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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25 - 2 Kings 1-25

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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.

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1/16/2008
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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2 Kings continues the history begun in 1 Kings. The books tell the story of a nation without leadership. It describes what happens when a nation passes from affluence and influence to poverty and paralysis. Kingdoms taken captive. Many scholars feel that the author may have been Jeremiah. The book of 2 Kings can be divided into 2 sections – section one ending in the captivity of Israel and section two ending in the captivity of Judah.

1. The Divided Kingdom – 2 Kings 1-17

  1. a. The third dynasty in the Northern Kingdom – 2 Kings 1-9

  2. b. The fourth dynasty in the Northern Kingdom – 2 Kings 10-15:12

  3. c. Israel taken in captivity by Assyria – 2 Kings 15-17


2. The Southern Kingdom – 2 Kings 18-25

  1. a. The reign of Hezekiah – 2 Kings 18-20

  2. b. The reign of Manasseh & Amon – 2 Kings 21

  3. c. The reign of Josiah – 2 Kings 22-23:30

  4. d. Judah taken in captivity by Babylon – 2 Kings 23:31-chapter 25



CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

872 B.C.
Jehoshaphat becomes king in Judah

865 B.C.
Elijah begins to prophesy against Ahab

850 B.C.
Elijah is taken to heaven in a chariot of fire; Elisha prophesies

755 B.C.
Isaiah begins to prophesy in Judah

736 B.C.
Ahaz begins to reign in Judah

722 B.C.
Israel is taken captive by the Assyrians

697 B.C.
Manasseh begins to reign in Judah

640 B.C.
Josiah's reign begins in Judah

624 B.C.
The Book of the Law is found in Jerusalem

612 B.C.
Assyria's capital Nineveh falls to the Babylonians

586 B.C.
Judah is taken captive by the Babylonians

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Abana and Pharpar Rivers – Two great rivers in Syria. When Naaman was told to dip himself in the Jordan River, he referred to these great rivers in his home country. The Abana River flows through Damascus today and the Pharpar flows south of the city. (2 Kings 5:12)

Assyria – The name of an area derived from the city Asshur on the Tigris, the original capital of the country. Was originally a colony from Babylonia, and was ruled by viceroys from that kingdom. It was a mountainous region lying to the north of Babylonia, extending along the Tigris as far as the high mountain range of Armenia, the Gordiaean or Carduchian mountains. In 738 B.C., in the reign of Menahem, king of Israel, Tiglath-Pileser III occupied Philistia and invaded Israel, imposing on it a heavy tribute (2 Kings 15:19). Ahaz, king of Judah, engaged in a war against Israel and Syria, and appealed for help to this Assyrian king by means of a present of gold and silver (2 Kings 16:8). He accordingly "marched against Damascus, defeated and put Rezin to death, and besieged the city itself."

Damascus – This was the name of the most ancient of Oriental cities. It was the capital of Syria (Isaiah 7:8, 17:3) located about 133 miles north of Jerusalem. There was a long string of wars, with varying success, between the Israelites and Syrians. Later they became allies of Israel against Judah (2 Kings 15:37). The Syrians were at length subdued by the Assyrians, the city of Damascus was taken and destroyed, and the inhabitants carried captive into Assyria (2 Kings 16:7-9; compare Isaiah 7:8). This city is memorable as the scene of Saul's conversion (Acts 9:1-25).

Jezreel – Located about 45 miles from Ramoth Gilead, this town was settled by the tribe of Issachar. The city of Jezreel is located near the southern edge of the Jezreel Valley. Under Kings Omri and Ahab, Jezreel was chosen to be the Northern Kingdom's second capital. It was also the site of a confrontation between the prophet Elijah and King Ahab.
(2 Kings 9:15)

Ramoth Gilead - Although alternate sites for the location of Ramoth Gilead have been suggested, the strongest evidence points to the site of Tel er Ramith, which is on the border of modern Syria. The city was situated in the frontier territory allotted to the tribe of Gad, in northern Gilead, near the ancient border of Israel and Syria. Ramoth Gilead's strategic location on the Transjordan Highway made it the site of several battles between the Northern Kingdom and Syria in the ninth century B.C. (2 Kings 8:28)

Samaria (the city and the region) – To the north, Samaria is bounded by the Esdraelon Valley, to the east by the Jordan River, to the west by the Carmel Ridge (in the north) and the Sharon plain (in the south), to the south by Judea (the Jerusalem mountains). Samarian hills are not very high, seldom reaching the height of over 2700 feet. Samaria's climate is more hospitable than the climate of Judea. Omri, the king of Israel, purchased this hill from Shemer its owner for two talents of silver, and built on its broad summit the city to which he gave the name of Samaria, as the new capital of his kingdom instead of Tirzah (1 Kings 16:24). This location possessed many advantages. Omri resided here during the last six years of his reign. When the land was captured by the Assyrians, they repopulated the area with captured foreigners from other lands. Later, in the time of Jesus, the Jewish people looked down on these "Samaritans."

Kir Hareseth – The capital city of Moab. Located about 11 miles east of the Dead Sea and 15 miles south of the Arnon River. (2 Kings 3:25)

Shunem – This was a small town in the land of the tribe of Issachar. It was to the north of Jezreel and south of Mount Gilboa. In previous Israel history, it was where the Philistines encamped when they came against Saul (1 Sam 28:4). In 2 Kings, it is where Elisha was treated kindly and entertained by a rich woman of the city.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Amaziah ( Southern Kingdom) - Son of Joash, he became king of Judah in 796 B.C., and ruled 29 years. He executed those who had killed his father Joash. He challenged the Northern Kingdom to battle and was badly beaten, and was also assassinated like his father. (2 Kings 14:1; 2 Chronicles 25:27)

Ahaz (Southern Kingdom) - He was the first king to hear Isaiah's prophecy about the virgin birth (see Isaiah 7:14). He began his rule in 735 B.C. at age 20 and was king in the south for 16 years. Even though he had Isaiah and Micah around as prophets, he was a wicked king who refused to hear their message. He worshipped false gods and sacrificed his own children. (2 Kings 16:1)

Ahaziah (Southern Kingdom) - Ruled the Southern Kingdom beginning in 841 B.C. upon the death of his father Jehoram. He reigned for only one year—the shortest of any king of Judah. He came from a bad family line. His grandmother was Jezebel and his mother was the equally wicked Athaliah. He was killed by Jehu. (2 Kings 8:25)

