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Service Archives > Bible from 30,000 Feet, The > Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24

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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig

2 Samuel 11 (NKJV™)
1 It happened in the spring of the year, at the time when kings go out to battle, that David sent Joab and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the people of Ammon and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem.
2 Then it happened one evening that David arose from his bed and walked on the roof of the king's house. And from the roof he saw a woman bathing, and the woman was very beautiful to behold.
3 So David sent and inquired about the woman. And someone said, "Is this not Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?"
4 Then David sent messengers, and took her; and she came to him, and he lay with her, for she was cleansed from her impurity; and she returned to her house.
5 And the woman conceived; so she sent and told David, and said, "I am with child."
6 Then David sent to Joab, saying, "Send me Uriah the Hittite." And Joab sent Uriah to David.
7 When Uriah had come to him, David asked how Joab was doing, and how the people were doing, and how the war prospered.
8 And David said to Uriah, "Go down to your house and wash your feet." So Uriah departed from the king's house, and a gift of food from the king followed him.
9 But Uriah slept at the door of the king's house with all the servants of his lord, and did not go down to his house.
10 So when they told David, saying, "Uriah did not go down to his house," David said to Uriah, "Did you not come from a journey? Why did you not go down to your house?"
11 And Uriah said to David, "The ark and Israel and Judah are dwelling in tents, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are encamped in the open fields. Shall I then go to my house to eat and drink, and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do this thing."
12 Then David said to Uriah, "Wait here today also, and tomorrow I will let you depart." So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day and the next.
13 Now when David called him, he ate and drank before him; and he made him drunk. And at evening he went out to lie on his bed with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house.
14 In the morning it happened that David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it by the hand of Uriah.
15 And he wrote in the letter, saying, "Set Uriah in the forefront of the hottest battle, and retreat from him, that he may be struck down and die."
16 So it was, while Joab besieged the city, that he assigned Uriah to a place where he knew there were valiant men.
17 Then the men of the city came out and fought with Joab. And some of the people of the servants of David fell; and Uriah the Hittite died also.
18 Then Joab sent and told David all the things concerning the war,
19 and charged the messenger, saying, "When you have finished telling the matters of the war to the king,
20 if it happens that the king's wrath rises, and he says to you: 'Why did you approach so near to the city when you fought? Did you not know that they would shoot from the wall?
21 'Who struck Abimelech the son of Jerubbesheth? Was it not a woman who cast a piece of a millstone on him from the wall, so that he died in Thebez? Why did you go near the wall?'--then you shall say, 'Your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.'"
22 So the messenger went, and came and told David all that Joab had sent by him.
23 And the messenger said to David, "Surely the men prevailed against us and came out to us in the field; then we drove them back as far as the entrance of the gate.
24 "The archers shot from the wall at your servants; and some of the king's servants are dead, and your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also."
25 Then David said to the messenger, "Thus you shall say to Joab: 'Do not let this thing displease you, for the sword devours one as well as another. Strengthen your attack against the city, and overthrow it.' So encourage him."
26 When the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband was dead, she mourned for her husband.
27 And when her mourning was over, David sent and brought her to his house, and she became his wife and bore him a son. But the thing that David had done displeased the LORD.
2 Samuel 12 (NKJV™)
1 Then the LORD sent Nathan to David. And he came to him, and said to him: "There were two men in one city, one rich and the other poor.
2 "The rich man had exceedingly many flocks and herds.
3 "But the poor man had nothing, except one little ewe lamb which he had bought and nourished; and it grew up together with him and with his children. It ate of his own food and drank from his own cup and lay in his bosom; and it was like a daughter to him.
4 "And a traveler came to the rich man, who refused to take from his own flock and from his own herd to prepare one for the wayfaring man who had come to him; but he took the poor man's lamb and prepared it for the man who had come to him."
5 So David's anger was greatly aroused against the man, and he said to Nathan, "As the LORD lives, the man who has done this shall surely die!
6 "And he shall restore fourfold for the lamb, because he did this thing and because he had no pity."
7 Then Nathan said to David, "You are the man! Thus says the LORD God of Israel: 'I anointed you king over Israel, and I delivered you from the hand of Saul.
8 'I gave you your master's house and your master's wives into your keeping, and gave you the house of Israel and Judah. And if that had been too little, I also would have given you much more!
9 'Why have you despised the commandment of the LORD, to do evil in His sight? You have killed Uriah the Hittite with the sword; you have taken his wife to be your wife, and have killed him with the sword of the people of Ammon.
10 'Now therefore, the sword shall never depart from your house, because you have despised Me, and have taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be your wife.'
11 "Thus says the LORD: 'Behold, I will raise up adversity against you from your own house; and I will take your wives before your eyes and give them to your neighbor, and he shall lie with your wives in the sight of this sun.
12 'For you did it secretly, but I will do this thing before all Israel, before the sun.'"
13 So David said to Nathan, "I have sinned against the LORD." And Nathan said to David, "The LORD also has put away your sin; you shall not die.
14 "However, because by this deed you have given great occasion to the enemies of the LORD to blaspheme, the child also who is born to you shall surely die."
15 Then Nathan departed to his house. And the LORD struck the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and it became ill.
16 David therefore pleaded with God for the child, and David fasted and went in and lay all night on the ground.
17 So the elders of his house arose and went to him, to raise him up from the ground. But he would not, nor did he eat food with them.
18 Then on the seventh day it came to pass that the child died. And the servants of David were afraid to tell him that the child was dead. For they said, "Indeed, while the child was alive, we spoke to him, and he would not heed our voice. How can we tell him that the child is dead? He may do some harm!"
19 When David saw that his servants were whispering, David perceived that the child was dead. Therefore David said to his servants, "Is the child dead?" And they said, "He is dead."
20 So David arose from the ground, washed and anointed himself, and changed his clothes; and he went into the house of the LORD and worshiped. Then he went to his own house; and when he requested, they set food before him, and he ate.
21 Then his servants said to him, "What is this that you have done? You fasted and wept for the child while he was alive, but when the child died, you arose and ate food."
22 And he said, "While the child was alive, I fasted and wept; for I said, 'Who can tell whether the LORD will be gracious to me, that the child may live?'
23 "But now he is dead; why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me."
24 Then David comforted Bathsheba his wife, and went in to her and lay with her. So she bore a son, and he called his name Solomon. Now the LORD loved him,
25 and He sent word by the hand of Nathan the prophet: So he called his name Jedidiah, because of the LORD.
26 Now Joab fought against Rabbah of the people of Ammon, and took the royal city.
27 And Joab sent messengers to David, and said, "I have fought against Rabbah, and I have taken the city's water supply.
28 "Now therefore, gather the rest of the people together and encamp against the city and take it, lest I take the city and it be called after my name."
29 So David gathered all the people together and went to Rabbah, fought against it, and took it.
30 Then he took their king's crown from his head. Its weight was a talent of gold, with precious stones. And it was set on David's head. Also he brought out the spoil of the city in great abundance.
31 And he brought out the people who were in it, and put them to work with saws and iron picks and iron axes, and made them cross over to the brick works. So he did to all the cities of the people of Ammon. Then David and all the people returned to Jerusalem.
2 Samuel 13 (NKJV™)
1 After this Absalom the son of David had a lovely sister, whose name was Tamar; and Amnon the son of David loved her.
2 Amnon was so distressed over his sister Tamar that he became sick; for she was a virgin. And it was improper for Amnon to do anything to her.
3 But Amnon had a friend whose name was Jonadab the son of Shimeah, David's brother. Now Jonadab was a very crafty man.
4 And he said to him, "Why are you, the king's son, becoming thinner day after day? Will you not tell me?" Amnon said to him, "I love Tamar, my brother Absalom's sister."
5 So Jonadab said to him, "Lie down on your bed and pretend to be ill. And when your father comes to see you, say to him, 'Please let my sister Tamar come and give me food, and prepare the food in my sight, that I may see it and eat it from her hand.'"
6 Then Amnon lay down and pretended to be ill; and when the king came to see him, Amnon said to the king, "Please let Tamar my sister come and make a couple of cakes for me in my sight, that I may eat from her hand."
7 And David sent home to Tamar, saying, "Now go to your brother Amnon's house, and prepare food for him."
8 So Tamar went to her brother Amnon's house; and he was lying down. Then she took flour and kneaded it, made cakes in his sight, and baked the cakes.
9 And she took the pan and placed them out before him, but he refused to eat. Then Amnon said, "Have everyone go out from me." And they all went out from him.
10 Then Amnon said to Tamar, "Bring the food into the bedroom, that I may eat from your hand." And Tamar took the cakes which she had made, and brought them to Amnon her brother in the bedroom.
11 Now when she had brought them to him to eat, he took hold of her and said to her, "Come, lie with me, my sister."
12 And she answered him, "No, my brother, do not force me, for no such thing should be done in Israel. Do not do this disgraceful thing!
13 "And I, where could I take my shame? And as for you, you would be like one of the fools in Israel. Now therefore, please speak to the king; for he will not withhold me from you."
14 However, he would not heed her voice; and being stronger than she, he forced her and lay with her.
15 Then Amnon hated her exceedingly, so that the hatred with which he hated her was greater than the love with which he had loved her. And Amnon said to her, "Arise, be gone!"
16 So she said to him, "No, indeed! This evil of sending me away is worse than the other that you did to me." But he would not listen to her.
17 Then he called his servant who attended him, and said, "Here! Put this woman out, away from me, and bolt the door behind her."
18 Now she had on a robe of many colors, for the king's virgin daughters wore such apparel. And his servant put her out and bolted the door behind her.
19 Then Tamar put ashes on her head, and tore her robe of many colors that was on her, and laid her hand on her head and went away crying bitterly.
20 And Absalom her brother said to her, "Has Amnon your brother been with you? But now hold your peace, my sister. He is your brother; do not take this thing to heart." So Tamar remained desolate in her brother Absalom's house.
21 But when King David heard of all these things, he was very angry.
22 And Absalom spoke to his brother Amnon neither good nor bad. For Absalom hated Amnon, because he had forced his sister Tamar.
23 And it came to pass, after two full years, that Absalom had sheepshearers in Baal Hazor, which is near Ephraim; so Absalom invited all the king's sons.
24 Then Absalom came to the king and said, "Kindly note, your servant has sheepshearers; please, let the king and his servants go with your servant."
25 But the king said to Absalom, "No, my son, let us not all go now, lest we be a burden to you." Then he urged him, but he would not go; and he blessed him.
26 Then Absalom said, "If not, please let my brother Amnon go with us." And the king said to him, "Why should he go with you?"
27 But Absalom urged him; so he let Amnon and all the king's sons go with him.
28 Now Absalom had commanded his servants, saying, "Watch now, when Amnon's heart is merry with wine, and when I say to you, 'Strike Amnon!' then kill him. Do not be afraid. Have I not commanded you? Be courageous and valiant."
29 So the servants of Absalom did to Amnon as Absalom had commanded. Then all the king's sons arose, and each one got on his mule and fled.
30 And it came to pass, while they were on the way, that news came to David, saying, "Absalom has killed all the king's sons, and not one of them is left!"
31 So the king arose and tore his garments and lay on the ground, and all his servants stood by with their clothes torn.
32 Then Jonadab the son of Shimeah, David's brother, answered and said, "Let not my lord suppose they have killed all the young men, the king's sons, for only Amnon is dead. For by the command of Absalom this has been determined from the day that he forced his sister Tamar.
33 "Now therefore, let not my lord the king take the thing to his heart, to think that all the king's sons are dead. For only Amnon is dead."
34 Then Absalom fled. And the young man who was keeping watch lifted his eyes and looked, and there, many people were coming from the road on the hillside behind him.
35 And Jonadab said to the king, "Look, the king's sons are coming; as your servant said, so it is."
36 So it was, as soon as he had finished speaking, that the king's sons indeed came, and they lifted up their voice and wept. Also the king and all his servants wept very bitterly.
37 But Absalom fled and went to Talmai the son of Ammihud, king of Geshur. And David mourned for his son every day.
38 So Absalom fled and went to Geshur, and was there three years.
39 And King David longed to go to Absalom. For he had been comforted concerning Amnon, because he was dead.
2 Samuel 14 (NKJV™)
1 So Joab the son of Zeruiah perceived that the king's heart was concerned about Absalom.
2 And Joab sent to Tekoa and brought from there a wise woman, and said to her, "Please pretend to be a mourner, and put on mourning apparel; do not anoint yourself with oil, but act like a woman who has been mourning a long time for the dead.
3 "Go to the king and speak to him in this manner." So Joab put the words in her mouth.
4 And when the woman of Tekoa spoke to the king, she fell on her face to the ground and prostrated herself, and said, "Help, O king!"
5 Then the king said to her, "What troubles you?" And she answered, "Indeed I am a widow, my husband is dead.
6 "Now your maidservant had two sons; and the two fought with each other in the field, and there was no one to part them, but the one struck the other and killed him.
7 "And now the whole family has risen up against your maidservant, and they said, 'Deliver him who struck his brother, that we may execute him for the life of his brother whom he killed; and we will destroy the heir also.' So they would extinguish my ember that is left, and leave to my husband neither name nor remnant on the earth."
8 Then the king said to the woman, "Go to your house, and I will give orders concerning you."
9 And the woman of Tekoa said to the king, "My lord, O king, let the iniquity be on me and on my father's house, and the king and his throne be guiltless."
10 So the king said, "Whoever says anything to you, bring him to me, and he shall not touch you anymore."
11 Then she said, "Please let the king remember the LORD your God, and do not permit the avenger of blood to destroy anymore, lest they destroy my son." And he said, "As the LORD lives, not one hair of your son shall fall to the ground."
12 Therefore the woman said, "Please, let your maidservant speak another word to my lord the king." And he said, "Say on."
13 So the woman said: "Why then have you schemed such a thing against the people of God? For the king speaks this thing as one who is guilty, in that the king does not bring his banished one home again.
14 "For we will surely die and become like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be gathered up again. Yet God does not take away a life; but He devises means, so that His banished ones are not expelled from Him.
15 "Now therefore, I have come to speak of this thing to my lord the king because the people have made me afraid. And your maidservant said, 'I will now speak to the king; it may be that the king will perform the request of his maidservant.
