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Service Archives > Bible from 30,000 Feet, The > Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk

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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
Skip Heitzig

Micah 1 (NKJV™)
1 The word of the LORD that came to Micah of Moresheth in the days of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, which he saw concerning Samaria and Jerusalem.
2 Hear, all you peoples! Listen, O earth, and all that is in it! Let the Lord GOD be a witness against you, The Lord from His holy temple.
3 For behold, the LORD is coming out of His place; He will come down And tread on the high places of the earth.
4 The mountains will melt under Him, And the valleys will split Like wax before the fire, Like waters poured down a steep place.
5 All this is for the transgression of Jacob And for the sins of the house of Israel. What is the transgression of Jacob? Is it not Samaria? And what are the high places of Judah? Are they not Jerusalem?
6 "Therefore I will make Samaria a heap of ruins in the field, Places for planting a vineyard; I will pour down her stones into the valley, And I will uncover her foundations.
7 All her carved images shall be beaten to pieces, And all her pay as a harlot shall be burned with the fire; All her idols I will lay desolate, For she gathered it from the pay of a harlot, And they shall return to the pay of a harlot."
8 Therefore I will wail and howl, I will go stripped and naked; I will make a wailing like the jackals And a mourning like the ostriches,
9 For her wounds are incurable. For it has come to Judah; It has come to the gate of My people--To Jerusalem.
10 Tell it not in Gath, Weep not at all; In Beth Aphrah Roll yourself in the dust.
11 Pass by in naked shame, you inhabitant of Shaphir; The inhabitant of Zaanan does not go out. Beth Ezel mourns; Its place to stand is taken away from you.
12 For the inhabitant of Maroth pined for good, But disaster came down from the LORD To the gate of Jerusalem.
13 O inhabitant of Lachish, Harness the chariot to the swift steeds (She was the beginning of sin to the daughter of Zion), For the transgressions of Israel were found in you.
14 Therefore you shall give presents to Moresheth Gath; The houses of Achzib shall be a lie to the kings of Israel.
15 I will yet bring an heir to you, O inhabitant of Mareshah; The glory of Israel shall come to Adullam.
16 Make yourself bald and cut off your hair, Because of your precious children; Enlarge your baldness like an eagle, For they shall go from you into captivity.
Micah 2 (NKJV™)
1 Woe to those who devise iniquity, And work out evil on their beds! At morning light they practice it, Because it is in the power of their hand.
2 They covet fields and take them by violence, Also houses, and seize them. So they oppress a man and his house, A man and his inheritance.
3 Therefore thus says the LORD: "Behold, against this family I am devising disaster, From which you cannot remove your necks; Nor shall you walk haughtily, For this is an evil time.
4 In that day one shall take up a proverb against you, And lament with a bitter lamentation, saying: 'We are utterly destroyed! He has changed the heritage of my people; How He has removed it from me! To a turncoat He has divided our fields.'"
5 Therefore you will have no one to determine boundaries by lot In the assembly of the LORD.
6 "Do not prattle," you say to those who prophesy. So they shall not prophesy to you; They shall not return insult for insult.
7 You who are named the house of Jacob: "Is the Spirit of the LORD restricted? Are these His doings? Do not My words do good To him who walks uprightly?
8 "Lately My people have risen up as an enemy--You pull off the robe with the garment From those who trust you, as they pass by, Like men returned from war.
9 The women of My people you cast out From their pleasant houses; From their children You have taken away My glory forever.
10 "Arise and depart, For this is not your rest; Because it is defiled, it shall destroy, Yes, with utter destruction.
11 If a man should walk in a false spirit And speak a lie, saying, 'I will prophesy to you of wine and drink,' Even he would be the prattler of this people.
12 "I will surely assemble all of you, O Jacob, I will surely gather the remnant of Israel; I will put them together like sheep of the fold, Like a flock in the midst of their pasture; They shall make a loud noise because of so many people.
13 The one who breaks open will come up before them; They will break out, Pass through the gate, And go out by it; Their king will pass before them, With the LORD at their head."
Micah 3 (NKJV™)
1 And I said: "Hear now, O heads of Jacob, And you rulers of the house of Israel: Is it not for you to know justice?
2 You who hate good and love evil; Who strip the skin from My people, And the flesh from their bones;
3 Who also eat the flesh of My people, Flay their skin from them, Break their bones, And chop them in pieces Like meat for the pot, Like flesh in the caldron."
4 Then they will cry to the LORD, But He will not hear them; He will even hide His face from them at that time, Because they have been evil in their deeds.
5 Thus says the LORD concerning the prophets Who make my people stray; Who chant "Peace" While they chew with their teeth, But who prepare war against him Who puts nothing into their mouths:
6 "Therefore you shall have night without vision, And you shall have darkness without divination; The sun shall go down on the prophets, And the day shall be dark for them.
7 So the seers shall be ashamed, And the diviners abashed; Indeed they shall all cover their lips; For there is no answer from God."
8 But truly I am full of power by the Spirit of the LORD, And of justice and might, To declare to Jacob his transgression And to Israel his sin.
9 Now hear this, You heads of the house of Jacob And rulers of the house of Israel, Who abhor justice And pervert all equity,
10 Who build up Zion with bloodshed And Jerusalem with iniquity:
11 Her heads judge for a bribe, Her priests teach for pay, And her prophets divine for money. Yet they lean on the LORD, and say, "Is not the LORD among us? No harm can come upon us."
12 Therefore because of you Zion shall be plowed like a field, Jerusalem shall become heaps of ruins, And the mountain of the temple Like the bare hills of the forest.
Micah 4 (NKJV™)
1 Now it shall come to pass in the latter days That the mountain of the LORD'S house Shall be established on the top of the mountains, And shall be exalted above the hills; And peoples shall flow to it.
2 Many nations shall come and say, "Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, To the house of the God of Jacob; He will teach us His ways, And we shall walk in His paths." For out of Zion the law shall go forth, And the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.
3 He shall judge between many peoples, And rebuke strong nations afar off; They shall beat their swords into plowshares, And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation shall not lift up sword against nation, Neither shall they learn war anymore.
4 But everyone shall sit under his vine and under his fig tree, And no one shall make them afraid; For the mouth of the LORD of hosts has spoken.
5 For all people walk each in the name of his god, But we will walk in the name of the LORD our God Forever and ever.
6 "In that day," says the LORD, "I will assemble the lame, I will gather the outcast And those whom I have afflicted;
7 I will make the lame a remnant, And the outcast a strong nation; So the LORD will reign over them in Mount Zion From now on, even forever.
8 And you, O tower of the flock, The stronghold of the daughter of Zion, To you shall it come, Even the former dominion shall come, The kingdom of the daughter of Jerusalem."
9 Now why do you cry aloud? Is there no king in your midst? Has your counselor perished? For pangs have seized you like a woman in labor.
10 Be in pain, and labor to bring forth, O daughter of Zion, Like a woman in birth pangs. For now you shall go forth from the city, You shall dwell in the field, And to Babylon you shall go. There you shall be delivered; There the LORD will redeem you From the hand of your enemies.
11 Now also many nations have gathered against you, Who say, "Let her be defiled, And let our eye look upon Zion."
12 But they do not know the thoughts of the LORD, Nor do they understand His counsel; For He will gather them like sheaves to the threshing floor.
13 "Arise and thresh, O daughter of Zion; For I will make your horn iron, And I will make your hooves bronze; You shall beat in pieces many peoples; I will consecrate their gain to the LORD, And their substance to the Lord of the whole earth."
Micah 5 (NKJV™)
1 Now gather yourself in troops, O daughter of troops; He has laid siege against us; They will strike the judge of Israel with a rod on the cheek.
2 "But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old, From everlasting."
3 Therefore He shall give them up, Until the time that she who is in labor has given birth; Then the remnant of His brethren Shall return to the children of Israel.
4 And He shall stand and feed His flock In the strength of the LORD, In the majesty of the name of the LORD His God; And they shall abide, For now He shall be great To the ends of the earth;
5 And this One shall be peace. When the Assyrian comes into our land, And when he treads in our palaces, Then we will raise against him Seven shepherds and eight princely men.
6 They shall waste with the sword the land of Assyria, And the land of Nimrod at its entrances; Thus He shall deliver us from the Assyrian, When he comes into our land And when he treads within our borders.
7 Then the remnant of Jacob Shall be in the midst of many peoples, Like dew from the LORD, Like showers on the grass, That tarry for no man Nor wait for the sons of men.
8 And the remnant of Jacob Shall be among the Gentiles, In the midst of many peoples, Like a lion among the beasts of the forest, Like a young lion among flocks of sheep, Who, if he passes through, Both treads down and tears in pieces, And none can deliver.
9 Your hand shall be lifted against your adversaries, And all your enemies shall be cut off.
10 "And it shall be in that day," says the LORD, "That I will cut off your horses from your midst And destroy your chariots.
11 I will cut off the cities of your land And throw down all your strongholds.
12 I will cut off sorceries from your hand, And you shall have no soothsayers.
13 Your carved images I will also cut off, And your sacred pillars from your midst; You shall no more worship the work of your hands;
14 I will pluck your wooden images from your midst; Thus I will destroy your cities.
15 And I will execute vengeance in anger and fury On the nations that have not heard."
Micah 6 (NKJV™)
1 Hear now what the LORD says: "Arise, plead your case before the mountains, And let the hills hear your voice.
2 Hear, O you mountains, the LORD'S complaint, And you strong foundations of the earth; For the LORD has a complaint against His people, And He will contend with Israel.
3 "O My people, what have I done to you? And how have I wearied you? Testify against Me.
4 For I brought you up from the land of Egypt, I redeemed you from the house of bondage; And I sent before you Moses, Aaron, and Miriam.
5 O My people, remember now What Balak king of Moab counseled, And what Balaam the son of Beor answered him, From Acacia Grove to Gilgal, That you may know the righteousness of the LORD."
6 With what shall I come before the LORD, And bow myself before the High God? Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, With calves a year old?
7 Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, Ten thousand rivers of oil? Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, The fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?
8 He has shown you, O man, what is good; And what does the LORD require of you But to do justly, To love mercy, And to walk humbly with your God?
9 The LORD'S voice cries to the city--Wisdom shall see Your name: "Hear the Rod! Who has appointed it?
10 Are there yet the treasures of wickedness In the house of the wicked, And the short measure that is an abomination?
11 Shall I count pure those with the wicked scales, And with the bag of deceitful weights?
12 For her rich men are full of violence, Her inhabitants have spoken lies, And their tongue is deceitful in their mouth.
13 "Therefore I will also make you sick by striking you, By making you desolate because of your sins.
14 You shall eat, but not be satisfied; Hunger shall be in your midst. You may carry some away, but shall not save them; And what you do rescue I will give over to the sword.
15 "You shall sow, but not reap; You shall tread the olives, but not anoint yourselves with oil; And make sweet wine, but not drink wine.
16 For the statutes of Omri are kept; All the works of Ahab's house are done; And you walk in their counsels, That I may make you a desolation, And your inhabitants a hissing. Therefore you shall bear the reproach of My people."
Micah 7 (NKJV™)
1 Woe is me! For I am like those who gather summer fruits, Like those who glean vintage grapes; There is no cluster to eat Of the first-ripe fruit which my soul desires.
2 The faithful man has perished from the earth, And there is no one upright among men. They all lie in wait for blood; Every man hunts his brother with a net.
3 That they may successfully do evil with both hands--The prince asks for gifts, The judge seeks a bribe, And the great man utters his evil desire; So they scheme together.
4 The best of them is like a brier; The most upright is sharper than a thorn hedge; The day of your watchman and your punishment comes; Now shall be their perplexity.
5 Do not trust in a friend; Do not put your confidence in a companion; Guard the doors of your mouth From her who lies in your bosom.
6 For son dishonors father, Daughter rises against her mother, Daughter-in-law against her mother-in-law; A man's enemies are the men of his own household.
7 Therefore I will look to the LORD; I will wait for the God of my salvation; My God will hear me.
8 Do not rejoice over me, my enemy; When I fall, I will arise; When I sit in darkness, The LORD will be a light to me.
9 I will bear the indignation of the LORD, Because I have sinned against Him, Until He pleads my case And executes justice for me. He will bring me forth to the light; I will see His righteousness.
10 Then she who is my enemy will see, And shame will cover her who said to me, "Where is the LORD your God?" My eyes will see her; Now she will be trampled down Like mud in the streets.
11 In the day when your walls are to be built, In that day the decree shall go far and wide.
12 In that day they shall come to you From Assyria and the fortified cities, From the fortress to the River, From sea to sea, And mountain to mountain.
13 Yet the land shall be desolate Because of those who dwell in it, And for the fruit of their deeds.
