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Service Archives > Bible from 30,000 Feet, The > Destination: Romans

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Destination: Romans
Romans
Skip Heitzig

Romans 1 (NKJV™)
1 Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called to be an apostle, separated to the gospel of God
2 which He promised before through His prophets in the Holy Scriptures,
3 concerning His Son Jesus Christ our Lord, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh,
4 and declared to be the Son of God with power according to the Spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead.
5 Through Him we have received grace and apostleship for obedience to the faith among all nations for His name,
6 among whom you also are the called of Jesus Christ;
7 To all who are in Rome, beloved of God, called to be saints: Grace to you and peace from God our Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.
8 First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for you all, that your faith is spoken of throughout the whole world.
9 For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of His Son, that without ceasing I make mention of you always in my prayers,
10 making request if, by some means, now at last I may find a way in the will of God to come to you.
11 For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift, so that you may be established--
12 that is, that I may be encouraged together with you by the mutual faith both of you and me.
13 Now I do not want you to be unaware, brethren, that I often planned to come to you (but was hindered until now), that I might have some fruit among you also, just as among the other Gentiles.
14 I am a debtor both to Greeks and to barbarians, both to wise and to unwise.
15 So, as much as is in me, I am ready to preach the gospel to you who are in Rome also.
16 For I am not ashamed of the gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God to salvation for everyone who believes, for the Jew first and also for the Greek.
17 For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith; as it is written, "The just shall live by faith."
18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppress the truth in unrighteousness,
19 because what may be known of God is manifest in them, for God has shown it to them.
20 For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse,
21 because, although they knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were thankful, but became futile in their thoughts, and their foolish hearts were darkened.
22 Professing to be wise, they became fools,
23 and changed the glory of the incorruptible God into an image made like corruptible man--and birds and four-footed animals and creeping things.
24 Therefore God also gave them up to uncleanness, in the lusts of their hearts, to dishonor their bodies among themselves,
25 who exchanged the truth of God for the lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.
26 For this reason God gave them up to vile passions. For even their women exchanged the natural use for what is against nature.
27 Likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust for one another, men with men committing what is shameful, and receiving in themselves the penalty of their error which was due.
28 And even as they did not like to retain God in their knowledge, God gave them over to a debased mind, to do those things which are not fitting;
29 being filled with all unrighteousness, sexual immorality, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, evil-mindedness; they are whisperers,
30 backbiters, haters of God, violent, proud, boasters, inventors of evil things, disobedient to parents,
31 undiscerning, untrustworthy, unloving, unforgiving, unmerciful;
32 who, knowing the righteous judgment of God, that those who practice such things are deserving of death, not only do the same but also approve of those who practice them.
Romans 2 (NKJV™)
1 Therefore you are inexcusable, O man, whoever you are who judge, for in whatever you judge another you condemn yourself; for you who judge practice the same things.
2 But we know that the judgment of God is according to truth against those who practice such things.
3 And do you think this, O man, you who judge those practicing such things, and doing the same, that you will escape the judgment of God?
4 Or do you despise the riches of His goodness, forbearance, and longsuffering, not knowing that the goodness of God leads you to repentance?
5 But in accordance with your hardness and your impenitent heart you are treasuring up for yourself wrath in the day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judgment of God,
6 who "will render to each one according to his deeds":
7 eternal life to those who by patient continuance in doing good seek for glory, honor, and immortality;
8 but to those who are self-seeking and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness--indignation and wrath,
9 tribulation and anguish, on every soul of man who does evil, of the Jew first and also of the Greek;
10 but glory, honor, and peace to everyone who works what is good, to the Jew first and also to the Greek.
11 For there is no partiality with God.
12 For as many as have sinned without law will also perish without law, and as many as have sinned in the law will be judged by the law
13 (for not the hearers of the law are just in the sight of God, but the doers of the law will be justified;
14 for when Gentiles, who do not have the law, by nature do the things in the law, these, although not having the law, are a law to themselves,
15 who show the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and between themselves their thoughts accusing or else excusing them)
16 in the day when God will judge the secrets of men by Jesus Christ, according to my gospel.
17 Indeed you are called a Jew, and rest on the law, and make your boast in God,
18 and know His will, and approve the things that are excellent, being instructed out of the law,
19 and are confident that you yourself are a guide to the blind, a light to those who are in darkness,
20 an instructor of the foolish, a teacher of babes, having the form of knowledge and truth in the law.
21 You, therefore, who teach another, do you not teach yourself? You who preach that a man should not steal, do you steal?
22 You who say, "Do not commit adultery," do you commit adultery? You who abhor idols, do you rob temples?
23 You who make your boast in the law, do you dishonor God through breaking the law?
24 For "the name of God is blasphemed among the Gentiles because of you," as it is written.
25 For circumcision is indeed profitable if you keep the law; but if you are a breaker of the law, your circumcision has become uncircumcision.
26 Therefore, if an uncircumcised man keeps the righteous requirements of the law, will not his uncircumcision be counted as circumcision?
27 And will not the physically uncircumcised, if he fulfills the law, judge you who, even with your written code and circumcision, are a transgressor of the law?
28 For he is not a Jew who is one outwardly, nor is circumcision that which is outward in the flesh;
29 but he is a Jew who is one inwardly; and circumcision is that of the heart, in the Spirit, not in the letter; whose praise is not from men but from God.
Romans 3 (NKJV™)
1 What advantage then has the Jew, or what is the profit of circumcision?
2 Much in every way! Chiefly because to them were committed the oracles of God.
3 For what if some did not believe? Will their unbelief make the faithfulness of God without effect?
4 Certainly not! Indeed, let God be true but every man a liar. As it is written: "That You may be justified in Your words, And may overcome when You are judged."
5 But if our unrighteousness demonstrates the righteousness of God, what shall we say? Is God unjust who inflicts wrath? (I speak as a man.)
6 Certainly not! For then how will God judge the world?
7 For if the truth of God has increased through my lie to His glory, why am I also still judged as a sinner?
8 And why not say, "Let us do evil that good may come"?--as we are slanderously reported and as some affirm that we say. Their condemnation is just.
9 What then? Are we better than they? Not at all. For we have previously charged both Jews and Greeks that they are all under sin.
10 As it is written: "There is none righteous, no, not one;
11 There is none who understands; There is none who seeks after God.
12 They have all turned aside; They have together become unprofitable; There is none who does good, no, not one."
13 "Their throat is an open tomb; With their tongues they have practiced deceit"; "The poison of asps is under their lips";
14 "Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness."
15 "Their feet are swift to shed blood;
16 Destruction and misery are in their ways;
17 And the way of peace they have not known."
18 "There is no fear of God before their eyes."
19 Now we know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.
20 Therefore by the deeds of the law no flesh will be justified in His sight, for by the law is the knowledge of sin.
21 But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed, being witnessed by the Law and the Prophets,
22 even the righteousness of God, through faith in Jesus Christ, to all and on all who believe. For there is no difference;
23 for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,
24 being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus,
25 whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood, through faith, to demonstrate His righteousness, because in His forbearance God had passed over the sins that were previously committed,
26 to demonstrate at the present time His righteousness, that He might be just and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus.
27 Where is boasting then? It is excluded. By what law? Of works? No, but by the law of faith.
28 Therefore we conclude that a man is justified by faith apart from the deeds of the law.
29 Or is He the God of the Jews only? Is He not also the God of the Gentiles? Yes, of the Gentiles also,
30 since there is one God who will justify the circumcised by faith and the uncircumcised through faith.
31 Do we then make void the law through faith? Certainly not! On the contrary, we establish the law.
Romans 4 (NKJV™)
1 What then shall we say that Abraham our father has found according to the flesh?
2 For if Abraham was justified by works, he has something to boast about, but not before God.
3 For what does the Scripture say? "Abraham believed God, and it was accounted to him for righteousness."
4 Now to him who works, the wages are not counted as grace but as debt.
5 But to him who does not work but believes on Him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is accounted for righteousness,
6 just as David also describes the blessedness of the man to whom God imputes righteousness apart from works:
7 "Blessed are those whose lawless deeds are forgiven, And whose sins are covered;
8 Blessed is the man to whom the LORD shall not impute sin."
9 Does this blessedness then come upon the circumcised only, or upon the uncircumcised also? For we say that faith was accounted to Abraham for righteousness.
10 How then was it accounted? While he was circumcised, or uncircumcised? Not while circumcised, but while uncircumcised.
11 And he received the sign of circumcision, a seal of the righteousness of the faith which he had while still uncircumcised, that he might be the father of all those who believe, though they are uncircumcised, that righteousness might be imputed to them also,
12 and the father of circumcision to those who not only are of the circumcision, but who also walk in the steps of the faith which our father Abraham had while still uncircumcised.
13 For the promise that he would be the heir of the world was not to Abraham or to his seed through the law, but through the righteousness of faith.
14 For if those who are of the law are heirs, faith is made void and the promise made of no effect,
15 because the law brings about wrath; for where there is no law there is no transgression.
16 Therefore it is of faith that it might be according to grace, so that the promise might be sure to all the seed, not only to those who are of the law, but also to those who are of the faith of Abraham, who is the father of us all
17 (as it is written, "I have made you a father of many nations") in the presence of Him whom he believed--God, who gives life to the dead and calls those things which do not exist as though they did;
18 who, contrary to hope, in hope believed, so that he became the father of many nations, according to what was spoken, "So shall your descendants be."
19 And not being weak in faith, he did not consider his own body, already dead (since he was about a hundred years old), and the deadness of Sarah's womb.
20 He did not waver at the promise of God through unbelief, but was strengthened in faith, giving glory to God,
21 and being fully convinced that what He had promised He was also able to perform.
22 And therefore "it was accounted to him for righteousness."
23 Now it was not written for his sake alone that it was imputed to him,
24 but also for us. It shall be imputed to us who believe in Him who raised up Jesus our Lord from the dead,
25 who was delivered up because of our offenses, and was raised because of our justification.
Romans 5 (NKJV™)
1 Therefore, having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,
2 through whom also we have access by faith into this grace in which we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.
3 And not only that, but we also glory in tribulations, knowing that tribulation produces perseverance;
4 and perseverance, character; and character, hope.
5 Now hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out in our hearts by the Holy Spirit who was given to us.
6 For when we were still without strength, in due time Christ died for the ungodly.
7 For scarcely for a righteous man will one die; yet perhaps for a good man someone would even dare to die.
8 But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were still sinners, Christ died for us.
9 Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from wrath through Him.
10 For if when we were enemies we were reconciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been reconciled, we shall be saved by His life.
11 And not only that, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received the reconciliation.
12 Therefore, just as through one man sin entered the world, and death through sin, and thus death spread to all men, because all sinned--
13 (For until the law sin was in the world, but sin is not imputed when there is no law.
14 Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over those who had not sinned according to the likeness of the transgression of Adam, who is a type of Him who was to come.
15 But the free gift is not like the offense. For if by the one man's offense many died, much more the grace of God and the gift by the grace of the one Man, Jesus Christ, abounded to many.
16 And the gift is not like that which came through the one who sinned. For the judgment which came from one offense resulted in condemnation, but the free gift which came from many offenses resulted in justification.
17 For if by the one man's offense death reigned through the one, much more those who receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness will reign in life through the One, Jesus Christ.)
18 Therefore, as through one man's offense judgment came to all men, resulting in condemnation, even so through one Man's righteous act the free gift came to all men, resulting in justification of life.
19 For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so also by one Man's obedience many will be made righteous.
20 Moreover the law entered that the offense might abound. But where sin abounded, grace abounded much more,
21 so that as sin reigned in death, even so grace might reign through righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord.
Romans 6 (NKJV™)
1 What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound?
2 Certainly not! How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it?
3 Or do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death?
4 Therefore we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life.
5 For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection,
6 knowing this, that our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin.
7 For he who has died has been freed from sin.
8 Now if we died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live with Him,
9 knowing that Christ, having been raised from the dead, dies no more. Death no longer has dominion over Him.
