Home
Campus:

Calvary Albuquerque

Plan a Visit

Location: map

4001 Osuna Road NE
Albuquerque, NM 87109
Contact Us: 505.344.0880

Service Times: today's schedule

Saturday: 6:30 pm
Sunday: 8:00, 9:45 & 11:30 am
Wednesday: 6:30 pm

Service Archives > White Collar Sins > The Destructive Harvest of a Bitter Heart

Message:

SHORT URL: http://CalvaryABQ.org/4274 Copy to Clipboard
BUY: Buy CD

The Destructive Harvest of a Bitter Heart - Hebrews 12:14-15

Taught on

We all know someone who has become embittered in life. They have planted kernels of unresolved anger and resentment and have become entrapped by the overgrown jungle of the bitter fruit it has created. To choose the bitter path (and it is a choice) is to walk down a self-destructive road that banishes peace and promotes self-centeredness. Let’s consider several Scriptures and the four attributes of a heart poisoned by bitterness.

Date Title   WatchListenNotes Share SaveBuy
2/4/2018
completed
resume  
The Destructive Harvest of a Bitter Heart
Hebrews 12:14-15
Skip Heitzig
Info
Message Summary
We all know someone who has become embittered in life. They have planted kernels of unresolved anger and resentment and have become entrapped by the overgrown jungle of the bitter fruit it has created. To choose the bitter path (and it is a choice) is to walk down a self-destructive road that banishes peace and promotes self-centeredness. Let’s consider several Scriptures and the four attributes of a heart poisoned by bitterness.
Message Trailer
Watch
Watch and take notes
Listen - Mini Player
Listen and Take Notes
Listen in Spanish
Outline
Detailed Notes
Study Guide
Facebook
Twitter
Email
Video (MP4)
Audio (MP3)
Spanish (MP3)
Buy CD

Series Description

Show expand

White Collar Sins

White Collar Sins

We say we want to be holy, yet we tolerate sin on a daily basis, comfortable with its permeating presence in our homes, our relationships—our very lives. And while we view murder, lust, and lying as unbearably wicked, we trivialize gossip, gluttony, and envy. In the series White Collar Sins: Death in Its Sunday Best, Pastor Skip Heitzig challenges us to view all sin as destructive and recognize its painful consequences.

Outline

    Open as Word Doc Open as Word Doc    Copy Copy to Clipboard    Print icon    Show expand


  1. Bitterness Begins with Small Seeds (vv. 12-14)

  2. Bitterness Requires Right Soil (v. 15a)

  3. Bitterness Develops Deep Roots (v. 15b)

  4. Bitterness Produces Bad Fruit (v. 15c)

Study Guide

    Open as Word Doc Open as Word Doc    Copy Copy to Clipboard    Print icon    Hide contract

Recap Notes: February 4, 2018
Teacher: Skip Heitzig
Teaching:"The Destructive Harvest of a Bitter Heart"
Text: Hebrews 12:14-15

Path

We all know someone who has become embittered in life. They have planted kernels of unresolved anger and resentment and have become entrapped by the overgrown jungle of the bitter fruit it has created. To choose the bitter path (and it is a choice) is to walk down a self-destructive road that banishes peace and promotes self-centeredness. In this teaching, Pastor Skip considered several Scriptures and four attributes of a heart poisoned by bitterness:
  1. Bitterness Begins with Small Seeds (vv. 12-14)
  2. Bitterness Requires Right Soil (v. 15a)
  3. Bitterness Develops Deep Roots (v. 15b)
  4. Bitterness Produces Bad Fruit (v. 15c)
Points