14 Shepherd Your people with Your staff, The flock of Your heritage, Who dwell solitarily in a woodland, In the midst of Carmel; Let them feed in Bashan and Gilead, As in days of old.
15 "As in the days when you came out of the land of Egypt, I will show them wonders."
16 The nations shall see and be ashamed of all their might; They shall put their hand over their mouth; Their ears shall be deaf.
17 They shall lick the dust like a serpent; They shall crawl from their holes like snakes of the earth. They shall be afraid of the LORD our God, And shall fear because of You.
18 Who is a God like You, Pardoning iniquity And passing over the transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He does not retain His anger forever, Because He delights in mercy.
19 He will again have compassion on us, And will subdue our iniquities. You will cast all our sins Into the depths of the sea.
20 You will give truth to Jacob And mercy to Abraham, Which You have sworn to our fathers From days of old.
Nahum 1 (NKJV™)
1 The burden against Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite.
2 God is jealous, and the LORD avenges; The LORD avenges and is furious. The LORD will take vengeance on His adversaries, And He reserves wrath for His enemies;
3 The LORD is slow to anger and great in power, And will not at all acquit the wicked. The LORD has His way In the whirlwind and in the storm, And the clouds are the dust of His feet.
4 He rebukes the sea and makes it dry, And dries up all the rivers. Bashan and Carmel wither, And the flower of Lebanon wilts.
5 The mountains quake before Him, The hills melt, And the earth heaves at His presence, Yes, the world and all who dwell in it.
6 Who can stand before His indignation? And who can endure the fierceness of His anger? His fury is poured out like fire, And the rocks are thrown down by Him.
7 The LORD is good, A stronghold in the day of trouble; And He knows those who trust in Him.
8 But with an overflowing flood He will make an utter end of its place, And darkness will pursue His enemies.
9 What do you conspire against the LORD? He will make an utter end of it. Affliction will not rise up a second time.
10 For while tangled like thorns, And while drunken like drunkards, They shall be devoured like stubble fully dried.
11 From you comes forth one Who plots evil against the LORD, A wicked counselor.
12 Thus says the LORD: "Though they are safe, and likewise many, Yet in this manner they will be cut down When he passes through. Though I have afflicted you, I will afflict you no more;
13 For now I will break off his yoke from you, And burst your bonds apart."
14 The LORD has given a command concerning you: "Your name shall be perpetuated no longer. Out of the house of your gods I will cut off the carved image and the molded image. I will dig your grave, For you are vile."
15 Behold, on the mountains The feet of him who brings good tidings, Who proclaims peace! O Judah, keep your appointed feasts, Perform your vows. For the wicked one shall no more pass through you; He is utterly cut off.
Nahum 2 (NKJV™)
1 He who scatters has come up before your face. Man the fort! Watch the road! Strengthen your flanks! Fortify your power mightily.
2 For the LORD will restore the excellence of Jacob Like the excellence of Israel, For the emptiers have emptied them out And ruined their vine branches.
3 The shields of his mighty men are made red, The valiant men are in scarlet. The chariots come with flaming torches In the day of his preparation, And the spears are brandished.
4 The chariots rage in the streets, They jostle one another in the broad roads; They seem like torches, They run like lightning.
5 He remembers his nobles; They stumble in their walk; They make haste to her walls, And the defense is prepared.
6 The gates of the rivers are opened, And the palace is dissolved.
7 It is decreed: She shall be led away captive, She shall be brought up; And her maidservants shall lead her as with the voice of doves, Beating their breasts.
8 Though Nineveh of old was like a pool of water, Now they flee away. "Halt! Halt!" they cry; But no one turns back.
9 Take spoil of silver! Take spoil of gold! There is no end of treasure, Or wealth of every desirable prize.
10 She is empty, desolate, and waste! The heart melts, and the knees shake; Much pain is in every side, And all their faces are drained of color.
11 Where is the dwelling of the lions, And the feeding place of the young lions, Where the lion walked, the lioness and lion's cub, And no one made them afraid?
12 The lion tore in pieces enough for his cubs, Killed for his lionesses, Filled his caves with prey, And his dens with flesh.
13 "Behold, I am against you," says the LORD of hosts, "I will burn your chariots in smoke, and the sword shall devour your young lions; I will cut off your prey from the earth, and the voice of your messengers shall be heard no more."
Nahum 3 (NKJV™)
1 Woe to the bloody city! It is all full of lies and robbery. Its victim never departs.
2 The noise of a whip And the noise of rattling wheels, Of galloping horses, Of clattering chariots!
3 Horsemen charge with bright sword and glittering spear. There is a multitude of slain, A great number of bodies, Countless corpses--They stumble over the corpses--
4 Because of the multitude of harlotries of the seductive harlot, The mistress of sorceries, Who sells nations through her harlotries, And families through her sorceries.
5 "Behold, I am against you," says the LORD of hosts; "I will lift your skirts over your face, I will show the nations your nakedness, And the kingdoms your shame.
6 I will cast abominable filth upon you, Make you vile, And make you a spectacle.
7 It shall come to pass that all who look upon you Will flee from you, and say, 'Nineveh is laid waste! Who will bemoan her?' Where shall I seek comforters for you?"
8 Are you better than No Amon That was situated by the River, That had the waters around her, Whose rampart was the sea, Whose wall was the sea?
9 Ethiopia and Egypt were her strength, And it was boundless; Put and Lubim were your helpers.
10 Yet she was carried away, She went into captivity; Her young children also were dashed to pieces At the head of every street; They cast lots for her honorable men, And all her great men were bound in chains.
11 You also will be drunk; You will be hidden; You also will seek refuge from the enemy.
12 All your strongholds are fig trees with ripened figs: If they are shaken, They fall into the mouth of the eater.
13 Surely, your people in your midst are women! The gates of your land are wide open for your enemies; Fire shall devour the bars of your gates.
14 Draw your water for the siege! Fortify your strongholds! Go into the clay and tread the mortar! Make strong the brick kiln!
15 There the fire will devour you, The sword will cut you off; It will eat you up like a locust. Make yourself many--like the locust! Make yourself many--like the swarming locusts!
16 You have multiplied your merchants more than the stars of heaven. The locust plunders and flies away.
17 Your commanders are like swarming locusts, And your generals like great grasshoppers, Which camp in the hedges on a cold day; When the sun rises they flee away, And the place where they are is not known.
18 Your shepherds slumber, O king of Assyria; Your nobles rest in the dust. Your people are scattered on the mountains, And no one gathers them.
19 Your injury has no healing, Your wound is severe. All who hear news of you Will clap their hands over you, For upon whom has not your wickedness passed continually?
Habakkuk 1 (NKJV™)
1 The burden which the prophet Habakkuk saw.
2 O LORD, how long shall I cry, And You will not hear? Even cry out to You, "Violence!" And You will not save.
3 Why do You show me iniquity, And cause me to see trouble? For plundering and violence are before me; There is strife, and contention arises.
4 Therefore the law is powerless, And justice never goes forth. For the wicked surround the righteous; Therefore perverse judgment proceeds.
5 "Look among the nations and watch--Be utterly astounded! For I will work a work in your days Which you would not believe, though it were told you.
6 For indeed I am raising up the Chaldeans, A bitter and hasty nation Which marches through the breadth of the earth, To possess dwelling places that are not theirs.
7 They are terrible and dreadful; Their judgment and their dignity proceed from themselves.
8 Their horses also are swifter than leopards, And more fierce than evening wolves. Their chargers charge ahead; Their cavalry comes from afar; They fly as the eagle that hastens to eat.
9 "They all come for violence; Their faces are set like the east wind. They gather captives like sand.
10 They scoff at kings, And princes are scorned by them. They deride every stronghold, For they heap up earthen mounds and seize it.
11 Then his mind changes, and he transgresses; He commits offense, Ascribing this power to his god."
12 Are You not from everlasting, O LORD my God, my Holy One? We shall not die. O LORD, You have appointed them for judgment; O Rock, You have marked them for correction.
13 You are of purer eyes than to behold evil, And cannot look on wickedness. Why do You look on those who deal treacherously, And hold Your tongue when the wicked devours A person more rightous than he?
14 Why do You make men like fish of the sea, Like creeping things that have no ruler over them?
15 They take up all of them with a hook, They catch them in their net, And gather them in their dragnet. Therefore they rejoice and are glad.
16 Therefore they sacrifice to their net, And burn incense to their dragnet; Because by them their share is sumptuous And their food plentiful.
17 Shall they therefore empty their net, And continue to slay nations without pity?
Habakkuk 2 (NKJV™)
1 I will stand my watch And set myself on the rampart, And watch to see what He will say to me, And what I will answer when I am corrected.
2 Then the LORD answered me and said: "Write the vision And make it plain on tablets, That he may run who reads it.
3 For the vision is yet for an appointed time; But at the end it will speak, and it will not lie. Though it tarries, wait for it; Because it will surely come, It will not tarry.
4 "Behold the proud, His soul is not upright in him; But the just shall live by his faith.
5 "Indeed, because he transgresses by wine, He is a proud man, And he does not stay at home. Because he enlarges his desire as hell, And he is like death, and cannot be satisfied, He gathers to himself all nations And heaps up for himself all peoples.
6 "Will not all these take up a proverb against him, And a taunting riddle against him, and say, 'Woe to him who increases What is not his--how long? And to him who loads himself with many pledges'?
7 Will not your creditors rise up suddenly? Will they not awaken who oppress you? And you will become their booty.
8 Because you have plundered many nations, All the remnant of the people shall plunder you, Because of men's blood And the violence of the land and the city, And of all who dwell in it.
9 "Woe to him who covets evil gain for his house, That he may set his nest on high, That he may be delivered from the power of disaster!
10 You give shameful counsel to your house, Cutting off many peoples, And sin against your soul.
11 For the stone will cry out from the wall, And the beam from the timbers will answer it.
12 "Woe to him who builds a town with bloodshed, Who establishes a city by iniquity!
13 Behold, is it not of the LORD of hosts That the peoples labor to feed the fire, And nations weary themselves in vain?
14 For the earth will be filled With the knowledge of the glory of the LORD, As the waters cover the sea.
15 "Woe to him who gives drink to his neighbor, Pressing him to your bottle, Even to make him drunk, That you may look on his nakedness!
16 You are filled with shame instead of glory. You also--drink! And be exposed as uncircumcised! The cup of the LORD'S right hand will be turned against you, And utter shame will be on your glory.
17 For the violence done to Lebanon will cover you, And the plunder of beasts which made them afraid, Because of men's blood And the violence of the land and the city, And of all who dwell in it.
18 "What profit is the image, that its maker should carve it, The molded image, a teacher of lies, That the maker of its mold should trust in it, To make mute idols?
19 Woe to him who says to wood, 'Awake!' To silent stone, 'Arise! It shall teach!' Behold, it is overlaid with gold and silver, Yet in it there is no breath at all.
20 But the LORD is in His holy temple. Let all the earth keep silence before Him."
Habakkuk 3 (NKJV™)
1 A prayer of Habakkuk the prophet, on Shigionoth.
2 O LORD, I have heard your speech and was afraid; O LORD, revive Your work in the midst of the years! In the midst of the years make it known; In wrath remember mercy.
3 God came from Teman, The Holy One from Mount Paran. Selah His glory covered the heavens, And the earth was full of His praise.
4 His brightness was like the light; He had rays flashing from His hand, And there His power was hidden.
5 Before Him went pestilence, And fever followed at His feet.
6 He stood and measured the earth; He looked and startled the nations. And the everlasting mountains were scattered, The perpetual hills bowed. His ways are everlasting.
7 I saw the tents of Cushan in affliction; The curtains of the land of Midian trembled.
8 O LORD, were You displeased with the rivers, Was Your anger against the rivers, Was Your wrath against the sea, That You rode on Your horses, Your chariots of salvation?
9 Your bow was made quite ready; Oaths were sworn over Your arrows. Selah You divided the earth with rivers.
10 The mountains saw You and trembled; The overflowing of the water passed by. The deep uttered its voice, And lifted its hands on high.
11 The sun and moon stood still in their habitation; At the light of Your arrows they went, At the shining of Your glittering spear.
12 You marched through the land in indignation; You trampled the nations in anger.
13 You went forth for the salvation of Your people, For salvation with Your Anointed. You struck the head from the house of the wicked, By laying bare from foundation to neck. Selah
14 You thrust through with his own arrows The head of his villages. They came out like a whirlwind to scatter me; Their rejoicing was like feasting on the poor in secret.
15 You walked through the sea with Your horses, Through the heap of great waters.
16 When I heard, my body trembled; My lips quivered at the voice; Rottenness entered my bones; And I trembled in myself, That I might rest in the day of trouble. When he comes up to the people, He will invade them with his troops.
17 Though the fig tree may not blossom, Nor fruit be on the vines; Though the labor of the olive may fail, And the fields yield no food; Though the flock may be cut off from the fold, And there be no herd in the stalls--
18 Yet I will rejoice in the LORD, I will joy in the God of my salvation.
19 The LORD God is my strength; He will make my feet like deer's feet, And He will make me walk on my high hills. To the Chief Musician. With my stringed instruments.