10 For the death that He died, He died to sin once for all; but the life that He lives, He lives to God.
11 Likewise you also, reckon yourselves to be dead indeed to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus our Lord.
12 Therefore do not let sin reign in your mortal body, that you should obey it in its lusts.
13 And do not present your members as instruments of unrighteousness to sin, but present yourselves to God as being alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness to God.
14 For sin shall not have dominion over you, for you are not under law but under grace.
15 What then? Shall we sin because we are not under law but under grace? Certainly not!
16 Do you not know that to whom you present yourselves slaves to obey, you are that one's slaves whom you obey, whether of sin leading to death, or of obedience leading to righteousness?
17 But God be thanked that though you were slaves of sin, yet you obeyed from the heart that form of doctrine to which you were delivered.
18 And having been set free from sin, you became slaves of righteousness.
19 I speak in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh. For just as you presented your members as slaves of uncleanness, and of lawlessness leading to more lawlessness, so now present your members as slaves of righteousness for holiness.
20 For when you were slaves of sin, you were free in regard to righteousness.
21 What fruit did you have then in the things of which you are now ashamed? For the end of those things is death.
22 But now having been set free from sin, and having become slaves of God, you have your fruit to holiness, and the end, everlasting life.
23 For the wages of sin is death, but the gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Romans 7 (NKJV™)
1 Or do you not know, brethren (for I speak to those who know the law), that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives?
2 For the woman who has a husband is bound by the law to her husband as long as he lives. But if the husband dies, she is released from the law of her husband.
3 So then if, while her husband lives, she marries another man, she will be called an adulteress; but if her husband dies, she is free from that law, so that she is no adulteress, though she has married another man.
4 Therefore, my brethren, you also have become dead to the law through the body of Christ, that you may be married to another--to Him who was raised from the dead, that we should bear fruit to God.
5 For when we were in the flesh, the sinful passions which were aroused by the law were at work in our members to bear fruit to death.
6 But now we have been delivered from the law, having died to what we were held by, so that we should serve in the newness of the Spirit and not in the oldness of the letter.
7 What shall we say then? Is the law sin? Certainly not! On the contrary, I would not have known sin except through the law. For I would not have known covetousness unless the law had said, "You shall not covet."
8 But sin, taking opportunity by the commandment, produced in me all manner of evil desire. For apart from the law sin was dead.
9 I was alive once without the law, but when the commandment came, sin revived and I died.
10 And the commandment, which was to bring life, I found to bring death.
11 For sin, taking occasion by the commandment, deceived me, and by it killed me.
12 Therefore the law is holy, and the commandment holy and just and good.
13 Has then what is good become death to me? Certainly not! But sin, that it might appear sin, was producing death in me through what is good, so that sin through the commandment might become exceedingly sinful.
14 For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am carnal, sold under sin.
15 For what I am doing, I do not understand. For what I will to do, that I do not practice; but what I hate, that I do.
16 If, then, I do what I will not to do, I agree with the law that it is good.
17 But now, it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells in me.
18 For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh) nothing good dwells; for to will is present with me, but how to perform what is good I do not find.
19 For the good that I will to do, I do not do; but the evil I will not to do, that I practice.
20 Now if I do what I will not to do, it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells in me.
21 I find then a law, that evil is present with me, the one who wills to do good.
22 For I delight in the law of God according to the inward man.
23 But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members.
24 O wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death?
25 I thank God--through Jesus Christ our Lord! So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God, but with the flesh the law of sin.
Romans 8 (NKJV™)
1 There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.
2 For the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus has made me free from the law of sin and death.
3 For what the law could not do in that it was weak through the flesh, God did by sending His own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, on account of sin: He condemned sin in the flesh,
4 that the righteous requirement of the law might be fulfilled in us who do not walk according to the flesh but according to the Spirit.
5 For those who live according to the flesh set their minds on the things of the flesh, but those who live according to the Spirit, the things of the Spirit.
6 For to be carnally minded is death, but to be spiritually minded is life and peace.
7 Because the carnal mind is enmity against God; for it is not subject to the law of God, nor indeed can be.
8 So then, those who are in the flesh cannot please God.
9 But you are not in the flesh but in the Spirit, if indeed the Spirit of God dwells in you. Now if anyone does not have the Spirit of Christ, he is not His.
10 And if Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the Spirit is life because of righteousness.
11 But if the Spirit of Him who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, He who raised Christ from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through His Spirit who dwells in you.
12 Therefore, brethren, we are debtors--not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh.
13 For if you live according to the flesh you will die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live.
14 For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God.
15 For you did not receive the spirit of bondage again to fear, but you received the Spirit of adoption by whom we cry out, "Abba, Father."
16 The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God,
17 and if children, then heirs--heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ, if indeed we suffer with Him, that we may also be glorified together.
18 For I consider that the sufferings of this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory which shall be revealed in us.
19 For the earnest expectation of the creation eagerly waits for the revealing of the sons of God.
20 For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of Him who subjected it in hope;
21 because the creation itself also will be delivered from the bondage of corruption into the glorious liberty of the children of God.
22 For we know that the whole creation groans and labors with birth pangs together until now.
23 Not only that, but we also who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, eagerly waiting for the adoption, the redemption of our body.
24 For we were saved in this hope, but hope that is seen is not hope; for why does one still hope for what he sees?
25 But if we hope for what we do not see, we eagerly wait for it with perseverance.
26 Likewise the Spirit also helps in our weaknesses. For we do not know what we should pray for as we ought, but the Spirit Himself makes intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered.
27 Now He who searches the hearts knows what the mind of the Spirit is, because He makes intercession for the saints according to the will of God.
28 And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.
29 For whom He foreknew, He also predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the firstborn among many brethren.
30 Moreover whom He predestined, these He also called; whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified.
31 What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?
32 He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how shall He not with Him also freely give us all things?
33 Who shall bring a charge against God's elect? It is God who justifies.
34 Who is he who condemns? It is Christ who died, and furthermore is also risen, who is even at the right hand of God, who also makes intercession for us.
35 Who shall separate us from the love of Christ? Shall tribulation, or distress, or persecution, or famine, or nakedness, or peril, or sword?
36 As it is written: "For Your sake we are killed all day long; We are accounted as sheep for the slaughter."
37 Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us.
38 For I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels nor principalities nor powers, nor things present nor things to come,
39 nor height nor depth, nor any other created thing, shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus our Lord.
Romans 9 (NKJV™)
1 I tell the truth in Christ, I am not lying, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Spirit,
2 that I have great sorrow and continual grief in my heart.
3 For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my countrymen according to the flesh,
4 who are Israelites, to whom pertain the adoption, the glory, the covenants, the giving of the law, the service of God, and the promises;
5 of whom are the fathers and from whom, according to the flesh, Christ came, who is over all, the eternally blessed God. Amen.
6 But it is not that the word of God has taken no effect. For they are not all Israel who are of Israel,
7 nor are they all children because they are the seed of Abraham; but, "In Isaac your seed shall be called."
8 That is, those who are the children of the flesh, these are not the children of God; but the children of the promise are counted as the seed.
9 For this is the word of promise: "At this time I will come and Sarah shall have a son."
10 And not only this, but when Rebecca also had conceived by one man, even by our father Isaac
11 (for the children not yet being born, nor having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works but of Him who calls),
12 it was said to her, "The older shall serve the younger."
13 As it is written, "Jacob I have loved, but Esau I have hated."
14 What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? Certainly not!
15 For He says to Moses, "I will have mercy on whomever I will have mercy, and I will have compassion on whomever I will have compassion."
16 So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who shows mercy.
17 For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, "For this very purpose I have raised you up, that I may show My power in you, and that My name may be declared in all the earth."
18 Therefore He has mercy on whom He wills, and whom He wills He hardens.
19 You will say to me then, "Why does He still find fault? For who has resisted His will?"
20 But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed say to him who formed it, "Why have you made me like this?"
21 Does not the potter have power over the clay, from the same lump to make one vessel for honor and another for dishonor?
22 What if God, wanting to show His wrath and to make His power known, endured with much longsuffering the vessels of wrath prepared for destruction,
23 and that He might make known the riches of His glory on the vessels of mercy, which He had prepared beforehand for glory,
24 even us whom He called, not of the Jews only, but also of the Gentiles?
25 As He says also in Hosea: "I will call them My people, who were not My people, And her beloved, who was not beloved."
26 "And it shall come to pass in the place where it was said to them, 'You are not My people,' There they shall be called sons of the living God."
27 Isaiah also cries out concerning Israel: "Though the number of the children of Israel be as the sand of the sea, The remnant will be saved.
28 For He will finish the work and cut it short in righteousness, Because the LORD will make a short work upon the earth."
29 And as Isaiah said before: "Unless the LORD of Sabaoth had left us a seed, We would have become like Sodom, And we would have been made like Gomorrah."
30 What shall we say then? That Gentiles, who did not pursue righteousness, have attained to righteousness, even the righteousness of faith;
31 but Israel, pursuing the law of righteousness, has not attained to the law of righteousness.
32 Why? Because they did not seek it by faith, but as it were, by the works of the law. For they stumbled at that stumbling stone.
33 As it is written: "Behold, I lay in Zion a stumbling stone and rock of offense, And whoever believes on Him will not be put to shame."
Romans 10 (NKJV™)
1 Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel is that they may be saved.
2 For I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge.
3 For they being ignorant of God's righteousness, and seeking to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted to the righteousness of God.
4 For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.
5 For Moses writes about the righteousness which is of the law, "The man who does those things shall live by them."
6 But the righteousness of faith speaks in this way, "Do not say in your heart, 'Who will ascend into heaven?'" (that is, to bring Christ down from above)
7 or, " 'Who will descend into the abyss?' " (that is, to bring Christ up from the dead).
8 But what does it say? "The word is near you, in your mouth and in your heart" (that is, the word of faith which we preach):
9 that if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God has raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.
10 For with the heart one believes unto righteousness, and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.
11 For the Scripture says, "Whoever believes on Him will not be put to shame."
12 For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek, for the same Lord over all is rich to all who call upon Him.
13 For "whoever calls on the name of the LORD shall be saved."
14 How then shall they call on Him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in Him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without a preacher?
15 And how shall they preach unless they are sent? As it is written: "How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the gospel of peace, Who bring glad tidings of good things!"
16 But they have not all obeyed the gospel. For Isaiah says, "Lord, who has believed our report?"
17 So then faith comes by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.
18 But I say, have they not heard? Yes indeed: "Their sound has gone out to all the earth, And their words to the ends of the world."
19 But I say, did Israel not know? First Moses says: "I will provoke you to jealousy by those who are not a nation, I will move you to anger by a foolish nation."
20 But Isaiah is very bold and says: "I was found by those who did not seek Me; I was made manifest to those who did not ask for Me."
21 But to Israel he says: "All day long I have stretched out My hands To a disobedient and contrary people."
Romans 11 (NKJV™)
1 I say then, has God cast away His people? Certainly not! For I also am an Israelite, of the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin.
2 God has not cast away His people whom He foreknew. Or do you not know what the Scripture says of Elijah, how he pleads with God against Israel, saying,
3 "LORD, they have killed Your prophets and torn down Your altars, and I alone am left, and they seek my life"?
4 But what does the divine response say to him? "I have reserved for Myself seven thousand men who have not bowed the knee to Baal."
5 Even so then, at this present time there is a remnant according to the election of grace.
6 And if by grace, then it is no longer of works; otherwise grace is no longer grace. But if it is of works, it is no longer grace; otherwise work is no longer work.
7 What then? Israel has not obtained what it seeks; but the elect have obtained it, and the rest were blinded.
8 Just as it is written: "God has given them a spirit of stupor, Eyes that they should not see And ears that they should not hear, To this very day."
9 And David says: "Let their table become a snare and a trap, A stumbling block and a recompense to them.