Amon (Southern Kingdom) - He began his reign in 642 B.C. and lasted only two years. Like his father Manasseh, he was wicked and his servants rose up and killed him. (2 Kings 21:19)

Ashurbanipal – One of the kings of Assyria who moved non-Israelite foreigners into the now de-populated Northern Kingdom. They would intermarry with the remaining Jews in the land. This was the beginning of the Samaritans. (2 Kings 17:24)

Athaliah (Southern Kingdom) - She was the only woman ruler of either the Northern or Southern Kingdoms. She began her six-year rule in 841 B.C. after the death of her son Ahaziah. When she assumed power, she had all of her grandchildren executed except Joash, because his mother Jehosheba, hid him. She was married to the high priest Jehoiada. Athaliah was eventually arrested and executed. (2 Kings 11:1)

Ben-Hadad II – Ruled in Damascus Syria around 801 B.C. He was the son of Hazael. He was defeated a couple of times by the Northern Kingdom. Jehoash recaptured the land from Ben-Hadad and Joash defeated him three times (2 Kings 13:24-25).

Elisha – After Elijah, Elisha was accepted as the leader of the sons of the prophets, and became noted in Israel. God granted Elisha's request for "a double portion" of Elijah's spirit (2 Kings 2:9), and for sixty years (892-832 B.C.) held the office of "prophet in Israel" (2 Kings 2:9 & 5:8).

Huldah – An unknown prophetess in the land. Her husband, Shallum, was the wardrobe keeper for King Josiah. She was the one who confirmed the genuineness of the Law of Moses when it was found by Hilkiah the priest. (2 Kings 22:14)

Ishmael – A prince of Judah, a rebel from the line of David who fled to the Ammonites when Jerusalem was destroyed by the Chaldeans. Soon after, he returned and assassinated Gedaliah the governor who had been selected by Nebuchadnezzer (2 Kings 25:25).

Jehoahaz (Southern Kingdom) - The second son of Josiah, he ruled for only three months. He was taken out of power by Egypt's Pharaoh Necho and his older brother Jehoiakim was placed on the throne. He was carried off to Egypt where he later died. (2 Kings 23:31)

Jehoahaz (Northern Kingdom) - The son of Jehu, he ruled in Israel for 17 years, beginning in 814 B.C. He repented of the sins of his fathers, but his repentance did not last long. (2 Kings13:1)

Jehoash (Northern Kingdom) - Son of Jehoahaz, he was rebuked by Elisha as he lay on his deathbed. He began his 16-year rule in 798 B.C.(2 Kings 13:10)

Jehoiachin (Southern Kingdom) - This son of Jehoiakim reigned only three months in 597 B.C. He was carried off to Babylon. A special curse was put on this king. (2 Kings 24:8)

Jehoiakim (Southern Kingdom) - Began his reign in 609 B.C. and ruled for 11 years. During this time, he became a vassel king for the invading Nebuchadnezzar. After three months in this position, he rebelled.(2 Kings 23:34)

Jehoram (Northern Kingdom) - He began his 12-year reign in 852 B.C. He was Ahab's youngest son and much took place under his reign. He was king when Naaman visited Elisha to be healed, and he was there when all of Samaria was saved through the work of four lepers. However, he was killed by Jehu, a former commander and chariot driver for Ahab.(2 Kings 3:1)

Jehosheba – She was the wife of the high priest Jehoiada. When Athaliah was killing all the heirs to the throne, she saved Joash and hid him from his power-grabbing grandmother. He would later become king due to the heroic action taken by Jehosheba. (2 Kings 11:2-3)

Jehu (Northern Kingdom) – Ruled for 28 years beginning in 841 B.C. He was the founder of the 5th and longest dynasty in the Northern Kingdom. Jehu became a very bloody leader. He executed Ahaziah while he was visiting from the Southern Kingdom, and he also killed Jehoram, Jezebel, the priest of Baal, and Ahab's 70 sons. (2 Kings 9:29)

Jezebel – The wicked wife of the wicked King Ahab, she was a Baal-worshipping princess from Phoenicia. 1 Kings 21:23 predicted her violent death and her remains being eaten by the dogs. (2 Kings 9:30-37)

Zechariah (Northern Kingdom) - He was the son of Jeroboam II and the last king to rule from the dynasty of Jehu. He reigned a short six months in 753 B.C. before being murdered by a man named Shallum. (2 Kings14:29)

FUN FACTS:

A man being lowered into his own grave – There was a group of Israelites who were in the process of burying a man when they were interrupted by a band of raiders. They threw the man's body into Elisha's tomb and ran away. When the man's body came in contact with Elisha's bones the man became alive again and jumped to his feet. He is not mentioned again (2 Kings 13:21).

The widow's oil – Olive oil was an essential ingredient in just about every aspect of daily life at this time. In cooking, olive oil was poured into a pan to prevent the meat or bread from sticking. Oil was mixed with flour to make bread dough. The lamps of most houses burned with oil-soaked wicks. Minor injuries were rubbed with light oils to help the healing process. Wealthy people would bath with oil to heal aches and pains. Women rubbed oil onto their skin to replenish moisture in the dry, hot desert climate. The kings of both Judah and Israel were anointed with oil. (2 Kings 4:1-7)

How oil was made – The most common type of oil used in Palestine was olive oil. The ripe olives were at first partially squeezed to remove the seeds. After that, to remove the remaining oil, they were pressed with a heavy stone or trampled on by foot. One olive tree yielded about 10 gallons of oil per year. Since it was so expensive, the olives were sometimes squeezed three or four times. Each time it was pressed, the oil lost some of its purity. (2 Kings 4:1-7)

A room for Elisha – Elisha was a traveling prophet always moving throughout the land. At Shunem, a woman was concerned for Elisha and set up a room that he would be able to stay in while he was in that area. This room was built on the roof of their house. This would allow the room to be cool and bright. The location also allowed for privacy. (2 Kings 4:8-17)

The life of a leper (Naaman) – Until healed, a leper lived as an outcast in a society. Though not hated, he was greatly feared. Therefore he would often be driven from town and forced to live in caves. While this seems cruel, it was the only way to protect the healthy segment of the city. Naaman, since he was not an outcast, probably had a milder form of leprosy. Sometimes it took 10 to 20 years to heal from leprosy – but most would not live that long. (2 Kings 5:1-19)

Cosmetics – Before Jezebel was killed, she went in and put on her makeup. What did she do? Women of her day painted their faces with bright colors and drew heavy dark lines around their eyes. These colors came from iron or copper ore mixed with water. Ancient fingernail polish came from a dye made from the flower of the henna plant. It was actually a stain. (2 Kings 9:30)

Rimmon, a god of Syria – In the land of Syria, just north of Israel, the people worshiped a god named Rimmon. He was known as the god of storms and rain. It was in the temple of Rimmon that Naaman would worship (2 Kings 5:18).