New King James Version®, Copyright © 1982, Thomas Nelson, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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Detailed Notes

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DESTINATION: Micah

Micah was written by the Prophet Micah to the leaders of Samaria and Jerusalem during the reigns of three kings of Judah: Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. Micah the prophet is remembered as the prophet of authentic worship/service to God and social justice.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 760 – 715 B.C. Ministries of Amos and Hosea in Israel

c. 750 – 735 B.C. Reign of Jotham, King of Judah

c. 735 – 715 B.C. Reign of Ahaz, King of Judah

c. 715 – 686 B.C. Reign of Hezekiah, King of Judah

c. 740 – 681 B.C. Isaiah's ministry in Judah

c. 740 – 710 B.C. Ministry of Micah to Jerusalem & Samaria

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength


TRIP PLANNER:

Micah spoke out against the oppression of the people by both spiritual (prophets and religious leaders) and secular leaders. Selfish coveting is for Micah the source of all sorts of evil. He describes Injustice primarily in three activities: in coveting what belongs to others, in perverting justice, and in hypocritical religiosity. Micah can be divided into three sections:

Section 1 – Chapters 1-3. After pronouncing doom on the capital cities of Samaria and Jerusalem, and the peril of continuing to ignore living faithfully in response to God while still claiming to be God's people, he exposes their sins and ultimate destruction.

Section 2 – Chapters 4-5. Micah predicts the future restoration after the destruction, including the expectation of a new Davidic king who would usher in a period of peace and security.

Section 3 – Chapters 6-7. Micah ends with predictions of hope to and redemption through the promised Messiah, in the form of a prayer and confession of sin from the people.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Morashtite or Moresheth – A small town near Gath about 25 miles southwest of the royal capital in the beautiful hill country of Judah, commanding a broad view across the coastal plain to the
Mediterranean. Judean kings maintained five fortress cities within a
radius of less than six miles round about Moresheth.

Samaria – Capital city of the Northern Kingdom of Israel.

Jerusalem – Capital city of the Kingdom of Judah.

Mountain of the Lord (3:12) – Also referred to as Mount Zion; the place where the Lord will establish His kingdom on earth. (See also Zechariah 8:3.)

Bethlehem Ephrathah (5:2) – The predicted place of Jesus' birth, the city is located in the "hill country" of Judah, and was originally called Ephrath (Gen. 35:16, 19; 48:7; Ruth 4:11). It was also called Bethlehem Ephratah (Micah 5:2), Beth-lehem-judah (1 Sam. 17:12), and "the city of David" (Luke 2:4). It is first noticed in Scripture as the place where Rachel died and was buried "by the wayside," directly to the north of the city (Gen. 48:7). The valley to the east was the scene of the story of Ruth the Moabitess. There are the fields in which she gleaned, and the path by which she and Naomi returned to the town.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Micah – The prophet's name, in its long form "Micaiahu," is commonly translated "Who is like the Lord?" And his pursuit of the ministry in response to this question continued the prophetic tradition of calling the people of God into a closer walk with Him. Little is known of Micah, the prophet, other than he was from the
town of Morashtite and he prophesied during the reigns of 3 kings of Judah: Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah. What holds true for all the prophets holds true for Micah: His life has disappeared behind the word which he was sent to proclaim.

Deliverers - God reminds Israel in Chapter 6 of His deliverance through Moses, Aaron, and Miriam, and reminds them of His
righteousness through the counsel of Balak and Balaam.


