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Destination: Exodus 19-40 - Exodus 19-40

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In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.

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8/1/2007
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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Detailed Notes

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Throughout the drama of Exodus God demonstrates His power to deliver through miraculous signs and wonders. It is an epic storythat portrays God as Savior and Provider of His people. At Mount Sinai God gives to Moses a series of detailed laws and instructions. This revelation from God would define Israel's national identity.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

c. 1446 B.C.
The Tabernacle is constructed

c. 1445 B.C.
The Law is given on Mount Sinai

c. 1406 B.C.
Joshua conquers Jericho

c. 1380 B.C.
Joshua's death


TRIP PLANNER

Exodus is divided into two major sections. The second section from Exodus 19:1-40:38 focuses on the identification of God's People from bondage. The setting for our journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshipped.

1. The Law: 19:1-23:33
2. The Tabernacle: 24:1-31:18
3. Israel's Response in Disobedience: 32:1-33:23
4. Israel's Response in Obedience: 34:1-40:38


PLACES OF INTEREST

Mount Sinai - Mountain in the south central part of the Sinai Peninsula in the northwestern end of Arabia. God made many significant revelations of Himself and His purposes to Israel there. The Bible uses the term Sinai for both the mountain and the entire wilderness area (Lev. 7:38). Sometimes Sinai is called "the mount" (Ex. 19:2); sometimes "the mountain of God" (Ex. 3:1); sometimes "the mount of the Lord" (Num. 10:33).

The Tabernacle - The English word tabernacle comes from the Latin tabernaculium, meaning "tent." The Hebrew word literally means "dwelling place." The tabernacle was to provide a place where God might dwell among His people. The description of the tabernacle begins with the inside and moves to the outside signifying that God built the tabernacle from God's viewpoint out.

The Wilderness Of Sin - Located between Elim and Sinai. This was probably the narrow plain of el-Markha, which stretches along the eastern shore of the Red Sea for several miles toward the promontory of Ras Mohammed, the southern extremity of the Sinitic Peninsula. It was here that Moses received the ten commandments.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST

Aaron - Brother of Moses - became his brother's representative, being called his "mouth" (Ex. 4:16) and his "prophet" (Ex. 7:1). Aaron was the first high priest of Israel.
Bezalel - The designer of the tabernacle. He was filled with the Spirit of God in wisdom and understanding, in knowledge and all manner of workmanship.

Moses - The central figure of the Exodus story. Moses is known as a great prophet and the "lawgiver" of Israel.


FUN FACTS

God Reveals Himself in Exodus

1. The giving of the Law - A God of Holiness (Ex. 19-24)

2. The tabernacle, priests and offerings - A God of Fellowship (Ex. 25-30)

3. The judgment for the golden calf - A God of Discipline (Ex. 32)

4. The renewal of the covenant - A God of Grace (Ex. 33)

5. The descent of God's glory - A God of Glory (Ex. 40)

The Feasts and Holy Days of Exodus

  • Feast of Unleavened Bread - The nation of Israel would eat unleavened bread seven days during the month of Abib. This feast commemorated the first 7 days of the Exodus.


  • Feast Of Harvest - Also called the Feast Of Weeks or Pentecost. This festival was observed 50 days after the offering of the barley sheaf at the Feast of Unleavened Bread. It marked the end of the harvest and the beginning of the seasonal offering of first fruits.


  • Feast Of Ingathering - Also known as the Feast of Tabernacles or Booths. This festival commemorated Israel's wanderings in the wilderness when they lived in tents (tabernacles). This holiday was celebrated on the 15th day of the 7th month (Tishri) which is equivalent to October.


  • The Sabbath - The first mention of the Sabbath is Exodus 16:23. There seems to be no mention of a special day of rest before the time of Moses. In the Wilderness of Sin, God gives Moses the Ten Commandments and institutes the Sabbath day rest in honor of God's work of creation where He rested on the seventh day. The Sabbath day separated the Israelites from all work activities and reminded them that God was their provider.

Manna

Manna translated means "what is it?"