Transcript

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Heavenly Father, thank you for hungry hearts and a warm place where we can gather together and enjoy the warmth of Your spirit, the encouragement of fellowship and the joy that comes just by being with each other and seeing Christ displayed in so many different lives and in so many different ways. Lord, there're a lot of different spiritual levels represented here tonight, from recently saved to veterans in the faith. There're different age groups, physically that are represented but we trust Lord that Your Spirit can break through any barrier, address any need and speak to any of us at our level and at our place in life. We pray that You do that. In Jesus' Name. Amen.
By reading USA Today, I noticed that American Idol started last night. I've always been intrigued by that title, by the way. It's sort of a very honest title and admission: American idolatry. The opening program is the one where they highlight all of the rejects and yet it is one of their most highly rated programs. The title of the USA Today article was, "Idol Starts Out Bad, and Fans Love It." It's interesting and here's a sentence from it: "TV shows usually don't boast about how bad they can be but that's the big selling point for American Idol's hugely popular season opening auditions." As you know if you have seen the program, they mix the very bad and the very good. They show the ones who have been accepted and are going to make it to the next level and the ones who are really bad but for some reason think they are good and they get in and it's very entertaining.
This period of Israel's history in the book of 2 Kings is similar to that. You have a mix of the very good and the very bad. You've got great kings; not many but some and you've got a lot of very bad kings. So it's almost like we have parallel tracts of degeneration and regeneration; and of unrighteousness and righteousness. The book, A Tale of Two Cities begins, "It was the best of times and it was the worst of times;" two parallel tracts. This is a tale not of two cities but of two kingdoms, two countries and if you remember from the last study in 1 Kings the big event is the division of the kingdom. It's not a united monarchy with one king reigning over the country; it is split from north to south. Ten tribes in the north, which is the nation of Israel and the two tribes in the south, the nation of Judah with Jerusalem as the capital. The big event in 1 Kings is the division of the kingdom. The big event in 2 Kings is the collapse of the kingdom or you might say the captivity. There are a couple of different super powers and there will be the taking over of these two kingdoms in the north and in the south. I'm going to give you a division of the book very simply into two slices. Basically what you have here and if you have read some of the chapters you know that there are a lot of lists of names of kings and a couple of prophets, which we will meet in this study. But you have a list of kings and how long they reigned and something notable about them and you'll notice that it will tell you who reigns in the north and then who reigns in the south and if they intersect or interact at all. It's just sort of follows that through but there is a distinct division in 2 Kings. Chapters 1 through 17 is the first division and chapters 18 through 25 is the second division. You can call that first section, "The Struggling Kingdoms," (plural). The Kingdom of Israel and the Kingdom of Judah are struggling. Sometimes they are going down and sometimes they are going up because the prophet will speak to them and there will be a mild period of repentance and then they go back down. Sometimes they are fighting each other. Then in chapters 18 through 25 is the surviving kingdom (singular). So we have the struggling kingdoms and the surviving kingdom which is Judah. I say it survived because the kingdom of Israel will go into captivity and the kingdom of Judah will survive for a period of about 150 years but the book ends where it finally collapses as well.
Something to note about God (and you see it in the ministry of two notable prophets) is that God is a pursuing God. He is a merciful God and before He judges He loves to reach out. He loves to give people as many chances as is possible before He ultimately judges them. Though it's repeated here, it doesn't happen just here, you see it repeated as a theme throughout the Scriptures. God pronounces a judgment and gives a warning but before He ultimately judges, it's as if He reaches His hand out and says, "Now, let's consider this. You don't have to go in that direction. It can be changed and you can turn around." That's a theme we see even in the New Testament. One of the most notable examples of that is with a fellow by the name of Judas Iscariot; the one who betrayed Jesus for 30 pieces of silver; the one who had prearranged the arrest of Christ even before the last supper. That is why I find it interesting that at the last supper Judas was sitting to Jesus' left. If anybody knows ancient Middle East customs, the honored guest was at the right hand and at the left hand of the master and you only get there by invitation. So before the supper, I'm sure Jesus walked up to Judas and said, "Judas, I want you sitting right next to me buddy; at my left hand." That's why Jesus said, "The one that I give the sup to," and it's typical at Passover to take a piece of the bread and dip it in that bitter herb sauce and pass it to the left; He gave it to Judas. It was as if He was reaching out. "I know what you are doing and I know what you are about and you don't have to go this direction." As He got up, Jesus, finally said to him, "Whatever you do, do it quickly."
Something to note is that in spite of these kingdoms struggling and the one surviving and in spite of these kings going from bad to worse, there are two prophets and their names are similar: Elijah and Elisha. It's as if God sends them in the midst of a faltering kingdom to defibrillate the heart; that's the only term I can really think of. They are failing, they are having heart failure and these prophets come in and try to defibrillate the heart and revive the patient, but it's too late. So you have some wicked kings but you also have some great messengers that come and we'll notice them especially in the first eight chapters.
Let's begin in chapter 1. This is the struggling kingdoms of Israel in the north and Judah in the south. As we begin in chapter 1, we are beginning with the end of Elijah's ministry and the beginning of Elisha's ministry. Most people get these two prophets mixed up because their names sound so similar and that's because that's what they sound like in English. In Hebrew it would be very easy to tell the difference. The first prophet is Eliyahu and the second one is Eliyshah. But in English they sound very similar to each other but they are very different and we'll read about that succession in this study. In chapter 1 verse 8 we see a description of Elijah the prophet. By the way, the chapter opens up with Ahaziah who is the king in the north. Jehoram is the king in the south as the book opens and Elijah and Elisha will interact with them. Verse 8 describes Elijah and he is called: "A hairy man wearing a leather belt around his waist." It sounds like Bigfoot! "And he said, 'It is Elijah the Tishbite.'" Turn to chapter 2 verse 1: "And it came to pass, when the Lord was about to take up Elijah into heaven by a whirlwind, that Elijah went with Elisha from Gilgal." Verse 9: "And so it was, when they had crossed over, that Elijah said to Elisha, 'Ask! What may I do for you, before I am taken away from you?' Elisha said, 'Please let a double portion of your spirit be upon me.'" What does a double portion mean? Simply this. "I want to be your successor. I want that same Spirit of God that is operating so powerfully in your life that allows