FUN FACTS:

Micah uses a play on words to describe the Assyrian triumph through
the nation in Chapter 1:

Beth Aphrah – Literally "House of Dust" ... "roll yourself in the dust"

Shaphir – Literally "pleasantness" ... "Pass by in naked shame"

Zaanan – Literally "going out" ... "the inhabitant...does not go out"

Beth Ezel - Literally house of removal ... "Its place to stand is taken away from you"

Maroth – Literally "bitterness" ... Becomes weak waiting for good

Lachish – Literally "the beginning of sin"; the rebellion of Jacob

Moresheth Gath – Literally "possession of Gath; inheritance"

Achzib – Literally "lie" ... "shall be a lie to the kings of Israel"

Mareshah – Literally "inheritance" ... "I will yet bring an heir to you, O inhabitant of Mareshah"


Familiar Passages in Micah

  • 4:1-5 They shall beat their swords into plowshares, And their spears into pruning hooks; Nation shall not lift up sword against nation,
    Neither shall they learn war anymore. (3)


  • 5:2-4 But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah, Though you are little among the thousands of Judah, Yet out of you shall come forth to Me
    The One to be Ruler in Israel, Whose goings forth are from of old,
    From everlasting." (2)


  • 6:1-8 He has shown you, O man, what is good;
    And what does the LORD require of you
    But to do justly,
    To love mercy,
    And to walk humbly with your God? (8)


  • 4:5 For all people walk each in the name of his god,
    But we will walk in the name of the LORD our God
    Forever and ever. (cf Zech 10:12; Josh 24:15)



DESTINATION: Nahum

Nahum means "Prophet of Comfort." He is the seventh of the twelve
Minor Prophets. His prophecy, received by a vision, was of God's
wrath and judgment against the Assyrians for rejecting the previous
generation's example of repentance as a result of Jonah's message,
and returning to their evil practices. The result was punishment and
ultimate destruction for their treatment of Israel.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

c. 790-770 B.C. Jonah's ministry to Nineveh

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c.742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

c. 640 -621 B.C. Zephaniah's ministry in Judah

c. 663-609 B.C. Life & ministry of Nahum in Israel to Ninevah

c. 626-585 B.C. Jeremiah's ministry in Judah

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:

Nahum was a poet and wrote lyrically. Nahum's original poem is recorded in Chapters 2 and 3. It is a book about judgment, as can be seen in each of the three chapters:
  • Nahum 1: Judgment Is Announced: God is Righteous
  • Nahum 2: Judgment Is Executed: Nineveh is Destroyed
  • Nahum 3: Judgment's Reason: Nineveh's Guilt

Nahum's writing testifies to his belief in the righteousness of God. The
Assyrians had been used as God's "rod of mine anger, and the staff in
their hand is mine indignation" (Isaiah 10:5).


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Nahum – Little is known about this minor prophet other than he was an Elkoshite. Most historians agree that likely he came from Elkesei beyond Jordan toward Begabor and was of the tribe of Simeon. He was a poet who possessed a remarkable style of writing and who described in unforgettable language the fall of Nineveh, the capital of the Assyrian empire, in 612 B.C. His contemporaries were Zephaniah, Jeremiah, and Habakkuk. He was likely influenced by the prophecies of Isaiah (compare 1:15 and Isaiah 52:7).

Assyrians – People from a region on the Upper Tigris River, named for its original capital, the ancient city of Assur in modern-day Iraq. The Assyrian kings controlled a large kingdom at three different times in history. The most powerful and best-known nation of these periods is the Neo-Assyrian kingdom, 911-612 B.C. The Assyrians were one of the first groups to convert to Christianity, along with the Armenians and Ethiopians. They went on and played a big role in spreading Nestorian Christianity to the Far East. In the beginning of the 20th century, the Ottoman empire was collapsing, and during World War I, the Assyrians, like the Armenians, claim a genocide was committed against its people during the period of 1914-1922. After the
creation of Iraq, the Assyrians refused to sign loyalty to the Iraqi monarchy, and demanded to be recognized as a nation within a nation. Eventually, this led to the Iraqi government committing its first of many massacres against its people.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Nineveh - Nineveh was the capital of the Assyrian empire. Its founder was Nimrod, who lived shortly after the flood (Gen. 10:8-12). Nineveh reached great importance around 900 B.C. Shalmaneser III of Assyria defeated King Ahab of Israel in the battle of Carcar around the year 843 B.C. Jonah was sent to Nineveh around 800 B.C. to turn them from their cruel ways. In 722 B.C. the whole northern kingdom of Israel was brought into Assyrian captivity under Shalmaneser and Sargon (2 Kings 17). Finally, the great city was conquered and totally destroyed in 612 B.C. by the Medes under Cyaxares (king of Media; modern-day Iran) and the Babylonians under Nabopolassar (father of Nebuchadnezzar II).


FUN FACTS:

There was rivalry between Assyria and Babylon from the very
beginning. Babylon is the picture of worldly might in a religious
garment. Assyria pictures the haughty, cruel and high-handed world,
which knows nothing but her own importance. They became allies
in 614 B.C. after the Medes destroyed the city of Assur. The alliance
was sealed by the marriage of Nebuchadnezzar to the daughter of
Cyaxares.

A few of Nahum's prophecies:

Nahum 1:8-9, 3:19
Nineveh's destruction would be permanent - In 612 B.C. (about
2600 years ago), a coalition of Babylonians, Scythians and Medes
conquered the heavily fortified city. It ceased to be an important city
from that point on.

Nahum 1:10
Ninevites would be drunk in their final hours – Fulfilled 612 B.C.
According to the ancient historian Diodorus Siculus, "The Assyrian
king gave much wine to his soldiers. Deserters told this to the enemy,
who attacked that night."

Nahum 1:14
Ninevites would be wiped out - Nineveh's destruction in 612 B.C.
marked a permanent end to the Assyrian Empire. The city itself
never again rose to any significant importance. Today, Nineveh is an
archaeological site in Iraq.

Nahum 2:6
Nineveh would be hit with a flood - According to the Greek historian
Diodorus Siculus, who lived in the First Century B.C., heavy rains had
caused the Tigris River to overflow and flood part of Nineveh. The
flooding destroyed some of Nineveh's protective walls. That might
have helped the attacking forces conquer Nineveh.

Nahum 3:12
Nineveh's fortresses would be easily captured - Ancient Babylonian
records say the fortified towns around Nineveh began to fall in 614
B.C., about two years before the total defeat of the Assyrian empire.

Nahum 3:15
Nineveh would be destroyed by fire - Archaeologists unearthed the site
during the 1800s and found a layer of ash covering the ruins.

Nahum 3:17
Nineveh's army officers would desert - Babylonian records claim that
Assyrian army members did flee from the battle.


DESTINATION: Habakkuk

Habakkuk is the eighth of the twelve minor prophets and the last of
the five prophets who are known to have prophesied in the Southern
Kingdom of Judah before the exile. It was written during a time
when Judah was in blatant rebellion against God and the strength of
Babylon was rising around them. Three of the five prophets, Isaiah,
Zephaniah, and Jeremiah, focused the majority of their message and
ministry on Judah and Jerusalem. The fourth prophet, Micah, focused
more on the common people "living in the western foothills of Judah."
Habakkuk was the only one of the five who didn't prophesy directly
against Judah, but encouraged people to "live by faith in the dark days
ahead."


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 875 – 600 B.C. Assyrian Empire at its strength

722 B.C. Fall of the Northern Kingdom

710 B.C. Sennacharib's invasion of Judah

c.742-681 B.C. Ministries of Micah and Isaiah in Judah

c. 612 – 598 Time of Habakkuk's life and ministry in Judah

605 B.C. First exile of Jews to Babylon

586 B.C. Fall of Jerusalem


TRIP PLANNER:

The book of Habakkuk was written to assure God's people that evil does not endure forever. It is the only minor prophet who did not address the people directly. It is written more as a journal of Habakkuk's questions of God and God's answers. The book can be divided into four sections:
  1. The Burden (Chapter 1)
  2. The Watch (Chapter 2:1)

  3. The Vision (Chapter 2:2-20)
  4. The Prayer (Chapter 3)
PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Habakkuk – No personal information is known about Habakkuk. His name means "embrace" – in the comforting sense. Scholars have placed him possibly as a temple prophet or a guardian to the Temple of Solomon. His contemporaries were Nahum and Zephaniah. He was likely one of the first group to be taken into exile in 605 B.C.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Judah
– One of the 12 tribes of Israel, and one of two tribes that comprised the Southern Kingdom of Israel. Its capital was Jerusalem.

Babylon – Also known as Chaldea. The nation of Babylon was at its peak of power during Habakkuk's writing. He watched as they invaded and conquered all the surrounding regions and eventually captured and destroyed Jerusalem and the kingdom of Judah.


FUN FACTS:

Watch and Wait - The pivotal verse in Habakkuk is Chapter 2:1: "I will stand at my watch and station myself on the ramparts. I will look to see what he will say to me and what answer I am to give to this complaint."

Lessons from Habakkuk -
  1. God can handle all of our questions but He may answer only a few.
  2. The bottom line of faith is not to silence all of our doubts so that we never struggle again, but to make us sure of God and confident of His care.
  3. Waiting strengthens our patience and lengthens our perspective.*Chuck Swindoll, Insight for Living

Verse to claim in times of difficulty -
Though the fig tree do not blossom,
nor fruit be on the vines,
yet I will rejoice in the Lord,
I will joy in the God of my salvation.
God, the Lord, is my strength (Hab. 3:17-19a RSV)

Transcript

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Behind me is the Temple Mount. This is the scene from many of the stories in the Old Testament, from Abraham to Zechariah. Before we begin our next flight of "The Bible From 30 Thousand Feet" let's get this background.

We have a full agenda for this journey, there's three Old Testament books ahead. We'll see Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk; these prophets speak to the nation of Assyria

I've got to tell you something, you are hardcore devoted to Bible study. I mean, just think about it, it's Wednesday night, it's summer time, there's a lot of things you could be doing and you're here at church, studying the Bible. Not only that, if you would have told your friends I'm going to go to a Bible study tonight on the books of Micah, Nahum and Habakkuk, they would think you are a kook. It sounds like you are on drugs or something.

But I love it, I love your appetite for Bible study, and I believe the Lord is going to reward that. He's a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him.

Now these three books that we have before us tonight, and I've chosen to go through all three, it's only 13 chapters total. So it's not that many, we can do this. And this is an overview; this is "The Bible From 30,000 Feet." So we're going to get an overall view, sweep in for a few verses, give summaries of chapters and move on.

But I've chosen to put these books together because all three of these prophets are God's representative to the same nation, and that is the nation of Judah. Remember the southern kingdom; the kingdom of Israel has been split in two; the northern ten tribes and the southern two tribes under the name of Judah. And so these three prophets speak to Judah. Micah speaks to the common people of Judah, the farmers out on the fields, the people who live in villages, the commoners.

Nahum speaks to the collective of Judah, all of the people; kings, rulers, as well as commoners.

Habakkuk is a book for a clergyman in Judah, Habakkuk himself. This prophet wrestles with some issues and it's really a little dialog between this prophet, this clergyman, and his God.

