bad news
        1. The gospel was identified with a poor Jewish carpenter who had been crucified
        2. The Romans conquered and occupied Judea; they saw the Jews as inferior
        3. The Romans imposed crucifixion only on the very worst of criminals who stood against the empire
      2. Who would put their faith in a dead Jew who had been crucified?
        1. Rome had great religions and great philosophers
        2. Romans referred to Christians as atheos—atheists, because Christians had rejected the Roman pantheon
      3. Some Romans even referred to Christians as cannibals—the result of misunderstanding the Lord's Supper
    4. The gospel is unattractive and repulsive to a natural, unsaved person
      1. The gospel speaks about man's lost condition
      2. The gospel strikes a blow to human pride and ego
    5. People tend to react adversely to the gospel because it exposes their sinful nature
      1. Because of their adverse reaction to the gospel, we tend to grow silent
      2. We become embarrassed of our message, even though it is good news
      3. Fear is probably the greatest roadblock to sharing our faith with others
        1. "The fear of man brings a snare" (Proverbs 29:25)
        2. But it's such good news that it must be shared
  3. Because It's God's Power
    1. The Romans boasted in their power
      1. At the time, the Roman legions were the most powerful fighting force in the world
      2. Rome had over 55 million subjects
      3. When Caesar Augustus ordered a census (see Luke 2:1-3), entire families returned to their hometowns because they feared Rome's power
    2. Even with all that power, Rome was still powerless to save
      1. Rome's power couldn't change one soul for all of eternity
      2. Rome was strong militarily, but weak morally
      3. The gospel is the one message that can change people's lives
    3. The gospel is the power of God—in and of itself, it's powerful enough to accomplish God's purpose in a fallen world polluted by sin
      1. Saul's transformation from the enemy of Christianity to Paul the apostle
      2. 3,000 people at Pentecost in a single day
      3. Thousands responded during the first and second Great Awakening, thousands more during the Welsh and Moravian revivals
      4. More than two million through the ministry of Billy Graham
      5. Powerful enough to convert scholars:
        1. Augustine
        2. Dr. Francis Collins
        3. Antony Flew
        4. C.S. Lewis
        5. Martin Luther
      6. Powerful enough to convert celebrities:
        1. Johnny Cash
        2. Alice Cooper
        3. Bob Dylan
        4. Brian Head Welch
      7. Powerful enough to change murderers: David Berkowitz (the Son of Sam)
    4. Not only is the gospel God's power, God also promises power to those who speak it
      1. "You shall receive power when the Holy Spirit has come upon you" (Acts 1:8)
      2. God promises to meet you in that moment when you decide to speak the good news
  4. Because It's Given Freely
    1. The gospel is for everyone
      1. It's not only for a chosen people
      2. It is freely given "for everyone who believes" (v. 16)
    2. When Paul said it was "for the Jew first and also for the Greek" (v. 16), he wasn't speaking exclusively; he was speaking chronologically
      1. The gospel was promised through Jewish prophets, in Jewish Scriptures, to a Jewish nation, with a Jewish context, about a Jewish Messiah, but it is for the whole world
      2. It came to the Jews first, "for salvation is of the Jews" (John 4:22)
      3. The gospel is nondiscriminatory
    3. Paul borrowed the word debtor (see v. 14) from a Roman word used in economics
      1. It meant to borrow money from someone or to entrust money to someone for someone else
      2. Paul was in debt because he had been entrusted with the gospel by Jesus Christ for other people
      3. Jesus gave us the treasure of the gospel, and we are in debt to those people it's meant for until we deliver it to them
        1. If the gospel stops with us, it's a crime
        2. The moment we're set free from sin and death by Jesus, we're encumbered by a debt to deliver the good news to those who are still lost
  5. Because It Gets Us Right
    1. The theme of Romans is the righteousness of God
      1. How to get right with God
      2. How to make wrong people right with God
    2. This implies that we're not right with God naturally
      1. "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven" (v. 18)
      2. Romans 3:10
      3. God can make anyone right with Himself by conferring on them the status of His righteousness (see Romans 3:21-24)
      4. It's not something you can produce—it's something you have to receive
    3. God wrote us a letter, telling us that He was coming (the Old Testament)
      1. He constantly promised it
      2. It was fulfilled when Jesus came
      3. "He who has seen Me has seen the Father" (John 14:9)
  6. Because It's Greatly Simple
    1. What do you need to be saved?
      1. God is not asking people to behave in order to be saved—He's asking people to believe in order to be saved
      2. Romans 10:9
    2. Belief will change behavior
      1. You're not saved by behavior; you're saved by belief
      2. But if it's real belief, it will change your behavior
      3. It's not the faithfulness of Christians that saves them; it's faith in Christ that saves
  7. Conclusion
    1. Eternal life is a gift—it's not an earning
      1. It's free, not a fee
      2. Received, not produced
    2. The gospel is too simple for some
      1. That's why religion is such a big business
      2. People will accept that they're sinners, but they will not accept that they can't solve the problem themselves
Figures referenced: Augustine, David Berkowitz, Johnny Cash, Dr. Francis Collins, Alice Cooper, Bob Dylan, Antony Flew, Billy Graham, C.S. Lewis, Martin Luther, Brian Head Welch

Cross references: Proverbs 29:25; Luke 2:1-3; John 4:22; 14:9; Acts 1:8; Romans 1:18; 3:10, 21-24; 10:9

Topic: the gospel

Keywords: ashamed, believe, eternal, everyone, faith, gift, good news, power, received, righteousness, salvation, treasure

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Is God Mad?
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 1:18-32
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4413

MESSAGE SUMMARY
The Wrath of God Is Revealed God is full of love, right? Right! That’s the good news. And Paul gets back to that theme and develops it fully in the chapters ahead. But first, there’s some bad news. Like a powerful prosecuting attorney, Paul made the case as to why we need the good news of Christ. God’s grace is necessary because of our guilt. In this section, we learn about the wrath of God—an attribute that many people can’t wrap their heads (and hearts) around.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: May 26, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Is God Mad?"
Text: Romans 1:18-32

Path

God is full of love, right? Right! That's the good news. And Paul gets back to that theme and develops it fully in the chapters ahead. But first, there's some bad news. Like a powerful prosecuting attorney, Paul made the case as to why we need the good news of Christ. God's grace is necessary because of our guilt. In this section, Pastor Skip taught about the wrath of God—an attribute that many people can't wrap their heads (and hearts) around:

  1. What Does It Regard?
  2. Why Is It Required?
    1. For Suppressing God's Truth
    2. For Ignoring God's Revelation
    3. For Perverting God's Glory
  3. How Is It Revealed?
Points

What Does It Regard? Why Is It Required?
For Suppressing God's Truth For Ignoring God's Revelation For Perverting God's Glory
How Is It Revealed? Practice

Connect Up: Though God is love (1 John 4:7-21), why can't Christians only focus on one attribute of God? Why is it important to see the full nature of God's attributes, including His wrath, judgment, and sovereignty? Discuss this quote by Wayne Grudem: "If God loves all that is right and good, and all that conforms to his moral character, then it should not be surprising that He would hate everything that is opposed to His moral character." (Systematic Theology)

Connect In: Judgment is a recurring theme in the Bible. In 1 Peter 4:17, Peter states that judgment begins at "the house of God." Given that Peter means the church—the visible gathering place of believers—what do you think this passage means? Using Pastor Skip's three-tiered points listed above, here are some thoughts to discuss:Connect Out: Many people have been brought to Christ through the thought of eternal judgment in hell, and recognizing that sin separates them from a holy God. Though they are saved through the thought of judgment, they soon realize it is because of His love (see John 3:16) that God uses judgment. Take a moment to discuss the connection between love and wrath. Why would a loving God show wrath or judgment? God loves the sinner but hates the sin. How would you explain this connection to an unbeliever you are trying to reach with the good news?

DETAILED NOTES
"Is God Mad?"
Romans 1:18-32

  1. Introduction
    1. The wrath of God is an attribute that some dismiss because it's too painful to consider
      1. Some people tend to be offended when the words God and wrath are used in the same sentence
      2. The idea of God's wrath can insult sensitivities and sensibilities
    2. Paul announced the bad news as well as the good news
      1. The theme of Romans is the righteousness of God, but Paul believed that you will never fully appreciate the good news until you fully apprehend the bad news
      2. You must know how bad things are before you realize how good the good news is
      3. Until mankind admits the problem of sin, they will never seek a savior
  2. What Does It Regard?
    1. God is not neutral when it comes to sin
      1. There are two Greek words used for wrath in the New Testament:
        1. Thumos
          1. A red-hot anger; overcome by rage
          2. This is impulsive, passionate anger
        2. Orgē
          1. To grow ripe
          2. This is an anger that builds up over a long period of time, the way that water collects behind a dam; it is stable, settled, and controlled
      2. God doesn't fly into a rage or lash out; He lets the water collect and controls His response, waiting for the right timing
      3. Romans 2:5
    2. The wrath of God, as Paul presented it here, is God's firm, settled, and perfect hostility toward all evil
      1. The wrath of God is parallel to the righteousness of God (see Romans 1:17)
      2. God is perfectly righteous; therefore, God is perfectly wrathful
    3. Some refuse to believe they are guilty—they want to live in a false paradise of supposed innocence
  3. Why Is It Required?
    1. For Suppressing God's Truth
      1. God put His stamp in us and His workmanship around us
        1. We can look inward through our conscience and see the testimony of God
        2. We can look around us at the cosmos and see the testimony of God
      2. To suppress means to hold down or hold back
        1. Some don't believe, not because they can't believe, but because they won't believe
        2. It's not a matter of ability, but a matter of will
    2. For Ignoring God's Revelation
      1. God, who is invisible and unknowable, has made Himself visible and knowable through His creation
        1. This is known as the teleological argument for the existence of God—the argument from design
        2. Creation is the visible disclosure of invisible God—the divine artist has revealed Himself
      2. Creation is general revelation—anybody, anywhere, at any time, can know this truth
        1. "The undevout astronomer is mad" —Johannes Kepler
        2. Psalm 19:1-3
      3. The art speaks of an artist—the design speaks of a designer
        1. The radiation of the sun is produced by the sun losing some of its energy
        2. Because it will obviously have an end at some point, it must have had a beginning
    3. For Perverting God's Glory
      1. The theory of devolution: the Bible does not teach that man started lower and climbed higher, but that man started high and sunk lower
        1. We began in familiarity with God, then moved to vanity, then went from vanity to idolatry and from idolatry to immorality
        2. Idolatry always tends toward immorality, because an errant theology will produce an errant sexuality
      2. Paul painted a picture of the downward slope of the human condition and God's settled and perfectly righteous antagonism toward those who have knowledge of the truth but suppress it in favor of a self-centered path
  4. How Is It Revealed?
    1. God's wrath is released in three different ways:
      1. Final wrath: a final reckoning at the last day
        1. The great white throne judgment
        2. This will be unlike any earthly court—no defense, jury, appeal, parole, or escape
        3. 1 Thessalonians 1:10
        4. Romans 2:5
      2. Provisional wrath: God's wrath satisfied through the judicial system
        1. Romans 13:4
        2. God uses human government to execute His wrath
      3. Permissible wrath: God gives you what you want
        1. He abandons them to their desires (see vv. 24, 26, 28)
        2. This is the quiet, non-intervention judgment of God
          1. Hosea 4:17
          2. Matthew 15:14
          3. Acts 7:42
    2. How often have we heard that God is going to judge America?
      1. God has already judged America
      2. Part of the judgment of God is abandoning us to our own wills and desires
      3. "There are only two kinds of people in the end: those who say to God, 'Thy will be done,' and those to whom God says, in the end, 'Thy will be done.'" —C.S. Lewis
    3. The more God lets go, the worse things get
      1. The spiritual and moral degradation around us is a judicial act of God
      2. When God gives you over to whatever you want, that's the wrath of God
  5. Conclusion
    1. If you believe, you already have everlasting life
      1. No matter what you go through, things will only get better
      2. John 3:36
    2. If you're in this world, the wrath of God already abides on you
      1. Every person in this world is sitting under the fabled sword of Damocles, waiting for the rope to break
      2. When you believe, you move to sit underneath the grace of God, and that is why the good news, set against the bad news, is really great news
Figures referenced: Damocles, Johannes Kepler, C.S. Lewis