MAPS

Major Events Of Exodus

Transcript

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Let's turn in our Bibles to Exodus chapter 19 this evening.
A word of introduction as we get started tonight: We are going to go, as we have been the last three weeks at a very fast pace, so it's good to take notes but it's also good to just let it soak in. I've been known for speaking fast, and that's so I can cover a lot of territory. Yes, we are flying over the Scriptures, and no, we are not covering every verse, "And what about that verse and what about that section?" What I'm hoping to do is two things: number one - wet your appetite for you go back to study those portions on your own; number two - to help you navigate as you see it from a fly-by perspective. How to navigate your own personal adventure, you might say, through the Word of God and there are a lot of ways to do that. But, this is designed, once again, to give you an overview so we see how all the Bible fits together. We only have a year, so we have to move quickly. We've gone through the Bible verse by verse - one verse at a time and I think we've covered just about every verse in all 66 books. It took us 14 years to do that. That's all on tape, so if you want go back and listen to that, you can. But this is a different perspective. We hope that you will enjoy this way of going through it as well.
Let's just open with a word of prayer. Father, we do give You our hearts, give You our minds, our bodies, we place them before You as a living sacrifice. It's our spiritual act of worship - our reasonable service. We give You every second of every minute of this 50 minutes or so that we're going to be together. We pray Lord, that we would have a hunger and a thirst that is insatiable. I thank You for so many people in Albuquerque that have come out and I do pray that You would fill this city with Your doctrine through these people. I pray that what is learned would then be taught and multiplied several times over. In Jesus' name, Amen.
A little over a year ago, there was a newspaper article about a strange sight in Berlin, Germany. Let me read it to you. "Numerous sightings of massive fireballs in the skies over Germany this week have lead to an upsurge in reports of UFO's. The scientists believe that this could be a bazaar meteor blitz. According to NASA, such fireballs have been reported elsewhere in the world and may also be due to the fact that the earth is now orbiting through a swarm of space debris. One amateur astronomer by the name of Verner Walters, said, 'This week we've had at least 15 e-mails and phone calls from people reporting these fireballs. Some people said it looks like something out of a science fiction horror film.'" Now, segue quickly, and imagine in your mind what it must have looked like from afar to look at Mount Sinai with lightening flashes and the noise of thunder as God descended upon that mountain. That's what we're going to look at in brief tonight. Our journey has led us to Mount Sinai; we're there as Moses gives the Law and we're going to stay there for a while as we finish this book. Now, in review, we said that there are two major themes of this book: Redemption and Revelation. God redeems them from Egypt, then He reveals His law to the people of Israel through Moses, the Lawgiver. And if you remember from last week, and we only covered 18 chapters, we noted that chapters 1 through 12 could be called Domination in Egypt or by Egypt, chapters 13 through 18 could be titled Liberation from Egypt; and now, chapters 19 through the end of the book, (chapter 40), is Revelation after Egypt. So, they've left Egypt, they're out in the wilderness, God has them safe and secure, so to speak; He's fed them with manna from heaven, (you tasted a little bit of that last week), water from the rock, and now that they're settled and nestled in that place, God is going to reveal to them how they are to live with one another and before God. He's going to give them the Law. The emphasis in the book is going to move from narration of a story to legislation; the laws that will be given for them and for their generations. The Jews call this part of Exodus - that is the giving of the law - the kernel and the core of the nation's life because the law, to the Jew, is the identity of the nation. It's a covenant that God gave to Moses. It is good to have an identity. If I were to ask you, in a word, give me what your identity is, your purpose statement in life in just a word or two or three - I tell you what mine would be: In Christ; I'm in Christ. I'm a new creation in Christ. I have blessings in heavenly places in Christ. All that I am now is because I am in Jesus Christ and what He has done for me. We live in a very aimless time of society and in a very aimless culture. No values or wandering values - people searching for them. It's great to know who you are, where you've come from, and where you're going.
Verse 1, chapter 19, "In the third month after the children of Israel had gone out of the land of Egypt, on the same day, they came to the Wilderness of Sinai." Now, there they are in front of a mountain, Mount Sinai, the Arabs call in Jebel Musa, the Mountain of Moses. It jets 7500 feet up above sea level. It's quite high; I've climbed it before and it's not easy. It is not dissimilar to what Sandia Mountain looks like from the city of Albuquerque, jutting up high into the sky and climbing the La Luz Trail to get up. "For they had departed from Rephidim, had come to the Wilderness of Sinai, and camped in the wilderness. So Israel camped there before the mountain. And Moses went up to God, and the Lord called to him from the mountain, saying, 'Thus you shall say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel: 'You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles' wings and brought you to Myself.'" In other words: remember where you were; remember what I've done; remember how I've cared for you. "Now therefore, if you will indeed obey My voice and keep My covenant, then you shall be a special treasure to Me above all people; for all the earth is Mine." This is an important text here. God likens Himself in His care for them like an eagle would bear her young on eagles' wings. The eagle that is spoken about here in the text was called the Griffin Eagle and it inhabited that part of the world and it would build its nest high up in rocky, inaccessible places; hard to get to. There, isolated from all natural protection and provision, that mother eagle would care for her young. And so it was with the Children of Israel. God brought them from Egypt where they had plenty of food, at one time at least, took them way in the middle nowhere, crossing the Red Sea, out in the desert, where there was no natural protection nor provision; and there God miraculously provided for them while they were in the wilderness. Notice also, in verse 5, God says, "Then you shall be a special treasure to me." 