So all three books are a message or three messages to Judah; in fact, if I were to give this message tonight a title, I would call it, "Hey Judah!" I know, that's just how my mind thinks, but God is speaking through these prophets to that one nation.

In the first book Micah, I would say the theme is, God is moving; God is moving. That is, it's a reassurance that God will be equitable to all believers. Yup, judgment is coming, that's assured. However, after that the future is going to be glorious. God is moving and His plan includes some temporarily chastisement, but a whole lot of future blessing and glory. So God is moving; that's the theme of the book of Micah.

The book of Nahum, the theme, the Ninevites are going, the Ninevites are going, and this book provides comfort to worried believers, comfort to worried believers. Worried about the trials that assail them, the enemies that attack them, it's a reassurance that God will handle your enemies.

Then Habakkuk is a book that speaks that the Babylonians are coming, So the Ninevites are going but in Habakkuk the Babylonians are coming. And this is a warning to smug believers; arrogant, prideful, detached, aloof, it's a warning to them that God is very, very active, and God has an answer, but it's not going to be a pleasant one.

Now, in the book of Micah, if you have ever wondered this question, when you are going through a trial. How many of you have ever gone through a trial in your life, raise your hands? You better all raise your hands. If you ever wonder in a trial, is there life beyond my trial, is this ever going to get any better, am I ever going to see the reason for this, then this book is for you. Because this speaks of God's plan temporarily but also ultimately, as God deals with the nation of Judah.

Now, I mention that Micah was to the common folks, right? These people were oppressed. They were oppressed by enemy armies coming in and messing with them. They were oppressed by rulers. They were exploited by the wealthy class. So they really had it rough, and this prophet speaks to them about a few different issues.

Verse 1 of Micah, chapter 1; "The word of the Lord that came to Micah of Moresheth; [we know what that is, its 20 miles west of Jerusalem], in the days of Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah; [those three kings], kings of Judah, which he saw concerning; [notice] Samaria, [that's up north now], and Jerusalem, [that's down south]."

"Hear, all you peoples! Listen, O earth, and all that is in it! Let the Lord God be a witness against you." And you notice this is written in courtroom language, as if a case is being brought before God, the judge, and He is bringing the case Himself as the witness. "The Lord from His holy temple."

"For behold, the Lord is coming out of His place; He will come down and tread on the high places of the earth."

"The mountains will melt under Him, the valleys will split like wax before fire, like waters poured down a steep place."

Do you guys remember that song, in your presence Lord, the mountains melt like wax; it's one of the, the phrases and the song we used to sing around here? This is where that comes from. It's a picture of God swooping down via the Assyrians on Samaria, and later on the Babylonians on Jerusalem, and exacting His judgment.

"All this, verse 5, all this is for the transgression of Jacob and for the sins of the house of Israel. What is the transgression of Jacob? Is it not Samaria? And what are the high places of Judah? Are they not Jerusalem?"

The prophet comes, primarily his message is for Judah, he's saying, hey Judah, I've got a message of judgment but a future blessing for you. Now, in addressing Judah he mentions Samaria as well as Jerusalem; Samaria is the capital of the northern kingdom, Jerusalem is the capital of the southern kingdom. Why does he mention them both, because they are partners in crime? Because both of them are involved in some of the issues I mentioned, including adultery, including oppression. And so companions in sin are destined to be companions in judgment.

These two cities are named primarily because as capital cities they exert tremendous influence on the villages of that area. These were the centers of influence, this is where all the people lived, this is where all the trend started. It's not very different than today. The centers of influence in the United States, people talk about New York City, that's where the fashion starts, or Los Angeles, California, that's where the trend starts.

As Peter Drucker who did marketing, years ago he used to say, if you want to test a product do it in Denver or Albuquerque or Iowa, because he said, if it fails, nobody will know. That's why places like Albuquerque, and Denver and Iowa are test markets. But Los Angeles, New York, some of these places are epicenters of influence, and because they are centers of influence back then, Samaria and Jerusalem, they are named. They are named because the nation is corrupt, because in large part these centers of influence have corrupted them.

You might say then, the nation up north and down south is rotten from the core; not to the core, from the core, it starts in the core and goes outward.

Not too long ago I bit into an apple. As I took a bite and swallowed it, I noticed I was looking at a wormhole. You know what the problem was, no worm. You guessed it. I had swallowed the worm. Now, I didn't see it, it wasn't there wasn't a hole on the outside of the apple. And then I did a little research, because I was fascinated, how did I eat a worm and not see it. I discovered that a worm will lay its egg on the apple blossom, it will hatch in the core of the apple, and the worm will dig from the inside to the outside, that's why I didn't see it, that's why I swallowed and ate the worm.

That's how corruption works. It starts on the inside, it's an inside job, and then it permeates outwardly; so with these two nations; Israel up north and Judah down south.

Chapter 2, verse 2; "They covet fields, they take them by violence, also houses, and seize them. And so they oppress a man and his house, a man and his inheritance." This is the upper class seizing land from lower class. Therefore thus says the LORD: "Behold, against this family I am devising disaster, from which you cannot remove your necks; Nor shall you walk haughtily, for this is an evil time."

Now, you know God was really great in the Old Testament, to protect the Israelite landowner. If an Israelite landowner, because he became poor lost his land and had to sell it or become a slave, there was this great stipulation called the Jubilee Year. And then when the Jubilee Year came, all the land that you had to get rid of reverted automatically back to you. So God was protecting the land of the poor.

However, some of the rich people would disregard the land; seize the land from the lower class. We even read about this back in the book of Kings, when one of the kings of Israel named Ahab, married to a creep named Jezebel; actually they were made for each other, two peas in a pod, two creeps in a pod. Ahab was an idol worshiper, his wife Jezebel was an idol worshiper, but there was a guy in their land named Naboth. Naboth had a cool vineyard, it was so green, it was so beautiful, it was so fruitful, and the King Ahab, he wanted it so badly. And he tried to buy it off the guy, and the guy said, I'm sorry; I'm not going to sell it.

He goes home, he pouts like a little baby, I wanted that vineyard. His wife says, you are the king, take it. That's exactly what he does, he takes it by force, and part of the judgment that fell upon King Ahab was because of this very sin that is named in this book.

Go down to verse 11, "If a man should walk in a false spirit and speak a lie, saying, I will prophesy to you of wine and drink, even he would be the prattler of this people."

Here's the skinny on this verse. God is saying, this people, these folks would rather listen to false prophets under the influence of alcohol than true prophets like Micah, under the influence of the Holy Spirit. The only preaching they'll tolerate is some false prophet saying, thus sayeth the Lord dude, let's party, let's have a kegger and they thought, I like this preacher. Those are good messages he's giving. That's the gist of this verse.

By the way, there's nothing new under the sun. I hear today talk among some Christians who love to talk about their liberty in Christ. I have liberty, I can do whatever I want and nobody can judge me; whether it's being loose morally, sleeping around with someone, or drinking publicly. And you know if you say, you know brother that stumbles me. Don't talk to me about stumbling, I have -- it's all about freedom.

And so if you preach a message on, you're free to do whatever you want. They go, I like this guy. But if you talk about, sin is sin, corruption is corruption, thus sayeth the Lord, like in these days, it's not often tolerated.

Go down now to chapter 3 and look at verse 5, "Thus says the Lord concerning the prophets; [He just made reference to them, He zeroes in on them now]; Who make my people stray; Who chant Peace while they chew with their teeth, But who prepare war against him Who puts nothing into their mouths:"

"Therefore you shall have night without vision, you shall have darkness without divination; The sun will go down on the prophets, the day will be dark for them."

"So the seers; [that's what they were called in ancient times, the prophets], shall be ashamed and the diviners abased; Indeed they shall cover, all cover their lips; for there is no answer from God."

There are always, in every generation, are too huge dangers among God's people. Now, there are more than two, but two that come to mind in light of these verses. Number one, wolves from the outside, number two, false shepherds from the inside. Even Paul warned the church at Ephesus, I know he said, after my departure, savage wolves will come in, not sparing the flock. They'll arise from among your own group and they will rip you to shreds. They won't care about you, they won't want to nourish you, they don't have your interest in mind.

Verse 12, "Therefore because of you Zion shall be plowed like a field, Jerusalem shall become a heap of ruins, and the mountains of the temple like the bare hills of the forest."

Did you know that this verse that I just read, Verse 12, saved Jeremiah's life? We've already gone through Jeremiah, but in the book of Jeremiah, this verse is quoted. And one of the people in a courtroom setting, almost ready to put Jeremiah's life out, to kill him, quotes this verse, and says, you know, wait a minute, we shouldn't really touch this guy, because in the days of Micah from Moresheth, he said; and this verse is quoted, Zion is going to be wiped out, and nobody killed him, nobody destroyed him, nobody hassled him, they just didn't listen to him. Let's just not listen to Jeremiah. So it's interesting that this verse was quoted in Jeremiah by one of his enemies and had spared his life.

But, but notice the truth of the verse; It says, "because of you, Zion shall be plowed like a field and Jerusalem will become a heap of ruins." You know, Israel at one time truly was one nation under God. They weren't divided, there were 12 tribes with the central love for God, not two nations split from each other, with two different areas of worship; one nation under God.

But as time went on, they turned from the very God they claimed to worship and be under. Does that ring a bell? It does. I always see certain parallels at certain point of Jewish history with the United States of America. We call ourselves one nation under God. Our coins say, in God we trust. Really? Do we as a nation by and large trust God? Are we truly one nation under God? I know we used to be, and I know a lot of people who love to rewrite American history want to leave quotes out like one I am about to give to you.

The early part of our nation, in 1643, the Constitution of the New England Confederation stated this; listen to this quote, "Whereas we all came into these parts of America with one and the same end and aim." You want to hear what their end and aim was back then? Here's their goal, here's their end and aim, and that is, "Namely, to advance the Kingdom of Our Lord Jesus Christ and to enjoy the liberties of the Gospel in purity and peace."

I dare any politician to say that today, and see how far he or she will get with that as an agenda. At one time that was the national agenda.

So because of you Zion is going to be plowed like a field. Judgment is coming. God is moving. Remember that's the theme of this book.