Bitterness Begins with Small Seeds
  • In this text, the writer uses a metaphor: the Christian is running a race of faith.
  • The biggest challenge to our race and peace is people.
  • Sometimes people can be the chastening rod of God. But if we don't choose to see frustrating people as God's correction, we tend to see them as Satan's aggravation.
  • Bitterness is internalized anger that festers. It begins from a seed of anger planted by one who hurt you. When that pain goes untreated, it turns to anger, which turns to bitterness.
  • Hebrews 12 is a picture of discouragement that has planted a seed of hurt.
  • Pastor Skip gave Dr. Diamond's definition of bitterness: "a chronic and pervasive state of smoldering resentment." Notice two key words: chronic and pervasive. How is bitterness both long-lasting (chronic) and widespread (pervasive)?
Bitterness Requires Right Soil
  • We never have a need that can outstrip the grace of God. When we forget the grace of God in our lives, we become susceptible to bitterness.
  • We need to grow in grace or bad things will grow in us, like bitterness.
  • Sadly, some hearts are fertile ground for bitterness, and it becomes an essential part of their life (Naomi is an example; see Ruth 1:20-21).
  • Bitterness turns you into a perpetual victim.
  • When a hurt comes, don't let it take root in your heart. If you hold on to that hurt, the hurt will get a hold on you.
  • Probe: What are some types of soil in which bitterness takes root? Consider the following: mind, soul, relationships, work, family, and friends.
Bitterness Develops Deep Roots
  • Deuteronomy 29 warns not to turn your heart from God, "that there may not be among you a root bearing bitterness or wormwood" (v. 18). Wormwood is a reference to someone going back to paganism, someone who has forgotten God's grace and covenant.
  • People who let such seeds grow in the soil of their heart develop a root system that feeds on bitterness. These roots grow underground and are undetected—for a time. It grows through the roots to the branches, becoming stronger and moving from thoughts to words and actions.
  • Bitterness will choke off the fruit of the Christian's spiritual life. This is why Paul said, "Get rid of all bitterness" (Ephesians 4:31, NIV).
  • When bitterness hides in your heart, God will not be real to you because hatefulness and holiness cannot dwell in the same heart.
  • The remedy to bitterness: be grounded in love, built up in Christ (see Ephesians 3:17-18). Once we grow in the right root, we'll get the right fruit.
  • Probe: If you're comfortable with sharing, discuss a time you were bitter. How did it take hold of your heart, causing you to lose sight of the Lord?
Bitterness Produces Bad Fruit
  • Bitterness grows in two directions: toward you and toward others.
    • Toward you: Note the phrase cause trouble. It's like taking poison and hoping your enemy will die.
      • Bitterness is a form of emotional suicide. It slowly destroys hope and peace of mind.
      • Bitterness ruins your relationship with God (see 1 John 4:20).
    • Toward others: Note the phrase many become defiled.
      • Defiled is miainó, meaning to sully or taint. Bitterness contaminates relationships, costing more than you ever want to pay.
  • The words bitter and better start with b and end with -ter. The only difference is one letter: I. Bitterness focuses on I, me, and mine—the self. But better focuses on God and others. Life is better when you let go of bitterness.
  • Probe: Continuing your story from the previous section, what was some of the fruit from your bitterness? How did you resolve or how are you resolving the bitterness in your life?
Practice

Connect Up: One of the hallmarks of God's character is His holiness (see Psalm 99), so we're called to pursue holiness. In Greek, holiness is hagiasmos, meaning purification and sanctification. How do we pursue God's holiness? How are we sanctified when we pursue God's holiness, "without which no one will see the Lord" (Hebrews 12:14)?

Connect In: Sadly, bitterness is found in the church, causing "trouble" (Hebrews 12:15).   What steps should Christians take to overcome bitterness in life and the church? One person recommended the following steps: forgive, make a plan, stop dwelling and retelling, seek grace, and seek help. ¹Discuss these five steps.

Connect Out: Because the Lord is our peace (see Ephesians 2:14), how shall we pursue peace with all people (see Hebrews 12:14)? What does a peaceful life look like in the world today? How can being an effective peacemaker (see Matthew 5:9) be a witness to a watching world?

¹ Dr. Greg, "Overcoming Bitterness: 5 Steps for Healing the Hurt that Won't Go Away," November 20, 2013, http://www.patheos.com/blogs/faithonthecouch/2013/11/overcoming-bitterness-5-steps-for-healing-the-hurt-that-wont-go-away, accessed 2/4/18.