10 Let their eyes be darkened, so that they do not see, and bow down their back always."
11 I say then, have they stumbled that they should fall? Certainly not! But through their fall, to provoke them to jealousy, salvation has come to the Gentiles.
12 Now if their fall is riches for the world, and their failure riches for the Gentiles, how much more their fullness!
13 For I speak to you Gentiles; inasmuch as I am an apostle to the Gentiles, I magnify my ministry,
14 if by any means I may provoke to jealousy those who are my flesh and save some of them.
15 For if their being cast away is the reconciling of the world, what will their acceptance be but life from the dead?
16 For if the firstfruit is holy, the lump is also holy; and if the root is holy, so are the branches.
17 And if some of the branches were broken off, and you, being a wild olive tree, were grafted in among them, and with them became a partaker of the root and fatness of the olive tree,
18 do not boast against the branches. But if you do boast, remember that you do not support the root, but the root supports you.
19 You will say then, "Branches were broken off that I might be grafted in."
20 Well said. Because of unbelief they were broken off, and you stand by faith. Do not be haughty, but fear.
21 For if God did not spare the natural branches, He may not spare you either.
22 Therefore consider the goodness and severity of God: on those who fell, severity; but toward you, goodness, if you continue in His goodness. Otherwise you also will be cut off.
23 And they also, if they do not continue in unbelief, will be grafted in, for God is able to graft them in again.
24 For if you were cut out of the olive tree which is wild by nature, and were grafted contrary to nature into a cultivated olive tree, how much more will these, who are natural branches, be grafted into their own olive tree?
25 For I do not desire, brethren, that you should be ignorant of this mystery, lest you should be wise in your own opinion, that blindness in part has happened to Israel until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in.
26 And so all Israel will be saved, as it is written: "The Deliverer will come out of Zion, And He will turn away ungodliness from Jacob;
27 For this is My covenant with them, When I take away their sins."
28 Concerning the gospel they are enemies for your sake, but concerning the election they are beloved for the sake of the fathers.
29 For the gifts and the calling of God are irrevocable.
30 For as you were once disobedient to God, yet have now obtained mercy through their disobedience,
31 even so these also have now been disobedient, that through the mercy shown you they also may obtain mercy.
32 For God has committed them all to disobedience, that He might have mercy on all.
33 Oh, the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and His ways past finding out!
34 "For who has known the mind of the LORD? Or who has become His counselor?"
35 "Or who has first given to Him And it shall be repaid to him?"
36 For of Him and through Him and to Him are all things, to whom be glory forever. Amen.
Romans 12 (NKJV™)
1 I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service.
2 And do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind, that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God.
3 For I say, through the grace given to me, to everyone who is among you, not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think soberly, as God has dealt to each one a measure of faith.
4 For as we have many members in one body, but all the members do not have the same function,
5 so we, being many, are one body in Christ, and individually members of one another.
6 Having then gifts differing according to the grace that is given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, let us prophesy in proportion to our faith;
7 or ministry, let us use it in our ministering; he who teaches, in teaching;
8 he who exhorts, in exhortation; he who gives, with liberality; he who leads, with diligence; he who shows mercy, with cheerfulness.
9 Let love be without hypocrisy. Abhor what is evil. Cling to what is good.
10 Be kindly affectionate to one another with brotherly love, in honor giving preference to one another;
11 not lagging in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord;
12 rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation, continuing steadfastly in prayer;
13 distributing to the needs of the saints, given to hospitality.
14 Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse.
15 Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep.
16 Be of the same mind toward one another. Do not set your mind on high things, but associate with the humble. Do not be wise in your own opinion.
17 Repay no one evil for evil. Have regard for good things in the sight of all men.
18 If it is possible, as much as depends on you, live peaceably with all men.
19 Beloved, do not avenge yourselves, but rather give place to wrath; for it is written, "Vengeance is Mine, I will repay," says the Lord.
20 Therefore "If your enemy is hungry, feed him; If he is thirsty, give him a drink; For in so doing you will heap coals of fire on his head."
21 Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.
Romans 13 (NKJV™)
1 Let every soul be subject to the governing authorities. For there is no authority except from God, and the authorities that exist are appointed by God.
2 Therefore whoever resists the authority resists the ordinance of God, and those who resist will bring judgment on themselves.
3 For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to evil. Do you want to be unafraid of the authority? Do what is good, and you will have praise from the same.
4 For he is God's minister to you for good. But if you do evil, be afraid; for he does not bear the sword in vain; for he is God's minister, an avenger to execute wrath on him who practices evil.
5 Therefore you must be subject, not only because of wrath but also for conscience' sake.
6 For because of this you also pay taxes, for they are God's ministers attending continually to this very thing.
7 Render therefore to all their due: taxes to whom taxes are due, customs to whom customs, fear to whom fear, honor to whom honor.
8 Owe no one anything except to love one another, for he who loves another has fulfilled the law.
9 For the commandments, "You shall not commit adultery," "You shall not murder," "You shall not steal," "You shall not bear false witness," "You shall not covet," and if there is any other commandment, are all summed up in this saying, namely, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself."
10 Love does no harm to a neighbor; therefore love is the fulfillment of the law.
11 And do this, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep; for now our salvation is nearer than when we first believed.
12 The night is far spent, the day is at hand. Therefore let us cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armor of light.
13 Let us walk properly, as in the day, not in revelry and drunkenness, not in lewdness and lust, not in strife and envy.
14 But put on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make no provision for the flesh, to fulfill its lusts.
Romans 14 (NKJV™)
1 Receive one who is weak in the faith, but not to disputes over doubtful things.
2 For one believes he may eat all things, but he who is weak eats only vegetables.
3 Let not him who eats despise him who does not eat, and let not him who does not eat judge him who eats; for God has received him.
4 Who are you to judge another's servant? To his own master he stands or falls. Indeed, he will be made to stand, for God is able to make him stand.
5 One person esteems one day above another; another esteems every day alike. Let each be fully convinced in his own mind.
6 He who observes the day, observes it to the Lord; and he who does not observe the day, to the Lord he does not observe it. He who eats, eats to the Lord, for he gives God thanks; and he who does not eat, to the Lord he does not eat, and gives God thanks.
7 For none of us lives to himself, and no one dies to himself.
8 For if we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. Therefore, whether we live or die, we are the Lord's.
9 For to this end Christ died and rose and lived again, that He might be Lord of both the dead and the living.
10 But why do you judge your brother? Or why do you show contempt for your brother? For we shall all stand before the judgment seat of Christ.
11 For it is written: "As I live, says the LORD, Every knee shall bow to Me, And every tongue shall confess to God."
12 So then each of us shall give account of himself to God.
13 Therefore let us not judge one another anymore, but rather resolve this, not to put a stumbling block or a cause to fall in our brother's way.
14 I know and am convinced by the Lord Jesus that there is nothing unclean of itself; but to him who considers anything to be unclean, to him it is unclean.
15 Yet if your brother is grieved because of your food, you are no longer walking in love. Do not destroy with your food the one for whom Christ died.
16 Therefore do not let your good be spoken of as evil;
17 for the kingdom of God is not eating and drinking, but righteousness and peace and joy in the Holy Spirit.
18 For he who serves Christ in these things is acceptable to God and approved by men.
19 Therefore let us pursue the things which make for peace and the things by which one may edify another.
20 Do not destroy the work of God for the sake of food. All things indeed are pure, but it is evil for the man who eats with offense.
21 It is good neither to eat meat nor drink wine nor do anything by which your brother stumbles or is offended or is made weak.
22 Do you have faith? Have it to yourself before God. Happy is he who does not condemn himself in what he approves.
23 But he who doubts is condemned if he eats, because he does not eat from faith; for whatever is not from faith is sin.
Romans 15 (NKJV™)
1 We then who are strong ought to bear with the scruples of the weak, and not to please ourselves.
2 Let each of us please his neighbor for his good, leading to edification.
3 For even Christ did not please Himself; but as it is written, "The reproaches of those who reproached You fell on Me."
4 For whatever things were written before were written for our learning, that we through the patience and comfort of the Scriptures might have hope.
5 Now may the God of patience and comfort grant you to be like-minded toward one another, according to Christ Jesus,
6 that you may with one mind and one mouth glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ.
7 Therefore receive one another, just as Christ also received us, to the glory of God.
8 Now I say that Jesus Christ has become a servant to the circumcision for the truth of God, to confirm the promises made to the fathers,
9 and that the Gentiles might glorify God for His mercy, as it is written: "For this reason I will confess to You among the Gentiles, And sing to Your name."
10 And again he says: "Rejoice, O Gentiles, with His people!"
11 And again: "Praise the LORD, all you Gentiles! Laud Him, all you peoples!"
12 And again, Isaiah says: "There shall be a root of Jesse; And He who shall rise to reign over the Gentiles, In Him the Gentiles shall hope."
13 Now may the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.
14 Now I myself am confident concerning you, my brethren, that you also are full of goodness, filled with all knowledge, able also to admonish one another.
15 Nevertheless, brethren, I have written more boldly to you on some points, as reminding you, because of the grace given to me by God,
16 that I might be a minister of Jesus Christ to the Gentiles, ministering the gospel of God, that the offering of the Gentiles might be acceptable, sanctified by the Holy Spirit.
17 Therefore I have reason to glory in Christ Jesus in the things which pertain to God.
18 For I will not dare to speak of any of those things which Christ has not accomplished through me, in word and deed, to make the Gentiles obedient--
19 in mighty signs and wonders, by the power of the Spirit of God, so that from Jerusalem and round about to Illyricum I have fully preached the gospel of Christ.
20 And so I have made it my aim to preach the gospel, not where Christ was named, lest I should build on another man's foundation,
21 but as it is written: "To whom He was not announced, they shall see; And those who have not heard shall understand."
22 For this reason I also have been much hindered from coming to you.
23 But now no longer having a place in these parts, and having a great desire these many years to come to you,
24 whenever I journey to Spain, I shall come to you. For I hope to see you on my journey, and to be helped on my way there by you, if first I may enjoy your company for a while.
25 But now I am going to Jerusalem to minister to the saints.
26 For it pleased those from Macedonia and Achaia to make a certain contribution for the poor among the saints who are in Jerusalem.
27 It pleased them indeed, and they are their debtors. For if the Gentiles have been partakers of their spiritual things, their duty is also to minister to them in material things.
28 Therefore, when I have performed this and have sealed to them this fruit, I shall go by way of you to Spain.
29 But I know that when I come to you, I shall come in the fullness of the blessing of the gospel of Christ.
30 Now I beg you, brethren, through the Lord Jesus Christ, and through the love of the Spirit, that you strive together with me in prayers to God for me,
31 that I may be delivered from those in Judea who do not believe, and that my service for Jerusalem may be acceptable to the saints,
32 that I may come to you with joy by the will of God, and may be refreshed together with you.
33 Now the God of peace be with you all. Amen.
Romans 16 (NKJV™)
1 I commend to you Phoebe our sister, who is a servant of the church in Cenchrea,
2 that you may receive her in the Lord in a manner worthy of the saints, and assist her in whatever business she has need of you; for indeed she has been a helper of many and of myself also.
3 Greet Priscilla and Aquila, my fellow workers in Christ Jesus,
4 who risked their own necks for my life, to whom not only I give thanks, but also all the churches of the Gentiles.
5 Likewise greet the church that is in their house. Greet my beloved Epaenetus, who is the firstfruits of Achaia to Christ.
6 Greet Mary, who labored much for us.
7 Greet Andronicus and Junia, my countrymen and my fellow prisoners, who are of note among the apostles, who also were in Christ before me.
8 Greet Amplias, my beloved in the Lord.
9 Greet Urbanus, our fellow worker in Christ, and Stachys, my beloved.
10 Greet Apelles, approved in Christ. Greet those who are of the household of Aristobulus.
11 Greet Herodion, my countryman. Greet those who are of the household of Narcissus who are in the Lord.
12 Greet Tryphena and Tryphosa, who have labored in the Lord. Greet the beloved Persis, who labored much in the Lord.
13 Greet Rufus, chosen in the Lord, and his mother and mine.
14 Greet Asyncritus, Phlegon, Hermas, Patrobas, Hermes, and the brethren who are with them.
15 Greet Philologus and Julia, Nereus and his sister, and Olympas, and all the saints who are with them.
16 Greet one another with a holy kiss. The churches of Christ greet you.
17 Now I urge you, brethren, note those who cause divisions and offenses, contrary to the doctrine which you learned, and avoid them.
18 For those who are such do not serve our Lord Jesus Christ, but their own belly, and by smooth words and flattering speech deceive the hearts of the simple.
19 For your obedience has become known to all. Therefore I am glad on your behalf; but I want you to be wise in what is good, and simple concerning evil.
20 And the God of peace will crush Satan under your feet shortly. The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you. Amen.
21 Timothy, my fellow worker, and Lucius, Jason, and Sosipater, my countrymen, greet you.
22 I, Tertius, who wrote this epistle, greet you in the Lord.
23 Gaius, my host and the host of the whole church, greets you. Erastus, the treasurer of the city, greets you, and Quartus, a brother.
24 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.
25 Now to Him who is able to establish you according to my gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery kept secret since the world began
26 but now has been made manifest, and by the prophetic Scriptures has been made known to all nations, according to the commandment of the everlasting God, for obedience to the faith--
27 to God, alone wise, be glory through Jesus Christ forever. Amen.