Cross references: Psalm 19:1-3; Hosea 4:17; Matthew 15:14; John 3:36; Acts 7:42; Romans 1:17; 2:5; 13:4; 1 Thessalonians 1:10

Greek words: orgē, thumos

Topic: the wrath of God

Keywords: anger, artist, creation, design, glory, good news, grace, judgment, judicial, rage

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Four Mistakes Religious People Make
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 2:1-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4453

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Jesus was not a religious leader. He was a righteous leader. And He was often confronting the religious leaders of His day. Likewise Paul found many enemies among the religious elite of his day, among both Jews and Gentiles. After announcing his theme of good news in Jesus, Paul promptly plunged into the bad news of God’s wrath—a subject that religious people sometimes love (but for all the wrong reasons). Paul tells us some of their most common mistakes.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: July 7, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Four Mistakes Religious People Make"
Text: Romans 2:1-11

Path

Jesus was not a religious leader. He was a righteous leader. And He was often confronting the religious leaders of His day. Likewise, Paul found many enemies among the religious elite of his day, among both Jews and Gentiles. After announcing his theme of good news in Jesus, Paul promptly plunged into the bad news of God's wrath—a subject that religious people sometimes love (but for all the wrong reasons).

  1. Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)
  2. Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)
  3. Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)
  4. Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11)
Points

Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11) Practice

Connect Up: Echoing Leviticus 11:44, Jesus said, "Be perfect, just as your Father in heaven is perfect" (Matthew 5:48). The word Jesus used for perfect is teleios, which means complete and full. The only way to be complete and full is to be saved by the grace of Jesus Christ; as the righteousness of God (see Romans 6), Jesus secures a believer's salvation. The New Testament presented a lifestyle that is pleasing to God. Use the following verses to discuss the results of Christ's righteousness:Connect In: Discuss Pastor Skip's thought: "Jesus was not a religious person, but a righteous person." What does this mean? If you were a "religious person" before coming to Christ, share your story. If you know of a religious or self-righteous person, discuss the habits that are unbecoming (as outlined above). Take time to pray for people struggling with a self-righteous mindset, particularly those in the church.

Connect Out: Hypocrites—two-faced people—alienate non-believers, who see the falsehood of a hypocrite's life. This is one of the reasons Jesus spoke against hypocrisy. In Matthew 6:5, Jesus says not to be like the hypocrites, including drawing attention to your spirituality (how you pray, fast, etc.). How can Christians be on guard against religious hypocrisy? Discuss how to not condemn others, how to listen before talking, how to trust others—even when you disagree—and how to not live a legalistic life. Take time to pray for yourself, asking God to reveal any hypocrisy, and to replace it with love, patience, kindness, and all the fruits of the spirit (see Galatians 5).

DETAILED NOTES
"Four Mistakes Religious People Make"
Romans 2:1-11

  1. Introduction
    1. The hardest people to reach with the gospel are religious people, because they can't see their own need for Christ
      1. Those who are morally bankrupt and have hit rock bottom know they need help; people who have religion and religious ceremonies often do not
      2. Religion can cover a multitude of sins; it can become a mask worn by hypocrites
    2. In Romans 2, Paul began to address the religious person—the moralist—who lives by some kind of code
      1. In chapter 1, Paul introduced the gospel and how we can get right with God
      2. Paul said that first, each person needs to know how not right with God they are—they need to hear the bad news before they can grasp and appreciate the good news
      3. The bad news, the wrath of God, was introduced in 1:18
    3. There are those who don't know the bad news; they don't think they need a doctor because they have already diagnosed themselves
      1. Who was Paul speaking to?
        1. Religious people—either Jews or very moral Greeks and Romans
        2. Romans 1:28-32
      2. Who would fit in this category today?
        1. Any unsaved person who is hiding behind religion or morality
        2. The self-righteous—those who trust in ritual observances or anything other than Christ alone for their eternal safety
        3. This person is moral, friendly, and charitable, but self-satisfied and unsaved
      3. No one can be saved until they realize we're all guilty and we all need God's solution in Christ
  2. Blame: Pointing the finger but not perceiving the heart (vv. 1-2)
    1. You can point your finger, but you can't pinpoint the heart
      1. All human judgment is skewed and distorted because we don't know all the details of the situation and the motives of the heart
      2. How often do we misjudge people anyway?
      3. Luke 18:9-14
    2. Only God judges according to truth
      1. Truth is part of God's nature
      2. He is omniscient—there's nothing He doesn't know
        1. Psalm 139:1-6
        2. Acts 15:8
        3. 1 Kings 8:39
        4. Revelation 2:23
      3. Rather than being fault-finders, we need to realize that God is the only one qualified to point the finger at all
  3. Brashness: Sitting as A judge while standing before THE Judge (v. 3)
    1. Some pious people are experts at evaluating others
      1. They have forgotten that they are being evaluated by God
      2. "What we are often doing is seeing our own faults in others and judging them vicariously. That way, we experience the pleasure of self-righteousness without the pain of penitence" —John Stott
    2. The problem is in our thinking
      1. The Greek word for think here is logizomai, which means to estimate, evaluate, or calculate
      2. A religious person calculates, but wrongly; he's logical, but he's not theological, so his logic is skewed
        1. He evaluates people and their lifestyles, as well as his own life, but he does it falsely because he's self-righteous
        2. The self-righteous person is always underestimating God's perfection and overestimating their own
        3. Hebrews 4:13
        4. 2 Corinthians 5:10
    3. The secret hope of the hypocrite is that God will judge them by a lower standard
      1. Our fallen nature tends to justify our own sins
      2. This is not a call to suspend analytical judgment and discernment, but a reminder not to take God's place as judge, condemning others without examining yourself
      3. Romans 3:23
  4. Bitterness: Hating people's badness over loving God's goodness (v. 4)
    1. Religious people love to focus on people's badness rather than God's goodness
      1. They focus on the nature of the world rather than the nature of God
      2. Paul used the word despise, which means to scorn, look down upon, or undervalue
      3. They undervalue God's patience, which Paul described using several colorful words:
        1. Forbearance
          1. Withholding judgment; God calls a temporary truce
          2. Noah built the ark and preached to the people for 120 years
          3. God sent prophet after prophet for 800 years before the Babylonian exile
        2. Longsuffering
          1. The Greek word is makrothumeó, which means large, great anger
          2. When used in reference to God, it means that God has an incredible capacity to store up anger before He lets it spill out in judgment
        3. Goodness
          1. The English word good comes from the Anglo-Saxon word for God, which meant the good
          2. Goodness is God's nature
    2. Some people despise the goodness of God
      1. How could God ever forgive something so bad?
      2. Ted Bundy came to faith before his death, and people hated the notion that God could, or ever would, forgive such badness
      3. The religious leaders were not happy about Jesus' forgiveness
    3. Why is God so good?
      1. Paul answered this question in verse 4: to lead us to repentance
      2. 2 Peter 3:9
      3. God isn't being lenient when He waits to judge; He's being patient
      4. He's not winking at the sinner; He's waiting for them to change their mind
    4. Before you hate people's badness and the world's wickedness over loving God's goodness, ask yourself one thing: Was God patient with your ignorance and your rebellion?
  5. Blindness: Beholding others' sin; being blind to their own (vv. 5-11)
    1. This passage uncovers the human tendency to be hard in our judgment of others but soft in our judgment of ourselves
      1. Sometimes, this isn't righteous indignation, but self-righteous indignation
      2. This kind of blindness—noticing others' problems and failures without acknowledging your own—reveals a hard heart
      3. The word used for hardness is sklērotēta
        1. This is where we get the word sclerosis
        2. This is the hardening of one's spiritual heart—becoming unresponsive to God, which is much worse than arteriosclerosis
        3. Most people who have arteriosclerosis don't know they have it; the first symptom is a heart attack
    2. Most people do not know their own spiritual condition
      1. Hardening of the arteries may send you to your grave
      2. The hardening of your spiritual heart will send you to hell
  6. Conclusion
    1. This is the mask religious people hide behind
      1. Paul exposed this mask because he wanted everyone to know we're saved by grace
      2. The good news is that all who call upon Him will be saved
      3. Paul was honest about his own sin (see 1 Timothy 1:15)
    2. The essence of the good news is that God extends grace to unworthy people, and we are all unworthy
      1. You can't hide behind your religious background
      2. You can't hide behind your rituals
Figures referenced: Ted Bundy, John Stott

Cross references: 1 Kings 8:39; Psalm 139:1-6; Luke 18:9-14; John 8:11; Acts 15:8; Romans 1:18, 28-32; 3:23; 2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 Timothy 1:15; Hebrews 4:13; 2 Peter 3:9; Revelation 2:23

Greek words: logizomai, makrothumeó, sklērotēta

Topic: the wrath of God

Keywords: bad news, bitter, blame, blind, brash, forgive, hard, heart, judgment, good news, mask, religion, sin

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Hypocrisy Gets an Audit
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 2:17-29
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4455

MESSAGE SUMMARY
All businesses, corporations, and individuals have blind spots. Auditors can help by giving a clear and unbiased reading of practices and procedures, and then give appropriate recommendations for change. Here, Paul played the role of auditing the hypocrite—the one who has spiritual style but no substance. Let’s consider the assets, the deficits, and the net appraisal of the one who wears a spiritual disguise.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: July 14, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Hypocrisy Gets an Audit"
Text: Romans 2:17-29

Path

All businesses, corporations, and individuals have blind spots. Auditors can help by giving a clear and unbiased reading of practices and procedures, and then give appropriate recommendations for change. Here, Paul played the role of auditing the hypocrite—the one who has spiritual style but no substance.