Detailed Notes

    Open as Word Doc Open as Word Doc    Copy Copy to Clipboard    Print icon    Show expand

Recap Notes: February 4, 2018
Teacher: Skip Hetizig
Teaching: "The Destructive Harvest of a Bitter Heart"
Text: Hebrews 12:14-15

Path

We all know someone who has become embittered in life. They have planted kernels of unresolved anger and resentment and have become entrapped by the overgrown jungle of the bitter fruit it has created. To choose the bitter path (and it is a choice) is to walk down a self-destructive road that banishes peace and promotes self-centeredness. In this teaching, Pastor Skip considered several Scriptures and four attributes of a heart poisoned by bitterness:
  1. Bitterness Begins with Small Seeds (vv. 12-14)
  2. Bitterness Requires Right Soil (v. 15a)
  3. Bitterness Develops Deep Roots (v. 15b)
  4. Bitterness Produces Bad Fruit (v. 15c)
Points

Bitterness Begins with Small Seeds
  • In this text, the writer uses a metaphor: the Christian is running a race of faith.
  • The biggest challenge to our race and peace is people.
  • Sometimes people can be the chastening rod of God. But if we don't choose to see frustrating people as God's correction, we tend to see them as Satan's aggravation.
  • Bitterness is internalized anger that festers. It begins from a seed of anger planted by one who hurt you. When that pain goes untreated, it turns to anger, which turns to bitterness.
  • Hebrews 12 is a picture of discouragement that has planted a seed of hurt.
  • Pastor Skip gave Dr. Diamond's definition of bitterness: "a chronic and pervasive state of smoldering resentment." Notice two key words: chronic and pervasive. How is bitterness both long-lasting (chronic) and widespread (pervasive)?
Bitterness Requires Right Soil
  • We never have a need that can outstrip the grace of God. When we forget the grace of God in our lives, we become susceptible to bitterness.
  • We need to grow in grace or bad things will grow in us, like bitterness.
  • Sadly, some hearts are fertile ground for bitterness, and it becomes an essential part of their life (Naomi is an example; see Ruth 1:20-21).
  • Bitterness turns you into a perpetual victim.
  • When a hurt comes, don't let it take root in your heart. If you hold on to that hurt, the hurt will get a hold on you.
  • Probe: What are some types of soil in which bitterness takes root? Consider the following: mind, soul, relationships, work, family, and friends.
Bitterness Develops Deep Roots
  • Deuteronomy 29 warns not to turn your heart from God, "that there may not be among you a root bearing bitterness or wormwood" (v. 18). Wormwood is a reference to someone going back to paganism, someone who has forgotten God's grace and covenant.
  • People who let such seeds grow in the soil of their heart develop a root system that feeds on bitterness. These roots grow underground and are undetected—for a time. It grows through the roots to the branches, becoming stronger and moving from thoughts to words and actions.
  • Bitterness will choke off the fruit of the Christian's spiritual life. This is why Paul said, "Get rid of all bitterness" (Ephesians 4:31, NIV).
  • When bitterness hides in your heart, God will not be real to you because hatefulness and holiness cannot dwell in the same heart.
  • The remedy to bitterness: be grounded in love, built up in Christ (see Ephesians 3:17-18). Once we grow in the right root, we'll get the right fruit.
  • Probe: If you're comfortable with sharing, discuss a time you were bitter. How did it take hold of your heart, causing you to lose sight of the Lord?
Bitterness Produces Bad Fruit
  • Bitterness grows in two directions: toward you and toward others.
    • Toward you: Note the phrase cause trouble. It's like taking poison and hoping your enemy will die.
      • Bitterness is a form of emotional suicide. It slowly destroys hope and peace of mind.
      • Bitterness ruins your relationship with God (see 1 John 4:20).
    • Toward others: Note the phrase many become defiled.
      • Defiled is miainó, meaning to sully or taint. Bitterness contaminates relationships, costing more than you ever want to pay.
  • The words bitter and better start with b and end with -ter. The only difference is one letter: I. Bitterness focuses on I, me, and mine—the self. But better focuses on God and others. Life is better when you let go of bitterness.
  • Probe: Continuing your story from the previous section, what was some of the fruit from your bitterness? How did you resolve or how are you resolving the bitterness in your life?
Practice


Connect Up: One of the hallmarks of God's character is His holiness (see Psalm 99), so we're called to pursue holiness. In Greek, holiness is hagiasmos, meaning purification and sanctification. How do we pursue God's holiness? How are we sanctified when we pursue God's holiness, "without which no one will see the Lord" (Hebrews 12:14)?