you to not operate in your own strength but see God's continual power. I want that; I want to continue where you leave off." The idea of a double portion comes from the laws of inheritance. Back in the Torah, the first five books of Moses, the first born son got a double portion of dad's inheritance. That was his right as he was going to become the successor in that family as a leader. So that's the idea of it. It doesn't mean, "I want twice as much as what you have." The idea is that "I want to succeed where you leave off." Verse 10: "So he said, 'You have asked a hard thing.'" That's an interesting thing to say. "Hey, I want to operate by the same spirit and power that you do; I want the double portion; I want that law of inheritance from you." "Well, you've asked a hard thing!" Why would he say that? Because, frankly it's hard to be a prophet. As you read about their stories and their lives you can see that being a spokesperson for the Lord to a nation is difficult. I would even say this to anyone who says, "I want to be in the ministry. I want to be a pastor." I would say, "What you ask is a hard thing; it's not easy to do that." Notice what he says after that: "'Nevertheless, if you see me when I am taken from you, it shall be so for you; but if not, it shall not be so.' Then it happened, as they continued on and talked, that suddenly a chariot of fire appeared with horses of fire, and separated the two of them; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven." It's wild, I'll admit it, and it's better than American Idol! He's taken up into heaven in a whirlwind. Elijah does not die. This makes him an exception to the rule where it says, "It's appointed unto every man once to die and after this the judgment." This guy doesn't die. Now, I believe that he ultimately will die. It's my personal belief that just like the long standing Jewish tradition that Elijah will come that he indeed will come as it says in the last chapter of the Old Testament, chapter 4 of Malachi, "That God will send Elijah the prophet before the great and dreadful day of the Lord," (that's that final epic of judgment in the tribulation period), "and he will turn the hearts of the children to the fathers and the fathers to the children." I believe that it's very possible that we see Elijah mentioned in the book of Revelation. I'm going to briefly read Revelation chapter 11 and it concerns the two witnesses that come in the tribulation period and look at their description; verse 5: "If anyone wants to harm them, fire proceeds from their mouth and devours their enemies." You've heard of bad breath? This is deadly breath! "And if anyone wants to harm them he must be killed in this manner. They have power to shut heaven so that no rain falls in the days of their prophecy," (which incidentally is 3 1/2 years), "and they have power over waters to turn them to blood and to strike the earth with all plagues as often as they desire. When they had their testimony the beast that rises up out of the bottomless pit will make war against them, overcome them, and kill them." The question is always, "Well, who are these two strange witnesses?" It's my belief and it's very possible that it's none other than the prophet Elijah and Moses the law giver who return as a testimony. It would be the greatest testimony to the Jewish nation; Moses the great law giver and the greatest of all prophets to the Jewish nation, Elijah. It would be the final bright light before the final Day of Judgment at Armageddon occurs. I make that statement based on a few clues: Number one is the past. If you think back in your Old Testament to some of the things that Moses and Elijah did, it's very similar. For instance, in 1 Kings chapter 18, Elijah brings fire down from heaven to consume the sacrifices. Also, in 2 Kings chapter 1 when the king demands that Elijah be brought before him he sends 50 men to go get Elijah and they look up to him as he is sitting up on a hill and say, "You, man of God, come down here because the king wants to see you." Elijah says, "If I am a man of God, let fire come down from heaven and wipe you guys out." Fire fell from heaven and all 50 of them died. Another group is dispatched and the same thing happens. A third group comes and the leader of the third group finally says, "Please spare our lives! Please come down and talk to the king." So he does but fire falls down from heaven. Then also back in the Old Testament, Moses turned the Nile River into blood and brought all sorts of plagues; a similar description as we see in Revelation 11. So the first clue is the past and the second is that prophecy that I mentioned in Malachi chapter 4. "Elijah will come," and even Jesus who said that John the Baptist is a partial fulfillment turned to His disciples and said, "Elijah will," (future tense) "still come." Even to this day at Passover, the Jews leave the door open and a chair at the Passover table for Elijah, just in case he would happen to show up at their Passover. A third clue is New Testament precedence. For them to come again is already established in two of the Gospels when Jesus was on the Mount of Transfiguration, two persons were transfigured with Him and they were Moses and Elijah. That's found in Matthew 17 and in Mark chapter 19. Moses and Elijah appear with Christ and they are speaking about the Kingdom. Then finally, their passing and the way they died is a clue. As I said, Elijah didn't die; he was taken up into heaven in a whirlwind. Moses died and the Bible says in Deuteronomy, "God buried Him and nobody knows where his body was." When we get to the New Testament we read a very strange passage in the book of Jude verse 9 that says: "Michael the Archangel in contending with the devil when he disputed about the body of Moses." It's an odd Scripture. We have insight into the fact that you have an angel of God and Satan fighting over a dead corpse. I would look at that and think, "What's the point of this argument?" Unless of course, God wanted to use the body of Moses for some future purpose: i.e. resurrection and bringing him back as a testimony with Elijah in the tribulation period to speak to the people of Israel and 144,000 of them will be saved. It's a very interesting thought, is it not?
Elisha, the second dude and the guy that asked for the double portion, not only does a lot of miracles that are recorded here (we'll only touch on a couple) but he also confronts the kings of Israel and Judah. In chapter 3 he confronts King Jehoram down in Judah.
In chapter 4 we have a couple of little highlighted stories and a couple of cameos of the prophet Elisha and some of the miracles that he worked. One is with a poor widow and the other is with a Shunemite woman (I'll explain those terms in a minute.) The chapter opens up with a widow. Her husband died, the creditors want money, and she is left destitute. Finally the creditors come and threaten to take her sons and sell them into slavery. Now enters the prophet Elisha who says, "I'll tell you what to do. Go get a container of oil and bring it into your house. Get as many empty containers that you can from all your neighbors and bring them inside the house and close the door. Take whatever little oil you have and start pouring it. She poured it and it miraculously filled up all of the empty vessels that she had and then Elisha said, "Now sell them and you'll be able to live off of that income and pay off your creditors."