  1. The Assets
    1. The Right Background (v. 17)
    2. The Right Book (v. 18)
    3. The Right Business (vv. 19-20)
  2. The Deficits
    1. The Wrong Practice (vv. 21-23)
    2. The Wrong Prominence (v. 24)
    3. The Wrong Perspective (vv. 25-28)
  3. The Net Appraisal (v. 29)
Points

The AssetsThe DeficitsThe Net Appraisal (v. 29)Practice

Connect Up: Jesus criticized the Jewish religious leaders for hypocrisy—their failure to put their knowledge and privilege as God's chosen people into true practice in their hearts and lives. It's important to ask God to show us any ways in which we have been hypocritical. How can we know a true believer from a counterfeit? Here are some key ways to spot a true believer:1Connect In: It's important to make sure that we are living what we teach before we address any sin outside the church. Remember what Jesus said about removing the plank from your own eye before you tell someone about the speck in theirs (see Matthew 7:3-5). As Peter said about Christian house cleaning, "The time has come for judgment to begin at the house of God" (1 Peter 4:17). Let grace be the rule as you deal with what you see in God's house.

Connect Out: Christianity is not invalidated by the bad behavior of a few members—Jesus is the standard of integrity. Rather than looking for hypocrisy in others, take a serious look at your own behavior this week. Is there something you have been doing that might cause unbelievers to disregard God? Consider the areas Paul warned about: being self-righteous or criticizing someone for something you've done yourself. Ask God for the opportunity to make things right, and wisdom in how to make things right.


1 Tom Hicks, "How to Distinguish a True Christian from a Hypocrite," https://www.biblestudytools.com/blogs/founders-ministries-blog/how-to-distinguish-a-true-christian-from-a-hypocrite.html, accessed 07/15/2019.

DETAILED NOTES
"Hypocrisy Gets an Audit"
Romans 2:17-29

  1. Introduction
    1. 25 percent of the American public is afraid of being audited; nobody really likes auditors
      1. In this passage, Paul acted as an auditor commissioned by the Holy Spirit
      2. Paul used the word profitable, which means valuable or to gain something
    2. Jesus used the word hypocrite frequently
      1. Matthew 6:5
      2. Matthew 23:27
      3. An unbeliever wearing a mask—an unsaved person disguised as a saved person—is a hypocrite (see 2 Timothy 3:5)
    3. Paul addressed those who had a Jewish background, and he anticipated an objection
      1. In the first chapter of Romans, he wrote to those who did disgraceful things
      2. In the beginning of chapter 2, he wrote about the religious crowd, addressing their assets, deficits, and ultimate appraisal
  2. The Assets
    1. The Right Background (v. 17)
      1. God's chosen people—the Jewish nation—took pride in the name Jew
        1. This is a shortened form of Judah, which means praise to YHWH; of all the people on earth, God chose them to give Him praise
        2. Many Jews who lived in Gentile cities used it as a second surname
        3. Paul called himself "a Hebrew of the Hebrews" (Philippians 3:5)
      2. Paul acknowledged their background and spiritual heritage
        1. However, a good thing can be a bad thing if it keeps you from the best thing
        2. They stood behind the name Jew and relied on their background for salvation
          1. They thought they were safe simply because they were Jews
          2. Many people today consider themselves Christians because of their own family heritage or cultural background (see Matthew 3:9)
    2. The Right Book (v. 18)
      1. The Jewish people had the Law—the first five books of Moses—but Paul was also referring to the Old Testament in its entirety (the Tanakh)
      2. Of all the people in the world, God gave the Jews His oracle (see Romans 3:2)
      3. Jewish children were taught the Scriptures from an early age:
        1. The Sh'ma at age three (from Deuteronomy 6:4-5)
        2. The Hallel at age five (Psalm 113-118)
        3. Reading and writing the Torah at age six
        4. Bar mitzvah for boys at age thirteen; bat mitzvah for girls at age twelve
          1. Bar mitzvah means son of the commandment
          2. After bar mitzvah, the boys would wear tefillin or phylacteries (small leather boxes containing Scripture—reminders to keep the Law) on their forehead and left arms
    3. The Right Business (vv. 19-20)
      1. God's original design for Israel was for her to become an exporter of truth to the world (see Genesis 22:18)
      2. God's chosen people were to be God's responsible people
        1. Being chosen, they were also responsible—their business was to be ambassadors of truth to the world
        2. Being instructed, they were to instruct; being taught, they were to teach; being enlightened, they were to enlighten
        3. Isaiah 42:6
        4. Matthew 5:14-16
        5. Christians who never witness are like kids shining flashlights in each other's eyes; the purpose of a flashlight is to lead people out of darkness
        6. We must take the light where the light really counts—we have to be exporters of truth
  3. The Deficits
    1. The Wrong Practice (vv. 21-23)
      1. They had the right background and the right book, but they didn't practice it; in theological terms, they had the orthodoxy but not the orthopraxy
      2. Their behavior did not match their beliefs
        1. Paul provided a spiritual spreadsheet; they had the right profession, but the wrong practice
        2. Matthew 7:21
      3. Jesus has a lot of fans, but not as many followers as you might think; we need to follow Him with the right practice to match the profession
    2. The Wrong Prominence (v. 24)
      1. They were known for the wrong thing
        1. A hypocrite gives God a bad name; for a Jew to live differently than he preached would make a non-Jew dismiss the claims of the Jew
        2. Paul called them out just as Nathan called David out (see 2 Samuel 12:14)
      2. When a believer falls into sin, his witness is ruined, God's name is sullied, and the world will then be justified in ridiculing Christians
    3. The Wrong Perspective (vv. 25-28)
      1. Circumcision was meant to be an outward sign of an inward change—the sign of a commitment to God and a covenant with God
        1. The ritual of circumcision was meant to point to the reality of following God
        2. But if you have the ritual that points to the reality of following God, but you don't follow God, all you have is an empty ritual
      2. They had begun to view the ritual of circumcision as a sort of insurance policy against God's wrath; the ceremony became a substitute for obedience
        1. Deuteronomy 10:16
        2. When we wear masks, we can do a lot of things that look great, but there may not really be life underneath
        3. Your baptism or church membership is useless if your heart isn't in it
  4. The Net Appraisal (v. 29)
    1. The only one you need approval of your life from is the one who matters most—God
      1. In the end, He's the only one who judges according to truth
      2. He sees it all and knows it all, and He will be the one who approves or disapproves of your life
    2. It doesn't matter what people think—what matters is what God thinks of you
  5. Conclusion
    1. In Romans 1, Paul showed that no one is so bad that he can't be saved; in Romans 2, he showed that no one is so good that he doesn't need to be saved
    2. We all need the same thing: God's grace
    3. If you're making the right speech but missing the right stuff, you won't be approved
      1. So many people will be shocked at the end of days when they stand before God at the great white throne judgment and Jesus says to them, "I never knew you" (Matthew 7:23)
      2. Don't be whitewashed—be washed white with the blood of Jesus Christ
Figures referenced: Howard Carter, Luke Goodrich, Jesse James

Cross references: Genesis 22:18; Deuteronomy 6:4-5; 10:16; 2 Samuel 12:14; Psalm 113-118; Isaiah 42:6; Matthew 3:9; 5:14-16; 6:5; 7:21, 23; 23:27; Romans 3:2; Philippians 3:5; 2 Timothy 3:5

Hebrew words: bar mitzvah, bat mitzvah, Hallel, Sh'ma, Tanakh, tefillin, Torah

Topic: hypocrisy

Keywords: appraisal, approval, background, judge, mask, perspective, practice, profession, whitewashed

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: The Advantage of Having the Bible
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 3:1-8
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4463

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Those who have been raised in a home with spiritual foundations and the teaching of Scripture have an edge over those who were never exposed to such benefits. The advantage of having access to the Bible is enormous, but it is not a fail-safe. Paul addressed the Jews who were caretakers of God’s own words, and much can be applied to anyone who has the advantage of revealed truth but fails to take it to heart.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: Saturday, July 28, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "The Advantage of Having the Bible"
Text: Romans 3:1-8

Path

Those who have been raised in a home with spiritual foundations and the teaching of Scripture have an edge over those who were never exposed to such benefits. The advantage of having access to the Bible is enormous, but it is not a fail-safe. Paul addressed the Jews, who were caretakers of God's own words, and much can be applied to anyone who has the advantage of revealed truth but fails to take it to heart.

  1. The Arguments of the Skeptics (v. 1)
  2. The Answers of the Scholar (vv. 2-8)
  3. The Advantages of the Scriptures (v. 2b)
  4. The Admonition of the Scribe (vv. 3-4)
Points

The Arguments of the Skeptics (v. 1)The Answers of the Scholar (vv. 2-8)The Advantages of the Scriptures (v. 2b)The Admonition of the Scribe (vv. 3-4)Practice

Connect Up: Why do you think God communicated His plans for salvation through the Bible and not some other way? Discuss the similarity between Jesus as the Word, and the Bible as the word. Think of these analogies: both are called the Word of God, each has two natures (divine and human), the two natures are united by one medium, and both Christ and Scripture are without flaw (for more, see Norman Geisler's Systematic Theology, Volume 1, page 259).

Connect In: Why is biblical teaching and study crucial for a healthy church? How have you grown from systematic Bible teaching?

Connect Out: How would you defend the reliability of the Bible to an unbeliever? Theologians would argue that there are internal and external reasons, including historical, archaeological, and scientific evidence to confirm the reliability of the Bible. If time permits, download Dr. Geisler's insights at http://www.apologetics315.com/media/trustthescriptures.pdf and discuss.