If this book were to end right here, it will be a sad and bleak ending, but it doesn't end here. What God is going to say is that, my plan for you doesn't end with your trial, your affliction, your judgment. I've got a whole lot of blessing and glory coming up.

Verse 1 of chapter 4, "It will come to pass in the latter days; [21 times you will find that verse or that phrase in the Bible, latter days, its a technical phrase], that the mountains of the Lord's House; [that's Mount Zion], will be established on the top of the mountains and exalted above all the hills and people shall flow into it."

"Many nations will come and say, Come and let us go to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; He will teach us his ways and we will walk in His paths, for our of Zion the law shall go forth and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem."

"He shall judge between many peoples and rebuke strong nations afar off; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nations shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore."

You go what; I've, I've heard that before, in fact, it sounds like Micah copied Isaiah. It's almost word for word, Isaiah, chapter 2. If you're familiar with that, it's almost word for word. So the question comes, every commentary you read, who copied who? Because by the way, they were contemporaries. Did you know that at this very time that this guy is speaking to the common people of Judah, Isaiah is speaking to the court in Jerusalem, so they're, they're interfacing with each other, they knew each other.

Now, I don't know if Isaiah saw what Micah wrote and said, that's cool, I bear witness to that, I'm going to write that in my book. Or if, if Micah thought, you know, Isaiah has got something there, I, I would like to put that portion in my book.

Or here's a better explanation. How about this, the Holy Spirit of God superintended the writing of both books, and the Holy Spirit of God thought that this is so important to truth, He wanted to mention that, not once but twice, because you might forget it reading the book of Isaiah by chapter 66 and onto Jeremiah and Ezekiel, Daniel, you've forgotten that. You come again to this truth, it's like, oh yeah, God has this great eternal plan of glory that will cover the whole world, but it will center at Jerusalem. God is moving. God is the plan that will include this little, this this little town, I would say, little town, but it's a big town now of Jerusalem.

Now, notice in verse 1, at the end it says, "The peoples will flow into it." I just want you to notice this word. Isaiah used it and so did Micah. The word flow speaks of a spontaneous movement, with a, a heart's desire to do something. You're not compelled to do it, you want to do it. There will come a time when people all over the world will want to go Israel.

Now today a few people want to go to Israel, crazy Christians, that's about it. I remember the first time I told my mom, mom, I'm going to go live in Israel. She goes, oh no, please no, you don't want to do that. There's a war over there. Every time I've taken groups; I've gone now 31 times, without fail, somebody will go, I don't know if you want to go this time, because this time it's really bad. There's terrorism over there. Well, there's always that, and it's been going on since then. But there is coming a day when the world, nations of the world will spontaneously desire to go up to Jerusalem, because the Messiah will rule and reign from there for a thousand years and the world will be at peace. This is primarily what it's speaking about.

Now, go over to chapter 5, because God's future plan includes a little town not far from Jerusalem, called Bethlehem.

Chapter 5, verse 2, "But you, Bethlehem Ephrathah; [or it's it's there were two of them, two Bethlehems and this one, Ephrathah, is the one by Jerusalem and Judah], though you are little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of you will come forth to me the one who is to be the ruler in Israel, whose going forth are from of old, from everlasting."

Okay, we know what this means. We know that this is a prediction. It speaks of the deliverer, the future deliverer of Israel to be born in Bethlehem. The house of bread, that's what Beit Lechem means, the bread basket of Israel. The bread of life will be born in the house of bread. There's a deliverance that is coming. The ultimate deliverance will come from the one who will be born in Bethlehem.

Now, this prophecy came, get this, 700 years before the events of the gospels took place, 700 years. So how did God do it? How did God pull it off? How did God pull off having his Son, the Messiah, Jesus Christ born in Bethlehem? Easy. He played chess. That's right. He, He looked at the world, which is to Him like a giant chess set; He's in charge, He can move any player wherever He wants to, and there was this little nothing of a guy named Caesar Augustus; he thought he was something, he was just a pawn on God's chessboard. God says, I'm going to put something in his heart that all of the world that he operates over is going to be taxed, a census is going to take place.

So Caesar Augustus thinks he's making this earth shattering census, this order, which causes the populations of the Middle East, in mass, to move. It means that Joseph and Mary up in Nazareth now have to pack up everything and go all the way down to Bethlehem, because they are from the lineage of King David and they have to register in that town. I know she's pregnant, but we have got to do it, it's the law.

So they get on a little donkey. Joseph probably walking by their side, her side and walks from Nazareth down to Bethlehem, pregnant as all, get out. If that donkey slips, or if there's complications in the pregnancy, Jesus Christ will not be born in Bethlehem, but He was. It was all arranged and even written about 700 years earlier.

Notice the description of this one who will be born in Bethlehem of Judah, "Whose going forth are from of old, from everlasting."

Okay. So there's going to be somebody born in a town in Bethlehem, but His goings forth are from everlasting. You get what that means? It means He preexisted before He was born; He lived before he was born. His goings forth are from old, from everlasting. Same truth Isaiah said, "Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given, and His name will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace, the government will be upon his shoulder." It speaks of the incarnation. He always existed, but then He was born in time and it was in this village.

By the way, just so that there is no mistaking it, the ancient rabbis, way before Jesus was every born, understood Micah, chapter 5, verse 2, to be Messianic. They write about it in their commentaries. This they said must speak of the deliverer, the Messiah who is to come. They understood Micah 5:2 as being Messianic. And, and to fortify that, by the time we get to the New Testament, there is no question in the Jewish minds where the Messiah is going to be born, right?

Remember when the wise guys or the wise men came from the east into Jerusalem, and Herod's all flipped out because these wise guys are in Jerusalem, and, and they say, well, we've come to worship the king of the Jews, we've followed a star from the east. And so he gets all flipped out and he goes to his Jewish scholars, the scribes and says, tell me, where's this Messiah going to be born? Immediately they quote Micah chapter 5, verse 2, in Bethlehem, of Judah.

Here's the most amazing part. They understood, these scholars, these scribes, they understood the Jewish expectation. They knew the prophecies of Micah. They believed the Messiah would be born in Bethlehem. Now you have these Persian kings following a wonder and a sign saying, we're here to worship the king of the Jews. You would think, wouldn't you, that they would just have enough motivation to get off their spiritual duff and walk five miles from Jerusalem to Bethlehem just to see if this really was it or not. No record of that, no record of that.

The wise men go, the shepherds will, go but not these Jewish scholars. You can be so book smart and life dumb by not putting into practice what you are supposed to know. And these scholars were a case in point. Here's the prediction, they knew it, they quote it, they knew the expectation, they never experienced it.

Look at verse 4, verse 4 and 5 speak clearly about the second coming.

"He shall stand and feed His flock in the strength of the Lord, in the majesty of the name of the Lord His God; and they shall abide, for now He shall be great to the ends of the earth; and this One shall be peace."

Now, I, I quoted the first part of verse 5. This is where sometimes verses in the Bible aren't organized right. The verses and chapters were not in the original documents, they were added hundreds of years later, and actually, 'this One shall be peace' should be the end of verse 4, and verse 5 should begin; because it's a whole separate thought, "When the Assyrians comes into our land, when he treads in our palaces, then we will raise up against him seven shepherds and eight princely men."

Here here's the thought of these two verses. The character of the deliverer who is to be born in Bethlehem will be that of a shepherd. He'll be wanting to feed His people. He'll be wanting to nourish His people. He'll be a good shepherd. In contrast to the Assyrians, who will be like evil shepherds, evil rulers, oppressive dictators. Not this one. This one will be peace. This Messiah will bring peace.

Actually, one of the most beautiful descriptions of Jesus Christ is when He said, "I am the good shepherd."

But between the first coming of the shepherd and the second coming; verse 4 and 5, is a cross, where the shepherd dies. In Jesus' own words, the Good Shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. The shepherd dies and then will come again; and we're still waiting for that to happen, to rule and reign over the earth.

Now chapter 6, again picture a courtroom here; Micah, the lawyer, brings the case. Now, chapter 6, the defendants, Judah, they have some questions, they respond by suggesting four different outward modes of worship.

Now watch this. They ask first, "With what shall I come before the Lord, and bow myself before the Great God."

To bow before the Lord is the sign of humility, right? That's what it's intended to be when you bow before a king, you're showing humility and you're showing the loftiness of the king. And so it was common in worship to bow down.

What are they suggesting? They're saying, Lord, what is it you want; do you want intensity in my worship? You want me to bow down, right?

Did you know though that sometimes intensity in worship, even bowing down, could be done out of pride and not humility. You know it's possible to be thinking this, I'm going to bow down right now in this worship service, and as I do it, I know that people are going to be watching me, and they're going to be thinking, man, he's humble. Look how humble he is, he's bowing before the Lord. If that thought enters your mind, and if you haven't dealt with it right and your motivation is so that people will see you and think that you're humble, guess what? You ain't humble, you're prideful. You're doing it so that people will think you are humble and notice it.

So they're thinking of outward worship. You want intensity of worship, you want me to bow down, is that it? Notice what the rest of the verse says.

"Shall I come before Him with burnt offerings, with calves a year old?"

Or I would say, Lord, what is it that You want? You want quality of worship, right? You want the very best, right? Did you know in Leviticus, chapter 5, every Passover, God said you have to bring a yearling, a year old lamb, without spot, without blemish, the highest quality? And so let's ask ourselves, is that what God demands from us, the highest quality of worship, the best sounding praise? I believe that's important. I believe our worship ought to be the highest quality, the best sounding.

But if it sounds good and it's high quality, but the condition of our heart isn't right, it's a clanging symbol, right? It's an empty sound. Empty trucks make the loudest noises.

He goes on, verse 7, "Will the Lord be pleased with thousands of rams, ten thousands of rivers of oil?"

Wow, can you imagine? Now they're asking, what is it You really want God, quantity in worship? Do You want intensity? Do You want quality? Is it that You want quantity? Should I be praying more and sacrificing more and doing more, is that what You want?

He goes on, "Shall I give my firstborn for my transgression, the fruit of my body for the sin of my soul?" Human sacrifice; God forbade human sacrifice among His people; it was a pagan practice but it showed severity, austerity.