Also in that chapter is a story about a couple living up in Shunem and the Shunemite woman. There was a husband and wife up in a little village up north called Shunem that was up in the northern coast of Galilee. It seems that they saw Elisha the prophet traveling a lot. The woman said to her husband, "You know what we ought to do honey? We should prepare a little guest room for this guy so that when he is in town he can stay in the guest bed and we can give him food and take care of him." They outfitted this little room and Elisha stayed there whenever he was in town. As a sort of reward he prophesized that this couple who didn't have a child would within a year's time have a baby boy and miraculously that occurred. A baby boy was born and he started growing up and one day while he was out in the field he grew faint and grabbed his head. He had some kind of a splitting headache, we don't know if it was sunstroke or what, and he fell over and was presumed dead! She was so upset that the child that God gave her was now dead and she searches for the prophet Elisha. In chapter 4 verse 27 they didn't find Elisha but they found his servant: "Now when she came to the man of God at the hill, she caught him by the feet, but Gehazi came near to push her away. But the man of God said, 'Let her alone; for her soul is in deep distress, and the Lord has hidden it from me, and has not told me.'" So here is the prophet Elisha saying, "You know, this woman is really troubled and for some reason God hasn't told me what is troubling her." The reason I'm pointing this out is because can you imagine being so in tune with God that you are surprised when He doesn't reveal something to you that is going on in a person's life? This was shocking Elisha. "I should now about this! This should be on my radar screen but God hasn't revealed it to me!" It is revealed by the woman and Elisha comes and spreads himself over the child and he breaths on the child and the child comes back to life.
In chapter 5 is a great story about Naaman who was a field commander for the Syrian army. Though he was a powerful man he had a dreaded disease for that time, some kind of a skin outbreak all under the category of leprosy; he was a leper and he didn't know what to do. In his household he had an Israeli slave girl who knew about Elisha and said, "If only my master could get a hold of Elisha the prophet who is living in Samaria, I know that my master could be healed." Naaman hears about that and goes down to meet Elisha the prophet. Chapter 5, verse 9: "Then Naaman went with his horses and chariot, and he stood at the door of Elisha's house." Picture the scene. He's a dignitary and he's come not only on his steed but he no doubt has a lot of people with him. He's a field commander. It's typically customary that if some dignitary shows up you go out to greet him; it's common protocol. It seems that Elisha the prophet didn't follow common protocol. He didn't care about any dignitary. He's a servant of God after all so why should he pander to some human dignitary? Verse 10: "And Elisha sent a messenger to him, saying, 'Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored to you, and you shall be clean.'" So Elisha doesn't come and say, "Good to meet you. I heard so much about you! You're such a wonderful guy!" Instead, he just said to his messenger, "Just go tell him that if he wants to fix this problem to go dunk in the Jordan seven times and he'll be clean." "But Naaman became furious, and went away and said, 'Indeed, I said to myself, 'He will surely come out to me, and stand and call on the name of the Lord his God, and wave his hand over the place, and heal the leprosy.'" You have a commander with an expectation of a man of God, "I expect him to come out and do this." But Elisha didn't do it and didn't fulfill his expectations. He goes on to say: "'Are not the Abanah and the Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Could I not wash in them and be clean?' So he turned and went away in a rage." The Jordan River is like the Rio Grande on a bad day. It has some beautiful spots but there are some places where it's really narrow and muddy. The Jordan River up where they were was just this muddy little stream. It wasn't like the mighty Mississippi or even like these rivers that he mentioned. It's like a little puddle and it's really brown and muddy. So we can imagine this great commander shows up and Elijah doesn't even show up and just says, "Go give him a message; go tell him to go dunk in that dirty, muddy river seven times and he'll be fixed." He gets angry and thinks, "You want me to just go in the water? I could have done that up at home! This is ridiculous!" Elisha the prophet through God's power is going to have this man healed but it brings up a very interesting and an important principle: God's people do come with expectations of some things to happen; or for men, or women or leaders of God to perform certain ways and they can be disappointed when those expectations aren't met. For instance, and this is just an example. Somebody will come into a counseling office and say, "We are having problems in our marriage." If it's a good counselor he will quickly assess the situation and give Biblical principles on how that couple can change their relationship and hence fix the problem. Some people don't want the problem fixed as much as they want to be coddled; "Just understand and pat me on the back." There is room for that and the Bible even says that we are to encourage each other. However, as it is with Naaman, so it can be said with us. Do you want to be coddled or do you want to be cured? You want me to come out and wave my hand and make you feel really good or do you want this problem fixed? If you want the problem fixed, get in that muddy, crazy little river and it will work. I can just picture Naaman. He reluctantly says okay and walks in the river and he dunks one time and people are looking at him and maybe his men are snickering at him. He goes down once but he has to do it six more times. He comes up and is all wet and thinks how ridiculous this is and goes down again. He's still wet and has mud hanging off all over him. On that seventh time he came up and he was healed. It was miraculous. No he didn't get the personal attention that he wanted the prophet to give him but he was cured and the problem went away.
In chapters 6 through 8 there are more of Elisha's miracles as God is providing a witness to the nation. I'm taking you now to chapter 8 verse 16 and I'm purposely taking you to certain sections because in the Bible from 30,000 Feet I want you to not only get the overall picture but I want you to see how the New and Old Testament intertwine. Chapter 8 verse 16 gives insight into the covenant that God makes. "Now in the fifth year of Joram the son of Ahab, king of Israel, Jehoshaphat having been king of Judah, Jehoram the son of Jehoshaphat began to reign as king of Judah. He was thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned eight years in Jerusalem." At first he served as co-king with his father Jehoshaphat; then his dad died and he continued the reign without him. Verse 18: "And he walked in the way of the kings of Israel, just as the house of Ahab had done, for the daughter of Ahab was his wife; and he did evil in the sight of the Lord. Yet the Lord would not destroy Judah, for the sake of His servant David, as He promised him to give a lamp to him and his sons forever." Jehoram happened to be the king that introduces Baal worship into the southern kingdom. Just like his father-in-law, Ahab introduced Baal worship with Jezebel into the northern kingdom. Jehoram introduces this idolatrous pagan worship into Jerusalem and all of Judah. Back in the Old Testament in the book of Genesis, God promised that the tribe of Judah would be kept and preserved because the Messiah would come through that tribe. In Genesis 49 it says: "The Scepter will not depart from Judah nor a lawgiver from between his feet until Shiloh comes"; and that's a Messianic prophesy; Judah would be protected. With that in mind, get ready for some spiritual warfare here because the narrative goes on and we have more kings that are displayed and mentioned here in the north and in the south; more intrigue; and more warfare.