New King James Version®, Copyright © 1982, Thomas Nelson, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



FREE - Download Entire Series (MP3) (Help) | Buy series

Detailed Notes

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DESTINATION: Romans

Paul wrote this letter to the church at Rome to prepare the way for a visit he hoped to make. He presented the basic system of salvation to a church that had not received the teaching of an apostle before. He also explained the relationship between Jew and Gentile in God's overall plan of redemption, because the Jewish Christians in Rome were being rejected by the larger Gentile group because the Jewish believers still felt constrained to observe dietary laws and sacred days.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

54 A.D.
Nero becomes ruler of the Roman Empire

c. 53-57
Paul's third missionary journey

c. 57 A.D.
Writing of the book of Romans


TRIP PLANNER:

Paul's primary theme in Romans is the basic gospel, God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. Its theme can be stated broadly as "righteousness from God," which includes justification by faith, and also such related ideas as guilt, sanctification and security.

Romans is most systematic of Paul's letters; it reads more like an elaborate theological essay than a letter. It strongly emphasizes Christian doctrine, including sin and death, salvation, grace, faith, righteousness, justification, sanctification, redemption, resurrection and glorification. Paul makes widespread use of Old Testament quotations, sometimes using them to carry along his argument. He expresses a deep concern for Israel, its present status, relationship to the Gentiles and final salvation.


PLACES OF INTEREST:

Rome -- The capital of the ancient world, with over a million people. Christians in the city were numerous, as the Roman historian Tacitus calls them "an immense multitude" by 64 A.D.

Corinth -- A major city in Greece where Paul probably wrote the book of Romans.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul -- An apostle of Jesus Christ and the preeminent theologian of the early church.  Paul wrote much of the New Testament.

Tertius -- Secretary who wrote down Paul's words.  He makes some greetings at the end of the letter.

Gaius -- Paul's host; Paul wrote Romans in his home.


FUN FACTS:

When Paul wrote this letter, he was probably on his third missionary journey.

Since Paul had not yet been to Rome when he wrote the book of Romans, he was not acquainted directly with the church, and he says little about its problems.

Paul did not immediately to go Rome because he felt he must personally deliver the money given by the Gentile churches for the poverty-stricken Christians of Jerusalem.

Transcript

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The book of Romans was written by Paul during a time of intense persecution; to see the scope of this book we should note that Paul used the words 'righteousness', 'sin', and 'faith' 60 times each in this book. The book of Romans is considered by some to be the greatest and richest of the letters in the New Testament.

Pastor Skip Heitzig: We come now to the third major division in the New Testament. This is the third major division. We're dealing now with epistolatory literature. Now an epistle is not the wife of an apostle, epistle is an old word for a letter. So we're dealing now with letters that are written; most of them written by Paul, some written by Peter, some written by John, and a lot of them are filled with doctrine. So when I say the third major division, we have the first division, that's the four Gospels: Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; a biography about Jesus. The second division is historical, that's the history of the church written in the book of Acts by Luke and now the third that is the epistolatory or the letters.

Now if you recall last week, in the book of Acts, in the very beginning, Jesus said, "They were to take the Gospel eventually to the uttermost parts of the earth." Good, you can interact with me, it's okay, it's Wednesday night, we're family. "They were to take it to the uttermost parts of the earth." Compared to where the Gospel started in Jerusalem, Rome was pretty uttermost part, and there was something about Rome that was a magnet to Paul, he had never been there yet, even though he writes a letter, never been there. He longed to go there. He kept saying, "I want to go to Rome, I want to go to Rome, if it's in the will of God."