'Segula' is the word that is used here and it means something very precious, a precious object. I wonder if you view yourself as God views you. I don't know what messages you say about yourself. "I'm worthless; I'll never amount to anything; I'm not really that good at a lot of things." But understand something; value always depends on what someone is willing to pay for it. I've seen the house market lately in Albuquerque. Let me back up a little bit. The housing market in California? What people pay for like a little tiny house? It's worth like a tenth of what people pay for it, but the value goes up because people are willing to pay that much for it. You know what God was willing to pay for you? The death and the blood of His own Son. So never say, "I'm worthless; I can't do anything; I'm no good" - when God values you enough that He would send His Son to purchase you so that you could be His own special treasure. You are a child of the King. You're a son or a daughter of God. Verse 8, "Then all the people answered together and said, 'All that the Lord has spoken we will do.' So Moses brought back the words of the people to the Lord." Now, that's a bold statement. It's sort of like saying, "Okay, you give us the law, bring it on, we'll do it all." Now it sounds good, but God saw a problem with that. It's not mentioned here, but in Deuteronomy, chapter 5, (we'll be there in a few weeks), you'll see it. This story is told but God's comment is added. God says, "Oh, that My people had such a heart in them." God realized that the weakness of the law was a weakness of the human heart itself to keep it. We're not able to keep the law. That's why in the book of Romans, chapter 3, we read, "Whatever the law says it says to those who are under the law that every mouth may be stopped and the whole world judged as guilty before God." That's why in Galatians the Bible says the law is a school master or a tutor. It leads you to Christ. You read the law, you try to keep it, you fail, you feel bad, you try it again, you fail, you feel worse, and eventually you go, "I need help; I can't keep this thing. I need a Redeemer; I need a Savior; Someone who can take all of the requirements of the law, live the perfect life that I could never live and just count me as being righteous." And that's what the new covenant is all about.
Verse 16, "Then it came to pass on the third day, in the morning, that there were thundering and lightnings, and a thick cloud on the mountain; and the sound of the trumpet was very loud, so that all the people who were in the camp trembled. Now Mount Sinai was completely in smoke, because the Lord descended upon it in fire. Its smoke ascended like the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mountain quaked greatly." It's like what Verner Walter said in that little quote from the newspaper, "Like a science fiction horror film." Now, Mount Sinai appeared to be from a distance like an erupting volcano. It wasn't a beautiful sight. Don't picture the Children of Israel going, "Oh, isn't this wonderful? This is nice. Let's have a picnic." This was a dreadful sight. The people would shrink back in fear. You wonder, "Well, what's that all about?" Because it is to show an attribute of God that most people have forgotten about today. And that is the utter and total holiness of God. He is so pure and utterly unique and absolutely holy that when you put someone - that One - that unique and holy in the presence of mankind, this is what it looks like. The rabbis used to say, "No mortal can gaze on the unveiled majesty of God." So this was dramatic, lightening, thundering, people were trembling and quaking because God was speaking.
Now, God doesn't always speak that way. I remember as a brand new Christian, I read this and I went up on a mountain and I thought, "Okay, I'm on a mountain, piece of paper and pencil, and I even got a little wooden staff; a broom handle, (that's all we had), and I walked up to this mountain and thought, "Okay, God's going to talk to me." And I waited for a long time and I didn't get any lightening or thunder or "Go to Africa." I didn't get any of that. God doesn't always speak that way. You'll read later on that a guy named Elijah goes to the same mountain, Mount Horeb, or Mount Sinai, and God tells him to come out of the cave that he had spent the night in. And it said, "A great wind came by that broke the rocks, but the Lord wasn't in the wind. And then a great earthquake shook the mountain, but the Lord wasn't in the earthquake. And then in a fire, but the Lord wasn't in the fire", and then finally, and you know the rest of the story, "A small still voice spoke to Elijah." On Mount Sinai, God spoke quietly, at other times God can speak dramatically.
So Mount Sinai; the place of the law, in contrast to Mount Zion. That's what Christians identify with. We're not here identifying with Mount Sinai as much as with Mount Zion. It's the law versus grace. John talks about Jesus, the Son of God, coming, tabernacling upon the earth, and it says this, "For the law came by Moses, but grace and truth came through Jesus Christ." And the writer of Hebrews spends the latter portion of chapter 12 making a distinction, metaphorically between Mount Sinai, the law, and Mount Zion, grace. Let me just read a portion to you. This is Hebrews 12, "For you have not come to this mountain that may be touched and that burned with fire, and to the blackness and darkness and the tempest, But you have come to Mount Zion and to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, to Jesus the Mediator of the new covenant." Herein lies the fundamental difference between the synagogue and the church; between Judaism and Christianity; and that is the synagogue believes that the covenant God made with Moses on Sinai is an eternal covenant, whereas we know that was a covenant God once made with a particular people that had an end game in mind. As Jeremiah 31 predicted, "God would put a new covenant and write it on their hearts."
So in chapter 20, we get into and we've been looking at that on Sunday morning, so we'll just kind of skate through it briefly. God gives the law, the Top Ten, or the Ten Commandments, but not only that; that's just the beginning. There are many laws in chapters to come after the Ten Commandments. Basically, as we've noted on Sunday morning, God expects two things from His people: supreme devotion to Him and sincere affection for others. Supreme devotion to Him - that's the first four commandments; sincere affection for others - that's the second six commandments. So the Ten Commandments are split in two. The first four are God centered; the second six are man centered. God gives brief commandments - His Top Ten. No other God's before Me; no images; keep My name revered or Holy; keep the Sabbath. That's the first four. We're to honor our parents; not to murder people; no committing of adultery; no stealing; no lying; and no coveting. That's the second six and that wraps up the Ten Commandments and again we're covering them in depth, so no need to look at them again. Notice that they're in tablet form, or two tables of stone. I'd like to think of it this way - the Ten Commandments were given in 'tablet' form and if you obey them it's going to keep you from having to take other 'tablets'! This is good for living right here! This is healthy; it's like daily vitamins - keep God's Word.
Verse 23, "You shall not make anything to be with Me - gods of silver or gods of gold. You shall not make for yourselves an altar of earth, (or dirt - you would say adobe or stone), You shall make for Me, and you shall sacrifice on it your burnt offerings and your peace offerings, your sheep and your oxen. In every place where I record My name I will come to you, and I will bless you. And if you make Me an altar of stone, you shall not build it of hewn stone; for if you use your tool on it, you have profaned it." I like this about God. It seems that God isn't interested in ornate structure, just keep it simple. Pile a bunch of dirt up there; that's good enough. Throw some rocks on there; that'll serve the purpose. But the idea of going out of your way to make it ornate would simply put all of the attention on the person who designed and built it rather than on God Himself. That seems to be the idea here. I've been in great cathedrals, great Abbeys in England and in Scotland and massive cathedrals and they go in and they'll point out this architect, so and so, and this builder and this artist and they're talking all about what man did. When God said, "You know, that's the problem with ornate structure. Just keep it simple so that people go, 'How great is our God.'" There's nothing wrong with art and beautification, but art must never eclipse heart. God is all about the heart more than He is about art. Remember the woman at the well of Samaria who said, "Well, our fathers worshiped on this beautiful temple, Mount Garizim, you Jews say, 'Jerusalem, that's the temple in the place where one is to worship.'" Jesus said, "That's irrelevant. God's looking for true worshipers who will worship Him in spirit and in truth." It's all about the heart.