DETAILED NOTES
"The Advantage of Having the Bible"
Romans 3:1-8

  1. Introduction
    1. The Bible doesn't just change a life—it changes a lifestyle
      1. However, not everyone who is exposed to the truth lives by the truth
      2. Some hear the truth and twist it
    2. The theme of the book of Romans is the gospel
      1. How an unrighteous human can be made right with a righteous God
      2. The book of Romans is divided into four sections:
        1. The wrath of God (1:1-3:20)
        2. The grace of God (3:21-8:39)
        3. The plan of God (9-11)
        4. The will of God (12-16)
    3. Paul took apart each component of the gospel, examined each piece, and reassembled it
      1. The theme of the first section was introduced in 1:18: "The wrath of God is revealed from heaven"
      2. Paul pronounced judgment on the raunchy crowd in chapter 1 and the religious crowd in chapter 2
      3. Paul said that God judges everyone so He can save anyone
      4. Once you realize you're at the bottom, there's only one way to turn, and that's up
    4. Paul also anticipated objection
      1. Romans 2:1
      2. Romans 2:11
      3. Romans 2:29
    5. This is not an easy passage to understand
      1. 2 Peter 3:15-16
      2. If an apostle found it hard to understand another apostle, we can be comforted in our own struggle to understand
  2. The Arguments of the Skeptics (v. 1)
    1. Paul expected them to respond with these questions:
      1. "What advantage then has the Jew, or what is the profit of circumcision?" (v. 1)
      2. "What if some did not believe? Will their unbelief make the faithfulness of God without effect?" (v. 3)
      3. "If our unrighteousness demonstrates the righteousness of God, what shall we say? Is God unjust who inflicts wrath?" (v. 5)
    2. Essentially, they would ask, "If the Jewish heritage doesn't make us right with God, what's the advantage of the heritage at all?"
      1. Anyone who has studied the history of Judaism might ask this question, because, of all people, the Jews have the most difficult history
        1. Slavery
        2. Deportation
        3. Persecution
        4. Dispersion
        5. Intimidation
        6. Mass genocide
      2. The reality is that they are God's chosen people
        1. They knew it, Paul knew it, and Scripture affirmed it
        2. Deuteronomy 14:2
        3. Isaiah 43:21
    3. It's great to be God's chosen, but they concluded that this alone made them acceptable to God
      1. Paul explained that being physical descendants of Abraham did not make them spiritual descendants of Abraham
      2. If God hasn't put a mark on your heart, the mark on your flesh (circumcision) is worthless
  3. The Answers of the Scholar (vv. 2-8)
    1. Paul wrote this chapter as a scholar
      1. He used a diatribe method, which was an ancient Socratic teaching method
      2. The writer asked rhetorical questions then answered those questions in order to lead those who were listening from error into truth
        1. The questions Paul asked and answered were probably questions Paul had heard as he visited the synagogues in different cities
        2. These also may have been questions he, as a Jew, had once asked
    2. Paul anticipated these questions and objections from his audience because he had just demolished the Jews' false security in their external religion
      1. Paul never said that their heritage was not important—just that it wasn't enough
      2. Heritage is good—it gives you an edge—but heritage by itself is never enough
      3. Paul himself was a Jew and respected that heritage
        1. He worshiped in the temple whenever he was in Jerusalem
        2. He had Timothy circumcised as a concession to the Jewish believers in Galatia (see Acts 16:3)
        3. Paul paid for the purification rites of four men in the temple so that they could fulfill their Nazirite vows (see Acts 21:26)
  4. The Advantages of the Scriptures (v. 2b)
    1. What's the advantage of being a Jew?
      1. "Much in every way!" (v. 2)
      2. Paul said they had many advantages, but he focused on one
        1. If you were raised in a Christian home, you have advantages that nobody else has
        2. Don't depreciate your own testimony in favor of others' testimonies
        3. If your testimony is that you were raised in a Christian home with a framework of biblical truth and you still follow Him today, you have the best testimony, because it testifies to the keeping power of God
    2. Paul's answer: "Chiefly because to them were committed the oracles of God" (v. 2)
      1. In the NIV, chiefly is translated "first of all," which implies a list
        1. Paul finished this list in Romans 9:1-5 and included eight advantages
        2. The Greek word is prōton, which means primarily, most importantly, or first in rank
      2. Paul said that the most important advantage the Jewish people have is "the oracles of God" (v. 2)
        1. The Greek word used for oracles is logia, which means word or words
        2. Paul was referring to the Old Testament
          1. God chose the Jews in that He revealed Himself to the world through them
          2. God spoke to Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, etc.
    3. Paul stressed this advantage above all others because this is the basis for all the others
      1. Paul answered his first question, but not his second
      2. Paul zeroed in on their primary advantage—the Scripture
    4. This is also our chief advantage as Christians
      1. Giving our lives to Christ is not the end; He doesn't leave you adrift in a sea of human speculation about the meaning of life
      2. He gives us the Holy Spirit as a guide, as well as His Word
    5. This leads to an important question: What is the Bible? There are three positions you can take:
      1. It's the Word of God
        1. 2 Timothy 3:16
        2. The Greek word for inspiration here is theopneustos, which means breathed out by God
        3. How does God inspire writing?
          1. Each writer had his own style, education, circumstances, and experiences
          2. God "moved" each of them (2 Peter 1:21); moved is a sailing metaphor that refers to a ship being carried along by the wind
      2. It's the words of men
        1. Liberalism does not accept the Bible as the Word of God; it's inspired on the same level as a Picasso
        2. In this view, the Bible embodies the highest human ideals, ethics, thought, and aspirations, but at the end of the day, it's just a human book
      3. It's a combination of the two
        1. It's both the Word of God and the word of men; some things are the true Word of God, and some things are from men, so they're wrong
        2. Their scholarship is what tells you which is from God and which is from man; this leads to the scholar taking preeminence over God
        3. Everybody's a sinner, including scholars (see Romans 3:23)
  5. The Admonition of the Scribe (vv. 3-4)
    1. Jewish history is filled with failure
      1. They failed to believe God's promise
      2. They failed to obey His Word, especially when Jesus came into the world—He was rejected (see John 1:11)
    2. God has promised in both the Old and New Testaments to one day restore and redeem the nation of Israel
      1. It's happened in part, but it's been delayed
      2. Romans 11:25-27
      3. All of these are unconditional promises, and the fulfillment may be postponed, but it will never be prevented; God still has a plan for the future of the nation of Israel
      4. Not believing God's promises won't nullify God's promises
    3. The advantage can become the disadvantage
      1. You can have the oracles of God, but if you don't read, believe, and apply them, they're worthless
        1. John 5:39
        2. Hebrews 4:2
      2. Outward identity with God's people is one thing, but inward conformity to God's principles is another
  6. Conclusion
    1. Being in a Christian environment where the Bible is taught has many advantages
      1. But to take advantage of the advantage, you have to read it, study it, apply it, and share it
      2. The Bible has the power to change a life, but it also has the power to do more—only when you apply it
    2. In studying the Bible, you will find things you like, and others you don't want to hear
      1. Many truths sound very narrow; so is every landing strip in every airport—but every passenger would have it no other way
      2. The oracles of God may seem very narrow, but they lead to the gateway of a fulfilled, happy life
Figures referenced: Pablo Picasso, Alexander Smith, Mark Twain, John Wesley

Cross references: Deuteronomy 14:2; Isaiah 43:21; John 1:11; 5:39; Acts 16:3; 21:26; Romans 1:18; 2:1, 11, 29; 3:23; 9:1-5; 11:25-27; 2 Timothy 3:16; Hebrews 4:2; 2 Peter 1:21; 3:15-16

Greek words: logia, proton, theopneustos

Topic: the Scriptures

Keywords: advantage, the Bible, grace, heritage, history, Jews, Jewish, meditate, oracles, promise, study, word

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: How Prisoners Go Free
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 3:9-26
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4465

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Freedom is a huge word for the Christian believer. Picture yourself nervously standing in a courtroom before a judge who has just read the pile of evidence against you. Just before the gavel strikes the bench proclaiming your guilt, a piece of evidence strikes his gaze and he unexpectedly announces your innocence. You can now go free! Here Paul explains how any person anywhere can find hope and freedom because of the gospel.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: August 4, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "How Prisoners Go Free"
Text: Romans 3:9-26

Path

Freedom is a huge word for the Christian believer. Picture yourself nervously standing in a courtroom before a judge who has just read the pile of evidence against you. Just before the gavel strikes the bench proclaiming your guilt, a piece of evidence strikes his gaze and he unexpectedly announces your innocence. You can now go free! Here Paul explains how any person anywhere can find hope and freedom because of the gospel.

  1. Our Guilt Is Universal (vv. 9-20)
    1. Condemnation of Sin (v. 9)
    2. Confirmation by Scripture (vv. 10-18)
    3. Clarification of a System (vv. 19-20)
  2. God's Gift Is Available (vv. 21-24)
    1. It's Completely Scriptural (v. 21)
    2. It's Completely Suitable (vv. 22-24)
  3. This Grace Is Remarkable (vv. 24-26)
    1. God Acted Graciously (vv. 24-26)
    2. God Acted Judiciously (v. 26)
Points

Our Guilt Is Universal (vv. 9-20)God's Gift Is Available (vv. 21-24)This Grace Is Remarkable (vv. 24-26)Practice

Connect Up: The declaration of Scripture is clear, but profound—all are guilty, but, through God's grace, all can receive the gift of salvation in Christ. Two key attributes of God are found in the guilt/grace model: God's perfect righteousness and His all-goodness (love and grace). Why are both attributes necessary for a biblical picture of God? How are these two attributes related, in that you can't have God's grace without His holiness?

Connect In: The guilt/grace pattern can be found in our interaction with other Christians. As an example, someone may wrong you, but you are called to forgive them (see Matthew 18:21-35). Without using names or indicting someone, share the story of a time when you had to go out of your way to forgive someone when they didn't deserve it. Discuss how God gives us grace, and how we are to follow His example.

Connect Out: Romans 3:23-24 is one of the clearest proclamations of the guilt/grace reality. Using this text, how would you reach out to an unbeliever, describing our guilt, as well as God's grace? How can you tie in your personal testimony? Why is it important to balance the truths of guilt and grace when leading someone to Christ?