16 'For the king will hear and deliver his maidservant from the hand of the man who would destroy me and my son together from the inheritance of God.'
17 "Your maidservant said, 'The word of my lord the king will now be comforting; for as the angel of God, so is my lord the king in discerning good and evil. And may the LORD your God be with you.'"
18 Then the king answered and said to the woman, "Please do not hide from me anything that I ask you." And the woman said, "Please, let my lord the king speak."
19 So the king said, "Is the hand of Joab with you in all this?" And the woman answered and said, "As you live, my lord the king, no one can turn to the right hand or to the left from anything that my lord the king has spoken. For your servant Joab commanded me, and he put all these words in the mouth of your maidservant.
20 "To bring about this change of affairs your servant Joab has done this thing; but my lord is wise, according to the wisdom of the angel of God, to know everything that is in the earth."
21 And the king said to Joab, "All right, I have granted this thing. Go therefore, bring back the young man Absalom."
22 Then Joab fell to the ground on his face and bowed himself, and thanked the king. And Joab said, "Today your servant knows that I have found favor in your sight, my lord, O king, in that the king has fulfilled the request of his servant."
23 So Joab arose and went to Geshur, and brought Absalom to Jerusalem.
24 And the king said, "Let him return to his own house, but do not let him see my face." So Absalom returned to his own house, but did not see the king's face.
25 Now in all Israel there was no one who was praised as much as Absalom for his good looks. From the sole of his foot to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him.
26 And when he cut the hair of his head--at the end of every year he cut it because it was heavy on him--when he cut it, he weighed the hair of his head at two hundred shekels according to the king's standard.
27 To Absalom were born three sons, and one daughter whose name was Tamar. She was a woman of beautiful appearance.
28 And Absalom dwelt two full years in Jerusalem, but did not see the king's face.
29 Therefore Absalom sent for Joab, to send him to the king, but he would not come to him. And when he sent again the second time, he would not come.
30 So he said to his servants, "See, Joab's field is near mine, and he has barley there; go and set it on fire." And Absalom's servants set the field on fire.
31 Then Joab arose and came to Absalom's house, and said to him, "Why have your servants set my field on fire?"
32 And Absalom answered Joab, "Look, I sent to you, saying, 'Come here, so that I may send you to the king, to say, "Why have I come from Geshur? It would be better for me to be there still."' Now therefore, let me see the king's face; but if there is iniquity in me, let him execute me."
33 So Joab went to the king and told him. And when he had called for Absalom, he came to the king and bowed himself on his face to the ground before the king. Then the king kissed Absalom.
2 Samuel 15 (NKJV™)
1 After this it happened that Absalom provided himself with chariots and horses, and fifty men to run before him.
2 Now Absalom would rise early and stand beside the way to the gate. So it was, whenever anyone who had a lawsuit came to the king for a decision, that Absalom would call to him and say, "What city are you from?" And he would say, "Your servant is from such and such a tribe of Israel."
3 Then Absalom would say to him, "Look, your case is good and right; but there is no deputy of the king to hear you."
4 Moreover Absalom would say, "Oh, that I were made judge in the land, and everyone who has any suit or cause would come to me; then I would give him justice."
5 And so it was, whenever anyone came near to bow down to him, that he would put out his hand and take him and kiss him.
6 In this manner Absalom acted toward all Israel who came to the king for judgment. So Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.
7 Now it came to pass after forty years that Absalom said to the king, "Please, let me go to Hebron and pay the vow which I made to the LORD.
8 "For your servant took a vow while I dwelt at Geshur in Syria, saying, 'If the LORD indeed brings me back to Jerusalem, then I will serve the LORD.'"
9 And the king said to him, "Go in peace." So he arose and went to Hebron.
10 Then Absalom sent spies throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, "As soon as you hear the sound of the trumpet, then you shall say, 'Absalom reigns in Hebron!'"
11 And with Absalom went two hundred men invited from Jerusalem, and they went along innocently and did not know anything.
12 Then Absalom sent for Ahithophel the Gilonite, David's counselor, from his city--from Giloh--while he offered sacrifices. And the conspiracy grew strong, for the people with Absalom continually increased in number.
13 Now a messenger came to David, saying, "The hearts of the men of Israel are with Absalom."
14 So David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, "Arise, and let us flee; or we shall not escape from Absalom. Make haste to depart, lest he overtake us suddenly and bring disaster upon us, and strike the city with the edge of the sword."
15 And the king's servants said to the king, "We are your servants, ready to do whatever my lord the king commands."
16 Then the king went out with all his household after him. But the king left ten women, concubines, to keep the house.
17 And the king went out with all the people after him, and stopped at the outskirts.
18 Then all his servants passed before him; and all the Cherethites, all the Pelethites, and all the Gittites, six hundred men who had followed him from Gath, passed before the king.
19 Then the king said to Ittai the Gittite, "Why are you also going with us? Return and remain with the king. For you are a foreigner and also an exile from your own place.
20 "In fact, you came only yesterday. Should I make you wander up and down with us today, since I go I know not where? Return, and take your brethren back. Mercy and truth be with you."
21 And Ittai answered the king and said, "As the LORD lives, and as my lord the king lives, surely in whatever place my lord the king shall be, whether in death or life, even there also your servant will be."
22 So David said to Ittai, "Go, and cross over." Then Ittai the Gittite and all his men and all the little ones who were with him crossed over.
23 And all the country wept with a loud voice, and all the people crossed over. The king himself also crossed over the Brook Kidron, and all the people crossed over toward the way of the wilderness.
24 There was Zadok also, and all the Levites with him, bearing the ark of the covenant of God. And they set down the ark of God, and Abiathar went up until all the people had finished crossing over from the city.
25 Then the king said to Zadok, "Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the LORD, He will bring me back and show me both it and His dwelling place.
26 "But if He says thus: 'I have no delight in you,' here I am, let Him do to me as seems good to Him."
27 The king also said to Zadok the priest, "Are you not a seer? Return to the city in peace, and your two sons with you, Ahimaaz your son, and Jonathan the son of Abiathar.
28 "See, I will wait in the plains of the wilderness until word comes from you to inform me."
29 Therefore Zadok and Abiathar carried the ark of God back to Jerusalem. And they remained there.
30 So David went up by the Ascent of the Mount of Olives, and wept as he went up; and he had his head covered and went barefoot. And all the people who were with him covered their heads and went up, weeping as they went up.
31 Then someone told David, saying, "Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom." And David said, "O LORD, I pray, turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness!"
32 Now it happened when David had come to the top of the mountain, where he worshiped God--there was Hushai the Archite coming to meet him with his robe torn and dust on his head.
33 David said to him, "If you go on with me, then you will become a burden to me.
34 "But if you return to the city, and say to Absalom, 'I will be your servant, O king; as I was your father's servant previously, so I will now also be your servant,' then you may defeat the counsel of Ahithophel for me.
35 "And do you not have Zadok and Abiathar the priests with you there? Therefore it will be that whatever you hear from the king's house, you shall tell to Zadok and Abiathar the priests.
36 "Indeed they have there with them their two sons, Ahimaaz, Zadok's son, and Jonathan, Abiathar's son; and by them you shall send me everything you hear."
37 So Hushai, David's friend, went into the city. And Absalom came into Jerusalem.
2 Samuel 16 (NKJV™)
1 When David was a little past the top of the mountain, there was Ziba the servant of Mephibosheth, who met him with a couple of saddled donkeys, and on them two hundred loaves of bread, one hundred clusters of raisins, one hundred summer fruits, and a skin of wine.
2 And the king said to Ziba, "What do you mean to do with these?" So Ziba said, "The donkeys are for the king's household to ride on, the bread and summer fruit for the young men to eat, and the wine for those who are faint in the wilderness to drink."
3 Then the king said, "And where is your master's son?" And Ziba said to the king, "Indeed he is staying in Jerusalem, for he said, 'Today the house of Israel will restore the kingdom of my father to me.'"
4 So the king said to Ziba, "Here, all that belongs to Mephibosheth is yours." And Ziba said, "I humbly bow before you, that I may find favor in your sight, my lord, O king!"
5 Now when King David came to Bahurim, there was a man from the family of the house of Saul, whose name was Shimei the son of Gera, coming from there. He came out, cursing continuously as he came.
6 And he threw stones at David and at all the servants of King David. And all the people and all the mighty men were on his right hand and on his left.
7 Also Shimei said thus when he cursed: "Come out! Come out! You bloodthirsty man, you rogue!
8 "The LORD has brought upon you all the blood of the house of Saul, in whose place you have reigned; and the LORD has delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom your son. So now you are caught in your own evil, because you are a bloodthirsty man!"
9 Then Abishai the son of Zeruiah said to the king, "Why should this dead dog curse my lord the king? Please, let me go over and take off his head!"
10 But the king said, "What have I to do with you, you sons of Zeruiah? So let him curse, because the LORD has said to him, 'Curse David.' Who then shall say, 'Why have you done so?'"
11 And David said to Abishai and all his servants, "See how my son who came from my own body seeks my life. How much more now may this Benjamite? Let him alone, and let him curse; for so the LORD has ordered him.
12 "It may be that the LORD will look on my affliction, and that the LORD will repay me with good for his cursing this day."
13 And as David and his men went along the road, Shimei went along the hillside opposite him and cursed as he went, threw stones at him and kicked up dust.
14 Now the king and all the people who were with him became weary; so they refreshed themselves there.
15 Meanwhile Absalom and all the people, the men of Israel, came to Jerusalem; and Ahithophel was with him.
16 And so it was, when Hushai the Archite, David's friend, came to Absalom, that Hushai said to Absalom, "Long live the king! Long live the king!"
17 So Absalom said to Hushai, "Is this your loyalty to your friend? Why did you not go with your friend?"
18 And Hushai said to Absalom, "No, but whom the LORD and this people and all the men of Israel choose, his I will be, and with him I will remain.
19 "Furthermore, whom should I serve? Should I not serve in the presence of his son? As I have served in your father's presence, so will I be in your presence."
20 Then Absalom said to Ahithophel, "Give counsel as to what we should do."
21 And Ahithophel said to Absalom, "Go in to your father's concubines, whom he has left to keep the house; and all Israel will hear that you are abhorred by your father. Then the hands of all who are with you will be strong."
22 So they pitched a tent for Absalom on the top of the house, and Absalom went in to his father's concubines in the sight of all Israel.
23 Now the advice of Ahithophel, which he gave in those days, was as if one had inquired at the oracle of God. So was all the advice of Ahithophel both with David and with Absalom.
2 Samuel 17 (NKJV™)
1 Moreover Ahithophel said to Absalom, "Now let me choose twelve thousand men, and I will arise and pursue David tonight.
2 "I will come upon him while he is weary and weak, and make him afraid. And all the people who are with him will flee, and I will strike only the king.
3 "Then I will bring back all the people to you. When all return except the man whom you seek, all the people will be at peace."
4 And the saying pleased Absalom and all the elders of Israel.
5 Then Absalom said, "Now call Hushai the Archite also, and let us hear what he says too."
6 And when Hushai came to Absalom, Absalom spoke to him, saying, "Ahithophel has spoken in this manner. Shall we do as he says? If not, speak up."
7 So Hushai said to Absalom: "The advice that Ahithophel has given is not good at this time.
8 "For," said Hushai, "you know your father and his men, that they are mighty men, and they are enraged in their minds, like a bear robbed of her cubs in the field; and your father is a man of war, and will not camp with the people.
9 "Surely by now he is hidden in some pit, or in some other place. And it will be, when some of them are overthrown at the first, that whoever hears it will say, 'There is a slaughter among the people who follow Absalom.'
10 "And even he who is valiant, whose heart is like the heart of a lion, will melt completely. For all Israel knows that your father is a mighty man, and those who are with him are valiant men.
11 "Therefore I advise that all Israel be fully gathered to you, from Dan to Beersheba, like the sand that is by the sea for multitude, and that you go to battle in person.
12 "So we will come upon him in some place where he may be found, and we will fall on him as the dew falls on the ground. And of him and all the men who are with him there shall not be left so much as one.
13 "Moreover, if he has withdrawn into a city, then all Israel shall bring ropes to that city; and we will pull it into the river, until there is not one small stone found there."
14 So Absalom and all the men of Israel said, "The advice of Hushai the Archite is better than the advice of Ahithophel." For the LORD had purposed to defeat the good advice of Ahithophel, to the intent that the LORD might bring disaster on Absalom.
15 Then Hushai said to Zadok and Abiathar the priests, "Thus and so Ahithophel advised Absalom and the elders of Israel, and thus and so I have advised.
16 "Now therefore, send quickly and tell David, saying, 'Do not spend this night in the plains of the wilderness, but speedily cross over, lest the king and all the people who are with him be swallowed up.'"
17 Now Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed at En Rogel, for they dared not be seen coming into the city; so a female servant would come and tell them, and they would go and tell King David.
18 Nevertheless a lad saw them, and told Absalom. But both of them went away quickly and came to a man's house in Bahurim, who had a well in his court; and they went down into it.
19 Then the woman took and spread a covering over the well's mouth, and spread ground grain on it; and the thing was not known.
20 And when Absalom's servants came to the woman at the house, they said, "Where are Ahimaaz and Jonathan?" So the woman said to them, "They have gone over the water brook." And when they had searched and could not find them, they returned to Jerusalem.
21 Now it came to pass, after they had departed, that they came up out of the well and went and told King David, and said to David, "Arise and cross over the water quickly. For thus has Ahithophel advised against you."
22 So David and all the people who were with him arose and crossed over the Jordan. By morning light not one of them was left who had not gone over the Jordan.
23 Now when Ahithophel saw that his advice was not followed, he saddled a donkey, and arose and went home to his house, to his city. Then he put his household in order, and hanged himself, and died; and he was buried in his father's tomb.
24 Then David went to Mahanaim. And Absalom crossed over the Jordan, he and all the men of Israel with him.
25 And Absalom made Amasa captain of the army instead of Joab. This Amasa was the son of a man whose name was Jithra, an Israelite, who had gone in to Abigail the daughter of Nahash, sister of Zeruiah, Joab's mother.
26 So Israel and Absalom encamped in the land of Gilead.
27 Now it happened, when David had come to Mahanaim, that Shobi the son of Nahash from Rabbah of the people of Ammon, Machir the son of Ammiel from Lo Debar, and Barzillai the Gileadite from Rogelim,
28 brought beds and basins, earthen vessels and wheat, barley and flour, parched grain and beans, lentils and parched seeds,
29 honey and curds, sheep and cheese of the herd, for David and the people who were with him to eat. For they said, "The people are hungry and weary and thirsty in the wilderness."
2 Samuel 18 (NKJV™)