Chapters 21 through 24 - this is the nitty gritty of everyday life. This is the place most people reading the Bible slow down. They get all ambitious: Genesis - "That was cool!" Exodus - "This is great!" Then they come to chapter 21 all the way to the end of the book then Leviticus and Numbers and they feel it's hard to go through because of the multitude of laws: social laws, moral laws, spiritual laws, property rights. But we're just going to highlight a few things. In chapter 21, verse 1: "Now these are the judgments which you shall set before them: If you buy a Hebrew servant, he shall serve six years; and in the seventh he shall go out free and pay nothing." Are you noticing by now a pattern in the Bible of six and one that comprise seven? It's the Sabbath law. This in particular, is for indentured servitude. This is how it would work: Let's say you couldn't pay off your debts. Well, there was a way around that. You could become a servant, a slave. You sell yourself to a master and basically what you do is for six years you work off the debt that you owe him. The seventh year, you're to go free because you're a brother. They let you off the hook. However, that servant could say after six years and then into the seventh, "You know, I kind of have a good gig here, I like this guy, in fact I love my master." Then you would be a servant by choice not by debt. If you wanted to do that, they would take you to the door of the house and they would take an awl and run it through your ear - punch a hole in your ear. That shouldn't shock you. People do it all the time, it's called an earring. They poke an awl - or an ice pick - into the ear and open it up. When it dries, they put an earring in there. It signified, "I am a servant, willingly, of this master." So that six and one pattern follows in many areas of life; six days, the seventh day you rest, and we'll find out later on in chapter 23, we won't read it but I'll tell you about it. You would plant your fields and harvest them for six years but on the seventh year you would do nothing. You had a year vacation every six years. Whatever grew on your land you'd take it and harvest it and you'd eat it and you'd let the land recover, or lie fallow. I'm sharing this with you because we're seeing the Bible from 30,000 feet. Six years you work, seventh year lay fallow - six, one. You keep doing that - they didn't do it. They disobeyed this law and they disobeyed it for 490 years. That is why you read at the end of the book of 2 Chronicles, second to the last verse, that the children of Israel went into captivity for 70 years to give the land its Sabbath rest as predicted by the Prophet of Jeremiah to fulfill 70 years. If you don't obey this law for 490 years, that's how many Sabbath years? Seventy. So God said, you owe me 70; I'll take it out of you while you're in Babylon, I'll let the land rest. So that's the overall, overview picture.
Now let me throw something else in since we're at 30,000 feet. Some people see a correspondence in the six and one with what we call in the Bible, the Millennium, or the thousand year reign of Christ. Many scholars believe that Adam was in the garden 4,000 BC, so 6,000 years ago, and that we have been sold under slavery of Satan since the fall for 6,000 years. By the way, in the Jewish calendar the year is 5767 today, not 2007 - almost 6,000 years, some of those scholars say, from the fall of Adam. So that we are very close to that six and one when the entire world could unravel and Christ could come back and ushering in the seventh year, the thousand year reign of Christ on the earth. Interesting, at least.
Well, we get into capital punishment laws. Verse 1:"He who strikes a man so that he dies shall surely be put to death." Capital punishment is a subject that is hot right now, it's on the news, it has been and there're some proponents and there are some people who want to abolish is all together. Some states practice it; other states do not practice it. Some in quoting the Bible will say, "Well, it's the old covenant, it's the old law." Actually, you're right, but you're not completely right. You see, capital punishment didn't come at the time of Moses, it pre-dated Moses. It goes all the way back to the time of Noah, so it's not just a Mosaic stipulation; it goes all the way back to the very fundamental, after the earth was being repopulated by Noah in Genesis 9. "'Whoever sheds man's blood,' says the Lord, 'by man his blood shall be shed.'" Now in the book of Exodus, we find out that capital punishment is given for these crimes: murder, child sacrifice, kidnapping, sexual immorality - which includes adultery, homosexuality, bestiality, cursing your parents, (just going to let that settle a little bit - you're thinking, boy I'm glad we're living in the New Testament - so am I), witchcraft, magic, astrology, idolatry, and being a false prophet. This is how the Law of Moses views capital punishment. It doesn't see it as murder. People will say, "Capital punishment is bad because you're murdering someone after they murdered someone." The Bible sees it as righteously administered judicial execution, not as murder.
Verse 23, "But if any lasting harm follows, then you shall give life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, burn for burn, wound for wound, stripe for stripe. If a man strikes the eye of his male or female servant, and destroys it, he shall let him go free for the sake of his eye. And if he knocks out the tooth of his male or female servant, he shall let him go free for the sake of his tooth." Now, this is a law that becomes known as the Lextalionis, it's a Latin word - the 'law of exact retribution'; that the punishment must fit the crime. It appears in the earliest laws, the earliest codes. The code of Hammurabi, the ancient Babylonian text of those kingdoms that this was written in. Now, this is why it's here in the Bible - because God wanted to limit vengeance. People look at this and go, "How barbaric!" You know why God put it here? Because He understood that human nature isn't satisfied with exact retribution - vengeance is never satisfied. It's like, "Oh, you knocked one of my eyes out? Thou shalt be blind in both of your eyes! Oh, you knocked out one of my teeth; thou shall wear dentures for the rest of your life!" You know, we don't want to stop; we want to keep going until it feels right. So, to limit vengeance, the Lextaliones was given. By the way, right out of the Bible, we see this is a problem. In the book of Genesis, chapter 4, verse 24, there's a guy named Lamech and that was his sin. He said, "I have killed a man for wounding me. Even a young man for hurting me. If Cain shall be avenged sevenfold then Lamech shall be avenged seventy-seven fold."