We're going to skip to chapter 11 and past some of the names and some of the intrigue to a very key verse. Verse 1: "When Athaliah the mother of Ahaziah saw that her son was dead, she arose and destroyed all the royal heirs." Everyone who could succeed from the house of David in the tribe of Judah and become the king; destroying all of the royal heirs and wiping out the bloodline. "But Jehosheba, the daughter of King Joram, sister of Ahaziah, took Joash the son of Ahaziah, and stole him away from among the king's sons who were being murdered; and they hid him and his nurse in the bedroom, from Athaliah, so that he was not killed." So everybody was killed except one. "So he was hidden with her in the house of the Lord for six years, while Athaliah reigned over the land." Eventually this guy will become the king of Judah. Think about this. From a human perspective, this is a close call for salvation history. It reveals a very intense spiritual battle that is happening. On the human level, the lineage of King David, the royal heirs were almost wiped out. Spiritually and Messianically that means that it would hinder the Messiah's coming. What if all of them were destroyed? Yet the prophecies say that someone from the seed of David will become the Savior of the world. If you don't have a royal seed any longer and they are all destroyed, God's promises will be thwarted.
Back in the Garden of Eden after Adam and Eve fell and the serpent deceived our first parents and they sinned, God gave a prediction. He said to the serpent, "I will put enmity between you, Satan and the woman, between your seed and her seed, He (ultimately Jesus Christ) shall bruise or crush your head and you, Satan, will bruise his heel." The prediction is that eventually a male child is going to be born who will crush Satan's power while at the same time the best that Satan will do is bruise Jesus Christ. Jesus died on a cross but that paid for the sins of the world. Ever since that prediction, it was Satan's counter attack to discover who the royal seed is going to be so he could destroy Him. This answers a lot of questions for us. For instance: Why did Cain kill Abel? Because Abel was the righteous seed of Adam and Eve. So Satan inspired Cain to kill Abel so that seed was removed. Then God raised up Seth and the line continued through Seth. Secondly, Satan created such havoc on earth that the whole world was judged by God in the flood. God destroyed the entire world except for one family and that was Noah and his seed and the lineage continued. Here's a third point. Satan motivated Esau to destroy Jacob, Isaac's promised son. Here's another example. Pharaoh came up with the bright idea, "Hey let's kill all of the male Hebrew children. When the Hebrew's have their babies if it's a male kill it and throw it in the river and if it's a girl let it live." What was that all about? It was Satan's attempt to destroy all of the seed of the Jews so that the Messiah would be hindered from coming. We continue on in history and we find that Saul tried to destroy David. 1 and 2 Samuel record several instances of that; to destroy the Messianic line. Another one is Haman in the book of Esther. He puts out this weird edict to destroy all of the Jews in the land; a mass genocide in another attempt to destroy the royal seed. Now Athaliah, this crazy woman says, "Let's take the entire royal household and kill them all," because she wants to be in charge and have no competition. But she is inspired by Satan so that God's promises couldn't be fulfilled. You follow that all the way through the Bible and you come to the New Testament and you have Herod the Great saying that all of the male children in Bethlehem should be killed which is another attempt to kill Jesus Christ. In Luke chapter 4 Jesus goes into the synagogue and says, "I'm the fulfillment of the Scripture" and they take Him out to a brow of the hill upon which the city was built and try to throw Him over and He escapes from their midst. At the temptation of Jesus Christ, Satan takes Jesus to the pinnacle of the temple and says, "Jump! If You're really the Son of God He will send His angels to protect You!" All of these suggestions and attempts are a definite counterattack to destroy God's promised Messiah. When you put it in that frame, it puts a whole different view on anti-Semitism. It gives it a whole different complexion; it's satanically inspired. Here's the premise. What if God's promise of redemption required the existence of a nation and the continuance of that nation? That would mean then that if Satan could destroy that nation, he would have thwarted God's plan. That's a heavy statement and that is exactly what we see in the Scripture and it is all summarized in Revelation chapter 12. So here with Athaliah is one of those examples where there is the attempt to destroy the royal seed but it doesn't happen. One of them is kept and becomes the next king and the lineage continues.
Chapter 12, verse 1: "In the seventh year of Jehu, Jehoash became king, and he reigned forty years in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Zibiah of Beersheba. Jehoash did what was right in the sight of the Lord all the days in which Jehoiada the priest instructed him." A priest becomes a mentor to a political figure and I love that. Because of this man's mentoring and influence, you now have a Godly king, one of the few, who is living by the book and living according to the Spirit of God. A politician with a spiritual heart. However, in verse 3: "But the high places were not taken away; the people still sacrificed and burned incense on the high places." As long as Jehoiada the priest was alive, King Jehoash did okay. As soon as Jehoiada, his spiritual mentor died, his spiritual life fell apart. 2 Chronicles, chapter 24, verse 17 gives us the rest of the story: "Now after the death of Jehoiada the leaders of Judah came and bowed down to the king. And the king listened to them. Therefore they left the house of the Lord God of their fathers, and served wooden images and idols; and wrath came upon Judah and Jerusalem because of their trespass. Yet He sent prophets to them, to bring them back to the Lord; and they testified against them, but they would not listen." The lesson is interesting and sobering: If your faith in God needs to be propped up by other people, what happens when those props are taken away? Don't get me wrong, we all need encouragement, instruction and example but if you are relying on people rather than the relationship with God and those props are taken away, your spiritual life could collapse. That's why we all need our own relationship, our own time, and our own interaction with God; so that we can help others along.
Chapter 14, verse 23: "In the fifteenth year of Amaziah the son of Joash, king of Judah, Jeroboam the son of Joash, king of Israel, became king in Samaria, and reigned forty-one years. And he did evil in the sight of the Lord; he did not depart from all the sins of Jeroboam the son of Nebat, who had made Israel sin." (So we have two different Jeroboams mentioned.) "He restored the territory of Israel from the entrance of Hamath to the Sea of the Arabah, according to the word of the Lord God of Israel, which He had spoken through His servant Jonah the son of Amittai, the prophet who was from Gath Hepher." I'm showing you that Jonah is mentioned in the Old Testament apart from the book of Jonah. When you mention Jonah of course people think of the story of the great fish and being swallowed and going to Nineveh. What 2 Kings shows us is that this prophet had a ministry of revival and preaching to the northern kingdom. He was a prophet used by God even before he was sent to Nineveh from Israel and he was ministering in that quadrant of the land. I bring this up for a couple of reasons. Number one, some people have a tough time with the whole idea of the existence of Jonah the prophet. They say, "He's probably a myth and it probably didn't happen. It's probably some Old Testament myth just like there are Greek myths. This is probably an old Hebrew myth about a big fish that swallowed a dude and it's just not true." Others say that it's probably an allegory. It's a great story but it's simply an allegory where the great fish in the story of Jonah represents Nebuchadnezzar and the Babylonians and Jonah represents the people of Israel and Nebuchadnezzar was going to come in and swallow the people of Israel and destroy them. Or some will say that what probably happened was that there was a guy named Jonah who went on a boat and had a wild dream about this great fish coming and swallowing him. So it's either a myth, an allegory or a dream. Here we know that the prophet Jonah existed historically; he was an historical figure and he really lived. Apart from that, we have the words from Jesus Christ who looking back to the Old Testament said, "As Jonah was in the belly of the whale three days and three nights, the Son of man will be in the heart of the earth three days and three nights." He is staking His death, burial, and resurrection on a historical Jonah who lived and went through all of those things. Now we find out that he was a prophet in Israel even before the whole incident with the great fish.