So Lord, is that what You really want? You want, You want me to be austere in my worship, You want me to even sacrifice, like the pagans do, their children, You want me to do that?

Now, God is going to answer all their questions. I don't want intensity. It's not that I'm after quality, it's not that I really want quantity, I'm certainly not after austerity, I want reality, I want real authentic worship. Look at the next verse, "He has shown you, O man, what is good; and what does the Lord require of you But to do justly, love mercy, and walk humbly with your God?"

These three elements deal with reality now, the reality of daily life. It sums up the whole law, doesn't it? Loving God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength, loving your neighbor as yourself. You could sum all of that up in these three little words. Do justly, love mercy, walk humbly with your God.

Micah prays in chapter 7; I'd like you to go to chapter 7, verse 14. Micah the prophet has a personal petition, he says,

"Shepherd Your people with Your staff, the flock of Your heritage, who dwell solitarily in a woodland, in the midst of Carmel; let them feed in Bashan and Gilead, as in the days of old."

"Who is a God like You, pardoning iniquity [I'm down in verse 18, I skipped] Who is a God like You, pardoning iniquity and passing over transgression of the remnant of His heritage? He does not retain His anger forever, because He delights in mercy."

You see that question in verse 18, its a play on words. My son mentioned at the beginning of this service tonight that the word the name Micah means "who is like Yahweh", "who is like God." And so here's a Hebrew play on words of the name Micah, Miykayah is the Hebrew, Miykayah. Who is liken to God? So who is a God like you?

Verse 19, "He will again have compassion on us, He will subdue our iniquities." I love this "You will cast all our sins in the depths of the sea."

I love what Corrie ten Boom used to say. She said, when God buries our sins in the deepest sea, He then posts a sign that says, no fishing allowed; that's the mercy of God.

So you don't ever have to go before God and say, God, I know I confessed that sin last year, but remember, remember how bad that was? God's saying, why bring it up again, I've chosen to push that away and not have that in my memory. It's in the deepest sea, its gone, no fishing allowed, don't go fishing there, don't allow anybody else to do it.

Verse 20, "You will give truth to Jacob and mercy to Abraham, which You have sworn to our fathers from the days of old."

Now, here's something in passing and then we will get quickly to the next book. The last three verses of Micah are put together every Yom Kippur with the book of Jonah and read in the synagogues. Moreover, once a year on the afternoon of Jewish New Year's an orthodox Jewish person will go down to a stream of running water; they call it living water, and empty his pockets; I would empty my pockets but my keys will fall out, I'd empty the pockets, symbolically emptying his life of sin, and he will recite these verses, verses 18 through 20. This is in Jewish called the Tashlich, the Tashlich, which is the Hebrew, you will cast, from verse 19, where it says, "You will cast our sins into the depths of the sea." I like that, You will cast, empty your pockets.

Here here's the message, here's the idea. God has a big eraser, let Him use it, enjoy it, live in His mercy and His grace.

So back to the question, is there life beyond your trials? Oh yeah. But the trials are to give you a fuller life, you see. Remember what Peter said, he said, in this we rejoice, even though for a season, if need be, you are grieved through various trials. How many have ever been through not a trial but a season of trials; it's like, okay, one after another, why isn't God good? Oh, this is the goodness of God. This is a severe mercy. You're going to rejoice again. It's just a season, if need be. So Micah, God is moving.

Now, the next book, Nahum, the Ninevites are going. And the theme of this is, comfort to worried believers. Now, the book of Nahum is completely devoted to the destruction of Nineveh. You go, why would who would love this book, Jonah. Jonah would love if this was his prophecy; he'd of dug it.

It wasn't though. It came a 150 years later. Now, here's the deal. The Ninevites did what 150 years before Nahum? They repented. The whole city turned; 150 years later they went back and they got worse. So whereas Jonah was all about God's mercy to Nineveh, this one is all about God's destruction because they have gone back and they have gotten worse.

"The burden [verse 1] against Nineveh." "The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite."

Where is that? Where is Elkosh? Anybody know? I don't know. Okay. Know I have a thought though. There are three different places people pick up. Elkosh, some have thought is about 25 miles north of Nineveh. I don't think so, he's Jewish, he's not going to live there.

Number two, they say it's probably a town in Judah. But there's no nothing on record.

The other thought is, there's a place in ancient times around the Sea of Galilee, called Elkosh, that some identify as the New Testament, Capernaum. Now, to me that makes sense, because Capernaum is Hebrew for Kafar Nahum, which means the Village of Nahum; so Capernaum, Kafar Nahum, could be the village, Elkosh, where this guy grew up; just a little trivia, Bible trivia for you.

Verse 2 "God is jealous." Now here is the character of God described.

"God is jealous, and the Lord avenges; the Lord avenges and is furious. The Lord will take vengeance on His adversaries, He reserves wrath for His enemies; the Lord is slow to anger."

Boy, what a switch that is, God is jealous, He's going, and then, but He is slow to anger. Now, I know some of us just sort of laughed at that, because of the way I, I dealt with that segue, however, it's true. He's been patient a 150 years, that's slow to anger, that's slow to anger.

"And great in power, He will not at all at acquit the wicked. The Lord has His way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of His feet."

"He rebukes the sea and makes it dry, and dries up all the rivers. Bashan and Carmel wither, and the flower of Lebanon wilts."

So if God can make Israel and Judah wilt in judgment, He can certainly make Nineveh, the Assyrian empire.

It says God is jealous. You know, there's a lot people, they think God is passive, weak, detached. Well, how come God didn't do anything? We'll get to that in the very next book, by the way. Here it says, God is active, eight times in the Bible, God is called jealous.

You go, that's not a very good word to describe God. Don't think of it in terms of human sinful jealousy, think of it in terms of, God wants no rivals. I am the Lord your God, you will have no other Gods before me or besides me. I'm it. I'm the only one, and I don't want any ideals. I don't want any substitutes. I'm God.

And that truth speaks of the next truth, mentioned here that God is jealous. He's also slow to anger. Slow to anger. Peter said, He's long suffering, long suffering. You should always say that word, looooong suffering. He goes on to say, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to everlasting life or repentance.

Verse 7,"The Lord is good, a stronghold in the day of trouble; He knows those who trust in Him."

Martin Luther found this verse to be of great comfort during the Reformation Period, he said, it's overflowing with consolation.

Verse 8, "But with an overflowing flood He will make an utter end of its place, and darkness He will pursue His enemies."

Now, this would be a comfort to the Jewish people in Judah. Because the, the Ninevites hounded them, hassled them, dogged them for years, threatened them. So to hear that the Babylonians and the Medes have sacked Nineveh and the Assyrian empire will be like hallelujah to them. You know, ding dong, the witch is dead, which old witch, the wicked witch, the wicked witch of Nineveh, gone.

Chapter 2 verse 3, "The shields of his mighty men are made red, the valiant men are scarlet, are in scarlet. The chariots come with flaming torches in the day of His preparation, and the spears are brandished."

It's well known in history that the Babylonians and the Medes loved the color red. Now, nothing on the people wearing the red shirts tonight, it has nothing at all to do with them, but in ancient times wearing red was meant to intimidate people.

I'm looking at people wearing red tonight, I know, you're not intimidating, you're so lovely. But they wore red, and they took their shields, made out of this bull hide leather and they painted them red to intimidate the enemy, and here's the real reason, so if any of their blood got on their shields, the enemy wouldn't see it, it would blend in. They wouldn't know if they are hurt or not.

"Take the spoil of silver, take the spoil of gold, there is no end of treasure, or wealth of every desirable prize."

Verse 10, "She is empty, desolate, and waste! The heart melts, and the knees shake; much pain is in every side, all their faces are drained of color."

Now, you see back in verse 10, notice these three words; she is empty, in Hebrew Bukah. Desolate, in Hebrew Mehbukah. And waste, Mehbulakah. Okay, so listen to it, this is how it sounds, Bukah, Mehbukah, Mehbulakah. It sounds weird, doesn't it? It's intended phonetically to sound like breaking pottery. And that kind of syncopation in phonetics can sometimes do that. So don't we read it in English, but in the Hebrew it's powerful. They're going be shaking and breaking, is the idea.

Verse 1 chapter 3, "Woe to the bloody city! [That's Nineveh]. It is all full of lies and robbery. Its victim never departs."

"The noise of a whip and the noise of rattling wheels, of galloping horses, chattering chariots, horsemen charged with bright sword and glittering spear. There's a multitude of slain, a great number of bodies, countless corpses, they stumble over the corpses."

Do you remember what God said to Jonah?

"Go to the city of Nineveh [this is Jonah chapter 1] and cry out against it; for its [anybody?] wickedness has come up before Me."

Now, this prophet says it's a bloody city. See, they were known for their brutality. Ashurbanipal, King Ashurbanipal II, Tiglath-Pileser II and III, these Assyrian kings did things like impaling people on long poles. Sticking a pole through their body, up into their head while they were alive, and then hoisting them off the ground; that's the precursor by the way of crucifixion, that's where it was started. Or taking skulls, decapitating and building pyramids of skulls, hands, nailed to the walls of the palaces, brutal, grotesque treatment of bodies, they were known for it. So you understand this gross description, "Woe to the bloody city!"

Verse 12, "All your strongholds; all your strongholds [notice this], are fig trees with ripened figs: if they are shaken, they fall to the mouth of the eater."

See the description of the walls falling down. Your walls that you trust in are so weak, they're going to fall down like ripe fig trees emptying itself of the figs, falling easily.

Verse 13, "Surely, your people in your midst are women!"

I really don't want to comment much on this. This is a different era then when this was written, but clearly this is a verse meant to be sarcastic. He's speaking to these great armies and warriors of the Ninevites and God's saying, you are a bunch of women. I don't have to comment on that, I'm just telling you like it says. The idea would be you scare more easily than you think you mighty warriors. "The gates of your land are wide open for your enemies; fire shall devour the bars of your gates."

Now, the book of Habakkuk, we're going to make it, trust me. Habakkuk is a puzzled prophet. He's puzzled. He's facing an issue we all face; ready, here it is, have you ever thought this. How can a loving God who is suppose to be all powerful allow evil to exist?