Chapter 22 deals with property rights and many of the laws we use today are based right out of this. Chapter 23 are spiritual regulations, spiritual laws, and some of them regulate, let's call them, special events. You know we have a special events coordinator at this church for all the special events we do. God was into some special events. Let's read, verse 14, Exodus 23:"Three times you shall keep a feast to Me in the year: You shall keep the Feast of Unleavened Bread, you shall eat unleavened bread seven days, as I commanded you, at the time appointed in the month of Abib,(or Nisan),for in it you came out of Egypt; none shall appear before Me empty); and the Feast of Harvest, the first fruits of your labors which you have sown in the field; and the Feast of Ingathering at the end of the year, when you have gathered in the fruit of your labors from the field. Three times in the year all your males shall appear before the Lord God." People would gather. They would gather from their hamlets, their villages, their cities, and their towns and they would flood to Jerusalem, those in closest proximity especially, three times a year. This would be spiritually and socially uniting as they gathered together. God was big into fellowship. It's sort of like what it says in Hebrews 10, "Not forsaking the assembling of yourselves together but exhort one another (or encourage one another), and so much the more as you see the day approaching." The need to get together. So three feasts: Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles. Passover celebrated their redemption. Pentecost celebrated God's provision. Tabernacles celebrated God's protection in the wilderness. You already know about Passover. The lamb's blood was over the lintels and door posts and the blood of the lamb that was slain saved them, redeemed them, from the death angel. By the way, the lamb was selected for Passover, it says here, on the tenth of the month, the tenth of Nisan and slaughtered on Passover, (pecach), the fourteenth day of Nisan. Guess what day Jesus appeared in Jerusalem on a donkey and walked and was accepted, Hosanna in the Highest? On the tenth of Nisan; the day the Lamb is selected and presented. Then He was crucified and killed, we believe, on the fourteenth of Nisan, on Passover and Passover was split in that era - we'll get to that in a few months, I think, as we go through the Bible. The second feast, Pentecost, is interesting because it's the only feast where they were able to eat leavened bread. Now I hope some little bells are going off in your head, because the church was founded on what feast? Pentecost - book of Acts, chapter 2. Isn't it interesting that the only time they could eat leavened bread is the time when Jew and Gentile came together in what is called the church? Let me throw something else out, because we are cruising from 30,000 feet and these are fun facts. There is a Rabbinic tradition that Enoch, back in Exodus, chapter 5 it says that Enoch walked with God and he was not forgotten - God took him. The idea is that God instantly raptured him or translated him from earth to heaven and we find out that's the meaning of it when we get to Hebrews 11. The Rabbinic tradition says that Enoch was born on Pentecost and it was on his birthday that the Lord took him up, before the flood. Interesting, because it could be like just one of those little watermarks, you hold the paper up to the light and go, "Oh, there's like an image behind that." It's almost like a hint by the Holy Spirit, if that is indeed the fact - indicative of the church being raptured. Then the feast of Tabernacles, their protection in the wilderness. Look at verse 19 of chapter 23, "The first of the first fruits of your land you shall bring into the house of the Lord your God. You shall not boil a young goat in its mother's milk." Or as the King James says, "Seethe a kid in his mother's milk." This is a better translation. When you read that and I read that, what does that mean to you? To me, it's pretty straight forward, and I poured over reams of material over this text. It seems odd but it seems plain that you don't take a little goat and boil it in its mothers' milk. You think, "That's gross! Who would want to do that?" Well, this is the text that has resulted in the kosher kitchen. The reason that Jewish people will separate meat from milk and have two sets of dishes is because of this Scripture. Now you read this and go, "I don't get it. It's almost like they are straining at an interpretation." The idea, and I've talked to Rabbi's about this is that if there is milk in your stomach, or dairy, and you eat a piece of meat and it begins to break down by the gastric juices and it's sort of seething and boiling in there by the breakdown, you're violating that commandment. Now that is as stretched and as farfetched as the Jehovah Witnesses who say, based on the Scripture, "You're not to drink blood," that you can't have a blood transfusion. It's a stretch of the imagination. Now why is this text in here? It was a common pagan practice to take a young animal, like a goat, and boil it in the very substance that gave life to that young goat, its mothers' milk. Incantations were then said over that ritual. Plants and trees were sprinkled and spices and prayers were said. The idea was that we'll be a more fruitful, wealthy, prosperous family if we do that. It was a pagan practice that God was forbidding. You see, it's easy to miss the point in the Bible. You can make the Bible say just about anything. "Well, the Bible says…" Context here helps and you remember in the New Testament that Jesus said to the Pharisees, "Woe unto you Pharisees, you who strain at a gnat but you swallow a camel." When He said that, I can guarantee you there were people going, "Ha, ha, ha, it's a joke!" They were so worried about straining out a gnat, "Oh, a gnat got into the soup; we have to get it out because the law says everything has to be squeezed of its blood and if we have a gnat go in there, it's defiling." So they are straining out gnats but swallowing whole camels. In other words, you're majoring on minor points and you forget the larger aspects of the purpose of the law itself. That's just an example.
Exodus 25 through 27 forms, in part, the very heart of this book, the pattern of the Tabernacle itself. We have some furnishings up here on the stage that are really old. They were built by a guy name Jay McCoughlin about twenty some years ago and repainted like a thousand times. But you'll notice we have a few implements here. And have you smelled the incense? Okay, we're not turning into hippies here, it's because that's on the altar of incense. I'll explain that to you. Chapter 24, verse 17: "The sight of the glory of the Lord was like a consuming fire on the top of the mountain in the eyes of the children of Israel. So Moses went into the midst of the cloud and went up into the mountain. And Moses was on the mountain forty days and forty nights. Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 'Speak to the children of Israel, that they bring Me an offering. From everyone who gives it willingly with his heart you shall take My offering.'" So chapters 25 through 27, they take in the money for this, the gold the silver, the cloth and they make this tabernacle. A tabernacle was a shack, folks; it was a tent. God camped out 3500 years ago out in the desert with His people. We're going to throw up images of the tabernacle as we go. Now, what made the tabernacle awesome was not the way it looked but its occupant. God decided that in that simple enclosure He would hang out and the Children of Israel would behold His glory.