By the way, notice where he is from. It says Gath Hepher. That is Galilee and I bring that up because if you remember in the New Testament when Jesus was introduced to some of the Pharisees and Scribes and they said, "This is Jesus of Nazareth," and they answered, "Galilee? No prophet has arisen from Galilee." These were Bible scholars who apparently had forgotten all about this text. If they had just done their research and boned up a little bit on the Old Testament they would have remembered that Jonah was from Gath Hepher, a region in Galilee, and so was their Messiah, Jesus.
Chapter 15 is a story about King Uzziah. Some of you will remember that name. Here he is called Azariah. Sometimes there are two different names for the same dude so it gets a little confusing. Azariah is mentioned here but he is called Uzziah in some of the rest of the chapters here and in other places. Verse 1: "In the twenty-seventh year of Jeroboam king of Israel, Azariah the son of Amaziah, king of Judah, became king. He was sixteen years old when he became king." Is that frightening? What if a candidate running for president was 16 years of age? Would you vote for him? Well this guy was in the succession of kings and he became king at 16. "And he reigned fifty-two years in Jerusalem. His mother's name was Jecholiah of Jerusalem." Before you think, "Those poor people, to have such a young king"; he was one of their best kings. He reigned 52 years, brought spiritual reform and expanded their borders, etc. Verse 3 tells you his secret: "And he did what was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that his father Amaziah had done." He is one of the great kings of Judah. There weren't many but he is one of them. In fact, Isaiah chapter 6 begins: "In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord high and lifted up and the train of His robe filled the temple." When king Uzziah died after a 52 year reigned, it so shook the people of Israel that they were wondering, "Now what are we going to do? We had a great leader and now he is gone." God had to remind them and even the prophet Isaiah, "I'm still on the throne; I haven't left; I'm still in control and even though your king has left you, I the Lord God am sitting on that throne and I haven't vacated it and I'm fully in charge." So he did what was right except verse 4 tells us some of his failures and flaws. "Except that the high places were not removed; the people still sacrificed and burned incense on the high places. Then the Lord struck the king, so that he was a leper until the day of his death; so he dwelt in an isolated house. And Jotham the king's son was over the royal house, judging the people of the land." So he was good but he wasn't perfect and he had some failures. These were his failures: number one, as he got older he decided he wanted to be a priest so he dressed up as a priest one day and went into the very temple itself and started offering incense and that's why God struck him with leprosy. The second thing he did was show the vessels of the house of the Lord to foreign dignitaries who would eventually come in and seize control of the land. So he kind of gave away the spoils and God's judgment fell upon him.
In chapter 18 Hezekiah is the king. Verse 3: "And he did what was right in the sight of the Lord, according to all that his father David had done. He removed the high places and broke the sacred pillars, cut down the wooden image and broke in pieces the bronze serpent that Moses had made; for until those days the children of Israel burned incense to it, and called it Nehushtan. He trusted in the Lord God of Israel, so that after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor who were before him." This is the danger of relics. Back in chapter 21 of the book of Numbers Moses had a bronze serpent that he held up in the desert and if they looked to it they were healed. Evidently, they kept it and preserved it and after a while they superstitiously attached significance to it rather than to the Lord. They were using it and started burning incense to it. They venerated it and they made it the big deal. People do such things to the Shroud of Turin. Or I remember as a kid seeing a little card and on it there was a sliver of wood that my dad showed me. He was insistent that it was a piece of the original cross of Christ. The story told is that they found this piece of wood outside of Jerusalem and it was kept in a monastery and the hierarchy of the church sold it off until it ran out. Then they came up with a new miracle, the perpetuation of the cross wherein miraculously more and more wood appeared and they sold thousands and thousands of crosses. It was a miraculous perpetuation of the cross and people would pray to these things. The children of Israel were now superstitiously following a brass serpent.
Let's go back to chapter 17, verse 20 for just a second. This is the fall of the north; here is the collapse. "And the Lord rejected all the descendants of Israel, afflicted them, and delivered them into the hand of plunderers, until He had cast them from His sight." This is 722 B.C. "For He tore Israel from the house of David, and they made Jeroboam the son of Nebat king. Then Jeroboam drove Israel from following the Lord, and made them commit a great sin. For the children of Israel walked in all the sins of Jeroboam which he did; they did not depart from them, until the Lord removed Israel out of His sight, as He had said by all His servants the prophets. So Israel was carried away from their own land to Assyria, as it is to this day. Then the king of Assyria brought people from Babylon, Cuthah, Ava, Hamath, and from Sepharvaim, and placed them in the cities of Samaria instead of the children of Israel; and they took possession of Samaria and dwelt in its cities." It's 722 B.C. and the Syrians come in and take the northern kingdom captive. Here was their style. They took people and they let the poorest of the land remain. They brought in other people from nations they had conquered and had them intermarry and repopulate the land with foreign people who brought in foreign Gods. So here you have the northern country of Israel, already in idolatry becoming polluted with even more gods and goddesses. This group will become the Samaritans and this is precisely why in the New Testament the woman at the well of Samaria says to Jesus, "Why are You talking to me a Samaritan woman for the Jews have no dealings with the Samaritans." By the New Testament time there was a rival temple in Samaria that rivaled the worship down south in Jerusalem and a huge split and that split happened because of this occurrence in 722 B.C.