When he was arrested in Jerusalem, the Lord tells him, you're going to make it to Rome. In Acts 24, "As you have testified of me in Jerusalem, so you must also testify of me in Rome." He gets arrested, he goes through three trials in Caesarea, they put him on a grain-ship and he's a prisoner of the Roman government and gets a free trip to Rome as a prisoner. And there he's locked up for two years and from that prison cell it's an opportunity for him to share the Gospel, not the way he originally thought he would go there.

The book of Romans was written from the city of Corinth. Paul takes three major missionary trips around the known world. On the third trip, when he gets to Corinth and he has some time because he's there for about 18 months, it's there that he pens or should I say dictates, you will see by the end of the night why I say that, dictates the letter to the Romans from Corinth.

The book of Romans is, I call it the Christian Manifesto, it's salvation by God's grace through faith, and there are some keywords that are in this book that I want you to know about. I'm going to be referring to some of them tonight. The word 'law' mentioned 78 times in the book of Romans, even though he's not writing to Jewish people but Jews and Gentiles, the word 'law' 78 times.

Then there's the word 'righteousness' mentioned another 66 times, and then the word 'faith' mentioned 62 times in this book. Another keyword will be 'grace' that he will refer to on many occasions. So here's the theme of the book of Romans.

The righteousness of God that comes through the Gospel of Christ, that's the theme. The righteousness of God -- remember that little phrase, it's one of the most important things in this book, the righteousness of God that comes to the Gospel of Christ.

Now I take you to chapter 1, verse 16 and 17, before we even go back to first couple of verses. He says, "For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ, for it is the power of God to salvation for everyone who believes, for the Jew first, and also for the Greek. For in it the righteousness of God is revealed from faith to faith; as it is written; 'The just shall live by faith.'"

So we're going to follow this theme throughout the book, "The righteousness of God that comes through the Gospel of Christ."

Here's the picture the book of Romans pain'ts. We're all born into the slavery of sin and are all under the wrath of God until we are set free by Jesus Christ. Now that certainly is in a message the world would ever want to hear at all.

You know it's funny when I meet people and say, well; Christianity is a human religion that humans made up. Why in earth would anybody make that up, that we're all consigned to destruction and doom apart from faith in one person? Nobody in the right mind would make that up. But that is the Gospel, frees us from sin and death because we're under the wrath of God.

The world would love to celebrate not the wrath of God on the unrighteousness of man, the world wants to celebrate the righteousness of man, hey, we're all good, we all do good things, we're all sincere. Let's talk about the goodness of man, the positive aspects of man, the righteousness of man, Romans will say, as God looks down from heaven there's none who does good, no not even one.

Now this is all important to understand this book of Romans. I want you to think for a moment of the thief on the Cross, and here's what the Gospel and the righteousness of God comes in. Here's a thief on the Cross, a person that Roman government deems unfit to live on the earth, unfit to live in the Roman Empire, unfit to live on the earth. But in an instant, because of his faith Jesus declares Him fit to live forever in paradise. Today, you'll be with Me in paradise. See the world gets weird with that. Wait a minute, I thought, if you work really hard and get really religious and do really good, then you get to earn heaven, uh-huh, those people don't make it to heaven. But those people who are wretched and realize that they are sinners and place their faith in Jesus Christ, he will say because you did it by faith, today you will be with Me in paradise.

Now this book of Romans transform the life of one Martin Luther changed him and brought forth the Protestant Reformation. Luther said, "The book of Romans is the chief part of the New Testament. It is the purest of the Gospel."

Let me tell you about Luther. Luther was raised in the fear of judgment, his whole life. He decided to become really righteous, became a monk, an Augustinian monk in the year 1506 in the town of Erfurt, Germany. He prayed a lot, he fasted a lot, and according to his own admission quote, "If ever a monk got to heaven by his monkery, it is I." But he was tormented in his conscience and there was one phrase as he's reading this book of Romans, that caught his attention and he wrestled with it. Guess what phrase it was? "The righteousness of God," that's the phrase that arrested him.

Here's his words "I had greatly longed to understand Paul's letter to the Romans and nothing stood in the way but that one expression 'the righteousness of God' because I took it to mean the righteousness whereby God acts righteously in punishing the unrighteous. Night and day I pondered until I grasped the truth that the righteousness of God is that righteousness whereby through grace and share mercy, He justifies us by faith. Thereupon I felt myself to be reborn and to have gone open doors into paradise; the whole of scripture took on a whole new meaning."

John Wesley years later read the introduction of Paul's letter to the Romans, his commentary and he said when I read it, I felt strangely warmed. He was revived and that brought forth an eighteenth century revival through Wesley and countless moves of God in history, revivals in history have stem from the book of Romans. If we can get a hold of these trues, they are so, so great and so life-changing.

Now in the book of Romans, just about every major Christian doctrine is presented, I am going to divide the book up into four sections for you and we will follow that tonight.

Section number one, 'the wrath of God', that's how he begins, all of humanity is consigned under doom because of their unrighteousness; 'the wrath of God'. Section number two of the book of Romans: 'The grace of God'. Section number three: 'The plan of God' for Jew and Gentile. And number four: 'The will of God'. Those are the four sections we will follow.

First of all then; 'the Wrath of God'. That begins in chapter 1, Verse 18 because first part is introductory through chapter 3, verse 20. And from 1:18 to 3:20 is that section 'the Wrath of God'.

Look at verse 1, of Romans 1, "Paul, a slave or bond-servant of Jesus Christ called to be an apostle, separated to the Gospel of God, concerning His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord, who was born of the seed of David according to the flesh and declared to be the Son of God with power, according to the Spirit of holiness by the resurrection from the dead. Through him, we have received grace." That's a mega theme of this book 'grace' simply means undeserved privilege or unmerited favor.

"Through him we have received grace and apostleship, for obedience to the faith among all nations, for his name. Among whom you also are the called of Jesus Christ. To all who are in Rome, beloved of God, called sain'ts." The words 'to be' in my Bible are italicized because they are not in the original, it's not that one day if you are really good and a group of people examined your life and you have like 30 miracles, in 200 years they are going to canonize you a saint, that's not what it means, a little halo, that's not what it means. It means if you are a believer in Christ, right now today, why you are alive, God calls you a saint. And it simply means you are set apart for him because of what he has done.

"To those who are in Rome, beloved of God, called sain'ts. Grace to you and peace from God our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ."

So there is two kinds of people in Paul's thinking: the sain'ts and the ain'ts, and if you are not a saint that is said by Jesus Christ then you aint, you are a saint or an aint.

Now, here is the question, how did the church in Rome get established? No takers. Okay, you are safe, you have learned your lesson, you think you are setting this up, sort of I am. If you were to say, Paul, you would be wrong. Paul had never visited Rome but he is riding from Corinth to a church already established in Rome. And we believe that the Roman church was established from the day of Pentecost. There were people from all over the world.

Jewish people and some were from Rome and when Peter gave his message on the day of Pentecost, 3,000 souls were baptized because they believed in Jesus. We believe that some of them were from Rome and after Pentecost in the salvation message preached by Peter, those Messianic Jews went back to Rome and established the first congregation.

Paul heard about it, that's why he says, "I want to go to Rome. I want to see this church. I want to be a part of it." And so from that point on it was established and it grew.

Okay, now I said that Paul divided the human race into sain'ts and ain'ts. Let me take the ain'ts for a moment. In the ain'ts side, Paul divided the ain'ts into three groups: pagans, moralists and religionists. And he writes about them all; people who have no faith at all in God, pagans; moralists people who just do nice good things; religionists, those who are strict adherence of their faith. Usually Jewish people who trust in their own self-righteousness that was the big problem he confronted back then.

Verse 18 of chapter 1, "For the wrath of God," see this is the first section, "For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who suppressed the truth in unrighteousness. Because what may be known of God is manifest in them; for God has shown it to them." Now that phrase should chill the blood of any person who doesn't know God. Listen, life, death, and eternity are not to be trifled with, they are not trivial items.

And to read this phrase that the posture of God in heaven toward unregenerate man is, he is filled with wrath. Wait a minute, I thought God was a God of love, He is, but the posture until something is done with the love that he gave in Christ is one of wrath. The wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all unrighteousness, all ungodliness. People certainly don't like this message.

Have you heard this? Well, the God of the Old Testament is a God of judgment and wrath. The God of the New Testament is a God of love. There's two different Gods; you are wrong. This is the New Testament last time I checked, and it says, in the New Testament, the wrath of God is revealed from heaven. That's God's attitude towards sin period. It's consistent in the Old Testament, in between the Testaments, in the New Testament, and in 2008 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Same, his attitude and sin has never changed.

Go down to chapter 3 of Romans, verse 19, "Now we know that whatever the law says, it's the law of Moses, it says to those who are under the law that every mouth may be stopped," get this, "and the whole world may become guilty before God." There is the verdict. That's the final verdict of God as he looks at the earth, guilty. "Therefore, by the deeds of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight for by the law, is the knowledge of sin."

So, Paul in chapters 1 through 3 paints a very dismal dark picture of humanity in despair. No hope, can't do anything about it, absolutely hopeless, no ray of light, totally helpless. And what's the final verdict on mankind? Guilty. That means you are guilty. I am guilty. The Pope is guilty, Billy Graham is guilty. Everyone is guilty in their own before God.

Verse 20, "Therefore by the deeds of the flesh, deeds of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight, for by the law is the knowledge of sin."

Now, look how verse 21, the very next verse begins. "But now --", stop right there. Now we have a shift. Remember I said the first section of the book of Romans, the wrath of God is chapter 1, verse 18 through chapter 3, verse 20. Chapter 3, verse 21 takes on a whole new section and this is the grace of God, okay. Between verse 20 and 21 is a canyon, a great gulf, a transition, we move from darkness into light and we are left in darkness in chapter 20, hopeless and despair, all the light is gone. Suddenly, the day dawns, the sun rises in verse 21, or to put it in Narnia language, Chronicles of Narnia, the long dark winter is over and Aslan comes. This is the grace of God. Donald Grey Barnhouse, a great commentator. I would say, one of my favorite on certain books of the Bible.