DETAILED NOTES
"How Prisoners Go Free"
Romans 3:9-26

  1. Introduction
    1. About 2.3 million Americans are incarcerated
      1. 1 out of 138 Americans is in jail
      2. The United States has 5 percent of the world's total population and 25 percent of the world's prison population
    2. How do prisoners become free?
      1. There is a cross that sets men and women free; that cross is the key to liberty
      2. Luke 4:18
      3. John 8:36
    3. In this section of Romans 3, Paul announced both guilt and freedom
      1. As prisoners, we are brought into the courtroom, but instead of pronouncing a guilty verdict, the judge sets us free
      2. If I'm guilty, how can I have liberty?
  2. Our Guilt Is Universal (vv. 9-20)
    1. Condemnation of Sin (v. 9)
      1. Paul brought a fourteen-count indictment against humanity
      2. These indictments fall into three categories:
        1. Character: who a person is
        2. Conversation: what a person says
        3. Conduct: what a person does
    2. Confirmation by Scripture (vv. 10-18)
      1. Paul acted as the prosecutor in a courtroom and used Scriptures to show the magnitude of our guilt
      2. This is Paul's summary statement; after talking about the guilt of the raunchy, religious, and self-righteous crowds, Paul's conclusion was that all of us are guilty
      3. Paul repeated the word none four times and the word all three times
        1. In the Scriptures, the number seven represents completion or totality
        2. This is God's complete indictment against humanity
          1. How many are righteous? None
          2. How many are guilty? All
    3. Clarification of a System (vv. 19-20)
      1. We have a problem—very few people believe that
        1. Many people believe that mankind is basically good, and guilt is a "wasted emotion"
        2. Mankind is good only in that we are created in the image of God, but that image can be very faint at times
      2. People feel guilty because they are guilty
        1. The feeling is only a symptom of the problem
        2. The only permanent solution is to deal with the guilt at a deeper level
      3. Every human being will "fall short" (v. 23) of the standard of the glory of God
      4. Where does this leave us?
        1. It leaves us speechless
        2. Revelation 8:1
  3. God's Gift Is Available (vv. 21-24)
    1. It's Completely Scriptural (v. 21)
      1. This is the first transition in the book of Romans—from the wrath of God to the grace of God
        1. There is a Grand Canyon of sorts between verses 20 and 21
        2. "But now"—after a long, dark night, the sun begins to shine
      2. This is where Paul introduced the righteousness of God
        1. Paul referred back to a theme he introduced in Romans 1:16-17
        2. The righteousness of God does not refer to God's personal righteousness
          1. This is the righteousness He provides
          2. Isaiah 64:6
    2. It's Completely Suitable (vv. 22-24)
      1. Paul quoted the Old Testament to indict humanity fourteen times, but he referred back to the Law again
        1. The same Law and prophets that announced our guilt also announced God's gift
        2. Isaiah 53:6
        3. Jeremiah 31:31-33
      2. How is this righteousness available?
        1. "Through faith in Jesus Christ" (v. 22)
        2. This is not faith in God generally; it is faith in Christ specifically
        3. Faith in God is not enough; faith in the Son of God is enough
        4. John 14:6
  4. This Grace Is Remarkable (vv. 24-26)
    1. God Acted Graciously (vv. 24-25)
      1. If God is to be perfectly just, He must judge sin
      2. How can He be just but at the same time free the prisoners—justify people?
        1. He has to let it all rest on one sinless victim so that He can confer grace on those who are guilty
        2. This happens through grace—unmerited and undeserved favor
        3. God is filled with the sheer generosity of grace
    2. God Acted Judiciously (v. 26)
      1. Justification (see v. 24) appears thirty times in the New Testament, fifteen of which are in the book of Romans
        1. This is a legal term that means to declare a person righteous and to treat them as such; it does not mean to make someone righteous
        2. When we are justified, God treats us as if we'd never sinned
      2. Redemption (see v. 24) is language that comes from the slave market
        1. To redeem is to set someone free by paying a price
        2. The fact that money is given shows that the buyer places value on the slave
        3. Redemption indicates value; you are so precious to God that He looks at you and says that you are worth all of the pain that Jesus suffered through
          1. John 3:16
          2. Your value comes from being loved by the God of this universe
      3. Propitiation (see v. 25) means appeasement or satisfaction
        1. Modern translations don't use this word because it's difficult to translate the Greek word—hilastērion
        2. God's wrath is appeased by the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross
        3. The word propitiation is used twice in the New Testament but twenty times in the Septuagint (Greek translation of the Old Testament)
          1. It is translated as mercy seat in the Old Testament
          2. This was the only place God would meet with His people
          3. What kept God from judging His people? The blood on the mercy seat
  5. Conclusion
    1. Jesus is the only place God in heaven will meet with mankind on earth
      1. He is the only place where God and man can come together
      2. Jesus is our mercy seat
    2. Jesus satisfied the just demands of God's holy law and bought our freedom, paying the price with His own blood
      1. God is now able to declare you as righteous as Christ and treat you as such
      2. This is all summed up in the word grace
    3. This gift must be received
      1. Unless you accept God's forgiveness, you won't be forgiven
      2. If you're not forgiven, you'll still have guilt
      3. You'll never get rid of guilt until you come to the cross to be forgiven
Figures referenced: Donald Grey Barnhouse, Martin Luther, Alva McClain, Leon Morris, Henry Smith

Cross references: Isaiah 53:6; 64:6; Jeremiah 31:31-33; Luke 4:18; John 3:16; 8:36; 14:6; Romans 1:16-17; Revelation 8:1

Greek words: hilastērion

Topic: freedom

Keywords: gift, grace, guilt, indictment, justification, propitiation, redemption, righteousness

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Old Age; Young Faith
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 4
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4467

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Our skin may wrinkle but our faith never has to. Abraham’s faith was vibrant and youthful even when he was nearing one hundred years of age. As Paul points to the patriarch Abraham as an example for justification by faith, we can learn what it means to believe God through all the ages of life. How vibrant is your Christian faith? Have you let cynicism and doubt choke out your confidence in God?

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: August 11, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Old Age; Young Faith"
Text: Romans 4

Path

Our skin may wrinkle but our faith never has to. Abraham's faith was vibrant and youthful even when he was nearing one hundred years of age. As Paul points to the patriarch Abraham as an example for justification by faith, we can learn what it means to believe God through all the ages of life. How vibrant is your Christian faith? Have you let cynicism and doubt choke out your confidence in God?

  1. Abraham's Faith Exhibited (vv. 1-15)
  2. Abraham's Faith Explained (vv. 16-17)
  3. Abraham's Faith Examined (vv. 18-25)
    1. He Believed God Can Do Anything (vv. 17-18)
    2. He Believed Circumstances Aren't Everything (v. 19)
    3. He Believed Challenges Are Nothing (v. 20)
    4. He Believed Promises Mean Something (v. 21)
Points

Abraham's Faith Exhibited (vv. 1-15)Abraham's Faith Explained (vv. 16-17)Abraham's Faith Examined (vv. 18-25)Practice

Connect Up: Though we can see the handiwork of God in creation, we can't physically see God. Having faith in God is like trusting in the laws of physics to get a plane in the air. According to Hebrews 11:1 and 6, why is faith vital for belief in God? Knowing is not enough, nor is conviction. We must receive—by faith, through God's grace—the promises of God in Christ. Discuss why each of the following kinds of faith is important in our relationship with God:Connect In: How is faith communicated and lived out in the church? Here are some areas to discuss:Connect Out: How would you explain to an unbeliever the role of faith in the Christian life? Knowing that all people have faith in something, how can you direct an unbeliever's faith in self, science, money, power, etc., to faith in God?