Chapters 18 through 25 are the surviving kingdom of Judah. They last another 150 years. The Assyrian King, Sennacherib that conquered the northern kingdom goes down to conquer Jerusalem but he is unable to do it. They approach twice. In 713 B.C. they are to conquer Jerusalem after having conquered Judah. Hezekiah the king spreads out a letter before the Lord. Isaiah the prophet comes in (this is found in Isaiah chapters 26 and 37) and God answers his prayer and Jerusalem is spared. He comes again in 701 B.C. to conquer the land and this time look what happens in chapter 18, verse 13: "And in the fourteenth year of King Hezekiah, Sennacherib king of Assyria came up against all the fortified cities of Judah and took them." Now he is going to try and take Jerusalem.
Hezekiah spreads out this letter that Sennacherib sends him saying, "We're going to destroy you before the Lord." Isaiah says, "Don't sweat it, God is bigger than that." Now look at chapter 19, verse 35: "And it came to pass on a certain night that the angel of the Lord went out, and killed in the camp of the Assyrians one hundred and eighty-five thousand; and when people arose early in the morning, there were the corpses--all dead." Think of this as I say this next statement. Remember in the Garden of Gethsemane when they arrest Jesus and Peter is out there trying to defend Jesus with the sword cutting ears off? Jesus says, "Put your sword away Peter. Don't you know that I could call right now on my father and get 12 legions of angels?" If one angel can destroy 185,000 Assyrians, imagine what 12 legions (hundreds) of angels could do which are all at the disposal of Christ's command and His power.
They are destroyed but a whole new power emerges. In chapter 25 verses 1 and 2, Assyria takes the northern kingdom captive and they collapse. One hundred fifty years pass and Judah is spared and they are the surviving kingdom and kings are listed in the rest of these chapters. But in 604 B.C. a guy named Nebuchadnezzar makes one of three successive attacks against Jerusalem. In the very first attack he takes captive a whole bunch of choice young men and one of them is named Daniel. Eventually, on the third attack in 586 B.C. Judah will fall to the Babylonians.
Chapter 25, verse 1: "Now it came to pass in the ninth year of his reign, in the tenth month, on the tenth day of the month, that Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem and encamped against it; and they built a siege wall against it all around. So the city was besieged until the eleventh year of King Zedekiah." Let me briefly sum up the whole chapter. After Josiah who was a good king dies, his son Jehoahaz is on the throne. He's only there for three months, barely enough time to warm the throne and he is deposed by the Egyptians. They put his brother Eliakim on the throne and change his name to Jehoiakim and he is there for 11 years. Jeremiah the prophet warns Jehoiakim, "Don't mess with the Babylonians and do whatever Nebuchadnezzar says." He rebels against Nebuchadnezzar and he is deposed by the Babylonians and Jehoiakim is replaced by a guy named Jehoiachin and he is there for three months and ten days. He is deposed and taken captive to Babylon. Zedekiah is placed on the throne and he starts a coup and eventually the Babylonians come in and kill his sons and put his eyes out and he is taken captive to Babylon and the chapter ends.
That's the end of the book. What is the difference between these kingdoms? Answer in short: The kings who rule them. The kingdom was only as good as the king. If you had a good king God would honor the reforms and the sincerity and the repentance and bring them prosperity. When a bad king would take them further away from the Lord the judgment came swifter. A kingdom is only as good as a king. Who is your king? Who is ruling in your life? Are you calling the shots? Are you at the wheel? Are you steering your life or have you given it over to the Lord letting Him control your life? A kingdom and a person is only as good as the king ruling his life.
I was on an airplane in Phoenix and they were boarding us and I heard this lady a couple of rows behind me say, "You mean this isn't the plane to Hawaii?" It's very untypical for someone to get mixed up these days, post 9/11 with the ticket but evidently she was on the wrong plane. As they announced that the temperature in Albuquerque and not Hawaii was 31 degrees, she said, "You mean this isn't the plane to Hawaii?" She had to get on the right plane. Imagine the shock if she was thinking she was going to land in Hawaii to land in 31 degrees weather instead.
Do you ever ask yourself as you live your life which direction you are going and is it the proper direction? It's a question everybody ought to ask because like these two kingdoms, sometimes they went away from the Lord and sometimes they went back to the Lord, briefly. God was always trying to reach in and lend a hand. He's doing that today. If you haven't given your life to Christ, it doesn't matter how many times you've been to church and it doesn't matter what you know or don't know. What matters is, "Who is your king?" Let's pray.
Heavenly Father we thank You for this study though we only highlighted what is fascinating reading with so many great and important spiritual lessons. We're so thankful that You have promised us a Savior, a Messiah, somebody who would come into the world and save us as the angel said to Joseph, "Save us from our sins." Thank You Lord that not only is He Savior but He is pleased to take up residence in our lives and reign as king. We pray Lord that he would not just do that in the short term but throughout our lives. That more and more we would be living under Your authority, in Your kingdom. And as we place You as our king, at the same time we can't wait for Your kingdom to fully come as we were taught to pray, Your kingdom come, Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Lord it's just great to step into the pages of Scripture and get a little slice of Your plan and then apply it to our lives and see how we intersect with Your plan. I pray Lord that we would live lives in submission to You as our King. In Jesus' Name. Amen.

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/1/2007
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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8/8/2007
completed
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
completed
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
completed
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
completed
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
completed
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
completed
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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12/5/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.
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1/9/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/23/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
completed
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
Skip Heitzig
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
completed
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Destination: Acts
Acts
Skip Heitzig
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
completed
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Destination: Romans
Romans
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
completed
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
Skip Heitzig
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
Skip Heitzig
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
completed
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
Skip Heitzig
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
Skip Heitzig
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
Skip Heitzig
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.

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There are 64 additional messages in this series.