1 And David numbered the people who were with him, and set captains of thousands and captains of hundreds over them.
2 Then David sent out one third of the people under the hand of Joab, one third under the hand of Abishai the son of Zeruiah, Joab's brother, and one third under the hand of Ittai the Gittite. And the king said to the people, "I also will surely go out with you myself."
3 But the people answered, "You shall not go out! For if we flee away, they will not care about us; nor if half of us die, will they care about us. But you are worth ten thousand of us now. For you are now more help to us in the city."
4 Then the king said to them, "Whatever seems best to you I will do." So the king stood beside the gate, and all the people went out by hundreds and by thousands.
5 Now the king had commanded Joab, Abishai, and Ittai, saying, "Deal gently for my sake with the young man Absalom." And all the people heard when the king gave all the captains orders concerning Absalom.
6 So the people went out into the field of battle against Israel. And the battle was in the woods of Ephraim.
7 The people of Israel were overthrown there before the servants of David, and a great slaughter of twenty thousand took place there that day.
8 For the battle there was scattered over the face of the whole countryside, and the woods devoured more people that day than the sword devoured.
9 Then Absalom met the servants of David. Absalom rode on a mule. The mule went under the thick boughs of a great terebinth tree, and his head caught in the terebinth; so he was left hanging between heaven and earth. And the mule which was under him went on.
10 Now a certain man saw it and told Joab, and said, "I just saw Absalom hanging in a terebinth tree!"
11 So Joab said to the man who told him, "You just saw him! And why did you not strike him there to the ground? I would have given you ten shekels of silver and a belt."
12 But the man said to Joab, "Though I were to receive a thousand shekels of silver in my hand, I would not raise my hand against the king's son. For in our hearing the king commanded you and Abishai and Ittai, saying, 'Beware lest anyone touch the young man Absalom!'
13 "Otherwise I would have dealt falsely against my own life. For there is nothing hidden from the king, and you yourself would have set yourself against me."
14 Then Joab said, "I cannot linger with you." And he took three spears in his hand and thrust them through Absalom's heart, while he was still alive in the midst of the terebinth tree.
15 And ten young men who bore Joab's armor surrounded Absalom, and struck and killed him.
16 So Joab blew the trumpet, and the people returned from pursuing Israel. For Joab held back the people.
17 And they took Absalom and cast him into a large pit in the woods, and laid a very large heap of stones over him. Then all Israel fled, everyone to his tent.
18 Now Absalom in his lifetime had taken and set up a pillar for himself, which is in the King's Valley. For he said, "I have no son to keep my name in remembrance." He called the pillar after his own name. And to this day it is called Absalom's Monument.
19 Then Ahimaaz the son of Zadok said, "Let me run now and take the news to the king, how the LORD has avenged him of his enemies."
20 And Joab said to him, "You shall not take the news this day, for you shall take the news another day. But today you shall take no news, because the king's son is dead."
21 Then Joab said to the Cushite, "Go, tell the king what you have seen." So the Cushite bowed himself to Joab and ran.
22 And Ahimaaz the son of Zadok said again to Joab, "But whatever happens, please let me also run after the Cushite." So Joab said, "Why will you run, my son, since you have no news ready?"
23 "But whatever happens," he said, "let me run." So he said to him, "Run." Then Ahimaaz ran by way of the plain, and outran the Cushite.
24 Now David was sitting between the two gates. And the watchman went up to the roof over the gate, to the wall, lifted his eyes and looked, and there was a man, running alone.
25 Then the watchman cried out and told the king. And the king said, "If he is alone, there is news in his mouth." And he came rapidly and drew near.
26 Then the watchman saw another man running, and the watchman called to the gatekeeper and said, "There is another man, running alone!" And the king said, "He also brings news."
27 So the watchman said, "I think the running of the first is like the running of Ahimaaz the son of Zadok." And the king said, "He is a good man, and comes with good news."
28 And Ahimaaz called out and said to the king, "All is well!" Then he bowed down with his face to the earth before the king, and said, "Blessed be the LORD your God, who has delivered up the men who raised their hand against my lord the king!"
29 The king said, "Is the young man Absalom safe?" Ahimaaz answered, "When Joab sent the king's servant and me your servant, I saw a great tumult, but I did not know what it was about."
30 And the king said, "Turn aside and stand here." So he turned aside and stood still.
31 Just then the Cushite came, and the Cushite said, "There is good news, my lord the king! For the LORD has avenged you this day of all those who rose against you."
32 And the king said to the Cushite, "Is the young man Absalom safe?" So the Cushite answered, "May the enemies of my lord the king, and all who rise against you to do harm, be like that young man!"
33 Then the king was deeply moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept. And as he went, he said thus: "O my son Absalom--my son, my son Absalom--if only I had died in your place! O Absalom my son, my son!"
2 Samuel 19 (NKJV™)
1 And Joab was told, "Behold, the king is weeping and mourning for Absalom."
2 So the victory that day was turned into mourning for all the people. For the people heard it said that day, "The king is grieved for his son."
3 And the people stole back into the city that day, as people who are ashamed steal away when they flee in battle.
4 But the king covered his face, and the king cried out with a loud voice, "O my son Absalom! O Absalom, my son, my son!"
5 Then Joab came into the house to the king, and said, "Today you have disgraced all your servants who today have saved your life, the lives of your sons and daughters, the lives of your wives and the lives of your concubines,
6 "in that you love your enemies and hate your friends. For you have declared today that you regard neither princes nor servants; for today I perceive that if Absalom had lived and all of us had died today, then it would have pleased you well.
7 "Now therefore, arise, go out and speak comfort to your servants. For I swear by the LORD, if you do not go out, not one will stay with you this night. And that will be worse for you than all the evil that has befallen you from your youth until now."
8 Then the king arose and sat in the gate. And they told all the people, saying, "There is the king, sitting in the gate." So all the people came before the king. For everyone of Israel had fled to his tent.
9 Now all the people were in a dispute throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, "The king saved us from the hand of our enemies, he delivered us from the hand of the Philistines, and now he has fled from the land because of Absalom.
10 "But Absalom, whom we anointed over us, has died in battle. Now therefore, why do you say nothing about bringing back the king?"
11 So King David sent to Zadok and Abiathar the priests, saying, "Speak to the elders of Judah, saying, 'Why are you the last to bring the king back to his house, since the words of all Israel have come to the king, to his very house?
12 'You are my brethren, you are my bone and my flesh. Why then are you the last to bring back the king?'
13 "And say to Amasa, 'Are you not my bone and my flesh? God do so to me, and more also, if you are not commander of the army before me continually in place of Joab.'"
14 So he swayed the hearts of all the men of Judah, just as the heart of one man, so that they sent this word to the king: "Return, you and all your servants!"
15 Then the king returned and came to the Jordan. And Judah came to Gilgal, to go to meet the king, to escort the king across the Jordan.
16 And Shimei the son of Gera, a Benjamite, who was from Bahurim, hastened and came down with the men of Judah to meet King David.
17 There were a thousand men of Benjamin with him, and Ziba the servant of the house of Saul, and his fifteen sons and his twenty servants with him; and they went over the Jordan before the king.
18 Then a ferryboat went across to carry over the king's household, and to do what he thought good. Now Shimei the son of Gera fell down before the king when he had crossed the Jordan.
19 Then he said to the king, "Do not let my lord impute iniquity to me, or remember what wrong your servant did on the day that my lord the king left Jerusalem, that the king should take it to heart.
20 "For I, your servant, know that I have sinned. Therefore here I am, the first to come today of all the house of Joseph to go down to meet my lord the king."
21 But Abishai the son of Zeruiah answered and said, "Shall not Shimei be put to death for this, because he cursed the LORD'S anointed?"
22 And David said, "What have I to do with you, you sons of Zeruiah, that you should be adversaries to me today? Shall any man be put to death today in Israel? For do I not know that today I am king over Israel?"
23 Therefore the king said to Shimei, "You shall not die." And the king swore to him.
24 Now Mephibosheth the son of Saul came down to meet the king. And he had not cared for his feet, nor trimmed his mustache, nor washed his clothes, from the day the king departed until the day he returned in peace.
25 So it was, when he had come to Jerusalem to meet the king, that the king said to him, "Why did you not go with me, Mephibosheth?"
26 And he answered, "My lord, O king, my servant deceived me. For your servant said, 'I will saddle a donkey for myself, that I may ride on it and go to the king,' because your servant is lame.
27 "And he has slandered your servant to my lord the king, but my lord the king is like the angel of God. Therefore do what is good in your eyes.
28 "For all my father's house were but dead men before my lord the king. Yet you set your servant among those who eat at your own table. Therefore what right have I still to cry out anymore to the king?"
29 So the king said to him, "Why do you speak anymore of your matters? I have said, 'You and Ziba divide the land.'"
30 Then Mephibosheth said to the king, "Rather, let him take it all, inasmuch as my lord the king has come back in peace to his own house."
31 And Barzillai the Gileadite came down from Rogelim and went across the Jordan with the king, to escort him across the Jordan.
32 Now Barzillai was a very aged man, eighty years old. And he had provided the king with supplies while he stayed at Mahanaim, for he was a very rich man.
33 And the king said to Barzillai, "Come across with me, and I will provide for you while you are with me in Jerusalem."
34 But Barzillai said to the king, "How long have I to live, that I should go up with the king to Jerusalem?
35 "I am today eighty years old. Can I discern between the good and bad? Can your servant taste what I eat or what I drink? Can I hear any longer the voice of singing men and singing women? Why then should your servant be a further burden to my lord the king?
36 "Your servant will go a little way across the Jordan with the king. And why should the king repay me with such a reward?
37 "Please let your servant turn back again, that I may die in my own city, near the grave of my father and mother. But here is your servant Chimham; let him cross over with my lord the king, and do for him what seems good to you."
38 And the king answered, "Chimham shall cross over with me, and I will do for him what seems good to you. Now whatever you request of me, I will do for you."
39 Then all the people went over the Jordan. And when the king had crossed over, the king kissed Barzillai and blessed him, and he returned to his own place.
40 Now the king went on to Gilgal, and Chimham went on with him. And all the people of Judah escorted the king, and also half the people of Israel.
41 Just then all the men of Israel came to the king, and said to the king, "Why have our brethren, the men of Judah, stolen you away and brought the king, his household, and all David's men with him across the Jordan?"
42 So all the men of Judah answered the men of Israel, "Because the king is a close relative of ours. Why then are you angry over this matter? Have we ever eaten at the king's expense? Or has he given us any gift?"
43 And the men of Israel answered the men of Judah, and said, "We have ten shares in the king; therefore we also have more right to David than you. Why then do you despise us--were we not the first to advise bringing back our king?" Yet the words of the men of Judah were fiercer than the words of the men of Israel.
2 Samuel 20 (NKJV™)
1 And there happened to be there a rebel, whose name was Sheba the son of Bichri, a Benjamite. And he blew a trumpet, and said: "We have no share in David, Nor do we have inheritance in the son of Jesse; Every man to his tents, O Israel!"
2 So every man of Israel deserted David, and followed Sheba the son of Bichri. But the men of Judah, from the Jordan as far as Jerusalem, remained loyal to their king.
3 Now David came to his house at Jerusalem. And the king took the ten women, his concubines whom he had left to keep the house, and put them in seclusion and supported them, but did not go in to them. So they were shut up to the day of their death, living in widowhood.
4 And the king said to Amasa, "Assemble the men of Judah for me within three days, and be present here yourself."
5 So Amasa went to assemble the men of Judah. But he delayed longer than the set time which David had appointed him.
6 And David said to Abishai, "Now Sheba the son of Bichri will do us more harm than Absalom. Take your lord's servants and pursue him, lest he find for himself fortified cities, and escape us."
7 So Joab's men, with the Cherethites, the Pelethites, and all the mighty men, went out after him. And they went out of Jerusalem to pursue Sheba the son of Bichri.
8 When they were at the large stone which is in Gibeon, Amasa came before them. Now Joab was dressed in battle armor; on it was a belt with a sword fastened in its sheath at his hips; and as he was going forward, it fell out.
9 Then Joab said to Amasa, "Are you in health, my brother?" And Joab took Amasa by the beard with his right hand to kiss him.
10 But Amasa did not notice the sword that was in Joab's hand. And he struck him with it in the stomach, and his entrails poured out on the ground; and he did not strike him again. Thus he died. Then Joab and Abishai his brother pursued Sheba the son of Bichri.
11 Meanwhile one of Joab's men stood near Amasa, and said, "Whoever favors Joab and whoever is for David--follow Joab!"
12 But Amasa wallowed in his blood in the middle of the highway. And when the man saw that all the people stood still, he moved Amasa from the highway to the field and threw a garment over him, when he saw that everyone who came upon him halted.
13 When he was removed from the highway, all the people went on after Joab to pursue Sheba the son of Bichri.
14 And he went through all the tribes of Israel to Abel and Beth Maachah and all the Berites. So they were gathered together and also went after Sheba.
15 Then they came and besieged him in Abel of Beth Maachah; and they cast up a siege mound against the city, and it stood by the rampart. And all the people who were with Joab battered the wall to throw it down.
16 Then a wise woman cried out from the city, "Hear, Hear! Please say to Joab, 'Come nearby, that I may speak with you.'"
17 When he had come near to her, the woman said, "Are you Joab?" He answered, "I am." Then she said to him, "Hear the words of your maidservant." And he answered, "I am listening."
18 So she spoke, saying, "They used to talk in former times, saying, 'They shall surely seek guidance at Abel,' and so they would end disputes.
19 "I am among the peaceable and faithful in Israel. You seek to destroy a city and a mother in Israel. Why would you swallow up the inheritance of the LORD?"
20 And Joab answered and said, "Far be it, far be it from me, that I should swallow up or destroy!
21 "That is not so. But a man from the mountains of Ephraim, Sheba the son of Bichri by name, has raised his hand against the king, against David. Deliver him only, and I will depart from the city." So the woman said to Joab, "Watch, his head will be thrown to you over the wall."
22 Then the woman in her wisdom went to all the people. And they cut off the head of Sheba the son of Bichri, and threw it out to Joab. Then he blew a trumpet, and they withdrew from the city, every man to his tent. So Joab returned to the king at Jerusalem.
23 And Joab was over all the army of Israel; Benaiah the son of Jehoiada was over the Cherethites and the Pelethites;
24 Adoram was in charge of revenue; Jehoshaphat the son of Ahilud was recorder;
25 Sheva was scribe; Zadok and Abiathar were the priests;
26 and Ira the Jairite was a chief minister under David.
2 Samuel 21 (NKJV™)
1 Now there was a famine in the days of David for three years, year after year; and David inquired of the LORD. And the LORD answered, "It is because of Saul and his bloodthirsty house, because he killed the Gibeonites."
2 So the king called the Gibeonites and spoke to them. Now the Gibeonites were not of the children of Israel, but of the remnant of the Amorites; the children of Israel had sworn protection to them, but Saul had sought to kill them in his zeal for the children of Israel and Judah.