So let's take a brief tour. If you were to walk up to the tabernacle you would see, first of all, a plain cloth fence that was seven feet tall. And one door; one opening into the tabernacle itself. There is only one way in to the presence of God - not five, not twenty, not make up your own. One way and you have to bring a sacrifice. An animal's blood has to be shed. Are the lights going on about now? It's all a picture of something else that is going to come. Now the courtyard itself was 150 feet deep by 75 feet wide and if you were to walk in, the first thing you would see right ahead of you was a brass altar and to the left hand side, a laver, a basin, where water is. And then beyond that, another tent structure. That tent structure was divided into two rooms. The first room, when you went through the curtain, was 15 feet wide by 30 feet deep; that's called the Holy Place. Then the room beyond that, 15 by 15, was called the Holy of Holies. In the Holy Place, there were some of these articles that I'm going to explain. There was a table with twelve loaves of bread; the table of showbread - this is the Holy Place, the altar of incense, and the menorah - the seven branch candlestick. If you were to walk into the Holy Place, and by the way you never could unless you were a priest, and if you were a priest, you'd go in there to make sure that the showbread was taken care of and that the menorah, the candlestick, was lit. The candlestick would be on your left hand side as you go in; the table of show bread on your right hand side as you go in; the altar of incense, which represented the prayers of the people, was right before the veil that led into the Holy Place, the Holy of Holies, itself. Once you get into the Holy of Holies, there's one piece of furniture in this small room, 15 feet by 15 feet. Inside was the Ark of the Covenant. It was made out of acacia wood, covered with gold; the lid, the mercy seat, was pure gold; and on top were angels, cherubim, or the likeness of it hovering over it, whose wings touched. There were three things inside the Ark - now I know, all we have in our minds is Raiders of the Lost Ark, right? So, I can't fight against Hollywood, but they were the Ten Commandments, not wood, but stone, a golden pot of manna, and a rod (that was Aaron's), that butted. These were momentos that they were to carry through the wilderness. Now, get this visual: blood would be sprinkled on the top of the mercy seat by the high priest. God said, "I'm going to meet you here, on this place - this mercy seat is the place where I will meet with you and have fellowship with you." So inside the Ark were Commandments; the Law of God - God's perfect and utter holy standard that had been broken and broken and broken, time and time again, by all the sins of the people. The holiness of God and the broken law of God were covered by blood. So that God said, "When I look down, I will see the blood." Aren't you glad that when God looks at your life, He sees the blood of Christ? Now if you say, "Well, I'm really not one of those born again Christians. I don't really believe that the blood of Jesus Christ cleanses me from all sin. I do my best and I work hard and I try to keep the laws and help people across the street…" and all that nonsense - you'll fail - you've already failed. The only hope for mankind is to apply the blood of the Lamb of God that was slain for us to cover our brokenness, our sinfulness. Maybe some of you can relate to this: "Dear Lord, so far today, I've done alright. I haven't gossiped. I haven't lost my temper. I haven't been greedy, grumpy, nasty, selfish or over indulgent. I'm thankful for that, but in a few minutes, God, I'm going to get out of bed, and from then on, I'm going to need a lot more help, Amen." All of the broken laws that they had were covered by the blood predictive of Christ who would come.
Exodus chapter 25, verse 21: "You shall put the mercy seat on top of the ark, and in the ark you shall put the Testimony that I will give you. And there I will meet with you, and I will speak with you from above the mercy seat, from between the two cherubim which are on the ark of the Testimony, about everything which I will give you in commandment to the children of Israel." The entire tabernacle is a study of itself and how it is fulfilled in Jesus Christ. Again, one door and one door, one entrance only. As Jesus said, "I am the way, the truth and the life." There's only one way to heaven, friend. It's not by your good works; it's not by believing in any guru or master or any other alternate religion - it's by Christ alone. The entrance to the tabernacle was on, guess what side? The eastern side. Guess what tribe occupied the front part of the eastern side? The tribe of Judah. You had to go through Judah to get into the tabernacle. Jesus came from the tribe of Judah. He was the Lion of the tribe of Judah. Inside the tabernacle of the Holy Place, there were four layers of curtains. White linen on the inside, over that - goat's hair, over that - ram's skins, over that - badger skins on the outside. So on the outside, it looked ugly. On the inside it looked beautiful. There was gold and white and blue and red. That is also like Jesus Christ. The Bible says, "To look on Jesus, He has no form or comeliness, that when we see Him we should not desire Him." I don't think Jesus Christ looked like the holy cards depict Him. You know in all the holy cards, He's just this striking, kind of brownish-blond, American surfer and He's glowing and there's this big halo that kind of walks around wherever He goes. Then when another saint comes into the room, they have a halo but it's just not quite as big, but their face is kind of glowing too. And then there are the people in the crowd, and well, their faces aren't glowing at all. I think you look at Jesus and go, "That's Jesus?" He just looked like a normal guy. But from the inside - the pure, perfect, white, righteous, Son of God - so beautifully pictured here in the tabernacle.
Then there's the menorah. The only source of light in the tabernacle was that. Jesus said, "I am the light of the world." There was bread in the tabernacle. Jesus said, "I am the bread of life." There was an altar of incense right before the approach to the Ark veil. By the way, that is the ministry of Jesus Christ today. He prays; He's at the right hand of God making intercession for you. The incense was always a representation of the prayers of the Children of Israel. Then there was the veil in the temple. You can see it here in this picture. You can see the white and then all of that beautiful ornate linen. Just on the other side of that veil was the Holy of Holies. It's the veil that kept everybody out. Nobody, not even a priest, could go into that room. The only one who could go in, once a year, was a high priest. He would sprinkle blood on the mercy seat. Once a year he went in and he had little bells on his robe, because if his heart wasn't completely right and he wasn't totally pure before God, he would just keel over dead and they had a rope tied to him and they'd pull him out and say, "Okay, who's the next high priest?" "Not me! My shift isn't until next month!" What did Jesus do when He died on the cross? What happened in Jerusalem? "The veil of the temple," Matthew 27 tells us, "was torn from top to bottom." God tore the veil, saying, you don't just have to be a high priest - you don't just have to be of the sons of Levi or of that tribe - anybody and everyone can come and have intimate fellowship with that was Aaron's Me, 24/7. So all of it speaks of Christ. We ought not to be surprised because Jesus said, "If you were to believe Moses, you would believe Me, for Moses wrote of Me." Have you ever stopped to ask the question, "Where did Moses write about Jesus?" It's all over here. This tabernacle; all of the sacrifices; a beautiful picture of Christ.
