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Destination: 2 Corinthians - 2 Corinthians

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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.

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10/15/2008
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
Skip Heitzig
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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DESTINATION: 2 Corinthians

Between the writing of 1 Corinthians and 2 Corinthians, the church at Corinth was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul because they thought he was unqualified as an apostle of Jesus Christ. Paul sent Titus as his representative to deal with them, and the majority of the church repented of their actions. Paul later wrote 2 Corinthians to express his joy at the turnaround, and to appeal to the church to accept his authority.

CALENDAR OF EVENTS:

c. 35-67 A.D.

Ministry of Paul

c. 53-57

Paul's third missionary journey

c. 57 A.D.

Writing of 2 Corinthians

TRIP PLANNER:

Paul speaks more about himself in this letter than in any other. He explains his ministry in the first seven chapters, then talks about the collection for the saints (chapters 8-9), and in the last four chapters he defends his claim to be an apostle. Several times, he refers to the many hardships he has suffered for the Gospel, especially in the argument called the "fool's speech" in the latter part of the book. He mocks the Corinthians for their preoccupation with showy spiritual gifts by contrasting it with his weaknesses and the hardships he has faced.

PLACES OF INTEREST:

Corinth – A city located in southern Greece about 50 miles from Athens. It was a major seaport and crossroads in the ancient world.

Macedonia – North part of Greece, where Paul wrote 2 Corinthians during is third missionary journey.

PEOPLE OF INTEREST:

Paul – Paul tells us more about himself in this book than in any other

Corinthians – The believers in the church at Corinth were swayed by false teachers to rebel against Paul's authority as an apostle.

Titus – Paul's emissary to the church at Corinth.

Timothy – Paul's partner on his third missionary journey.

FUN FACTS:
  • 2 Corinthians was written 6-18 months after 1 Corinthians.

  • Scholars speculate that Paul wrote four letters to the church at Corinth, only two of which survive, as 1 and 2 Corinthians.

Transcript

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In the time of Paul the Apostle, Corinth was a prosperous city in southern Greece. Residence of the city knew the depths of depravity but Paul brought them to the heights of God's grace; this did not mean the church at Corinth was without blemish. Paul's second letter goes right to the heart of these issues.

Pastor Skip Heitzig: Tonight is the fiftieth week in "The Bible From 30,000 Feet", which means technically we're still under a year and by week 52 the year mark we'll be in the book of Ephesians so we're making pretty good time. Some of the books we'll be able to put together are like First and Second Thessalonians, First and Second Timothy, some of the shorter epistles, and sooner very shortly we'll be in our final night of the book of Revelation; sailing through it very, very rapidly. So it's been, it's been a good time so far. Are you ready for Second Corinthians? Let's turn there tonight Second Corinthians chapter 1. There's a book that was put out some years ago called, "The Jewish 100" by an author, Jewish author named Michael Shapiro. And he wrote a list and then an explanation of the list, a list of the 100 most influential Jews of history, ranking on the top of the list was none other than Moses. Number one, the most influential Jew of all times, Moses the great law giver, for obvious reasons, the law came through Moses. Second on his list was Jesus Christ, an interesting pick for number two. Now of course you would contend, He would be number one, but keep in mind the framework of the list and you would understand.

Third on his list, Albert Einstein, fourth on his list Sigmund Freud. Fifth on his list, the patriarch Abraham, and number six Saul of Tarsus aka Paul, the Apostle, very influential undeniable. This changed the course of world history. I don't know exactly how you picture Paul with his personality. What you would assume he would be like personally. But I can say that a lot of people think that Paul, the Apostle was detached aloof, after all he was a very strong leader. He came off to some people that way, and some people today might read the "Epistles of Paul" and figure that he was sort of that individual didn't really need anybody, didn't let the cracks show.

Well, if you have that idea of Paul, then Second Corinthians will break and shatter than illusion. It is the most personal of all of Paul's letters. It is so personal, it is so enduring that Homer Kent who was a great Bible expositor wrote a commentary, and he titled the commentary the theme of the book, "A Heart Opened Wide," "A Heart Opened Wide." It's language that Paul himself will use in the book, I have opened my heart wide to you, please open your heart to me. So Paul shares the deep emotion and love and how he wrestled for the souls who were there at Corinth, very, very personal, very, very emotional of all the books.