3 Therefore David said to the Gibeonites, "What shall I do for you? And with what shall I make atonement, that you may bless the inheritance of the LORD?"
4 And the Gibeonites said to him, "We will have no silver or gold from Saul or from his house, nor shall you kill any man in Israel for us." So he said, "Whatever you say, I will do for you."
5 Then they answered the king, "As for the man who consumed us and plotted against us, that we should be destroyed from remaining in any of the territories of Israel,
6 "let seven men of his descendants be delivered to us, and we will hang them before the LORD in Gibeah of Saul, whom the LORD chose." And the king said, "I will give them."
7 But the king spared Mephibosheth the son of Jonathan, the son of Saul, because of the LORD'S oath that was between them, between David and Jonathan the son of Saul.
8 So the king took Armoni and Mephibosheth, the two sons of Rizpah the daughter of Aiah, whom she bore to Saul; and the five sons of Michal the daughter of Saul, whom she brought up for Adriel the son of Barzillai the Meholathite;
9 and he delivered them into the hands of the Gibeonites, and they hanged them on the hill before the LORD. So they fell, all seven together, and were put to death in the days of harvest, in the first days, in the beginning of barley harvest.
10 Now Rizpah the daughter of Aiah took sackcloth and spread it for herself on the rock, from the beginning of harvest until the late rains poured on them from heaven. And she did not allow the birds of the air to rest on them by day nor the beasts of the field by night.
11 And David was told what Rizpah the daughter of Aiah, the concubine of Saul, had done.
12 Then David went and took the bones of Saul, and the bones of Jonathan his son, from the men of Jabesh Gilead who had stolen them from the street of Beth Shan, where the Philistines had hung them up, after the Philistines had struck down Saul in Gilboa.
13 So he brought up the bones of Saul and the bones of Jonathan his son from there; and they gathered the bones of those who had been hanged.
14 They buried the bones of Saul and Jonathan his son in the country of Benjamin in Zelah, in the tomb of Kish his father. So they performed all that the king commanded. And after that God heeded the prayer for the land.
15 When the Philistines were at war again with Israel, David and his servants with him went down and fought against the Philistines; and David grew faint.
16 Then Ishbi-Benob, who was one of the sons of the giant, the weight of whose bronze spear was three hundred shekels, who was bearing a new sword, thought he could kill David.
17 But Abishai the son of Zeruiah came to his aid, and struck the Philistine and killed him. Then the men of David swore to him, saying, "You shall go out no more with us to battle, lest you quench the lamp of Israel."
18 Now it happened afterward that there was again a battle with the Philistines at Gob. Then Sibbechai the Hushathite killed Saph, who was one of the sons of the giant.
19 Again there was war at Gob with the Philistines, where Elhanan the son of Jaare-Oregim the Bethlehemite killed the brother of Goliath the Gittite, the shaft of whose spear was like a weaver's beam.
20 Yet again there was war at Gath, where there was a man of great stature, who had six fingers on each hand and six toes on each foot, twenty-four in number; and he also was born to the giant.
21 So when he defied Israel, Jonathan the son of Shimea, David's brother, killed him.
22 These four were born to the giant in Gath, and fell by the hand of David and by the hand of his servants.
2 Samuel 22 (NKJV™)
1 Then David spoke to the LORD the words of this song, on the day when the LORD had delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.
2 And he said: "The LORD is my rock and my fortress and my deliverer;
3 The God of my strength, in whom I will trust; My shield and the horn of my salvation, My stronghold and my refuge; My Savior, You save me from violence.
4 I will call upon the LORD, who is worthy to be praised; So shall I be saved from my enemies.
5 'When the waves of death surrounded me, The floods of ungodliness made me afraid.
6 The sorrows of Sheol surrounded me; The snares of death confronted me.
7 In my distress I called upon the LORD, And cried out to my God; He heard my voice from His temple, And my cry entered His ears.
8 "Then the earth shook and trembled; The foundations of heaven quaked and were shaken, Because He was angry.
9 Smoke went up from His nostrils, And devouring fire from His mouth; Coals were kindled by it.
10 He bowed the heavens also, and came down With darkness under His feet.
11 He rode upon a cherub, and flew; And He was seen upon the wings of the wind.
12 He made darkness canopies around Him, Dark waters and thick clouds of the skies.
13 From the brightness before Him Coals of fire were kindled.
14 "The LORD thundered from heaven, And the Most High uttered His voice.
15 He sent out arrows and scattered them; Lightning bolts, and He vanquished them.
16 Then the channels of the sea were seen, The foundations of the world were uncovered, At the rebuke of the LORD, At the blast of the breath of His nostrils.
17 "He sent from above, He took me, He drew me out of many waters.
18 He delivered me from my strong enemy, From those who hated me; For they were too strong for me.
19 They confronted me in the day of my calamity, But the LORD was my support.
20 He also brought me out into a broad place; He delivered me because He delighted in me.
21 "The LORD rewarded me according to my righteousness; According to the cleanness of my hands He has recompensed me.
22 For I have kept the ways of the LORD, And have not wickedly departed from my God.
23 For all His judgments were before me; And as for His statutes, I did not depart from them.
24 I was also blameless before Him, And I kept myself from my iniquity.
25 Therefore the LORD has recompensed me according to my righteousness, According to my cleanness in His eyes.
26 "With the merciful You will show Yourself merciful; With a blameless man You will show Yourself blameless;
27 With the pure You will show Yourself pure; And with the devious You will show Yourself shrewd.
28 You will save the humble people; But Your eyes are on the haughty, that You may bring them down.
29 "For You are my lamp, O LORD; The LORD shall enlighten my darkness.
30 For by You I can run against a troop; By my God I can leap over a wall.
31 As for God, His way is perfect; The word of the LORD is proven; He is a shield to all who trust in Him.
32 "For who is God, except the LORD? And who is a rock, except our God?
33 God is my strength and power, And He makes my way perfect.
34 He makes my feet like the feet of deer, And sets me on my high places.
35 He teaches my hands to make war, So that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.
36 "You have also given me the shield of Your salvation; Your gentleness has made me great.
37 You enlarged my path under me; So my feet did not slip.
38 "I have pursued my enemies and destroyed them; Neither did I turn back again till they were destroyed.
39 And I have destroyed them and wounded them, So that they could not rise; They have fallen under my feet.
40 For You have armed me with strength for the battle; You have subdued under me those who rose against me.
41 You have also given me the necks of my enemies, So that I destroyed those who hated me.
42 They looked, but there was none to save; Even to the LORD, but He did not answer them.
43 Then I beat them as fine as the dust of the earth; I trod them like dirt in the streets, And I spread them out.
44 "You have also delivered me from the strivings of my people; You have kept me as the head of the nations. A people I have not known shall serve me.
45 The foreigners submit to me; As soon as they hear, they obey me.
46 The foreigners fade away, And come frightened from their hideouts.
47 "The LORD lives! Blessed be my Rock! Let God be exalted, The Rock of my salvation!
48 It is God who avenges me, And subdues the peoples under me;
49 He delivers me from my enemies. You also lift me up above those who rise against me; You have delivered me from the violent man.
50 Therefore I will give thanks to You, O LORD, among the Gentiles, And sing praises to Your name.
51 He is the tower of salvation to His king, And shows mercy to His anointed, To David and his descendants forevermore."
2 Samuel 23 (NKJV™)
1 Now these are the last words of David.Thus says David the son of Jesse; Thus says the man raised up on high, The anointed of the God of Jacob, And the sweet psalmist of Israel:
2 "The Spirit of the LORD spoke by me, And His word was on my tongue.
3 The God of Israel said, The Rock of Israel spoke to me: 'He who rules over men must be just, Ruling in the fear of God.
4 And he shall be like the light of the morning when the sun rises, A morning without clouds, Like the tender grass springing out of the earth, By clear shining after rain.'
5 "Although my house is not so with God, Yet He has made with me an everlasting covenant, Ordered in all things and secure. For this is all my salvation and all my desire; Will He not make it increase?
6 But the sons of rebellion shall all be as thorns thrust away, Because they cannot be taken with hands.
7 But the man who touches them Must be armed with iron and the shaft of a spear, And they shall be utterly burned with fire in their place."
8 These are the names of the mighty men whom David had: Josheb-Basshebeth the Tachmonite, chief among the captains. He was called Adino the Eznite, because he had killed eight hundred men at one time.
9 And after him was Eleazar the son of Dodo, the Ahohite, one of the three mighty men with David when they defied the Philistines who were gathered there for battle, and the men of Israel had retreated.
10 He arose and attacked the Philistines until his hand was weary, and his hand stuck to the sword. The LORD brought about a great victory that day; and the people returned after him only to plunder.
11 And after him was Shammah the son of Agee the Hararite. The Philistines had gathered together into a troop where there was a piece of ground full of lentils. Then the people fled from the Philistines.
12 But he stationed himself in the middle of the field, defended it, and killed the Philistines. And the LORD brought about a great victory.
13 Then three of the thirty chief men went down at harvest time and came to David at the cave of Adullam. And the troop of Philistines encamped in the Valley of Rephaim.
14 David was then in the stronghold, and the garrison of the Philistines was then in Bethlehem.
15 And David said with longing, "Oh, that someone would give me a drink of the water from the well of Bethlehem, which is by the gate!"
16 So the three mighty men broke through the camp of the Philistines, drew water from the well of Bethlehem that was by the gate, and took it and brought it to David. Nevertheless he would not drink it, but poured it out to the LORD.
17 And he said, "Far be it from me, O LORD, that I should do this! Is this not the blood of the men who went in jeopardy of their lives?" Therefore he would not drink it. These things were done by the three mighty men.
18 Now Abishai the brother of Joab, the son of Zeruiah, was chief of another three. He lifted his spear against three hundred men, killed them, and won a name among these three.
19 Was he not the most honored of three? Therefore he became their captain. However, he did not attain to the first three.
20 Benaiah was the son of Jehoiada, the son of a valiant man from Kabzeel, who had done many deeds. He had killed two lion-like heroes of Moab. He also had gone down and killed a lion in the midst of a pit on a snowy day.
21 And he killed an Egyptian, a spectacular man. The Egyptian had a spear in his hand; so he went down to him with a staff, wrested the spear out of the Egyptian's hand, and killed him with his own spear.
22 These things Benaiah the son of Jehoiada did, and won a name among three mighty men.
23 He was more honored than the thirty, but he did not attain to the first three. And David appointed him over his guard.
24 Asahel the brother of Joab was one of the thirty; Elhanan the son of Dodo of Bethlehem,
25 Shammah the Harodite, Elika the Harodite,
26 Helez the Paltite, Ira the son of Ikkesh the Tekoite,
27 Abiezer the Anathothite, Mebunnai the Hushathite,
28 Zalmon the Ahohite, Maharai the Netophathite,
29 Heleb the son of Baanah (the Netophathite), Ittai the son of Ribai from Gibeah of the children of Benjamin,
30 Benaiah a Pirathonite, Hiddai from the brooks of Gaash,
31 Abi-Albon the Arbathite, Azmaveth the Barhumite,
32 Eliahba the Shaalbonite (of the sons of Jashen), Jonathan,
33 Shammah the Hararite, Ahiam the son of Sharar the Hararite,
34 Eliphelet the son of Ahasbai, the son of the Maachathite, Eliam the son of Ahithophel the Gilonite,
35 Hezrai the Carmelite, Paarai the Arbite,
36 Igal the son of Nathan of Zobah, Bani the Gadite,
37 Zelek the Ammonite, Naharai the Beerothite (armorbearer of Joab the son of Zeruiah),
38 Ira the Ithrite, Gareb the Ithrite,
39 and Uriah the Hittite: thirty-seven in all.
2 Samuel 24 (NKJV™)
1 Again the anger of the LORD was aroused against Israel, and He moved David against them to say, "Go, number Israel and Judah."
2 So the king said to Joab the commander of the army who was with him, "Now go throughout all the tribes of Israel, from Dan to Beersheba, and count the people, that I may know the number of the people."
3 And Joab said to the king, "Now may the LORD your God add to the people a hundred times more than there are, and may the eyes of my lord the king see it. But why does my lord the king desire this thing?"
4 Nevertheless the king's word prevailed against Joab and against the captains of the army. Therefore Joab and the captains of the army went out from the presence of the king to count the people of Israel.
5 And they crossed over the Jordan and camped in Aroer, on the right side of the town which is in the midst of the ravine of Gad, and toward Jazer.
6 Then they came to Gilead and to the land of Tahtim Hodshi; they came to Dan Jaan and around to Sidon;
7 and they came to the stronghold of Tyre and to all the cities of the Hivites and the Canaanites. Then they went out to South Judah as far as Beersheba.
8 So when they had gone through all the land, they came to Jerusalem at the end of nine months and twenty days.
9 Then Joab gave the sum of the number of the people to the king. And there were in Israel eight hundred thousand valiant men who drew the sword, and the men of Judah were five hundred thousand men.
10 And David's heart condemned him after he had numbered the people. So David said to the LORD, "I have sinned greatly in what I have done; but now, I pray, O LORD, take away the iniquity of Your servant, for I have done very foolishly."
11 Now when David arose in the morning, the word of the LORD came to the prophet Gad, David's seer, saying,
12 "Go and tell David, 'Thus says the LORD: "I offer you three things; choose one of them for yourself, that I may do it to you."'"
13 So Gad came to David and told him; and he said to him, "Shall seven years of famine come to you in your land? Or shall you flee three months before your enemies, while they pursue you? Or shall there be three days' plague in your land? Now consider and see what answer I should take back to Him who sent me."
14 And David said to Gad, "I am in great distress. Please let us fall into the hand of the LORD, for His mercies are great; but do not let me fall into the hand of man."
15 So the LORD sent a plague upon Israel from the morning till the appointed time. From Dan to Beersheba seventy thousand men of the people died.
16 And when the angel stretched out His hand over Jerusalem to destroy it, the LORD relented from the destruction, and said to the angel who was destroying the people, "It is enough; now restrain your hand." And the angel of the LORD was by the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite.
17 Then David spoke to the LORD when he saw the angel who was striking the people, and said, "Surely I have sinned, and I have done wickedly; but these sheep, what have they done? Let Your hand, I pray, be against me and against my father's house."
18 And Gad came that day to David and said to him, "Go up, erect an altar to the LORD on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite."
19 So David, according to the word of Gad, went up as the LORD commanded.
20 Now Araunah looked, and saw the king and his servants coming toward him. So Araunah went out and bowed before the king with his face to the ground.
21 Then Araunah said, "Why has my lord the king come to his servant?" And David said, "To buy the threshing floor from you, to build an altar to the LORD, that the plague may be withdrawn from the people."
22 Now Araunah said to David, "Let my lord the king take and offer up whatever seems good to him. Look, here are oxen for burnt sacrifice, and threshing implements and the yokes of the oxen for wood.
23 "All these, O king, Araunah has given to the king." And Araunah said to the king, "May the LORD your God accept you."
24 Then the king said to Araunah, "No, but I will surely buy it from you for a price; nor will I offer burnt offerings to the LORD my God with that which costs me nothing." So David bought the threshing floor and the oxen for fifty shekels of silver.
25 And David built there an altar to the LORD, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. So the LORD heeded the prayers for the land, and the plague was withdrawn from Israel.