Donald Grey Barnhouse, in his Bible, drew a heart over verse 21. A little heart in his Bible and he wrote these words, "I am convinced today after many years of Bible study that this is the most important verse in the Bible." Look at it, verse 21, now the grace of God, "But now the righteousness of God apart from the law is revealed being witnessed by the law and the prophets." Okay, that's the phrase that was turning over in Martin Luther's little brain; the righteousness of God, right standing with God. "Even the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ and to all and on all who believe there is no difference, for all have sin and fall short of the glory of God, being justified freely by His grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood through faith to demonstrate His righteousness, because in His forbearance God has passed over the sins that were previously committed; to demonstrate at the present time His righteousness that He might be just, and the justifier of the one who has faith in Jesus Christ."

Now, in the second section, first section, wrath of God, second section, grace of God. There's some keywords, key Biblical words and there are important words and I want you to know them. I want you to know what these words are. First is the word, 'justify' or 'justified' or 'justification'. Huge Biblical words, you need to know what that means. Second is the word 'redemption', you need to know what that means. Third is that weird word, 'propitiation', probably not a word you use today but it's an important Biblical word, sort of an ancient word but I want you to know what these are. Verse 24, "Being justified freely by His grace." Thirty times in the New Testament, the word 'justify' or 'justification' is used, 30 times, 15 of those are found in the book of Romans. It is a legal term, a forensic term to render a verdict.

Now, in ancient times, you've got a verdict, you stand before a courtroom or a judge, you get the guilty verdict or the non-guilty verdict; condemnation or justification, one of those two verdicts. The idea to justify when it says, God justifies us, it means this, He imputes to you the purity, the righteousness of Jesus Christ.

It means that God declares you righteous. The term 'justify' is a legal term, it's from the courtroom and it means to declare somebody as righteous or pronounce them, and once they are pronounced righteous, then they are treated as if they are righteous because God made the pronouncement, do you follow me?

So, sometimes you will find Bible commentators breaking the word apart to define it. Justified, now break it apart, what does it mean? Just if I'd never sinned, God has declared me pure, righteous, even though, I am not. I've fallen short of the glory of God because I trust in Christ, he says, you are righteous, and all of the purity and righteousness of Christ is now imputed to your account and that's how I see you. It's a declaration. That is the first word; also, verse 24, second word, 'redemption' through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus.

Now if 'justified' comes from the law courts, then the second word 'redemption' comes from the slavery block. It means to release a slave, to pay a price, to release somebody who is a prisoner or a slave. That's what the idea of 'redemption' means, to deliver by paying a price.

In Jewish terms, keep in mind as audience was both Gentile and Jew. In Jewish terms, redemption meant that you would buy land or people who were lost due to poverty and slavery. Think of the book of Ruth, Elimelech and Naomi and their two boys leave Bethlehem, go to Moab. They lose it all, everybody dies in the family who is a male, the women come back, there is Naomi and Ruth destitute. But there is a Goel, that is the Hebrew word, a Goel, a kinsman-redeemer who has because of blood relationship the power to buy back the land for the family, and buy those who went a stray back into the family through marriage. That's redemption.

Here is the third keyword 'propitiation' verse 25, "whom God set forth as a propitiation by His blood." Let me tell you what that word means because I want you to know it. It means appeasement or satisfaction. It means the idea is too appease God and to satisfy God's wrath; to satisfy God's demands. Something by the way, you and I can never do. We can't do it. Jesus is our propitiation, our appeasement, the satisfaction.

Okay, now follow me here. About 200 years before Jesus Christ, there was a translation of the Old Testament into the Greek language called the Septuagint. Ever heard of that? Septuagint, it's the Hebrew scriptures translated into Greek. Twenty times in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the Septuagint, we find the word that is translated here propitiation, we find it in the Old Testament. The Greek word is Hilasterion, Hilasterion and if you were to translate Hilasterion in the New Testament, it is propitiation. If you are to find it in the Old Testament, it means "Mercy Seat." They use that word to describe the golden lid that was on top of the Ark of the Covenant that was sprinkled once a year by the priest, remember.

That's where atonement was made; that's where God would fellowship over the broken sin of His people. So think of that image here. Jesus Christ is the "Mercy Seat." Because of what He has done, His blood was shed, He covers the sin and so some translations say, he is the atoning sacrifice, they are translating the single Greek word, Hilasterion, propitiation or "Mercy Seat."

Okay, I am going to sum up chapter 4 through 8 now, you are ready? Chapter 4, continuing with this theme, the grace of God, He says, look at Abraham, Abraham was justified by faith even before the law ever came, before Moses were born, before God ever gave a law. The Bible says," Abraham believed and it was accounted to him for righteousness." That's chapter 4.

Chapter 5 shows the resulting peace that we experience because of that justification. So it opens having been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ, that's chapter 5, describes all the benefits that come from that.

Chapter 6 is a series of questions and this is how rabbis would teach. They would teach in the diatribe fashion, they would make a statement, then they would say, yeah, but what about this? And then he would answer, yeah, but what about that? And then he would answer. He is doing that, that's a style of Paul in this book. It's an ancient rabbinical style. So chapter 6, there is a series of questions regarding the implications of being justified. For instance, here is the question. Well, then shall we continue in sin, the grace may abound? Because he said, wherever sin abounds grace overflows or abounds much more, so he asks, well, then shall we continue in sin and grace, God forbid, he answers it. And so, he breaks that down in chapter 6 and partly in chapter 7.

In chapter 7, he talks about the relationship of the believer to the law of Moses, and he talks about his own personal struggle. Paul says, "I've got to tell you something. There's things that I know that I shouldn't do that I do. There's things that I know that I should do that I don't do, and he says, oh wretched man that I am. Chapter 7, who shall deliver me from the body of this death?

In chapter 8, he answers himself and shows the liberation that comes from the end dwelling Holy Spirit. And so verse 35 of chapter 8, "Who shall separate us from the love of God?"

But go back to chapter 8, verse 28; one of the verses that every Christian memorizes and their first year of being a believer usually. It's in the little pocket-promise books or little loaves of bread that you pull out and there is a little promise. "We know that all things work together for good, to those who love God, and are the called according to this purpose." Now, here is this whole plan. "For whom he foreknew, he also predestined to be conformed to his image, that he might be the first-born among many brethren. Moreover, who he predestined, he also called, who he called, he also justified, who he justified, he also glorified."

So, we have wrath of God, we have the grace of God, chapters 9 through 11, it's the third section. This is the plan of God. Okay, let me set this up for you. Paul is writing to who? Romans. The audience in Rome was mixed ethnically. You would imagine it's a melting pot. It's a huge city. There were lots of Gentiles from different parts of the world and there were a seizable group of Jews, synagogues, etcetera and so they were mixed. So, he is going to pose some issues that Gentiles would ask about the Jews because they celebrate the law, they have the Old Testament, etcetera, so they've got some questions, okay.

So chapter 8 ends with a magnificent hymn of praise. It's on an upbeat. verse 38, chapter 8, "I am persuaded that neither death nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present or things to come, nor height, nor depth or any other created thing shall be able to separate us from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus, our Lord." It ends on an upbeat. This is amazing grace. So, here's some questions then that might be bouncing around the Gentiles' minds in Rome.

What about the Jews? Why did they reject Jesus as their Messiah? And if God has a plan for them, how does their unbelief and rejection fit into the plan of God? So chapters 9, 10, and 11 are all about God's plan for the Jews, for the rest of the world, and again for the Jews in the end times; all of these chapters are about that. So laced in this section are several statements of Paul's own personal, emotional heart toward his own people. Very, very touching, I wish we had time to go through it in depth; in fact, we have gone through it in depth in the years passed, we are just brushing over tonight.

Chapter 9 shows that Israel, God's elect has rejected the Gospel. Now, Paul will say, that doesn't mean God's word has failed, that doesn't mean God's promises have failed because some of them have believed. Paul would say, "I am one of them." Some have believed.

Chapter 10 says, the nation has been set aside because of their rejection for a time. It's not what God wanted that was their own doing, but in chapter 11, that rejection, that setting aside is not final there is going to be a reinstatement. Salvation has now been opened up to all the world, all the Gentiles because Israel has rejected their Messiah. Their rejection means salvation for the whole world. So Paul will say, "Can you imagine what will happen when they are reinstated, if their rejection means salvation, when there is the reinstatement? And God continues His plan what that is going to mean for the rest of the world. So let me frame this again for you this way.

Chapter 9 is the sovereignty of God in election, you get that? The sovereignty of God in election; God chose the Jewish people to be the chosen race, the Messiah would come through, the Bible would come through, the promises would come through, the sovereignty of God in election.

Chapter 10, the sovereignty of God in rejection, they rejected the Messiah; God will temporarily set them aside. But in chapter 11, the sovereignty of God in reception, God will receive His people back. We talked on Sundays about the Millennial Kingdom and how Christ will rule and reign from Mount Zion.

So chapter 9, verse 1, "I tell the truth in Christ, I am not lying, my conscience also bearing me witness in the Holy Spirit, that I have great sorrow and continual grief in my heart." And remember how we said chapter 8 ends with a hymn of praise, it's full of joy, what a transition from joy to deep sorrow. Paul's being very transparent and saying, "I want you guys in Rome to know something. As I am writing to you there is a heavy burden weighing in my heart, and it's about my own people, the Jewish people."

Verse 3, "For I could wish that I myself were accursed from Christ for my brethren, my countrymen according to the flesh."

There was a problem Jesus encountered the problem, Paul encountered the problem. Many of the Jewish people believed what Paul said, they are the chosen of God, they are the elect of God and that salvation is simply a matter of birth, all God requires is physical birth, I am born a Jew.

Paul said, "It's more than being born Jew, you have to be born a new, you have to be born again." And remember John the Baptist even confronted this, he is down at the Jordon river baptizing and the Pharisees are there tucking in their robes and he is reading their minds. Don't begin to think within yourselves, we have Abraham as our father. John the Baptist continues, God is able to raise up even from these rocks children to Abraham. That didn't go over very well. They understood what he meant, it's not about physical birth, it's much more. There was a misunderstanding among them, let's see what it is.

Chapter 10 verse 1, "Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God for Israel, is that they may be saved. For I bear them witness that they have a zeal for God, but not according to knowledge." Now here's Paul wanting Israel to be saved which would infer that just because you would live in Israel or you are Jewish or you are Israeli, you are a citizen of Israel that you are not saved. You need the same Christ that we have all received.