Connect In: Sadly, bitterness is found in the church, causing "trouble" (Hebrews 12:15).   What steps should Christians take to overcome bitterness in life and the church? One person recommended the following steps: forgive, make a plan, stop dwelling and retelling, seek grace, and seek help.¹ Discuss these five steps.

Connect Out: Because the Lord is our peace (see Ephesians 2:14), how shall we pursue peace with all people (see Hebrews 12:14)? What does a peaceful life look like in the world today? How can being an effective peacemaker (see Matthew 5:9) be a witness to a watching world?

¹ Dr. Greg, "Overcoming Bitterness: 5 Steps for Healing the Hurt that Won't Go Away," November 20, 2013, http://www.patheos.com/blogs/faithonthecouch/2013/11/overcoming-bitterness-5-steps-for-healing-the-hurt-that-wont-go-away, accessed 2/4/18.

Additional Messages in this Series

Show expand

 
Date Title   Watch Listen Notes Share Save Buy
1/14/2018
completed
resume  
Sin in a Three-Piece Suit
Matthew 23
Skip Heitzig
Info
Message Summary
Someone remarked that our sense of sin is in proportion to our nearness to God. We’re usually good at being aware of blatant wickedness, but what about less obvious infractions? Are we willing to point fingers at others for flagrant iniquity while coddling our own vices? The truth is that many are too Christian to enjoy sinning while being too fond of sinning to enjoy Christianity. My purpose in this series isn’t to condemn anyone. I hope to stimulate a heart for holiness for a fulfilled life and happy relationships. To start off this series, consider five characteristics of sin.
Message Trailer
Watch
Watch and take notes
Listen - Mini Player
Listen and Take Notes
Listen in Spanish
Outline
Study Guide
Transcript
Facebook
Twitter
Email
Video (MP4)
Audio (MP3)
Spanish (MP3)
Buy CD
1/21/2018
completed
resume  
The Lazy Life of the Couch Potato
Proverbs 6:6-11;Romans 12:11
Skip Heitzig
Info
Message Summary
The first in our list of White Collar Sins will be laziness—showing a lack of effort or energy, the unwillingness to act or, in some cases, even care. Though many would smirk at this as being petty or trivial (after all there are much worse things in the world), the Bible itself addresses it as being substantial since many other lives can be affected by it. Laziness grows on people; it begins in cobwebs and ends in chains.
Message Trailer
Watch
Watch and take notes
Listen - Mini Player
Listen and Take Notes
Listen in Spanish
Outline
Study Guide
Transcript
Facebook
Twitter
Email
Video (MP4)
Audio (MP3)
Spanish (MP3)
Buy CD
1/28/2018
completed
resume  
Fighting the Green-Eyed Monster
Genesis 37; Acts 7:9-10
Skip Heitzig
Info
Message Summary
Some attitudes can go undetected, at least for a while. You can't see someone committing envy or having resentful thoughts. But envy is detrimental because it blinds us and makes it impossible for us to think clearly. It discolors everything around us and steals our peace. Some know what it’s like to be envied, like Marilyn Monroe who once quipped, "Success makes so many people hate you." But most of us from time to time struggle with envying someone else.
Message Trailer
Watch
Watch and take notes
Listen - Mini Player
Listen and Take Notes
Listen in Spanish
Outline
Study Guide
Transcript
Facebook
Twitter
Email
Video (MP4)
Audio (MP3)
Spanish (MP3)
Buy CD
2/11/2018
completed
resume  
Psst! Have You Heard...?
Leviticus 19:11-18
Skip Heitzig
Info
Message Summary
The sin of gossip has never made it into the same lists as murder and manslaughter. It's regarded as one of the "little sins" that even Christians are unwilling to avoid. But gossip is in the same family as murder because it assassinates a person's character. It destroys reputations, disrupts families, divides friends, and causes heartbreak. And the problem isn't just in the speaking but in the hearing as well. Let's look at a direct command not to gossip.
Message Trailer
Watch
Watch and take notes
Listen - Mini Player
Listen and Take Notes
Listen in Spanish
Outline
Study Guide
Facebook
Twitter
Email
Video (MP4)
Audio (MP3)
Spanish (MP3)
Buy CD
There are 4 additional messages in this series.