New King James Version®, Copyright © 1982, Thomas Nelson, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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Detailed Notes

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The book of Second Samuel recounts the triumphs and defeats of King David. David took a divided and defeated Israel from his predecessor King Saul and unified the nation under God's guidance. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart."

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

1230-926 B.C.
The Settlement of Canaan

1018 B.C.
Samuel anoints David to be king

1011 B.C.
Death of Saul

1010 B.C.
David begins to reign at Hebron

1005 B.C.
Jerusalem becomes the capital

1003 B.C.
David becomes king over all Israel

990 B.C.
David commits adultery with Bathsheba

980 B.C.
Absalom revolts against his father David

970 B.C.
King David dies

930 B.C.
Solomon dies and the Kingdom divides

TRIP PLANNER:
The book of Second Samuel can be divided into two parts. The first part, chapters 1-10, recounts David's triumphs. The second part, chapters 11-24, deals with David's transgressions and the resulting trouble.

1. David's Transgressions (Adultery and Murder): 2 Samuel 11
2. David's Troubles: 2 Samuel 12-24
a. Troubles in David's House - 2 Samuel 12:1-13:36
b. Troubles in David's Kingdom - 2 Samuel 13:37- chapter 24

PLACES OF INTEREST:
The Mountain of Tears - As David was leaving Jerusalem, he went by way of the Mount of Olives. Saddened by the news of Absalom's plot, he cried as he looked down on his city. Perhaps this is the same spot that Jesus wept over Jerusalem (2 Samuel 15:30; Luke 13:34).

En Rogel - As David fled from Absalom with those who were still loyal to him, Jonathan and Ahimaaz stayed back at En Rogel to spy on Absalom to learn his plans. En Rogel was a spring in the area just south of Jerusalem in the Kidron Valley (2 Samuel 17:17).

Bethlehem - This was the hometown of both David and Jesus, located in the hills of Judah about six miles southwest of Jerusalem. David grew up here, tending to his father's flocks of sheep. As a side note, Bethlehem is first noted in Scripture as the place where Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside," directly to the north of the city (Genesis 48:7). The valley to the east was the scene of the story of Ruth the Moabitess. There are the fields in which she gleaned, and the path by which she and Naomi returned to the town.

From Dan to Beersheba - When talking about the entire nation of Israel, the phrase "from Dan to Beersheba" was often used. Dan was located on the northern border and Beersheba was on the southern border. When the messengers were told to take the message "from Dan to Beersheba" it meant to all 12 tribes (Judges 20:1; 2 Samuel 3:10, 24:2).

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:
Abigail - David's sister; mother of Amasa (2 Sam 17:25; 1 Chronicles 2:16).

Abishai - David's nephew and one of his most loyal friends. He was the second of three brothers, Joab older and Asahel was the younger. He was the one who wanted to kill the sleeping Saul (1 Sam 26:6-9). During Absalom's revolt, he remained loyal to King David (2 Sam 16:9). He was the one who rescued David from the giant Ishbi-Benob (2 Sam 21:16).

Absalom - David's favorite son. Absalom led a terrible revolt against David and drove the king out of Jerusalem for a time (2 Sam 15:13-14).

Adino - The first of David's mighty men. Also called Josheb-Basshebeth the Tachmonite (2 Sam 23:8).

Ahithophel - David's counselor; Bathsheba's grandfather. He later joined Absalom's revolt against David. Perhaps this was in response to the way David took advantage of his granddaughter (2 Sam 11:3, 15:12, 23:34). But when his counsel was rejected, he hung himself (2 Sam 17:21).
Amasa - David's nephew, daughter of his sister Abigail and cousin to Absalom, who appointed him commander of Absalom's troops. Also cousin to Joab (2 Sam 17:25).

Barzillai - A Gileadite who along with Machir and Shobi brought food and supplies to David when he was in great need. Barzillai was 80 years old (2 Sam 17:27, 19:32).

Abiathar - When Saul killed all the priesthood at Nob, Abiathar was the sole survivor. He was the son of Ahimelech (1 Sam 22). He remained loyal to David (2 Sam 15:24) but would later turn against Solomon (1 King 2:26).

Doeg - an Edomite called "a certain man of the servants of Saul." This man caused the bloody deaths of 85 priests at Nob, because the High Priest had offered bread to David (1 Sam 21:7).

Eleazar - The second of David's mighty men. He was the son of Dodo (2 Sam 23:9).

Hushai - One of David's friends and counselor. He pretended to be on Absalom's side but gave him ridiculous advice (2 Sam 15:31-37).

Ishbi-Benob - This was a Philistine giant who was killed by Abishai as he was about to kill David (2 Sam 21:16-17).

Ittai - He was from Gath. He left his Philistine city to go live with David in Jerusalem. During Absalom's revolt and when David was driven out of the city, Ittai placed his 600-man army at David's disposal (2 Sam 15:21).

Jonadab - A nephew of David's, the son of David's brother Shimeah (2 Sam 13:3). He plotted with Amnon, David's son, to have relations with Amnon's half-sister Tamar.

Jonathan - Another nephew of David's, also the son of Shimeah who killed a giant from Gath who was defying Israel (2 Sam 21:20-21).

Machir - The caretaker for Mephibosheth before David took him to the palace. He also was David's friend during Absalom's rebellion (2 Sam 17:27).

Shobi - An Amorite, the son of Nahash (who was an enemy of Israel - 1 Sam 11:1), who befriended David and brought them provisions while he was escaping from Absalom (2 Sam 17:27).

Shammah - The third of David's mighty men, the son of Agee the Hararite (2 Sam 23:11). The Lord gave him a mighty victory as he stood his ground in defeating the Philistines.