I tell you why that's important. There are some prominent teachers who are even on television and radio, and they will go around, they will talk about Israel and you get the impression that you know we need Jesus, but the Jewish people as they are just being Jewish, there is sort of a dualism they don't really need to accept Christ because they are Jewish, they are already in the covenant, they have already got it made, and it's wrong.

Here's Paul going, "I want my people to be saved." And here's why, "they have a zeal for God but not according to knowledge. For they being ignorant of God's righteousness, and seeking to establish their own righteousness have not submitted to the righteousness of God. For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes."

Every time I go to Israel, every time I walk up to that Western Wall, some call it the Wailing Wall, it's an old term, the Western Wall and I see them fervently praying or sometimes when I go with just a few guys or first night into the Garden of Gethsemane and look over the city, I think of these verses, I think of this. And you know what; man is incurably addicted to working for his own salvation. I don't know what it is about us. We can't just say, I am not good enough, I accept your gift. No, no, no, no, I am going to be good, I am going to earn this, I am going to pull up my boot straps and I am going to make it to happen. We are incurably addicted to working for our own righteousness. The problem is ignorance. Notice it's not according to knowledge they have a zeal for God but it's not according to knowledge. In other words they don't have a correct understanding of the Torah, of the revealed will of God in the scriptures, they are ignorant of it.

Paul says, "Look, I know this, I was ignorant of it." I personally grew up in a religious home; I believed in God, I was taught to believe in God. I was taught to go to church, I was taught to believe that Jesus Christ is God the Son, the Son of God. But I was ignorant about how one is saved; I was taught that if you go to church, if you work hard, if you go to confession, if you do certain things it could be that at the end you will go to heaven. And I remember even asking a clergyman, "I want to know that I am going to heaven?" He said, "You can't know till you die." I said, "Sir, it's a little bit too late to find out I was wrong, I want to find out now." And Paul worked hard but was ignorant. He came to a place where he knew for certain. Same way Martin Luther dealt with this was the righteousness of God.

Look down at verse 9 and 10 of chapter 10, "That if you confess with your mouth the Lord Jesus and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead you will be saved. For with a heart one believes unto righteousness and with the mouth confession is made to salvation." Here is two essential articles of faith acknowledging the Lordship of Jesus sometimes the idea of Lord in the Old Testament was the acknowledgment that He was Yahweh. I think this means that Jesus is the Lord God the Son, God in human flesh and that he raised physically from the dead.

Verse 11, for the scripture says, "Whoever believes on Him will not be put to shame." There is faith. "For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek." This would anger the audience that was Jewish and would anger the audience that was Greek.

Paul is saying, "There is no difference when it comes to how you are made right before God you come as a sinner all of you and you can only be accepted by faith."

"There is no distinction between Jew and Greek for the same Lord overall is rich to all who called Him for -- whoever calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved."

Now, something that I didn't mention that I'd like to mention now about the book of Romans; throughout the book in every chapter Paul quotes the Old Testament a lot. Especially, the book of Isaiah and the book of Psalms, he quotes, quotes, quotes, quotes, ties it back, ties it back, ties it back. In fact, Paul quotes the Old Testament in the book of Romans more than he quotes the Old Testament in all of the rest of his epistles combined. Very scripture heavy and it shows you the kind of grasp that this guy had on his Bible. He knew it and he knew how it applied even now.

Look at chapter 11. I say then, "Has God cast away His people?" That is the Jewish people? Let Him answer it.

Certainly not, the Amillennialist would take out the 'not' and put 'certainly'. "Has God cast-away His people? Certainly not! For I also am an Israelite, of the seed of Abraham, of the tribe of Benjamin." The word 'cast-away' means disowned or rejected.

There are some people today who teach that the nation of Israel or Israel nationally because they have rejected Christ, God has rejected them, so that all of the promises in the Old Testament that were given to Israel, are not given to them anymore. But they go to the church and will be fulfilled during the church age by the church. But that same group of the theologians will say, all of the curses that God gave to Israel, they go to Israel.

So they have made us into a group of thieves stealing from Israel the promises that God rightfully gave to them, and I believe will literally fulfill them because of the covenant He made with Abraham, Issac, Jacob, the covenant with David, etcetera.

So you can't steal the promise and say, "Oh! By the way we don't want the curses, you can, you can keep them." It doesn't work that way; it's inconsistent.

Verse 25, "For I do not desire brethren, that you should be ignorant of this mystery." Okay, whenever Paul says, I tell you secrets and mystery, it's so important I don't want you to be ignorant of this and we've got to understand what it is, it's important. "Lest you should be wise in your own opinion; that blindness in part has happened to Israel until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in."

Now the New International Version correctly translates this verse by saying, the full number of Gentiles, blindness in part has happened to Israel until the full number of Gentiles be coming. I think the New Living Translation sort of follows suit, that's the idea.

There is a number of people among the non-Jewish world or the Gentiles and God knows what that number is, and one day people who are non-Jewish who are receiving Christ and it's going on all the time around the world. God knows when that last number reaches this point. When that last number reaches this point God will be done with the church age drawing in nations; people from all over the world, all over the nations into the church. We will turn again from that dispensation that is some time called era or manner of dealing back to the Jewish nation to recover and restore them in a period of time known as Daniel's seventieth week that's Daniel chapter 9. That's the tribulation period. When that full number is reached or when that last Gentile person, God knows what that number is. Says; "Yes, I receive Christ." God knows what that number is. That is when the church age is over, church gets raptured, the attention gets taken now toward the Jewish people the seventieth week of Daniel, the tribulation that whole restoration process of gathering 144,000 from every tribe, that's the time.

So you might be here tonight and you are that last hold out. You could be the one holding up the whole show, or it could be a person in South America or in Africa or in Asia or somewhere else who will say, yes, but it could be here.

So stop it! Let's get on with this program when that full number is reached. Then God will continue His program with the Jewish people. Verse 29 tells you why, "For the gifts and calling of God are irrevocable." That means God has made a promise to a nation like He did to Israel and He has given them the gifts of prophets, scripture, promises, the Messiah, and He has given them a special Holy calling, that's irrevocable. He didn't say, okay, well, you rejected my plans, so I am going to take all of that stuff away and give it all of the Gentiles now and you are shut out. The gifts and callings of God are irrevocable or without repentance.

Now the last section then we close is chapter 12, verse 1, to chapter 15, verse 13. This is the will of God, this is the practical section of the book of Romans.

Notice he says, "I beseech you that therefore --", this is Paul's style, if you have read much of Paul's epistolatory literature and noticed that Paul begins his letters long or short by laying a foundation giving you some very important concrete doctrinal truth and then at some point in the letter he does it all so in Ephesians, he goes, "Now, therefore, meaning, I am going to make an application based upon all the stuff I have just told you that I want you to understand." He does that here.

He makes application to them, his audience, based upon chapters 1 through 11 what he calls the Mercies of God; the Mercies of God, mankind is under God, wrath and judgment, but grace came and overflows and God has a plan as for Jew, Gentile, Abraham, everybody, it's by faith, God has a plan for the Jews, for the world, and for Israel again.

Now therefore, and Paul is good at combining doctrine and deeds, doctrine and deeds, promises and practice. Okay, you know this now do this. That's what this is all about. "I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that you present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, and acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service." "Do not be conformed to this world, but transform by the renewing of your mind that you may prove what is that good and acceptable and perfect will of God."

Look at the word in verse 2 'transformed.' Metamorphoo, can you say that ten times? Metamorphoo, what does that sound like? Metamorphosis, that's where we get the term 'transform,' metamorphoo. Typically we use the word metamorphosis in the English language to speak of physical change. The idea is total change. When a caterpillar turns into a butterfly it's a metamorphoo a total, total change, okay.

Mark in his Gospel and also Matthew uses this vary word to speak of Jesus who is transfigured before them on the Mount of Transfiguration his raymond was white like the sun. He used the term, a metamorphosis is a complete change. The idea is that you change in your character from the value system of the world to the image of Christ.

Now here's Paul's thinking. As a Christian you are following one of two value systems, you are being molded, conformed to the standards of this world, the values of this world, what the world deems is important, you are following what the world deems is important, you are molded and shaped by that whole construct or you are being changed from that into the image of Christ.

You either think like the world or you think like Christ, your values are worldly or they are Christ like. That's what he does here in this section.

And he does so generally and specifically. And I am going to sum up something now, so follow me along here, generally and specifically.

Generally you present your body to God. Here is my body God, do whatever You want with me. I am Yours God, that's the general part of it. And then as you do that, He transforms your thinking, your mind gets changed, that's generally. Now specifically, he says what that means, is that you present yourself to the world to be a representative of God and to witness to them, and you present yourself to the body of Christ to serve them, that's what he does in this section.

So I am going to skip ahead to chapters 14 and 15 and read just two verses because what Paul does -- hold on, back up. You present yourself to God, here is the practical part, He changes your thinking. This includes your relationship to society and to secular government that's chapter 13. It also includes your relationship to each other in the body of Christ, the church, that's chapter 14 and 15. I am going to skip chapter 13, take you to 14 and 15, okay.

What Paul does in 14 and 15 is identifies two groups of Christians. One group he calls strong Christians, the other group he calls weak Christians. When he says strong Christians he doesn't mean guys who go to the gym and lift weights; I'm a strong Christian, because he can be a moral light-weight and be a physical heavy-weight because he is just thinking about muscle. It's funny; I asked a guy one time, "Hey, what do you do with all those muscles?" He went [Skip shows his muscles]. Hey, I saw that, what you do with them? [Laughter, Skip shows his muscles] Yeah, but what you do with them? See, it was all about show, not go, just about looking a certain way.

He calls a certain group of Christians strong and certain ones weak. The weak ones are the legalists and they believe that you have to really watch what you eat, you have to really watch what days you worship on because this is really, really important. He calls that the scruples of the weak, that's their conscience. They have really have a moral conviction about those things.