Wait a minute, if evil exists, it must mean, if there's a God, that He's not all loving, or it must mean that He's all loving but He's not all powerful, because He might be all loving and want to fix it but He can't fix it because He's not all powerful. Or maybe He's all powerful but He won't fix it because He's not all loving. That's the dilemma he's in. It's called theodicy; how do we deal with evil in the world with the thought of a good and all powerful God.

And what's worse is, why do good people suffer? Wouldn't it be a lot easier if only bad people got diseases and only bad people got in car accidents and got killed, and, and only murderers and child molesters got cancer and, and Parkinson's disease? It would be a lot easier; it would be some sense of celestial justice. Why do good people as well get these same kind of things?

Habakkuk 1, "The burden [or oracle of judgment] the burden which the prophet Habakkuk saw."
"O Lord, how long shall I cry, and You will not hear? Even cry out to You, "Violence!" and You will not save."

You know what he's bugged about, his own country. He's so mad. God, I can't believe it, this country of ours, Judah, is such an evil country, You don't seem to do anything about it. Now hold that thought.

"Why do You show me iniquity, and cause me to see trouble? For plundering and violence are before me; and there's strife, and contention arises."

"Therefore the law is powerless, justice never goes forth. For the wicked surround the righteous; therefore perverse judgment proceeds."

It was the time of national deterioration and degradation. There were godly people suffering, wicked people prospering, and he prayed about this, and waited a long time. And what bugged him is not only that, but God was silent for a long time. Now verse 5 God answers him.

"Look among the nations and watch -- Be utterly astounded! For I will work a work in your days which you would not believe, though it were told you."

"For indeed I am raisin up the Chaldeans, a bitter and hasty nation, which marches through the breadth of the earth, to possess dwelling places that are not theirs."

God, you never do anything to, to manage the evil in our nation, I can't believe it. God said, well, actually, I am going to do something, I'm going to spank you so hard, and I'm going to use; get this, I'm going to use the Babylonians to do it.

This is not what he expected to hear. What he expected God to hear was perhaps; send I'm going to send you a revival like in the days of Josiah, the good godly 16-year-old king who brought restoration to the temple sacrifices, that's probably what he expected, but not this. Verse 12, look at this, the prophet speaks to God.

"Are You not from everlasting, O Lord my God, my Holy One? We shall not die. O Lord, You've appointed them for judgment; [remember the Chaldeans, the Babylonians, the bad guys], O Rock, you have marked them for correction."

"You are of purer eyes than to behold evil, and cannot look on wickedness. Why do You look on those who deal treacherously, and hold Your tongue when wicked the wicked devours a person more righteous than he?"

Look, I know we're bad, and I just complained that we were bad, okay, but they're really bad, they're like so bad, and You're going to use them.

Okay, I'll give you an equivalent. It's not going to be comfortable, but I'll give you an equivalent. Here we are complaining about our nation. We used to be one nation under God. We used to worship and love the Lord. Now we are away from the Lord, right? We talked about deserving judgment and all that. So what if God said, okay, you're right, I'm going to use the radical Islamic nations to punish you Americans.

We're not comfortable with that thought, just like Habakkuk was not comfortable with God using up using Iraqis, Chaldeans to punish the Jews at that time. That's the equivalent of it. It would be very unnerving to hear that.

Chapter 2 verse 1, "I will stand my watch, I will set myself on my rampart, and watch to see what He will say to me, and what I will answer when I am corrected."

This is good policy. When you don't know what to do, shut up, and wait on the Lord. This is very good policy. When we don't understand what's happening, stop and think, think it through, think of all the options.

Number two, remind yourself of what you know to be true. Verse 12 he does that. I know You are righteous God, I know You are good, I know all those things, there are certain things that are unshakable, that I know about you to be true. Do that whenever you face a similar crisis.

And number three; commit your problem to the Lord. I'm just going to wait and see what God is going to tell me now.

See that there comes a point with Habakkuk where your reason can only take you so far, then you have to say, I commit it now to the Lord, I don't understand this. So I'll do my best and commit the rest.

Verse 2, "Then the Lord answered me and said: "Write the vision and make it plain on the tablets, that he may run who reads it."

In other words, take notes. Write legibly, write large, make it large print. So I want everybody to read this, even the old people, who they don't have their reading glasses four thousand years ago, I want everybody to read this is, this is going to be a large print.

"For the vision is yet for an appointed time; but at the end it will speak, it will not lie. Though it tarries, wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not tarry."

"Behold the proud, His soul is not upright in him; but the just shall live by His faith."

And let me sum this up. God is giving his answer. Number one, God will judge evil eventually. And here in this chapter, verses 5 through 19, God says, Babylon, the one I'm going to use to spank you, I'm going to judge them. I'm going to go after them, because they want to kill you and destroy you. So I'm going to deal with evil. I'm going to deal with that bad group of people over there, eventually I will deal with evil.

Number two, the future will be glorious. Verse 14, "The earth will be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea."

And number three, in the meantime the just shall live by faith. Verse 4, deliverance will come, it won't come immediately, but it will come; now you just wait for it.

Now, needless to say, verse 4 is one of the most important strategic verses in the Bible. Paul the Apostle quotes it three times in the New Testament.

Martin Luther, this is what he looked at. He was a monk in Erfurt, Germany, working his way to heaven, working out his salvation till he came upon this verse. He found it in the book of Romans, crossed referenced it with the book of Habakkuk, and it weighed heavy on his soul. I don't have to work; I trust; I live by faith.

Chapter 3 verse 2, "O Lord, I have heard Your speech and was afraid; O Lord, revive Your work in the midst of years! In the midst of the years make it known; but in wrath remember mercy."

Verse 16, "When I heard, my body trembled; my lips quivered at the voice; rottenness entered my bones; and I trembled in myself, that I might rest in the day of trouble. When He comes to the people, He will invade them with His troops."

Verse 17, "Though the fig tree may not blossom, nor fruit be in the vines; though the labor of the olive may fail, and the fields yield no food; though the flock may be cut off from the fold, and there is no herd in the stalls - Yet I will rejoice in the Lord, I will joy in the God of my salvation."

You see what he is doing. He's looking ahead to what God predicted. He sees the Babylonians invading the land, ruining their crops, taking their flocks away, trampling on the vineyards and on the olive groves. He sees the Babylonian destruction. That's what he sees.

He says, you know what, I'm going to rejoice, means, I'm going to jump for joy, not in what's coming, but in the Lord who has a plan for the Babylonians who are coming; for us and for them.

I don't get this Lord, I don't understand this, but whatever You're doing, revive Your work in the midst of years, do what it takes. Keep Your word going and revive us along the way. And even though I don't get it, and I see the destruction, I, I rejoice in You. I trust in You.

Brothers and sisters in Christ, next time you face a trial, I guarantee it won't be as bad as what we are reading about. Your and my typical response is to say, how can I get out of this? Who do I call? I have got to get out of this. Stop and ask. What can I get out of this? Because actually it could be that you are not supposed to get out of this. If you get out of this, you won't learn what you are supposed to get out of this.

So instead of how can I get out? What can I get out? And it will lead you to this conclusion, rejoice in the Lord. Suffering in the hands of a loving God can be used for ultimate good.

Before you go, I've heard that before, I don't like it. Know that that's the same philosophy as how God operates. That's what the cross is all about. The most vicious horrible thing ever done in history was to put God on a cross. It happened to be though the very best thing that could happen for the world because now our sins can be washed away and now we can be right with God because of that finished work on our behalf. All we have to do is believe in Him, trust in Him, and have everlasting life. Same message, Old and New Testament. The just shall live by faith.

Let's pray. Heavenly Father, we thank You for this time of going very rapidly through three men who spoke to Judah, to different groups in Judah, with different themes to Judah, but above it all was a God who loves us, and who redeems. And I pray for anybody tonight who has come, who doesn't know You personally, who's experiencing hardship, but they're not walking with You, they can't make sense of anything but could it be that in their anguish You brought them here and in their struggle You brought them here. And could it be that You brought them here because You want to bless them in this time of trouble and bless them with the ultimate gift, which is everlasting life, and then they can start to see how their life fits together.

Lord, I pray for those who are here tonight, who don't walk with Jesus; either who don't know Him at all or have fallen away from Him, that they be restored to You tonight.

And as we are praying right now and you want to give your life to Christ, have your sins forgiven and have purpose, real quickly, I want you to raise your hand up in the air. I want to see your hand. I want to pray for you as we close this service.

You're saying, I'm releasing my life, I'm letting go tonight. I'm not going to hold on any longer. I'm giving my life to Christ, or I'm coming back to Jesus Christ tonight.

You raise your hand up, raise it up so I can see it. God bless you sir and you ma'am, yes, and a couple of you behind them, toward the back. Amen!

Anybody else? Do business with God tonight. Make it right with Him. Give your life to Him tonight. Anybody else, anyone else?

Heavenly Father, we thank You for those who have done this, and, and we pray Father, their lives would forever be changed. In Jesus' name, Amen! I want you to stay seated, will those people you mind, you don't even have to come forward. If you, if you raised your hand, will you just stand to your feet right now? I'm not doing this to embarrass you; but I'm going to ask you to say a prayer, with me. Those of you who, yes, several of you have stood up around the room; now right where you're standing, right where you're at, that's right; thank you Lord for bringing you tonight; thank you Lord for bringing you tonight. I see about seven or eight of you, I want you to just pray where you are. Just close your eyes and say Lord I give you my life I know I'm a sinner. Please forgive me, I trust in Jesus who died on the cross and rose from the dead; I turn from my sin; I turn to you; I want you as my Savior; as my Lord; in Jesus' name, Amen.

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
completed
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
completed
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
completed
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/1/2007
completed
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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8/8/2007
completed
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
completed
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
completed
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
completed
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
completed
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
completed
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
completed
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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12/5/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.
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1/9/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/16/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
completed
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
completed
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Destination: Acts
Acts
Skip Heitzig
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
completed
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Destination: Romans
Romans
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
completed
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
completed
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
completed
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
completed
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
Skip Heitzig
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.
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There are 64 additional messages in this series.