Sheba - After the rebellion of Absalom had been put down, Sheba, a Benjamite started up his own insurrection against David (2 Sam 20:1).

Shimei - When David was being run out of town by Absalom, Shimei cursed him and threw rocks. He was later forgiven by David but held in house arrest in Jerusalem and executed by Solomon for crossing beyond the borders of Jerusalem (2 Sam 16:5-6, 19:16-23; 1 Kings 2:42).

Shimeah - David's brother (2 Sam 13:3), also known as Shammah. Solomon - David's greatest son, born to Bathsheba and also the firstborn in Jerusalem. He would become the third king in the history of Israel and the nation's most powerful. He would later build the Temple that David had wanted to build (2 Sam 12:24).

Tamar - David's daughter, defiled by her step-brother Amnon (2 Sam 13:1; 1 Chron 3:9), avenged by her brother Absalom.

Zadok - In the priesthood, Zadok was 11th in descent from Aaron. He was loyal to David (2 Sam 15:24). He shared the high office with Abiathar for a short period. Zadok anointed Solomon as king and would become the sole high priest (1 King 1:39-40).

FUN FACTS:
Bathing - Why was Bathsheba bathing in public view? Baths were a rare occasion back in those times. Water was hard to find. There was no indoor plumbing and the water had to be drawn from deep wells or saved from the rain in rock cisterns. Baths were a luxury, the weather was probably warm and she probably had the window open. Soap in those days was made from the ashes of certain burnt plants. Between baths people rubbed themselves with olive oil to cover up the body odors (2 Sam 11:2).

The Watchman - As David's small army battled the army of his son Absalom, David waited at Mahanaim to see the result. Standing on the top of the wall was the watchman whose duty was to warn the king of anyone approaching the city (2 Sam 18:24-27).

Araunah's Threshing Floor - The location of great Bible history. Mount Moriah was where Abraham offered Isaac to be sacrificed. Centuries later, David would buy Araunah's threshing floor. God had commanded David to build an altar on the site. Later, Solomon would build God's holy temple on the same location. This is the site of the temple mount in today's Israel
(2 Sam 18-25).

The Threshing Sledge - When the farmer would want to separate the kernels from the stalks of wheat, corn or barley, he would use a threshing sledge. It was made of wood planks and looked like a sled or toboggan but heavier. The bottom was covered with stones or metal. Hitched to oxen, it was dragged over the stalks of crops as men or children stood on it for extra weight (2 Sam 24:22).