So he tells the strong, "Don't upset them, don't be so full of liberty just because you are strong and have a broader understanding of scripture and Christian liberty to stumble those who are weak; who are legalistic and narrow-minded. You've got a love and put up with the weak. Not just flaunch your liberty around. So look at chapter 14, verse 1, "Receive one who is weak in the faith, but not to disputes over doubtful things." And he describe those disputes over doubtful things in chapter 14.

Now look at chapter 15, verse 1, "We then who are strong ought to bear with the scruples of the weak, and not to please ourselves." Whatever the convictions are of the weak Christian they maybe right or they maybe wrong as an older stronger believer. You sometimes need to correct, need to admonish, other times you need to just put up with it. And let that be their conviction. Oh I think Saturday is the only day to worship.

God bless you! Worship on Saturday, do that. I don't believe that a Christian should listen to that kind of loud music. God bless you! Don't listen to it, and I am not going to turn on my radio real loud in front of your face just to show you my liberty. I will do it a couple of blocks away, but not here, or eating meat that's sacrificed to idol, all of that can cover that.

Chapter 16, I love chapter 16. Just, just peruse it for a second, notice what it is. It's a very extensive list of names. You say, that's sort of boring to me. I don't know these names. It's boring to you but if your name is in that list, not boring to you because you made it in the Bible, it's really cool. Here's 26 names that Paul lists. He writes down, gives greetings. Here's the thing, he has never visited Rome before ever, but he is very well-connected. He must have heard of people and gotten news about them and he gives his personal greetings to 26 people, some are Jews, some are Gentile, some are nobility, some are slaves, some are males, some are females.

Thirteen of the names in chapter 16 are current documents, other documents that deal with the Emperor's palace. They have been found in the documents the deal with Caesar's household, his palace, which means some among the royal family or connected with the royal family were believers, were Christians. See, this is why a prison ministry is so needed.

Paul, that was his ministry, last part of his life, he has a prison ministry. He's locked up and there's people like the people in Philippi going, I can't believe Paul got put in jail, it must not be the will of God because if he was in the will of God he wouldn't be in jail. Paul goes, time out, I want you to know what's happened to me has happened for the furtherance of the Gospel.

There is people in the prison that are coming to Christ and some of them are Caesar's household. That's what he writes when he gets to Rome later on and he is imprisoned. And we see that through his whole life. He saw his imprisonment as something by the sovereign will of God.

Something else to note about this chapter; 9 out of the 26 that are mentioned here are women. That's important because you know Paul has gotten in a bad wrap, and some of it is from women's group, who say, "Paul was a chauvinist." Oh really? He mentions not only women 9 by name but he talks about what hard workers they were and how important they were to the ministry.

There is no chauvinistic, not a bone in his body was a male chauvinist bone. Verse 1, "I commend to you Phoebe our sister [she tops the list] who is a servant [the Greek word, she is a deacon, a deaconess] of the church of Cenchrea that you may receive her in the Lord, in a manner worthy of the saints, and assist her in whatever business she has need of you. For indeed she has been a helper of many, and of myself also."

See the word 'helper,' prostatis, it means a benefactor, somebody who is wealthy and gives their money to fund something. No doubt Phoebe was a rich girl, fell in love with Jesus, saw what Paul was doing and she said, "You know what, I am going to underwrite your ministry. Here is a big check for you Paul. I want you to do is to preach the Gospel, a helper in the ministry."

Verse 22, "I" notice what it says not "I Paul," "I Tertius, who wrote this epistle, greet you in the Lord."

No, wait a minute, is this a contradiction? Because the first part of the book says, "Paul wrote it." Then, there is a guy, he says, "Here I am. I am Tertius, I wrote the book." Who is Tertius? He was an amanuensis. He was a secretary. He is a guy who took dictation. Paul didn't sit down with a pen, he spoke it. It was oral, it was audible, and then it was written down.

Galatians chapter 6 toward the end, Paul says, "See with what large letters I am writing to you with my own hand." That is what we think. We think that Paul did Galatians, like he put together Romans. He dictated it. Somebody wrote it down an amanuensis. But toward the end of Galatians, he got his own pen and he started writing just his concluding remarks; just a verse or two. Large letters, he had to write really big because his eyes were bad; is the idea. We don't know what happened to his eyes; there's a lot of conjecture. It's my belief that perhaps when he was at derby and he was stoned and thought to be dead, caught up into the third Heaven perhaps also at that time, that it impaired his vision for the rest of his life; he couldn't see after that. He saw double or he just didn't see clearly and so he had to write large letters.

Now, let's close verse 24 through 27 and we will pray. This is the most extensive and eloquent benediction of all of Paul's letters.

"The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all, Amen!" Amen doesn't mean I am done because he goes on.

"Now, to Him who is able to establish you according to my Gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery kept secret since the world began. But now it's been manifest and by the prophetic Scriptures made known to all nations according to the commandment of the everlasting God for obedience to faith, to God alone, wise, be glory. To God, alone wise, be glory through Jesus Christ forever." Now, he says, 'Amen' again and that means Amen! I am done. Thank you Paul!

I commend to you the book called Pilgrim's Progress, which takes figuratively the idea of Romans, a man consigned under the wrath of God who experiences the grace of God and follows the plan and the will of God leaves the city of destruction, is redeemed and goes to the celestial city; a book that Charles Haden Spurgeon read twice every year. Read it at least once in your lifetime and see how it fits into the book of Romans.

You should know this too. The Bishop of Constantinople in the third century, a guy by the name of John Chrysostom had the book of Romans read to him once every week for 18 years. Because he said, this is it. I've got to master this. Also one of my favorite other dead guys named Martin Lloyd-Jones spent 14 years preaching through the book of Romans in his church at Westminster Chapel in London, and he didn't finish before he resigned from that pulpit, he had to finish it later and it's in written form, several commentaries, talk about an exhaustive commentary. But the idea is, everybody agrees this is the heart, this is the principle, this tells the whole story of God's plan from beginning to end. It's the Gospel of Grace, the righteousness of God, not through works, not through religion, not through moralistic behavior, but through faith, you are justified, you are atoned for and propitiation, redeemed, and eventually glorified, the whole entire plan. Let's pray.

Heavenly Father, we close tonight this wonderful book; just barely scratched the surface, talked really about it; didn't really get much into it. But we are able to see how it's constructed, why it's constructed, and how Paul masterfully weaves in promises and scripture from the Old into the New Testament. To show that it really was indeed in your mind, a part of your plan from eternity past, all of scripture has one main subject and that is the Lord Jesus Christ.

Thank You Father for the life of Paul; we thank You Lord for the truth that all have sinned, that there's none righteous in Your sight, not one, that we are all abiding under the wrath of God. People aren't basically good, that all people are depraved and basically evil and must be redeemed. Unless we understand that we will never understand the meaning of Gospel, good news. The good news is that freedom that would redeem, buy back a slave from a position of being utterly cast out. It is what Jesus is willing to do for each one of us; to forgive, to acquit, to declare righteous.

Lord, I pray, if anyone here has come tonight and has not cast themselves upon You as one poor in spirit, one mourning over their condition and needing salvation if there are those who have come, who haven't come that way, acknowledging their sinfulness and the need of your forgiveness but their desire tonight is to be saved, to be washed, to be set free, to have hope and purpose and enter into a relationship with You, Lord, we pray that You would bring conviction to those hearts and draw them by Your Holy Spirit to Your son, the Lord Jesus Christ. It's in His name we pray, Amen!

Let's all stand up; we're going to sing a final song. As we sing this song; I'm going to ask you, if you haven't received Jesus Christ personally, authentically; if you really haven't done this yet, I'm glad you've come to church but I want you do to more if you haven't come to Christ; I want you to come to Him tonight. You come just as you are and you ask Him to take you as you are and forgive you as you are and He'll make you His child, His son or daughter. So we'll sing this last song; I'm going to ask you if you're willing to do that or if you need to make a recommitment to Christ. I'm going to ask you to get up from where you're standing and come right up here in the front; where I'm going to lead you in a prayer to receive Christ; start a whole new life; stuff that Paul wrote about. As we sing you come, come right now and we'll meet you right up front, come right up now. Pray to receive Jesus; we'll wait for you, we'll wait for you but come. Don't hesitate, don't put this off. [Clapping -- Music]

God bless you [clapping -- Music] what's your name? [Clapping -- Music] What's your name? God bless you. [Clapping -- Music] [Music playing]

Some have struggled with different sins, occupations, things you've done, you've been involved in, you really long to be set free. [Clapping -- Music] You'd loved to know that, you've loved to know that if you were to die or when you are to die that you would go to heaven, you want to know that and more then that you want to live with joy, freedom, purpose, and enjoy the will of God. God is calling you to a complete life change; He's not asking you to add God to your already busy life; He's asking you to come to God, and make God the very center of everything you do and are. It's called repentance in the Bible, you turn from and you turn to and you let Him transform, metamorphosis, a total change. He wants to do that inside of you. Is there anybody else that is willing to take that offer? As we close this service you come right now. [Music playing - Clapping] What's your name? Steve. Steve, I'm Skip, God bless you. What's your name? I'm glad you came up man.

Now those of you who have come forward, I'd like to lead you in a prayer okay. This is how; this is how we do it. I'm going to ask you to pray. I'm going to ask you, to ask Jesus into your heart because you're the one in the driver seat right now of your life; you're the only one to make this choice. So I'm going to help by leading you in a prayer. I'm going to pray it out loud; I'd like you to pray it out loud after me from your heart to the Lord. Let's do it. Lord I give you my life, I know that I'm a sinner, please forgive me, I place my trust in Jesus Christ who died on the cross and rose from the dead, I turn from my sin, I turn to You, I receive You, Jesus, as my Savior and my Lord. Help me to live for You, in Jesus' name. Amen.

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
completed
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
completed
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/1/2007
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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8/8/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
completed
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
completed
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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12/5/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.
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1/9/2008
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Message Summary
Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/16/2008
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
completed
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
Skip Heitzig
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
Skip Heitzig
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
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Destination: Acts
Acts
Skip Heitzig
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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10/8/2008
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
Skip Heitzig
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
Skip Heitzig
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
completed
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
Skip Heitzig
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
Skip Heitzig
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
completed
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
Skip Heitzig
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
completed
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
Skip Heitzig
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
Skip Heitzig
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
Skip Heitzig
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.
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There are 64 additional messages in this series.