DETAILED NOTES
"Old Age; Young Faith"
Romans 4

  1. Introduction
    1. You should never fear growing old; you should fear growing stale as you grow old
      1. You should be afraid of losing a vibrant, active, childlike faith in God
      2. Psalm 92:13-14
      3. Confidence in God makes a person attractive at any age
    2. A survey of people over the age of ninety-five indicated three things people would have done differently if they could live their lives over again:
      1. They would reflect more, they would risk more, and they would do more things that would live on after they died
      2. You will never regret a life of faith; you won't get to the end of your life and say, "I think I trusted God way too much when I was younger"
    3. In the first three chapters of Romans, Paul focused on what it means to be right with God
      1. He said the Law can reveal sin, but never remove sin
      2. He also said that salvation by faith was witnessed by the Law and the prophets
        1. As Paul said this, he expected that those who read it would question it
        2. Paul knew he would be questioned because he understood the Jewish mindset
      3. Paul called on Abraham and David as witnesses in chapter 4 to prove his case that salvation is by grace alone, through faith alone
  2. Abraham's Faith Exhibited (vv. 1-15)
    1. Paul referred to an incident in Abraham's life when he was eighty-six years old
      1. Genesis 15:5-6
      2. Abraham believed God's promise, and God counted it to him as righteousness
      3. In Hebrew, the word believed is amen
      4. The word Paul used in the Greek is episteusen, which is a banking term meaning to credit something to somebody's account
    2. Abraham was spiritually bankrupt before God, but as soon as he said amen and trusted God, the accounts changed
      1. God considered Abraham righteous because he believed by faith
      2. Abraham's faith was used four times in the New Testament to make the same point—any sinful person can be right with holy God simply by faith
    3. When Abraham believed God, the Law wasn't even around; Moses wouldn't be born for another 400 years
      1. Abraham wasn't circumcised until age ninety-nine; he did it after he believed and after God counted him righteous
      2. Abraham's was a living, active, vibrant faith; he was an old man and God asked him to look to the future, not backwards
        1. If you want to stay young, say amen to God's promises more often—don't just read them in the Bible
        2. You are as young as your faith and as old as your doubt
  3. Abraham's Faith Explained (vv. 16-17)
    1. In verse 16, Paul explained a principle that he also laid out in Ephesians 2:8-9
      1. Abraham was the prototype—the poster child—of salvation by faith so that everyone who believes can trace their lineage back to him
      2. When you place your trust in Jesus Christ alone, you enter a spiritual heritage that goes all the way back to the simple faith of Abraham
    2. Like Abraham, we don't work for salvation or go through a ritual to obtain it
      1. When you believe in Jesus Christ and trust in Him, you are saved
      2. Romans 10:9-10
    3. Believing is just the beginning; growth follows, and works follow the growth
      1. But you're not saved by those works; they simply verify your real faith
      2. The simple amen, the simple belief in your heart makes you right with God
        1. Paul's audience thought exactly the opposite; many people in ancient pagan religions thought you had to work hard for it
        2. Most people today believe that you have to do something more than believe
          1. 77 percent of Americans believe that people must contribute their own effort for personal salvation
          2. 52 percent believe that good deeds help them earn a spot in heaven
        3. What a place heaven would be if people got there by paying their own way
          1. It would be a miserable place; people would be bragging and boasting
          2. We're all going to say, "I got here by grace—because of what Jesus did for me, not because of anything I did for Him"
  4. Abraham's Faith Examined (vv. 18-25)
    1. He Believed God Can Do Anything (vv. 17-18)
      1. Abraham brought God into the equation
        1. When a problem arises, the first thing we try to do is work it out in our own minds, and if we can't figure it out, we assume that God can't figure it out
        2. Throughout the Genesis narratives, God talked about Isaac as though Isaac was living at the time, even though he wasn't born yet
      2. Our issue is that we tend to carry our limitations over onto God
        1. God told Abraham several times that he would have a son
          1. On one of these occasions, Sarah was listening and responded by laughing
          2. "Is anything too hard for the Lord?" (Genesis 18:14)
        2. Jeremiah 32:27
      3. We need a perspective adjustment
        1. Remember who you're dealing with—who you're praying to
        2. Acts 4:18
          1. A law was passed that the church could not mention the name of Jesus in the city of Jerusalem
          2. They responded by holding a prayer meeting, and they framed their perspective using the character and power of God
      4. We tend to let our circumstances block our view of God, but Abraham decided, at age eighty-six, to let God be God and believe that He can do anything
    2. He Believed Circumstances Aren't Everything (v. 19)
      1. Abram was eighty-six when God promised that he would be the father of many nations
        1. Abraham was ninety-nine when God made the promise again and changed his name to Abraham, which means father of a multitude
        2. Abraham became his name in an act of faith; he wasn't thinking of the frailties of the flesh as much as the faithfulness of God
      2. Abraham believed that because God can do anything, circumstances aren't everything
    3. He Believed Challenges Are Nothing (v. 20)
      1. If God can do anything and circumstances aren't everything, then a challenge is nothing to God
      2. Abraham did not waver from believing in God's promises
        1. Waver means to vacillate or doubt
        2. It might seem like Abraham wavered in his faith
          1. Genesis 16:4
          2. Genesis 17:17-22
          3. Struggling in your faith is not the same as unbelief or doubting, just as being tempted isn't the same as sin
      3. Abraham was circumcised at age ninety-nine as a seal that he believed God's promises; he was strengthened in faith
        1. Luke 1:37
        2. This is the kind of faith that stays young; when you live like that, life is an adventure
        3. Romans 10:17
    4. He Believed Promises Mean Something (v. 21)
      1. Abraham was "fully convinced"; to Abraham, the promise was as good as the performance
      2. What do you do with God's promises?
        1. Your answer should be, "I take them to the bank and cash them in"
        2. Are we standing on the promises? Or sitting on the premises?
        3. 2 Peter 1:4
  5. Conclusion
    1. Abraham lived a life of faith
      1. "Lord, I crawled across the barrenness to you with my empty cup, uncertain in asking any small drop of refreshment. If only I had known you better, I'd have come running with a bucket" —Nancy Spiegelberg
      2. Romans 8:32
    2. Did you know that what you believe about God is the most important thing about you?
      1. Circumstances will not make or break you; they will just expose you
      2. What you believe about God determines what you believe about everything else
Figures referenced: George Muller, George Bernard Shaw, Nancy Spiegelberg, Billy Sunday

Cross references: Genesis 15:5-6; 16:4; 17:17-22; 18:14; Psalm 92:13-14; Jeremiah 32:27; Luke 1:37; Acts 4:18; Romans 8:32; 10:9-10, 17; Ephesians 2:8-9; 2 Peter 1:4

Greek words: episteusen

Topic: faith

Keywords: age, believe, challenges, circumstances, childlike, doubt, life, perspective, promise, regrets

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Our Benefits Package
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 5:1-5
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4469

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Why is being a Christian so great? Every unbeliever you meet is asking that question as they observe your life. What are the benefits of living with a committed faith in Jesus? After explaining what it means to be right with God by believing in Christ, and after illustrating that principle with Abraham, Paul gives a short list of some of the benefits of a saved life.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: August 18, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Our Benefits Package"
Text: Romans 5:1-5

Path

Why is being a Christian so great? Every unbeliever you meet is asking that question as they observe your life. What are the benefits of living with a committed faith in Jesus? After explaining what it means to be right with God by believing in Christ, and after illustrating that principle with Abraham, Paul gives a short list of some of the benefits of a saved life.

  1. Peace with God (v. 1)
  2. Privilege of Access (v. 2a)
  3. Preview of the Future (v. 2b)
  4. Purpose in Pain (vv. 3-5)
Points

Peace with God (v. 1)Privilege of Access (v. 2a)Preview of the Future (v. 2b)Purpose in Pain (vv. 3-5)Practice

Connect Up: It's good to talk about the moment God justified you (your salvation). Share your personal testimony. Talk about God's peace, and how it brought purpose to your life.

Connect In: Access to God is a privilege for Christians and the church. Discuss how we have access in the following ways:As Prophet, Priest, and King, how does Christ fulfill each of the above areas? For example, as High Priest, He gives us access to God's throne. As Prophet He proclaims (and is) the Word of God, giving us access to God's truth. And as King, He is worthy of prayer and honor, giving us access to a personal relationship with the King of Heaven. (If time permits, see Christian Apologetics & Research Ministry for more information: https://carm.org/prophet-priest-king.) What other connections can you make?

Connect Out: How can you use Pastor Skip's summary points as a guide in sharing your faith with others, highlighting the benefits of the Christian life? As an example: a Christian has peace with God (justification, evangelism), access to God (via prayer, worship, and Bible study), hope to be with God in heaven, and purpose in life, even in trials (trusting God in all areas).

DETAILED NOTES
"Our Benefits Package"
Romans 5:1-5

  1. Introduction
    1. Have you ever thought about how great the company we work for—the church of Jesus Christ—is?
      1. Our product works universally: you can share the gospel with any person willing to listen and receive it, and it will change their life
      2. We have offices worldwide: you can go to any country or culture and find some expression of the church
      3. Our benefits are exceptional: forgiveness for our past, which means peace of mind in the present
      4. We have a retirement package that is out of this world: when it's all over, heaven is waiting for us and we'll be rewarded based on our service for the Lord on earth
    2. The last word of Romans 4:25 is justification
      1. Justification is how you get right with God
      2. Salvation is by grace alone, through faith alone; it is not earned, but received
        1. None of us are going to be able to say how good we were to get into heaven
        2. We're all going to point to the man with five wounds and say, "That's how I got here—based on what He did for me"
      3. But forgiveness is just the beginning
  2.  Peace with God (v. 1)
    1. This is the first, immediate effect of justification
      1. Peace with God is not a feeling of peace; it's a fact of peace
      2. An unsaved person is at enmity with and separated from God
        1. Isaiah 48:22
        2. Psalm 7:11
        3. Romans 1:18
    2. The great enemy of peace is sin
      1. We need to have a peace treaty with God
        1. Unbelievers might feel peaceful, but they're not at peace with God
        2. Their feeling of peace is only a temporary illusion
      2. Believers are at peace with God, but might not have feelings of peace because of carnality or because they're untaught in Scripture
    3. God has declared us righteous and made peace possible; the peace treaty has been signed
      1. The cross made peace possible; when you said "yes" to Jesus, you received peace with God
      2. Isaiah 53:5
      3. Once we have peace with God as believers, we should experience the peace of God
        1. Philippians 4:6-7
        2. Peace with God should generate the peace of God, but the first is a fact and the second is a feeling
          1. The first is judicial; the second is experiential
          2. The first is objective; the second is subjective
          3. Jesus as Savior brings peace with God; Jesus as Lord brings the peace of God
          4. Jesus is called the Prince of Peace because He primarily came to make peace between mankind and God
      4. Everybody says they want peace, but not everybody wants what it takes to get peace
        1. They must surrender their lives to Christ
        2. For those of us who have been justified, our number one benefit is peace with God
  3. Privilege of Access (v. 2a)
    1. The word access is used of someone who brings another into someone else's presence
      1. This word could be used of a man who secured an audience with the king and brought another man, properly attired, before the king
      2. In and of ourselves, we are ill clad—our righteousness is as filthy rags (see Isaiah 64:6)
      3. Jesus clothes us with His righteousness, then takes us in and introduces us to the Father (see John 14:6)
    2. The idea of access to God was a revolutionary concept
      1. For pagans, the idea of intimacy with and access to God was unheard of
        1. The Greek and Roman gods were angry and petulant
        2. The pagans believed that the gods were to be placated, not approached
      2. Judaism was different, but not much better in terms of intimacy with or access to God
        1. There were different courts in the temple to keep people separated from God
        2. Only the high priest could enter the Holy of Holies once a year—briefly and carefully
        3. All of that ended at the cross; when Jesus died on the cross, a significant event occurred that showed access is now available
          1. The veil of the temple was torn from top to bottom, signifying that there is no longer a wall of separation
          2. You can come into the court of the king; you have access to His presence
        4. Ephesians 2:13
        5. Lamentations 3:22-23
      3. Jesus introduced us to the Father, then gave us the key card to the throne room so that we can make repeat visits
      4. Hebrews 4:16
    3. Paul used the word stand in verse 2 because we are to stand firmly, immovable
      1. Even when you fall, you can enter the throne room and come boldly before God
      2. The child of a king can enter his father's presence no matter how he looks; you can come because you have peace with God and access to God
      3. God bought us out of the slave market, adopted us as sons and daughters, and brought us into the family so that we have peace between us and God, access to the throne of grace, and all the resources of heaven at our disposal
  4. Preview of the Future (v. 2b)
    1. Our salvation is anchored in the future because we have a promise that all of this will lead somewhere else
      1. If Christianity is just a philosophy that gets people through life—a belief system that people hold on to, so they have a way to cope with this crazy world—then what we're doing is stupidity
      2. Our hope is founded in the glory of God
        1. The glory of God is a reference to heaven, where God's glory will be fully displayed
        2. Moses wasn't satisfied with what he had already experienced (see Exodus 33:18)
          1. God spoke to him audibly
          2. Moses witnessed the burning bush
          3. He witnessed all of the signs that God worked in Egypt
      3. No man can see God and live, but one day, Moses' prayer will be answered for us
        1. We will see God's full glory
        2. Our glorified bodies will share in a glory like His
        3. 1 John 3:2
        4. This is our hope in the glory of God; J.B. Phillips translates it "a happy certainty"
    2. We have hope for two reasons:
      1. Jesus prayed for us to see His glory (see John 17:20-24)
      2. Jesus did something to ensure that it would happen
        1. When Jesus rose from the dead, it proved that everything else He promised is possible
        2. 1 Peter 1:3
        3. When Jesus died, the disciples' hope was dead, but when Jesus rose from the dead, hope went ballistic
        4. All the promises Jesus made are true
          1. John 11:25
          2. John 14:6
          3. John 5:24
          4. John 14:19
      3. When Jesus rose from the dead, His promises became real, with real meaning
        1. If He can rise from the dead, every promise He made about everlasting life is possible
        2. We have a living hope that we know to be true; we rejoice in the certainty of the glory of God
  5. Purpose in Pain (vv. 3-5)
    1. In the past, we have peace with God; in the present, we have access; in the future, we have glory—but what about all the hardships we go through?
      1. Salvation isn't a fairytale; after you receive Christ, you will have tribulation
      2. John 16:33
    2. Justification is not an escape from trials—it is a guarantee that those trials have purpose
      1. Those trials will work for you, not against you
      2. Romans 8:28
      3. The English word tribulation comes from the Latin word tribulum
        1. A tribulum was a piece of wood with spikes
        2. It was used to separate the wheat from the chaff
    3. Tribulations separate what's important from what's unimportant; they work for you because they produce perseverance, character, and hope
      1. We are to glory in our tribulations
      2. We should thank God for our tribulations, because there's a purpose to the pain
      3. Unbelievers are unable to glory in tribulation
        1. To an unbeliever, this life is all there is, and if it's marked with pain and tribulation, they've lost everything
        2. The believer is able to glory in tribulation because no matter how dark the evening gets, the morning is coming
        3. Tribulation will work these character traits and depth into our lives, and heaven is on the other side
      4. This is why we need to be careful when we ask why God lets bad things happen to good people
        1. Be very careful what you're calling bad; what you look at as bad might be the best thing for you
        2. Genesis 50:20
  6. Conclusion
    1. "Why should I tremble at the plow of my Lord that makes deep furrows in my soul? He is no idle husbandman. He purposes a crop" —Samuel Rutherford
    2. Because we are justified by faith, we have peace with God, access to God, hope to be with God in glory, and purpose in our trials
    3. May the benefits that follow forgiveness motivate you to serve Him diligently
Figures referenced: J.B. Phillips, Samuel Rutherford, Kenneth Wiese