MAPS:
David's wars of conquest

Transcript

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Let's open our Bibles to 2 Samuel chapter 11 and we'll go through chapters 11 through 24 in this study. Let's have a word of prayer. Heavenly Father, we now give You our attention for this study. Our focus Lord is upon Your Word which we know to be inspired and given by Your Holy Spirit for our edification, our learning, and our application. Lord, some of the stories we will read may appear at the present not to be relevant to our lives; some of the military intrigues and some of the blatant and open revelation of David's life and yet it may prove to be of value in days, months, or years to come. I pray Lord that in studying Your Word we would form a Biblical world view so that our thoughts would be thoughts directed by Your Spirit and that our lives would reflect Your values and that we would instinctively respond and react with a Biblical fashion because of our emersion in Your Word. We pray that our study would add to that. So we give You our full attention and as part of our worship our focus is on what the Spirit would say to the church. In Jesus' Name. Amen.
There is an interesting true story about a wealthy contractor who was contracted to build a prison in lower Manhattan in New York City called, Tombs Prison. The contractor built the prison and shortly thereafter he was arrested and convicted for forgery and escorted to spend time in the prison that he had built, Tombs Prison. As he is being escorted to his cell, the cell of his own making, he said to the guard who was taking him there, "When I built this place I had no idea that one day I would come here as an inmate." We're studying the life of David and we discover that David is in a prison of his own making; he is in a palace that he built but he's in a prison of his own lust inside the palace that he has built. It all comes to a head. It seems that David had this problem all along but now that he has a little more power, authority and leeway with his life, he takes liberties and it costs him and gives him trouble the rest of his days.
By way of review, you may remember that first and second Samuel in the early Hebrew manuscripts were one book and not two. It was considered the Book of Samuel, Hasafare Shemuwal. Later on it became divided and it was seen as the first and second book of the Kingdoms (the north and the south). Then 1 Kings and 2 Kings were called the third and fourth book of the Kingdoms. Later on it was divided further into first and second Samuel, first and second Kings and first and second Chronicles. The period of time that we are looking at now, the forty years of David's reign, is all about David. The theme of first and second Samuel is principally on one character, David. In this study we look at David's reign. Remember that he reigned from Hebron and then later on was coronated as king over Jerusalem and all of Israel became his people. If you remember the outline of 2 Samuel, it's as follows: chapters 1 through 10, chapters 11 and 12 and chapters 13 through 24 mark three sections of David's life; David's triumphs, his transgressions, and his troubles. We are going to cover the last two sections, his transgressions, and troubles which form the second half of the book, in this study. So far, we have met some people that are important in David's life. We've met Abner, the son of Ner; he was the commander and chief of Ishbosheth's army. Ishbosheth was the son of King Saul and they tried to make him the king and give him the throne. We've also met a guy by the name of Joab, who was the commander and chief of David's army and Abner and Joab were at odds with other. Then we met two guys by the names of Abishai and Asahel who were David's cousins. We've met Ishbosheth, the son of Saul and Mephibosheth, the son of Jonathan. Now we meet David. You may be saying, "Excuse me, but we've already met David; he's been around in some of the other stories we've looked at." Yes, but we are going to meet him again and this time we see him in a different light. We see David not as a great king or ascending monarch or not as the sweet psalmist of Israel so much as David the failure. Here's what I like about the Bible; it is brutally honest even about its heroes. It doesn’t embellish the story or make David out to be something that he is not, though it does tell us the good points; that he was a man after God's own heart, the sweet psalmist of Israel, the great king for whom the kingdom and Bethlehem will be named and even Jesus will derive a name, the Son of David. However, here we see David as not only a man after God's own heart but a man who failed and the Bible portrays all of its heroes in the same light. It tells us the good and the bad.
Chapter 11 verse 1: "It happened in the spring of the year, at kings the time when go out to battle, that David sent Joab and his servants with him, and all Israel; and they destroyed the people of Ammon and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem." It's the spring time and around the beginning of May in Israel. It is the time when all of the rain ceases. When I say all of the rain there is basically a couple of different rainy seasons in that land and you've heard of them: the early rain and the latter rain; the yoreh and the malkoshe as they say in the Hebrew. The latter rain ends by around May and it's summer time and it's war time. It's the time that is seasonal for fighting. I know it sounds weird but it is sort of like baseball season. The mud dries out so chariots and people can run and it's time to get the teams out and go to battle; "It's the time of the year when the kings go out to battle." Frankly, David has been a very skilled warrior all of his life but he gets to a time in his life, and we think it is somewhere around middle age, where he starts thinking differently. "You know, war is a young man's sport and event. I've earned my right to stay home." That was a mistake. The warrior should have been out with his troops fighting the battle. If he were what we are about to read wouldn't have happened. In other words, if David would have been out on the battle field with his troops, he wouldn't have been in the bed with Bathsheba. He's getting a little idle and soft in his older years and he gets taken off guard and the enemy uses this period of idleness and relaxation out of his routine to get him to stumble. Verse 2: "Then it happened one evening that David arose from his bed and walked on the roof of the king's house. And from the roof he saw a woman bathing, and the woman was very beautiful to behold." The city of Jerusalem was built upon hills and kings lived on the top of the hill; they literally built on the highest point and they had the best view of anybody. If you lived on the top of the hill and the city is built descending upon the hill, terraced houses, when you walk out of the house, you can see the steps terracing down and your view point is quite clear. You can see a lot from that vantage point. When the king in Jerusalem walked out on top of his house he would see everything plainly and clearly. It's spring time, around May and it was a hot May evening and there was a woman who was bathing and David saw her. Notice the words, "saw," and "behold." "He saw her and she was beautiful to behold." Those are two different words and I want you to mark them. To "see" or to "notice" suggests just a glance; he noticed her. "Behold" suggests a gaze or a pondering; he's checking her out. He looks at her and he should have immediately turned away but instead he looked and kept gazing thinking, "Wow!" For him this will be a huge "Wow!"
Saint Augustine defines sin and the progression as a thought, a form, a fascination, and a fall. It all begins with a thought. Something goes in your mind and you notice or see something. Then it forms an idea in intent. That is followed by a fascination, "What if I did or could do this or that?" David did do this and that and then he fell. Now, I'm sure that David, being king thought "Well, nobody will know and after all I am the king and this will be nothing more than a one night stand," as he sees her and calls for her. They sleep together and have a sexual relationship with each other. The one night stand, however, turns into a pregnancy and when David discovers that Bathsheba is pregnant he begins his cover up. He sends for her husband, Uriah the Hittite, who is out in the battlefield where David should have been, and brings him back to the city of Jerusalem. He butters him up saying, "Hey, Uriah, dude, what's happening, good to see you." Uriah is saying, "You don't even know who I am. Why am I here?" "Well, I want to know how the battle is going and I hear you're a great guy. So, listen, tonight, you deserve a rest; go home to your wife and spend the night with her." We can see clearly what he is doing. He wants to get Uriah to sleep with his wife so when the fact that she is pregnant becomes public knowledge, they will think that her husband was home that night and now she ended up pregnant. However that doesn't work because Uriah has more integrity than that and says, "King, I don't feel right about doing that while my brethren are out in the field fighting the battle and I'm in a palace. I don't deserve being in a palace." I'm sure that shot an arrow through David's heart upon hearing it. Uriah refused to go home and he slept right outside with the servants of the palace. The next night David thought, "I have to do something," so he feeds Uriah well and gets him drunk thinking that while in a drunken stupor he's naturally going to go home. Uriah doesn't do it and again he sleeps out with the palace guards. Now David resorts to murder. He places Uriah in the heat of the battle and as the story continues Uriah the Hittite gets killed. We can see that one sin leads to another sin; it's always this way. You engage in one thing and think, "Well I can get by with a little more and then a little more," and pretty soon your life is a life of compromise and not commitment. Therefore, David's lust lead to adultery; his adultery led to a cover up and deception; the deception lead to entrapment; and the entrapment lead to murder. Sin upon sin is piled up in David's life. You can see how honest the Bible is.
I love to study photographs, especially of good photographers. There was a photographer some years ago, named Yoseph Karsh who photographed 90 famous people. He called the series, Portraits of Greatness. He was a large format (four by five; eight by ten) film-medium photographer which gives brilliant detail. People that studied Karsh's photographs noticed that his portraits showed the bad sides of people's faces. They noticed that the portraits were so lit that 70 of the 90 people that he photographed showed off a wart or a zit or a cut or some blemish. Karsh was purposely trying to show the famous people, warts and all; that everybody is imperfect, even the most famous and illustrious. The Bible does the same with its heroes.
Verse 26: "When the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband was dead, she mourned for her husband. And when her mourning was over, David sent and brought her to his house, and she became his wife and bore him a son. But the thing that David had done displeased the Lord." Ponder that phrase; here is why sin is so expensive whether anybody finds out or not. It is expensive because it will offend a Holy God. After all that is what sin is and God is God and He's the One that calls it sin and it offends Him and displeases Him. It will have other ramifications as well but this is primarily why it's so damaging. When David is caught he will write two Psalms. One of them is Psalm 51. In verse 4 David says, "Against Thee only have I sinned and done this wickedness in Your sight." "Lord, this has offended and affected a lot of people but ultimately I realize that it has offended and displeased You."
There was a man who was at the mall with his wife and she was examining some merchandise and he was sort of looking around like most men do on shopping sprees; not really concentrating or enjoying the experience. A shapely young woman walked by both of them and that man's eyes followed her across the store. When she exited the store, his wife who did not look up from the merchandise she was examining but could see in her periphery said to her husband, "Well, was it worth the trouble you are now in?" Is sin ever worth the trouble you get in with God? The feeling of emptiness and dislocation from God. The lack of fellowship and the misery; it's never worth it.
Chapter 12 continues the saga and is still under that second heading of David's transgressions. What you don't know is that between chapters 11 and 12 is a period of about one year. For one year David goes on as if nothing has happened. He doesn’t confess his sin; he thinks that nobody will find out; he doesn't go to God; he doesn't go tell the prophet, but all the while during that year he is feeling empty, isolated, and sickened. Even though it doesn't say so in this book, we know that because it says so in the second Psalm he wrote after this experience. In Psalm 32, written after this experience with Bathsheba David said in verse 2: "When I refused to confess my sin I was weak and miserable, I groaned all day." What is he referring to? His conscious was bothering him. Have you ever had your conscious bother you? Until you get right what you need to get right it never lets up; that's a God thing and a good thing. God gave you a conscious to bother you and if your conscious is tuned to Scripture it will bother you when it's supposed to. If it's not it could bother you for any reason and if you work hard to get rid of it, it is a dangerous thing. It's sort of like this: when you get in your car, hands on the wheel and you are driving down the street, you're used to the car running. However, what happens if one day you get in the car and a little light starts blinking on the dashboard? It's a warning light that is saying, "Something is wrong; fix me." You could do a couple of things. You could go get it fixed or you could say, "Well, I don't want to right now because it's a bother or I don't have money this paycheck so I'll let it go by." But every time you get in the car the lights are blinking and bothersome. What you could do is carry a small hammer with you in your glove compartment and when the warning light comes on you could fix it by just smashing it and it won't blink anymore. From now on you won't have that bothersome appeal. However, you will eventually regret it and it will cost you a lot more when the engine ceases up or something goes wrong. David has virtually smashed all of the warning lights in his internal system with his conscious; he's tried to just put a cap on it but it keeps surfacing and he doesn't go to God. Therefore, God goes to him via a guy named Nathan the Prophet. Nathan comes in the palace and because he is a man of God and a Godly man David receives him. Nathan comes in and in verses 2 through 4 Nathan tells King David a parable that goes something like this: "Hey, King David, I've got a little problem. There is this rich guy and he had exceedingly many flocks and herds; he had so many animals that he wouldn't even miss 100. Then there was this real poor guy who only had one little female sheep, a ewe lamb and in fact he loved this little lamb and it was his pet. The lamb drank from his own cup and drank from his own table; it was like a daughter to him. The rich guy had a friend coming over for dinner and didn't want to take one of his own sheep so he stole the poor man's sheep and slaughtered it and fed it to his friend." We're about to read that David gets torked! (Torked is probably not in the Old King James) David is deeply bothered by this. This is a parable; why a parable? In the parable the rich man is the symbol of David and the poor man is a symbol of Uriah and the little female ewe lamb is the symbol of Bathsheba his wife. Why a parable, and being so discreet and why third person instead of just saying, "You are a sinner?" It's because for a year, David hasn't been able to face his own sin so the prophet effectually gets a verbal mirror, a parable, and holds it up to David and says, "David, take a good hard look at the man in the mirror." David thinks, "That guy is ugly!" "Yeah, that's you!"
I heard a story about a church that had a history of being quarrelsome. They always chewed up their leadership; their pastor had problems and left; another one came and left and it continued and it was their history for many years. A new pastor came in and tried to fix the church and instill new programs and finally he discovered that "This church is dead and they just won't tolerate it." One Sunday morning he announced, "Ladies and gentlemen, this church is dead and tonight we are going to have a funeral for the church. We're just going to give this thing a decent burial. I'd like you to come out to the funeral service for this church." Well this was an odd thing to say and the newspaper picked up on it. That Sunday evening the church was packed out of curiosity. People wanted to find out what was going on; what was the deal; how do you bury a church? The church service opened and there was an opened casket in front of the church. The pastor said, "In this casket is our dearly beloved church; it's a dead church and I want you to come and pay respects to the beloved and you'll find out as you look in the casket, why this church died." The pastor had placed a mirror in the casket so in passing by the open coffin, everybody saw him or herself. It was a parable and a very poignant lesson put in the third person to bring conviction. That's what the prophet, Nathan, does.
Verse 5: "So David's anger was greatly aroused against the man," (this is the fictitious man in the parable), "and he said to Nathan, 'As the Lord lives, the man who has done this shall surely die!'" Now this is overkill. The man killed a lamb, a little animal. "Okay David, I know you love animals and you are Mr. Animal Rights King but you don't kill a man for killing a sheep." Notice this: "'And he shall restore fourfold for the lamb, because he did this thing and because he had no pity.'" In Exodus chapter 22 the penalty is given for somebody killing a lamb and that's it; you restore it four times and if it's an ox five times. David said, "Kill him and then make him pay!" Well, how is he going to pay once he is dead? He is not thinking this through and he is very emotional about this. Verse 7: "Then Nathan said to David, 'You are the man!'" I have always been amazed at this story. I picture a bony prophet finger poked in the king's face. "'Thus says the Lord God of Israel: 'I anointed you king over Israel, and I delivered you from the hand of Saul. I gave you your master's house and your master's wives into your keeping, and gave you the house of Israel and Judah. And if that had been too little, I also would have given you much more!'" I'm sure at this point David is thinking, "Who told him? How did he find that out?" Well, it was God. There is an old saying that says, "Secret sin on earth is open scandal in heaven." You don't want to sin around a prophet like this guy; God tells him stuff. At this point David confesses his sin and he writes two Psalms: Psalm 32 and 51. Verse 13: "So David said to Nathan, 'I have sinned against the Lord.' And Nathan said to David, 'The Lord also has put away your sin; you shall not die.'" This was a confession. "'However," (that's a haunting word; you're forgiven but…), "'because by this deed you have given great occasion to the enemies of the Lord to blaspheme, the child also who is born to you shall surely die.'" This brings up a point: forgiveness is one thing and consequences are another. You can be forgiven for no matter what sin you have ever committed but it doesn't mean that you won't suffer consequences. If a guy gets drunk and plays out in the street he might have a car run into him and break some bones. It doesn’t mean that God is going to heal him instantly. "God I got a broken leg, arm, hand and foot, why won't You heal me?" Well, you know, you're the idiot and there are natural consequences that happen. If a person is promiscuous and contracts a sexually transmitted disease, God is not obligated to heal though He may out of His great mercy and grace. The greatest thing, however, is forgiveness. Physical healing is temporary and forgiveness is eternal.
Therefore these are David's troubles. In chapter 12 his son dies. In chapter 13 the problems continue and I'll sum it up. In chapter 13, David's daughter Tamar is raped. Follow this carefully because it gets a little convoluted. She gets raped by her half brother Amnon. Amnon is the son of David and Tamar is David's daughter. There is a guy introduced in the story, Absalom, who is also David's son but they are not directly related. This sounds crazy so let me explain. David had eight wives so it makes everything messy from here on out. No wonder he was so messed up! He had a very convoluted household and his personal life was a mess. Absalom was David's third son by his wife Maacah and Amnon was David's son by Ahinoam and they were half brothers to each other. Absalom and Tamar were full brother and sister. Amnon and Tamar were half brother and sister. So he rapes his half sister. Chapter 13, verse 1: "After this Absalom the son of David had a lovely sister, whose name was Tamar; and Amnon the son of David loved her." Don't let the language fool you. It says he loved her because that is how he expressed it. "I love her and I can't live without her!" This is nothing more than hormones and glands. This isn't true love, this is infatuation and lust because look at this in verse 15 after the rape: "Then Amnon hated her exceedingly, so that the hatred with which he hated her was greater than the love with which he had loved her. And Amnon said to her, 'Arise, be gone!'" Lust and hatred are closely related. He violates her, forces himself on her and then demands that she be gone. What some people call love is really hatred for the other person. "I have to have you. We have to have sexual relationships. I love you. I can't live without you," is what he says to her. Let me retranslate that; this is really what he means. "I don't really care at all about you; I love me and I want you because I love me. You're here and you can satisfy me now so it's not that I love you it's that I love me and because of that I want you to satisfy me." That is not love for the other person. This explains and criminologists have discovered that women who are raped are frequently murdered by the assailant. Verse 21: "But when King David heard of all these things, he was very angry." Frankly, this bothers me. It's sort of like a postscript. David heard about it and says, "Gosh, you know that just kind of makes me mad." It's your daughter! What would most dads do? "I'm going to take this kid and I'm going to show him how displeased I am either legally or physically!" This just says he is angry. Why do you suppose he doesn’t really act upon this sufficiently? Here's my guess. He probably thought, "I lost all moral high ground myself; I lost the right to discipline my child in an area of sexual promiscuity because that's me and I can't do it; I failed in this area and I can't punish him." Sometimes, people who have a sorted pass feel this way. I just want to address that briefly. You might look back to a time where you sinned sexually or because of drug abuse or because you had an abortion or whatever the case might be you feel, "I can't lecture my son or daughter, because I failed in this area." I believe that Satan will whisper to you, "You have no right!" Yes you do! Number one, you are a parent and truth is truth and number two, you might be just the best example. If you come honestly and say, "Son, daughter, I failed in this area and I've regretted it ever since." In 2004 Larry King was interviewing a paragon and a great example of purity, Ozzie Osborne along with his wife Sharon on television. To his credit, he was very confessional in this meeting. They had just discovered that their daughter Kelly was arrested for drug abuse and he came on the air in front of the whole world and said, "You know what? I'm a drug addict; I'm a failure; I've blown it in this area and so I think I can speak to this." I think that is true. I think that when we have failed in certain areas and we can tell those who don't know what it's like but are involved or contemplated an involvement in that you can say, "Let me tell you what it's like from the ground level." Because of our failures we might be just the ones to speak.