Also, by the way, it's a model of heaven. So if you were to step into the tabernacle, it would be in a crude form on earth, of what it would be like to step into heaven. You're saying, "Now you're getting kind of weird and stretching this thing a little bit." No, I'm not. Listen to Hebrews, chapter 8. "They," the priests, "serve at a sanctuary that is a copy and a shadow of what is in heaven. This is why Moses was warned when he was about to build the tabernacle, 'See that you make everything according to the pattern shown you on the mountain.'"
So we get to Revelation, chapter 4, John's up in heaven. What does he see? The throne of God, and not two little angels carved in gold where God's throne is, but God Himself and four living creatures with their wings spread out in worship. That's a crude model of what's going on in heaven. He doesn't see a laver for washing anymore but he stands on a glassy sea. Here the laver is hardened. It's become stiffened because there's no need to be cleansed anymore. The cleansing is over. And then instead of an altar for sacrifice, there is the Lamb John sees: the One that looked like it had been slain. He was slain for the sins of the world. It's a picture - a model. Now I'm telling you that so that you'll understand, from 30,000 feet, why so much literature is devoted to the tabernacle. Let me frame it for you. There are only two chapters in the Bible that speak of the creation of the universe, and not even in much detail. There are over 50 detailed chapters that speak about the tabernacle. You ask, "Why?" That is why. Because of what it speaks about.
Chapters 28 through 31 are the priest in the tabernacle. What they are to wear, what they're to do, how they're to be consecrated. Aaron and his sons are taken to the gate, the door of the tabernacle. Blood is put on their ear, their big toe, their right thumb; all speaking of giving their bodies in service to the Lord. These are the priests. I'll tell you a little secret. Some of you may know it; I've told a few of you before. When I was young, it was my mom and dad's hope that one of their four boys would become a priest. So my two older brothers, Jim and Rick, actually went to seminary and were on their way to the priesthood. They dropped out and they got married and it was a disappointment, especially to my mother because she thought, "I'd just love to have one of my boys as a priest." So, then I turn up - the born again one. I'm the last kid. None of them become priests and I become like this born again Protestant to them and I was like their worst nightmare. Until I read 1st Peter that says, "Don't you know that you are chosen generation and a royal priesthood? A nation set apart." And I found that Scripture and said, "Mom, your prayers have been answered - I'm a priest!" She still wasn't that excited.
Chapter 31 is for all my artist friends. "Then the Lord spoke to Moses, saying: 'See, I have called by name Bezalel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah. And I have filled him with the Spirit of God, in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in all manner of workmanship.'" Bezalel was already an artist by profession and now he's given a special anointing by God - an empowering to fulfill God's will. Verse 4: "To design artistic works, to work in gold, in silver, in bronze, in cutting jewels for setting, in carving wood, and to work in all manner of workmanship." So, they did art, they crafted jewlery, they worked with fine carpentry - that's what they did. You might read that and go, "Okay, cool, so what was their ministry? What's all this about God anointing them and specially empowering them? You described what they did for a living. They were artists. Where's their ministry?" That's it. Their ministry was to be an artist for the glory of God. Sometimes we have the ministry so weird in our minds. We think, "Well, if you're in the ministry you're going to be a Reverend, a Pastor, a Teacher, Doctor." You could insert your name here. That God has raised up 'Frank' or 'George' or 'Nancy' as an accountant or a lawyer (yes, a lawyer) or a doctor or a whole host of other professions as a place to do ministry - a base of operations for God to work. I remember when I was going through school in radiology and I would always read my Bible and somebody said, "Don't you ever want to get into the ministry?" I said, "I am in the ministry, because I'm talking to you right now and since you asked me…" and I went on and told him about Jesus Christ to show him that I was in the ministry. You can be an executive; you can be a skateboarder for the glory of God. Okay, now listen. I don't want to minimize this. There's a skate park and a whole group of kids that the Lord is getting a hold of their hearts and they're taking their skate boarding skills and going out having contests in different parts of the state and country and sharing the Gospel. That's creative - very artistic.
Chapter 32 is the "Uh-oh" chapter. Everything is good, they're hearing God's Word, they made it up to this point, then you read chapter 32 and you think, "Uh-oh", because they really messed up. This chapter gets as much press in the Bible as the exodus out of Egypt. It's a hefty chapter. We'll just skim it. "Now when the people saw that Moses delayed coming down from the mountain, the people gathered together to Aaron, and said to him, 'Come, make us gods that shall go before us; for as for this Moses, the man who brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.' So they broke off their gold earrings and they brought them to Aaron." Verse 4:"And he received the gold from their hand, and he fashioned it with an engraving tool, and made a molded calf. Then they said, 'This is your god, O Israel, that brought you out of the land of Egypt!'" Verse 6: "Then they rose early on the next day, offered burnt offerings, and brought peace offerings; and the people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to indulge in revelry." (That's the idea of play - to indulge in pagan revelry.) Goodness! In the midst of God revealing Himself so powerfully to a nation, this quickly they turn away into idolatry and worship this bull. Now Moses gets mad, as we mentioned Sunday, breaks the Ten Commandments on the ground before the mountain, grinds up the calf, puts it in water and makes them drink it. Bummer. Verse 21: "And Moses said to Aaron, 'What did this people do to you that you have brought so great a sin upon them?' So Aaron said, (after he burped up the calf),'Do not let the anger of my lord become hot. You know the people, that they are set on evil.'" Now watch this. This is like classic excuses number 101, "For they said to me, 'Make us gods that shall go before us; as for this Moses, the man who brought us out of the land of Egypt, we do not know what has become of him.' And I said to them, 'Whoever has any gold, let them break it off.' So they gave it to me, and I cast it into the fire, and this calf came out.'" "Seriously, Moses, it just walked out! Listen, you had to have been there dude - it was amazing!" What a lame excuse! Somebody once said, "An excuse is the skin of a reason stuffed with a lie." I'm thinking, "If I was Moses I'd be shaking my head saying, 'You can't come up with anything better than that?'" I've talked to police officers who have told me about excuses that people give them for speeding. One guy said, "Well I had to floor it so I could get it to the gas station because I'm almost out of fuel." Another guy said, "I'm late for a funeral." Of course, the next could be his. I have a question for you as we bring this to a close. "What excuse do you have for not receiving Christ as your Savior? What excuse do you have for being an onlooker but not a receiver of Christ?"