Cross references: Genesis 50:20; Exodus 33:18; Psalm 7:11; Isaiah 48:22; 53:5; 64:6; Lamentations 3:22-23; John 5:24; 11:25; 14:6, 19; 16:33; 17:20-24; Romans 1:18; 4:25; 8:28; Ephesians 2:13; Philippians 4:6-7; Hebrews 4:16; 1 Peter 1:3; 1 John 3:2

Latin words: tribulum

Topic: salvation

Keywords: access, benefits, forgiveness, glory, hope, justification, pain, peace, purpose, resurrection, salvation, tribulations

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Unrivaled Love
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 5:6-11
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4471

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Modern wisdom continually tells us, “Love is a verb,” rather than a sentimental feeling. Love is a commitment that involves action. For the first time in the letter to the Romans, Paul introduced the word love and a very singular kind of love—God’s love for us. Wanting to show how secure we are in this salvation, he described the greatest demonstration of love—its proof, its provision, and its product.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: August 25, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Unrivaled Love"
Text: Romans 5:6-11

Path

Modern wisdom continually tells us, "Love is a verb," rather than a sentimental feeling. Love is a commitment that involves action. For the first time in the letter to the Romans, the apostle Paul introduced the word love and a very singular kind of love—God's love for us. Wanting to show how secure we are in this salvation, Paul describes the greatest demonstration of love—its proof, its provision, and its product.

  1. The Proof of God's Love (vv. 6-8)
    1. His Gift Was Sacrificial (vv. 6-8)
    2. His Gift Was Unconditional (v. 6)
    3. His Gift Was Incomparable (vv. 7-8)
  2. The Provision of God's Love (vv. 9-10)
    1. Jesus' Death Saved Us from God's Wrath (v. 9)
    2. Jesus' Life Saved Us from Our Ruin (v. 10)
  3. The Product of God's Love (v. 11)
Points

The Proof of God's Love (vv. 6-8)The Provision of God's Love (vv. 9-10)The Product of God's Love (v. 11)Practice

Connect Up: God is love (see 1 John 4:7-21), but that does not mean He is without justice (leading to wrath). God's love is both caring and just, making us perfect and complete like Him (see Matthew 5:48). Theologically, the unified character of God is called simplicity (i.e., without parts, indivisible). Why is it important to discuss both love and justice in relation to a unified understanding of God's character? Why does God punish evil, yet love the evildoer? How can both be true?

Connect In: How should the love/justice dynamic work in harmony within the church? Here are some areas to ponder:Connect Out: Using the concept of joy as a springboard, how could you implement the quote Pastor Skip gave from Thomas Aquinas to describe why people pursue carnal things in life? Why are people seeking joy apart from God, and why does that joy fail them? How can you weave true joy (the result of our salvation from wrath and ruin through Christ) as a talking point in sharing the gospel? Because of the power of joy, why is it important for Christians to exude joy when witnessing? What does our joy look like? How is it different from happiness?

DETAILED NOTES
"Unrivaled Love"
Romans 5:6-11

  1. Introduction
    1. True love is what people search for in life
      1. People want to be loved and to love
      2. Google provides over two billion results for true love, including:
        1. Advertisements on how to find true love
        2. Hit songs that talk about true love
        3. Articles about how to ensure that you'll find true love
        4. Explanations as to what true love is all about
    2. True love has been discussed, pondered, argued, and debated for centuries
      1. Some have become cynical
        1. Nobody can find true love
        2. Love is just a result of chemicals in the brain; it's a physiological response
      2. Others are hopeless romantics
        1. They believe they'll find a soulmate who is compatible with them in every way
        2. They believe they will have an endless romance as the sun sets over their white picket fence
    3. We live in a fallen world
      1. Our world is filled with broken and imperfect people
      2. Any relationship can fail at some point, because when broken, imperfect people love other broken, imperfect people, their love is imperfect
      3. However, God's love is in a different category altogether
        1. 1 John 3:1
        2. What foreign kind of love is this?
    4. The last word in Romans 4 is justification
      1. To be justified means to be declared righteous
      2. God declares that you are now right with Him, simply because you believe in what Jesus did for you
        1. He declares you right with Him and then treats you as such
        2. As a result of justification, we have peace with God, access to God, hope in the glory of the future, and purpose in all the trials of this life
    5. The first time the word love is used in the book of Romans is in 5:5
      1. Paul presented the wrath of God and the grace of God
      2. When you receive Jesus as Lord and Savior, you enter a lifelong relationship with God
      3. The second use of the word love is in verse 8
        1. God demonstrated His love toward us
        2. Paul introduced God's love, then pointed to the cross as the greatest example and act of love
    6. The overwhelming truth of the gospel is that God loves broken, imperfect people
      1. "No truth in the whole Bible ought to affect us as the love of God" —Dwight L. Moody
      2. Love is an essential part of God's character
        1. That does not mean that God doesn't hate
        2. Proverbs 6:16-19
      3. 1 John 4:8
      4. Paul discussed justification by faith, then he gave us God's motive for it all: love
  2. The Proof of God's Love (vv. 6-8)
    1. His Gift Was Sacrificial (vv. 6-8)
      1. The proof of love is always in the gift; what is love willing to give?
      2. God gave His Son, and His Son gave His life
        1. John 3:16
        2. Galatians 2:20
      3. Love is willing to give
          1. Love is willing to make a sacrifice
          2. Love is never passive or silent
          3. Love is always active and willing to act
      4. One of the reasons many marriages deteriorate is because couples stop giving to each other
        1. They stop giving their interest, time, energy, or care
        2. The marriage relationship deteriorates into a legal, formal relationship where those feelings disappear because giving stops
      5. For God, love was a verb, and He gave His very best: His only Son
      6. For Jesus, love was a verb
        1. He gave His life
        2. John 10:18
        3. Jesus was a true King searching for what He could give
          1. Matthew 20:28
          2. The proof of God's love is that the gift given was a sacrificial gift
    2. His Gift Was Unconditional (v. 6)
      1. "Without strength" (v. 6) means hopeless, powerless
        1. We had no ability to improve our condition, no capability to help ourselves, because we were spiritually dead
        2. Ephesians 2:1-2
        3. Before salvation, you were the walking dead—insensate to spiritual things
      2. "In due time" (v. 6)
        1. Galatians 4:4
        2. Our God, at the right time, sent His Son to save those who were in a helpless, hopeless, powerless condition; this is the style of God's love
          1. God loves the prodigal when they run away and wallow in the muck and mire of their own sin
          2. Jesus loves the prostitute
          3. Jesus loves the drug dealer and the drug user
          4. God hates what they're doing, but He loves the person (see Mark 10:21)
    3. His Gift Was Incomparable (vv. 7-8)
      1. In these two verses, Paul compared divine love to human love in order to show the vast difference between the way people love and the way God loves us
        1. Human love is almost always based on the attractiveness of the object that is loved
          1. If the object is more attractive, there's more love; if the object is less attractive, there's less love
          2. Human love is object-oriented, based upon the value, worth, status, or beauty of that object
          3. We are also inclined to love people who love us (see Luke 6:32)
        2. Our mistake is that we often attribute human love to God
          1. We think that God must love those who love Him, or that His love depends on how good we are
          2. "If God loved us because we loved Him, He would love us only so long as we love Him, and on that condition; and then our salvation would depend on the constancy of our treacherous hearts" —Charles Hodge
        3. God's love is not like human love; it is subject-oriented, not object-oriented
          1. Love is part of His nature, completely independent of the beauty, attractiveness, and value of the object
          2. God's love is completely dependent on the character of the subject giving the love
          3. It's unusual, from a human perspective, to love and sacrifice for a scoundrel, villain, rascal, cheat, or thief, but God is so inclined (see Luke 5:32)
  3. The Provision of God's Love (vv. 9-10)
    1. Jesus' Death Saved Us from God's Wrath (v. 9)
      1. Paul introduced the wrath of God in Romans 1:18, then unleashed for three chapters, describing the wrath of God and the condition of humanity
        1. This is the wrath that we're saved from
        2. For those who believe in Jesus, God's wrath is not an issue; a believer never has to worry about God's wrath
        3. John 5:24
      2. For you and I who trust in Jesus Christ simply, authentically, and wholeheartedly, God's wrath will never be an issue
        1. But that's not true for everybody (see John 3:36)
        2. The Bible divides all of humanity into two camps:
          1. Those who believe in Jesus—those who have escaped God's wrath
          2. Those who do not believe—those who will one day encounter God's wrath
        3. For believers, though, wrath is not an issue
          1. 1 Thessalonians 1:10
          2. God's wrath has been removed because Jesus took the brunt of it
          3. All the wrath of God was allowed to be poured into and on the body of Jesus so that when He died for you and me, God's wrath was satisfied in that sacrifice
    2. Jesus' Life Saves Us from Our Ruin (v. 10)
      1. Verse 10 is one of the strongest promises in the New Testament: we will be kept by God
        1. Paul argued from greater to lesser, both logically and theologically
          1. If the dying Savior reconciled us to God, then surely a living Savior will keep us reconciled to God
          2. If God can bring a sinner to heaven, then surely God can keep a saint while on the earth
          3. If our sin couldn't keep Him from loving us before we were saved, can anything keep us from His love now that we are saved?
          4. If our sin was not a barrier to the beginning of salvation, then how can our sin ever be a barrier at the completion of our salvation?
        2. God always finishes what He starts
          1. Hebrews 12:2
          2. Philippians 1:6
          3. Our safety depends on God's nature, not our own, just like your salvation didn't depend on your character and nature, but on God's
      2. Jesus not only pardons you; He preserves you
        1. John 17:15
        2. 2 Timothy 1:12
        3. He heals your soul, and He can keep your soul
  4. The Product of God's Love (v. 11)
    1. What does this love of God do in us?
      1. Authentic joy is the result of experiencing that true love
        1. Joy is what the world is missing, and joy is what the gospel produces
        2. Every person wants to be happy
        3. "No man can live without joy. That is why one who is deprived of spiritual joy goes over to carnal pleasures" —Thomas Aquinas
        4. Whenever you see someone trying to fill up their life with sensual, carnal, worldly pleasures, it's because they haven't found what they're looking for: a true sense of spiritual joy
      2. One of the first signs that a person is right with God is joy
        1. Luke 2:10
        2. Acts 13:48
        3. Acts 8:8
    2. The joy that God offers is not the joy that the car dealership promises
      1. God is not interested in just putting a temporary smile on your face
      2. He wants to deposit real joy, hope, and love in your heart
      3. The effect of true love is true joy, and Jesus is the author of both
  5. Conclusion
    1. God knows exactly what you need and sent a Savior
      1. He sent someone who demonstrated His love for you in His sacrifice
      2. He loves you at your worst so that He can take you at your worst and turn you into His best
    2. True love is when you discover that God in heaven, your Creator, who did all of this, thought that you were worth it
      1. When you realize that God thought you were worth all of this, you experience true love like you've never experienced it before
      2. You'll never find this love on a human level; it might be good, and it might come close, but it will be nothing like this
      3. God's great love is sacrificial, unconditional, and incomparable and provides salvation from wrath, and salvation for you, forever
Figures referenced: Thomas Aquinas, Stephen Covey, Corporal Jason Dunham, James Harrison, Charles Hodge, James Earl Jones, Dwight L. Moody