As the story goes on an evil plot develops and Absalom is determined to kill his brother because of what he has done to his sister as well as he's thinking, "If I get rid of him I might have the throne myself." Verse 23: "And it came to pass, after two full years, that Absalom had sheepshearers in Baal Hazor, which is near Ephraim; so Absalom invited all the king's sons." Here's a word about sheepshearing; it doesn't sound too cool. In the Old Testament among Israel sheepshearing was like Super Bowl Sunday. It was a big deal. Everybody was into it! "It's sheepshearing day dude! Bring out the Bud! It's our day!" It was a big feast and people got together and did their thing and it was a feast that all the king's sons were to be a part of. Absalom kills Amnon and now he runs away. Verse 38: "So Absalom fled and went to Geshur, and was there three years. And King David longed to go to Absalom. For he had been comforted concerning Amnon, because he was dead."
This takes us to chapter 14 where we now have Joab, the general and the commander of David's armed forces. He sees in David a longing for his son Absalom and he knows that David wants to have Absalom back. He has fled to another country for asylum and David longs to see his son. There's been a rape then a murder and now there is this distance between him and his remaining son Absalom but he won't bring him back even though he longs for him. He knows that the punishment and the penalty for what he has done is the death penalty so he just leaves it alone and doesn't touch it. Joab hires a woman from Tekoa, which is not very far from Jerusalem. She dresses up in black like she's mourning. Let me paint the picture for you. David was still accessible to the people so she goes to King David and says, "King David I have a real problem. My husband is dead and my two sons were having a fight and one of my sons killed my other son so now I only have one son left and the rest of my family wants me to bring him out of hiding and kill him because the law says it's capital punishment for this offense." David says, "Don't worry, not a hair from his head shall fall." She says to him, "King, you're a hypocrite." That was a parable just like Nathan's. She really didn't have a husband who died or a son that was murdered by another son. She just said that to get the King's read on it. The king says, "Don't worry; I know everybody wants to kill him but we'll protect him and not a hair on his head will fall." She says, "You hypocrite. I told you about a fake and pretend son in a story but you have a real son who is exiled and you won't bring him out of exile." He figured out what was going on and chapter 14 verse 19 says: "So the king said, 'Is the hand of Joab with you in all this?' And the woman answered and said, 'As you live, my lord the king, no one can turn to the right hand or to the left from anything that my lord the king has spoken. For your servant Joab commanded me, and he put all these words in the mouth of your maidservant.'" Here's his adjudication on his son, verse 24: "And the king said, 'Let him return to his own house, but do not let him see my face.' So Absalom returned to his own house, but did not see the king's face. Now in all Israel there was no one who was praised as much as Absalom for his good looks. From the sole of his foot to the crown of his head there was no blemish in him. And when he cut the hair of his head--at the end of every year he cut it because it was heavy on him--when he cut it, he weighed the hair of his head at two hundred shekels according to the king's standard." You have to picture this guy. He's very handsome; his hair grows at a rapid rate and is long, flowing, and luxurious and he gets a haircut once a year whether he needs it or not. Every year he comes up with four pounds of hair. He is kind of a freak. Do you remember those troll dolls? I'm giving you insight into my head now; this is where my mind goes when I read some Bible verses. As I was reading this I was thinking of those troll dolls which are those crazy ugly little beasts with this wild hair that comes out. Of course, he was a good looking kid with wild hair that came out and he's going to get really hung up on his hair in a couple of chapters. This is key to the story: he comes home but there is no intimacy, no resolution and no fellowship. David seems to have forgiven him but doesn't forget the incident and he refuses to restore or reconcile the relationship so now there is a distance. Instead of an embrace or talking it through and resolving it, bitterness festers in the heart of this boy and eventually his son is so bitter at his father because of the lack of communication and forgiveness that he rebels and throws David the king out of his kingdom. I bet I'm addressing a father or a mother who has had a child blow it and there is distance there and maybe you feel, and rightfully so, very justified in thinking, "I'm not going to talk to him; I'm not going to talk to her until they make the first move; that's the way it is; I'm right." You can be dead right. The relationship is dead and it won't get any better until you humble yourself. I had a father who was very distant and the distance grew until the time the Lord said to me, "You go to your father and make it right." He told me because I was the one who said, "I am now a born again Christian; see how my life is changed?" God was saying to me, "No, he can't see how your life has changed until you get down on your knees and then he'll see the change in your life." Parents need to do that. It says in the book of Ephesians, "Fathers, do not provoke your children to wrath." Another translation says, "Don't frustrate them; don't exasperate them." A lot of kids rebel because in their minds they are thinking, "Since my dad keeps telling me I'm a loser I'm going to be one and I'm going to be a big one and I'm going to hurt him because of it." This resentment is happening with these two.
This rebellion against the King comes in chapter 15. Again his good looks are brought up and those good looks camouflaged a bad heart. The chickens are now coming home to roost in David's life. You may recall in chapter 12 that as part of the sentence on David the Lord said, "I will raise up an adversary in your own house;" and that is Absalom. Verse 2: "Now Absalom would rise early and stand beside the way to the gate. So it was, whenever anyone who had a lawsuit came to the king for a decision, that Absalom would call to him and say, 'What city are you from?' And he would say, 'Your servant is from such and such a tribe of Israel.' Then Absalom would say to him, 'Look, your case is good and right; but there is no deputy of the king to hear you.' Moreover Absalom would say, 'Oh, that I were made judge in the land, and everyone who has any suit or cause would come to me; then I would give him justice.' And so it was, whenever anyone came near to bow down to him, that he would put out his hand and take him and kiss him." It sounds like he's running for office, doesn't it? It's amazing how gregarious politicians get about this season. They'll do anything; they'll promise you everything; they'll kiss your baby; shake your hands; "I'll solve the world's problems," and it gets weary to any of us who have suffered through election after election. I have to tell you, I'm going to vote, God willing we get a good candidate, however, more and more I'm becoming much less of a Republican or a Democrat. My position is I'm a Theocrat. I can't wait for Jesus Christ to come and take over and then there will be peace on earth, good will to men and the problem solved. Until then I'll be a responsible citizen but I bite my lip and go, "Even so, come quickly Lord Jesus." Verse 6: "In this manner Absalom acted toward all Israel who came to the king for judgment. So Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel." What a great politician he is. Verse 10: "Then Absalom sent spies throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, 'As soon as you hear the sound of the trumpet, then you shall say, 'Absalom reigns in Hebron!'' And with Absalom went two hundred men invited from Jerusalem, and they went along innocently and did not know anything." Look at this: Where does Absalom begin his rebellion? Hebron. Where was David first crowned King for the people? In Hebron, the same place. Why does Absalom go to Hebron? I can think of two reasons. Reason number one - out of sight out of mind; don't do it in Jerusalem but move yourself a few miles away; the king won't notice it as much and you can get by with a lot more. Reason number two, and I believe this is really at the heart of it - he would have found in Hebron some sympathizers who were really angry at David. You know why? David was crowned in Hebron but moved the capital to Jerusalem. I know in my heart that there were some disenfranchised people who were still mad that they didn't get included because the kingdom was moved from Hebron to Jerusalem. Absalom would have found some sympathizers in that town. In this chapter, David flees from Jerusalem and the hearts of Israel were stolen by Absalom and David leaves; he resigns as king and I'm sure it shocked the people. He did it because he loved the City of Jerusalem and he did not want to see the City of Jerusalem become the center of bloodshed and have the people at the crossfire which would have happened had David stayed there and fought. He could have stayed there and fought but he leaves to spare the city of Jerusalem. Also, David was pretty good at being a fugitive. Remember, Saul chased him around for about ten years so he knew how to handle himself out in the sticks.
In chapters 16 and 17 he runs away over the Mount of Olives and out into the wilderness. As David leaves, resigns, there is a coup going on with Absalom but God is at work. There were a couple of counselors in the court of the king which was now ruled by Absalom who has now taken over. There is one guy named Ahithophel and he was a brilliant strategist. King Absalom says, "Ahithophel, what do you think I should do?" Ahithophel says, "I know exactly what you ought to do. You should immediately send an army out after David and just take him by surprise and preemptively kill him." Absalom thinks about it, "Yeah, that sounds good," but he turns to another guy named Hushai the Archite and he asks, "What do you think I should do?" And he replies, "I disagree. I don't think you should chase David immediately out in the fields but give him a little time, remember that David is a warrior and has been doing this for years and you haven't been; he knows how to fight and if you take him now you will be dead meat. What you ought to do is organize an army first and then you should go to battle with the army that you organize." He is doing this on purpose because he is loyal to David. Chapter 17, verse 14: "So Absalom and all the men of Israel said, 'The advice of Hushai the Archite is better than the advice of Ahithophel.'" Hushai was loyal to David and he thought, "I'm going to come up with a plan and the king will buy it and but it will give David time to get out of town." Notice why; verse 14 tells us at the end: "For the Lord had purposed to defeat the good advice of Ahithophel, to the intent that the Lord might bring disaster on Absalom." I wonder if you believe this: God is sovereign even in war; it's a tough one to swallow. It's especially tough if you have a son or daughter in war. David is helped by a friend who stayed to spy; he was a mole but God used that to overturn the council of Ahithophel.
Here are the highlights of a great story: There was an Israeli spy named Eli Cohen back in the 1960's. He was born in Egypt, raised in Argentina, moved to Syria and was a spy for Israel. The Mossad, the secret service, hired him to watch the Syrians because the Syrians were trying to advance on the Golan Heights and take the northern border. Eli Cohen had his name changed and he was living in Damascus Syria at the time and got really close to the parliament of Damascus. He would get intelligence from them because they thought that he was one of them and then he would send updates to Israel by Morse code every day. One day they were out on the Golan Heights and in the summertime it can get blisteringly hot. While he was out there he persuaded some of the leaders of the parliament of Syria to get up on the Golan Heights with him and they were discussing the problem of the troops. They had 70,000 troops stationed in the Golan Heights. One of the guys said, "You know it gets so hot up here but we can't provide any shade and nothing really grows and we can't make shelters fast enough." So Eli Cohen said, "Here's an idea. You ought to plant some trees." They said, "What trees grow fast enough?" He replied, "Well there is a tree that Israel uses that is called the eucalyptus tree that drains water quickly and advances in growth very rapidly, faster than all these other trees; you should plant them." They did and the trees grew very rapidly in clumps and clusters. The 70,000 troops were so grateful. Then with Morse code he said to the Israelis, "Next time your troops are up on the Golan Heights and Syria is attacking you, just aim your mortars for the groups of eucalyptus trees. Make your targets wherever you see clumps of the trees and don't shoot anywhere else but there. He effectively wiped out the Syrian troops. He was discovered and he was hung. There is a fascinating little book called, Our Man in Damascus. It's the life story of Eli Cohen but it's how God used this man to allow Israel to maintain the covenant land that God gave to her.
Chapter 18 records the fight between David and Absalom; army against army. David, a skilled warrior divided his troops up into three different brigades, a very ancient tactic in fighting wars. However, he wanted Absalom alive. Verse 9: "Then Absalom met the servants of David. Absalom rode on a mule. The mule went under the thick boughs of a great terebinth tree," (a large oak), "and his head caught in the terebinth; so he was left hanging between heaven and earth. And the mule which was under him went on." I'm sure that when this happened he's thinking, "I should have got the yearly haircut!" Joab, the commander of David's army sees him and kills him contrary to what the king said. Verse 33: "Then the king was deeply moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept. And as he went, he said thus: 'O my son Absalom--my son, my son Absalom--if only I had died in your place! O Absalom my son, my son!'" I find it tragic that this father and this son never reconciled. I've watched this happen. I've been in emergency rooms and in hospitals and I've watched faces drop and lives shatter when the doctor comes out and says, "I'm so sorry, but we couldn't save her. We tried everything to preserve her life but she (or he) is dead." And that father or mother or son or daughter or brother or sister that is left living mourns not just the death but the emptiness of never being able to even have a word that would slightly touch at reconciliation. When it's all said and done and it's all over with, there are a lot of things that won't matter. It won't matter where you lived, what car you drove, how big your bank account was, what school your son or daughter or you went to, but the world may be a better place and a changed place if you get involved with a life of a young boy or a young girl and invest in that life rather than this.
Chapters 19 and 20 are the recovery after David's death. The weakening of relationships between the north and the south start here. There's been a leadership vacuum since David's departure and Absalom's rebellion and people are always looking for that. Chapter 20 verse 1: "And there happened to be there a rebel, whose name was Sheba the son of Bichri, a Benjamite. And he blew a trumpet, and said: 'We have no share in David, nor do we have inheritance in the son of Jesse; every man to his tents, O Israel!' So every man of Israel deserted David, and followed Sheba the son of Bichri. But the men of Judah, from the Jordan as far as Jerusalem, remained loyal to their king." Now I've noted this verse because I want you to remember this: it is a preview of coming attractions. Later on if you wonder why Rehoboam is the king and this fellow Jeroboam comes and starts dividing north and south it all started here with the leadership weakening with Absalom and David. Sheba rebelled and they pursue him, he rides up north, seeks asylum, goes to a town and to make a long story short, the troops of Israel go around the city and they are going to destroy a place called Abel Beth Maachah, (that's a long name for a little town). They are about to level the walls and destroy the city to get one guy. So there is a wise woman inside the wall who says, "Hey Joab, let me tell you something. This town has been a peaceful and wise town for a long time. Now here you are about ready to destroy a whole town to get one guy and you are going to wipe out God's inheritance. I have a good idea. Why don't we cut his head off and throw it out to you and make it easy." He replies, "Cool." They cut his head off, the woman grabs it and tosses it over the wall, and Joab is happy. Amazing what is in the Bible!
Chapters 23 and 24 are the final words of David. Chapter 23, verse 1: "Now these are the last words of David. Thus says David the son of Jesse; thus says the man raised up on high, the anointed of the God of Jacob, and the sweet psalmist of Israel." I wish I had time to do a sermon on that verse. It's a beautiful one sentence biographical sketch on King David. How God turned a kid into a king and a shepherd into a sovereign. Verse 8: "These are the names of the mighty men whom David had: Josheb-Basshebeth the Tachmonite, chief among the captains. He was called Adino the Eznite, because he had killed eight hundred men at one time." This was a whole gallery of 37 of David's heroes and buddies who worked with him.
The last chapter, chapter 24 is a chapter of sin and mercy; David's sin and God's mercy and you have homework. You have to discover this answer. Why does this chapter say that, "The Lord incited David to number the people of Israel"; and the account in Chronicles says, "Satan incited David?" I know the answer, I'm just giving you homework because it's a fascinating and beautiful answer when you discover why that is. It's not a conflicting report at all but it's actually a very dovetailed synopsis of the account. Kings would number people. They would take a census and they wanted to find out how many people there were in order to: number one, tax them and number two, for when they needed an army. David's motivation to do it, that God allowed and that Satan incited, was to find out how strong he was; for prideful reasons. Instead of trusting the Lord it was for prideful purposes. David was ripe and he confesses his sins and he tells the Lord, "I'm the one who has done it." Verse 15: "So the Lord sent a plague upon Israel from the morning till the appointed time. From Dan to Beersheba seventy thousand men of the people died. And when the angel stretched out His hand over Jerusalem to destroy it, the Lord relented from the destruction, and said to the angel who was destroying the people, 'It is enough; now restrain your hand.' And the angel of the Lord was by the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite." Why is that thrown in there? Because the temple built by Solomon will stand upon the threshing floor of Araunah, the top of Mount Zion where Abraham almost sacrificed Isaac and where the temple mount is still today. The most contested piece of real estate on planet earth is the threshing floor of Araunah; the big schism and debate of world powers between Arab nations, Islamic nations, and Israel. Much of it is over this piece of real estate. Verse 25: "And David built there an altar to the Lord, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. So the Lord heeded the prayers for the land, and the plague was withdrawn from Israel."
As we close our Bibles and we open our hearts to the Lord, remember this. When it comes to sin that we discover in yours and my life, do three things: admit it; three hard words - "I was wrong." Followed by another three hard words to say, "I am sorry." Number two, leave it; you see the woman on the house top - don't ponder. "I find myself in an awkward moment; maybe I should witness to her!" No! Don't witness to her, run from her. Number three, replace it. Replace that activity with a wholesome Godly activity.
Let's pray. Lord we see through the life of King David, Your anointed, the man after Your own heart, the one whom our Savior will be at least tangentially named the Son of David; this man was also a man of flesh and blood, feet of clay. A king; a man. A sovereign, a success; and yet a failure. So Lord we see that ongoing saga of our sin and Your mercy and grace that is needed. Thank you for the blood of Jesus Christ which cleanses a man or a woman from all sin. We want to bring our lives under submission to You; to admit; to forsake; and to replace. In Jesus' Name. Amen.

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/1/2007
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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8/8/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
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Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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1/9/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/16/2008
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
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Destination: Acts
Acts
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
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Destination: Romans
Romans
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
completed
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
completed
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
Skip Heitzig
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
Skip Heitzig
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.
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There are 64 additional messages in this series.