Chapters 33 and 34 are all about a personal encounter that Moses has with God. He sets up a tent where God speaks to him face to face. The glory of God via a cloud descends upon that tent. They speak, it says in this chapter, "face to face" and God promises that His presence will go with them. So in verse 18, here's the highlight, Moses said, "Please show me your glory. Then He said, 'I will make all My goodness pass before you, and I will proclaim the name of the Lord before you. I will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and I will have compassion on whom I will have compassion.' But He said, 'You cannot see My face; for no man shall see Me, and live.'" I just have to say, you'd think that Moses might be satisfied, right? He had seen more supernatural wonders than anybody so far. He saw plagues happen supernaturally. I think most of us would be satisfied with watching God plague our enemies. We'd go, "That's cool; I believe!" Then the Red Sea opens up. "Okay! I believe! I'll never doubt you again." Now he goes, "I want more! Show me your glory!" No matter how well educated or sophisticated we are, at our very core, we want to see God. That's the longing of every believer. Philip even said to Jesus, "Show us the Father and it will be sufficient." "Oh, Philip, don't you know who I am? Haven't I been around you long enough? Whoever has seen Me has seen the Father. But no man can see the full brunt of the unshielded glory of God and live. One day your body will be transformed via resurrection and you'll be able to handle it." But if God came here tonight and said, "I'm going to show you my glory," we'd just fizzle up - we're not ready for that, we need a new body.
Chapters 35 to 40 are "take two". What I mean is, I can quickly sum this up. Israel starts obeying God and they build the tabernacle. All the specifications are given. All the things they used to make it are given and it's completed. That's the brunt of chapters 35 through 40. So in chapter 40, verse 17, "And it came to pass in the first month of the second year, on the first day of the month, that the tabernacle was raised up. So Moses raised up the tabernacle, fastened its sockets, set up its boards, put in its bars, and raised up its pillars. And he spread out the tent over the tabernacle and put the covering of the tent on top of it, as the Lord had commanded Moses." Remember those four coverings? Linen and goat's hair and rams skins and badger skins? It was all assembled. Verse 34: "Then the cloud covered the tabernacle of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. And Moses was not able to enter the tabernacle of meeting, because the cloud rested above it, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. Whenever the cloud was taken up from above the tabernacle, the children of Israel would go onward in all their journeys. But if the cloud was not taken up, then they did not journey till the day that it was taken up. For the cloud of the Lord was above the tabernacle by day, and fire was over it by night, in the sight of all the house of Israel, throughout of all their journeys."
So now, here's where we're at. The tabernacle is at the very heart and center, geographically, of the encampment of Israel. The nation of Israel is centered on God. He's in the very center and the very midst of them. It's really a great way to end the book; God's presence dwelling among His people. We started the book - they were in Egypt crying out, they went through the wilderness, grumbled and complained a little bit - but you haven't seen nothin' yet! Wait until we get to the next few weeks! But it ends in glory. From groaning to grumbling to glory - that's how the book flows and we end with God delivering them from the furnace of Egypt out into the wilderness where God is providing, preserving and protecting them.
The Lord; His design for you, here's the message of Exodus for you: God wants to deliver you from the slavery caused by your sin, bring you into deliverance and be at the very center of your life, as the tabernacle was at the center of their life. He wants to deliver you from sin and be at the center of your life. That's why the Bible says, concerning Jesus Christ, "And the Word became flesh and tabernacled among us," literally, "and we beheld His glory."
As we close this service, I'm going to ask us all to stand right now and we are going to close in a word of prayer as the worship team comes out. But I'm going to ask you this, in finishing the book of Exodus with you, "Are you sure that tonight you're not enslaved to your own desires, wants, and practices? Are you certain that you have been delivered from sin? Is God at the center of your life? Do you walk with Him in loving obedience? Those are the great themes of this book - Redemption and Revelation. If you're not certain that you have a personal walk and relationship with Christ or maybe you remember looking back to a time where, "Yeah, I remember crossing that Red Sea and I thought it was grand for a while, but I haven't been walking with God - I don't even know where that cloud went." Maybe it's time for you to get right with Him tonight. This is how we're going to close - we just have a few moments. As we sing this last song, if you aren't right with God or you want to give your life to Christ for the first time or a rededication, I'm going to ask you to get up from where you're standing and come right up to the front. We'll make room for you, but come right now and follow God's call, be obedient to Him. Just come forward and give your life to Jesus Christ, your Redeemer, tonight. As we sing this song, no matter where you're at, just say excuse me to the person around you and come stand right up on the front. Right now, give your life to Christ - just say, "Pardon me." They'll know what to do. I'm going to lead you who have come in a prayer. I'm going to pray something out loud and I'd like it if you'd pray out loud after me, what I say. But I want you to just, if you can, as much as you can, tune everybody here out for a moment and just tune in this fact. You're standing before God, and you're going to mean from your heart the words you're about to say to Him. You're going to give your life over to Him.
Let's pray together. Lord, I give you my life. I know I'm a sinner. Please forgive me. I turn from my sin and I turn to You to be cleansed. I believe in Jesus who died on the cross and rose from the dead. Fill me with your Spirit and give me power to live for You. In Jesus name, Amen.

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/8/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
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Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
completed
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
completed
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
completed
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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12/5/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.
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1/9/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/16/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
completed
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
completed
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Destination: Acts
Acts
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
completed
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Destination: Romans
Romans
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
completed
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
completed
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
completed
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
completed
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.

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There are 64 additional messages in this series.