There is a keyword in this book, and I'm going to give you an outline in a minute, but I want to give you one of the key features, one of the keywords, probably the keyword, mentioned 29 times in Second Corinthians is the word comfort, or sometimes translated encouragement. But from the same Greek word, parakaleo or paraklesis, to encourage, to comfort, to walk alongside and uplift, used 29 times in this book, 11 times as a noun and 18 times as a verb. So that's one of the themes of the book is, Paul is encouraging people. So he wrote Second Corinthians for four reasons.

Here they are: number one, to encourage them, to encourage them, To do what? To forgive and restore a sinning brother. You remember him from last week, he was the guy who was involved in incest and Paul said, "Kick him out of the church." Obviously by now he's repented and he writes to encourage them to forgive and restore.

Reason number two, to explain to them, to encourage them, number two, to explain to them, why he has changed his plans and hasn't come again to visit them in Corinth. Reason number three, to enlist their help for the church in Jerusalem. He's going to take up an offering and in this book he is going to write a lot about Christian giving financially for the church in Jerusalem. And number four to establish his own apostleship.

Here is one of the problems and one of the incentives for Paul writing Second Corinthians. There was a group of self-styled authoritarian leaders who would come into the church and were talking bad against Paul because Paul had been absent. He had been in Corinth, but now he is in Ephesus for a few years, and they were stirring things up and the church was starting to divide over the issue of Paul, the Apostle. So Paul is going to write to firmly establish his own apostleship. So those are the reasons he writes this book and you'll find them smattered throughout. To encourage, to explain, to enlist, and to establish.

If you remember from last week, I'm just going to cover a couple of important facts. Paul had been in Corinth for 18 months, it's the longest he stayed anywhere except for one other place. Who knows what that is? Ephesus, Ephesus he stays for three-and-a-half years, but he stays one-and-a-half years, 18 months at Corinth. When he arrives he stays with tent makers, beautiful couple, Aquila and Priscilla, goes to the synagogue, starts preaching the gospel. It didn't go very well, synagogue kicks him out. So he begins a home Bible study. Well, it just happened that the guy's home, the guy's name was Justice and his home was right next door to the synagogue.

So his home Bible study was right there, next door to the synagogue for 18 months. So the nucleus of the church that forms in Corinth were Jewish at first. However, by this time they are predominantly gentile. The nature of Paul's message was so wide and so inviting and so forgiving that not only the Jewish people but a great number of gentiles by this time have come. Probably, most of the people in the church were the low class, not the high class, the low class of Corinth.

For Paul says in First Corinthians, "You see your calling brethrens, not many mighty, not many noble after the flesh are called, but God has chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise."

So Paul leaves Corinth, goes to Ephesus, while he's there, he gets a note from Chloe. Remember Chloe, Chloe's household. "Hey there's problems in Corinth," she says, "the church is dividing over Paul, Apollos, Peter, and Jesus. They're being very sectarian." Paul writes, to correct that, that's First Corinthians. He also sends Timothy to Corinth to settle them down. Timothy comes back with some very disturbing news.

Hey Paul, there's a group of leaders there, they're talking smack about you, they're trying to undermine your authority, they're trying to say that you are a wolf in sheep's clothing. So Paul writes Second Corinthians, impart to establish his apostolic authority, as the founder or father and apostle of that church, and he does so very elegantly toward the end.

Okay, let me give you the outline of the book and I won't tell you the breakdown of the chapters so we get into it. But there's five different sections of Second Corinthians; five different sections, actually seven if you take the introduction and the conclusion. So here is the layout. There is an introduction, and then number one corrections, corrections, corrections, number one corrections. Paul's going to correct or tell them about a change, their change in heart toward descending brother who has now repented, bring him back. Number two, his own personal change in plans, he has corrected his itinerary. I am not coming right away because things have come up.

So number one corrections. Number two, explanations, explanations. Paul wants to explain the nature of his ministry, the motivation of his ministry, the message of the Gospel. He will explain that to them. Number three, exhortations, exhortations. He's going to exhort them on a personal level, open your heart to me. Don't listen to these guys who are, who are turning you away from me, you know that I have opened myself to you, I love you. Open your heart wide. And number two, separate yourself from those sinning worldly people that are in Corinth, separate yourselves who are among them. Those are the exhortations.