Cross references: Proverbs 6:16-19; Matthew 20:28; Mark 10:21; Luke 2:10; 5:32; 6:32; John 3:16, 36; 5:24; 10:18; 17:15; Acts 8:8; 13:48; Romans 1:18; 4:25; 5:5; Galatians 2:20; 4:4; Ephesians 2:1-2; Philippians 1:6; 1 Thessalonians 1:10; 2 Timothy 1:12; Hebrews 12:2; 1 John 3:1; 4:8

Topic: the love of God

Keywords: believe, character, incomparable, joy, love, nature, sacrificial, salvation, true, unconditional, wrath

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: A One-Man Show
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 5:12-21
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4473

MESSAGE SUMMARY
Just one person can do a lot of damage, and conversely just one person can do a lot of good. Paul here showed the effect that Adam brought on by his rebellion and the effect that Jesus bought with His blood on the cross. One caused death. One conveys life. One brought guilt. One bought the gift of grace. The big question is, have you received the gift?

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: September 1, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "A One-Man Show"
Text: Romans 5:12-21

Path

Just one person can do a lot of damage, and conversely just one person can do a lot of good. Paul here showed the effect that Adam brought on by his rebellion and the effect that Jesus bought with His blood on the cross. One caused death. One conveys life. One brought guilt. One bought the gift of grace. The big question is, have you received the gift?

  1. One Man's Failure Brought Mankind's Fall (vv. 12-14)
    1. Adam Sinned
    2. All Were Affected
    3. Condemnation Resulted
  2. One Man's Fix Bought Mankind's Favor (vv. 15-21)
    1. Christ Sacrificed
    2. All Can Be Affected
    3. Justification Resulted
Points

One Man's Failure Brought Mankind's Fall (vv. 12-14)One Man's Fix Bought Mankind's Favor (vv. 15-21)Practice

Connect Up: Why do you think God allowed Adam and Eve to sin? Here are some thoughts to discuss:Because of Adam and Eve's choice, sin has been passed down from one generation to another. Although the Bible doesn't explicitly state how this is accomplished, here are three points to discuss:Connect In: A sacrifice is defined as "offering something precious up for a reason." Christ is our final sacrifice—He died for His bride, the church. How should the church serve each other sacrificially? Use the following verses to discuss: Connect Out: Why do you think the Lord used the shedding of blood to redeem? Discuss Leviticus 17:11 and Hebrews 9:11-18. How does blood function biologically, and what does it symbolize? In a day when many see sacrifice as barbaric, how would you describe why God worked through sacrifice to an unbeliever? As one person asks, "Why must God employ such distasteful means to effect salvation?"1 Discuss a response.

1 Pulliam, Ken, Blogspot, "Why I De-Converted from Evangelical Christianity," August 4, 2010, http://formerfundy.blogspot.com/2010/08/why-must-someone-die-before-god-can.html, accessed 09/03/19.

OUTLINE


  1. One Man’s Failure Brought Mankind’s Fall (vv. 12-14)

    1. Adam Sinned

    2. All Were Affected

    3. Condemnation Resulted

  2. One Man’s Fix Bought Mankind’s Favor (vv. 15-21)

    1. Christ Sacrificed

    2. All Can Be Affected

    3. Justification Resulted

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Don’t Look Back
SPEAKER: Nate Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 6:1-7
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4475

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: September 8, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Don't Look Back"
Text: Romans 6:1-7

Path

Returning to a life of sin after becoming a Christian is like winning the lottery but choosing to continue to live in poverty. Pastor Nate Heitzig poses this question: Can one be a Christian and continually pursue a sinful lifestyle? In examining Romans 6:1-7, we find the biblical answer: No. Because of what God has done for the Christian, the Christian's rightful response to God should be to pursue a transformed lifestyle.

  1. Get Up (vv. 1-2)
  2. Go Forward (vv. 3-5)
  3. Never Go Back (vv. 6-7)
Points

Get Up (vv. 1-2)Go Forward (vv. 3-5) Never Go Back (vv. 6-7)Practice

Connect Up: The Christian life can be summarized in three overarching acts of God:Throughout Romans, Paul shows how Christ procured our salvation (see Romans 8:27-32). Jesus calls us (see John 15:16), confirms us (see John 12:44-47), and conforms us (see John 13:15). Discuss the role of the Spirit in all areas: calling, confirming, and conforming. How are both Jesus and the Spirit involved in getting Christians up, moving forward, and never looking back?

Connect In: How can Pastor Nate's outline act as a guide for the local church? As an example, the church is to:What other parallels can you find?

Connect Out: How can Pastor Nate's points act as an outline for evangelism? Here are some thoughts to discuss:

OUTLINE


  1. Get Up (vv. 1-2)

  2. Go Forward (vv. 3-5)

  3. Never Go Back (vv. 6-7)

 


 

SERIES: Heart & Soul: A Study through Romans
MESSAGE: Winning the War with Sin
SPEAKER: Skip Heitzig
SCRIPTURE: Romans 6:11-14
URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4477

MESSAGE SUMMARY
There is not a person I know who doesn’t struggle with sin. Evil thoughts, bad habits, immoral impulses, and recurring temptations all rear their ugly heads, leaving us exhausted and disappointed in ourselves and wondering if any deliverance is possible. This struggle is real. The war can be fierce. How can we believers (who still have our old natures) win in these battles? Consider this four-step strategy.

STUDY GUIDE
Connect Recap Notes: Sunday, September 15, 2019
Speaker: Skip Heitzig
Teaching: "Winning the War with Sin"
Text: Romans 6:11-14

Path

There is not a person I know who doesn't struggle with sin. Evil thoughts, bad habits, immoral impulses, and recurring temptations all rear their ugly heads, leaving us exhausted and disappointed in ourselves and wondering if any deliverance is possible. This struggle is real. The war can be fierce. How can we believers (who still have our old natures) win in these battles? Consider this four-step strategy:

  1. We Reason (vv. 3, 6, 9)
  2. We Reckon (v. 11)
  3. We Resist (vv. 12-13a)
  4. We Replace (vv. 13b-14)
Points

We Reason  We ReckonWe Resist We Replace Practice

Connect Up: One theme Pastor Skip touched on is holiness. Holiness is a moral attribute of God; God is holy (see Psalm 99). Following His example, we are called to holiness as well (see 1 Peter 1:15-17). Consider these two Hebrew words as you discuss holiness:.
Connect In: Pastor Skip mentioned accountability with other Christians as support from the outside. Use these questions to discuss accountability:Connect Out: An unbeliever must first become a Christian before he or she can truly reckon, resist, and replace sin (since they don't have the Spirit living inside them). How can you use God's holiness and humankind's sin as a springboard to discuss the good news of Jesus? Using the Romans Road to Salvation, look up these verses to discuss: Romans 3:23; 3:10-18; 5:8; 6:23, 8:38-39; 10:8-10; 10:13; 10:17.1


1 For more information, visit www.gotquestions.org/Romans-road-salvation.html.

OUTLINE


  1. We Reason (vv. 3, 6, 9)

  2. We Reckon (v. 11)

  3. We Resist (vv. 12-13a)

  4. We Replace (vv. 13b-14)


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