Number four solicitation, or you could say, collection. He's going to take up an offering and explain the reason for it and the method for it and the motive for it in a couple of chapters. Then finally number five, vindication, he will defend his own apostolic ministry to those who were in Corinth.

Now let's just take a couple of verses out of the introduction and notice how personal even this is, as he opens up saying Paul, an Apostle of Jesus Christ by the will of God, and Timothy or brother look at verse 3. He portrays God as a merciful comforter.

"Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, the God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our tribulation; that we may be able to comfort those who are in any trouble with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God."

Now Paul did suffer as an apostle, it is part of his credential, he suffered. He suffered externally from the world who persecuted him and he suffered internally from Christians who misjudged his motivation. So he's sort of hinting it that here, and what he's saying, with this one of the most beautiful promises for anybody going through a trial, don't waste your suffering, don't waste it.

When, when you go through a trial, don't look at it, just a dumb trial, but a divine appointment and when I say don't waste it, I mean analyze it, learn from it, and ask yourself how can what I'm going through help other people who will go through this later on. I'm convinced. One of the reasons you go through trials is for this very reason, you can be a comfort to others. You know it's amazing, all the stuff Paul has suffered for years and he can still say, "Blessed be the God, Father of our Lord Jesus Christ."

You know somebody once said, "Your spiritual maturity can be measured by what it takes to steal your joy." Think about that, spiritual maturity can be measured by what it takes to steal your joy. Have you ever met a Christian who just seems no matter what they go through, to just sort of be above at all a little bit, just I know life is bad, I know this is horrible, but you know God is so good, and they always seem to have a lift in their step and they see that there's a greater purpose for it. Sometimes it's sort of hard to be around those people they are so convicting because they're filled with joy; it's actually a mark of maturity. I don't know what you're going through in your life and with this financial crisis going on around us. I wonder if you can say like Paul, "Blessed be the God, and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ."

You know no matter what happens in your world, there's always enough bad stuff going around that you can focus on it. I would like to use this example, if I had a white sheet that was 10 feet by 10 feet and I had a little five inch black dot somewhere on that white sheet. What would you look at? Yeah, the black dot even though there's much more white than there is black, we have a tendency to look at the black dots in life and not the overwhelming amount of blessings beside the black dot. The white swath that overshadows it and Paul did that. He looked at God's blessing through everything. Now the first section of Second Corinthians is corrections.

And beginning in chapter 1, verse 12, the chapter 2, verse 13, he's going to talk about changes in his plans and how they as a congregation of Corinth should change their attitude toward that sinning brother that he mentioned in First Corinthians; so in verse 5 of chapter 2.

"But if anyone has caused grief, he has not grieved me, but all of you to some extent -- not to be too severe. This punishment which was inflicted by the majority is sufficient for such a man, so that, on the contrary, you ought rather to forgive and comfort him, lest perhaps such a one be swallowed up with too much sorrow. Therefore I urge you to reaffirm your love to Him."

If you remember in First Corinthians, he said, I've heard about this case in your church where you've got somebody in fellowship who's practicing incest. It's a man who has his stepmother living with him, in a sexual manner and Paul says what really grieves me is you rejoicing it, because you're so tolerant, you're so lenient, you're like the new Christian, you just might let everything go. And Paul says, I'll tell you what you ought to do, get him out of your fellowship. Seems like they did that, and it seems that in the interim this brother came to his senses, and was sorrowful and repented.

So Paul says, look enough is enough, grief can overwhelm a person and he has a godly sorrow and it is toward repentant and so you ought to bring him back into the fellowship. It's a principle Jesus actually said in Luke chapter 17.

He says, "If your brother sins against you, rebuke him; if he repents forgive him." So Paul tells them, rebuke him, they rebuked him, got, cut and loose, now he is asking for forgiveness.

Verse 11, skip down to that, "lest Satan should take advantage of us; for we are not ignorant of his devices."

I wish Paul would have said, for most of us are not ignorant of his device. Because I fear some of us are ignorant of his devices. And case in point is the very case he's bringing up here, Satan's strategy is very simple when it comes to a church, divide and conquer.

And if he can allow unforgiveness into the midst of the assembly, it can be torn in two. If you have an unforgiving person inside the church or a group of unforgiving persons in the church, he has established a foothold. If there's an unforgiving spirit that pervades the whole church, he's got a beachhead to divide their church. Paul is warning them we're not ignorant of his devices.

So that's corrections, number two are explanations, explanations. And in chapter 2, beginning in verse 14 all the way to chapter 6, verse 10. Paul is going to explain the ministry, the nature of the ministry, the nature of his ministry. What the message is that he preached and the motivation.

In chapter 4, verse 1; "Therefore, since we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we do not lose heart." Obviously we don't have time to examine a large chunk of these verses, but Paul gets very personal. He says, let me tell you what I've gone through as an apostle, it's been really tough. I've worked really hard and I've been greatly misunderstood, and I get back up and I do it again, and I get beat up and thrown in jail, and I get out and I do it again.

But in summing it up, he says, "we do not lose heart." Chapter 4 verse 1, go down to verse 8.

"We are hard pressed [or pushed pressured] on every side, yet not crushed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed - always carrying about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body."

Think of Paul's career as a Christian. First experience receives the Lord, goes to Damascus. What happens in Damascus? Yeah, they threatened to kill him. He turns into a basket case, they have to let him over the wall in a basket, and he escapes and he goes to Jerusalem and his life is threatened and they have to ship him off to Tarsus for several years. On his first missionary journey, he gets to Lystra, they stone him and drag him out of the city. Later on when he gets to Philippi, after he sees a vision of the man from Macedonia. He's thrown in jail, after a mob riot in that city, and he's beaten by the jailer.

He goes later on to Ephesus, a huge riot erupts in that city, everywhere he goes that's part of his ministry, and he seems to be impervious to it all and never discouraged or if he is discouraged, it passes and he moves. He was human, he did get discourage, but that's important. Paul is giving us the anatomy of his ministry. You could look at Paul, the Apostle, yeah most six most influential Jewish person of all time, he has made the list.

Yeah, but examine behind the scenes, and some of you have been here for years at this church and back a few of you were here when we first started. Well that's what a lot of people don't see, if they come here recently they just see a large church, a big campus and they would say, successful. They don't look back when I worked two jobs, and everything was volunteer and we had a little coffee can that's how we collected, that was our agape can, at the back of the Bible study. They don't probably know anything about the death threats that have been leveled against this place or the time the Satan worshipers, some of you will recall, threatened to burn down this building and destroy us all etcetera, etcetera.

And they don't know always see the hard work of all the staff or the preparation of all the different messages. That's why Charles Spurgeon knowing this said to a group of young pastors, all who were so excited to be in the ministry, we want to be in the ministry, that sound so fun they thought. Charles Spurgeon to that class said these words, "If you plan to be the lazy, there are plenty of avocations in which you will not be wanted, but above all you are not wanted in the Christian ministry."

"The man who finds the ministry and easy life will also find that it brings a hard death." I'm sure that day the class was stunned at those very candid words. Paul would agree, Paul lived that, and yet, what motivates Paul, is knowing that he's in God's will now on earth and that he will one day be with the Lord in heaven. That's the payoff, now and later. Now I'm in God's will, later I will be rewarded for it.

So in chapter 5, verse 1; "For we know if our earthly house, this tent, is destroyed, we have a building from God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens."

Verse 14; "For the love of Christ compels us; because we judge thus, that if One died for all, then all died."

So he's talking about his ministry, been through some hardships but I know that my earthly house will give away and I have a reward in heaven, oh and by the way, another motivation for me is the great love of Jesus Christ. It compels me or constraints me.

Verse 15; "And He died for all, that those who live should no longer live for themselves but for Him who died for them and rose again."

Now go down to verse 21. I'm taking you here, we eluded to this in communion moments ago.

Verse 21 of Second Corinthians, chapter 5 is the clearest declaration of substitutionary atonement I think in all of scripture.

"For He made Him who knew no sin to be sin for us that we might become the righteousness of God in Him."

We would call this the great exchange; the great exchange. Here's Jesus sinless, here's us hopeless sinners, the great exchange. Where the Father would say, I'm going to give you Jesus all of their sin, so that I can give them all of your righteousness that's the exchange.

When I first heard the gospel, I got this part, this registered with me. It registered so much as I was listening to Billy Graham on television and I've told you that story and as he was preaching the gospel that evening, I actually listened and I thought, well that's not a good deal. God's like getting a horrible deal here, you're saying that I'm going to get all of His righteousness and all of His blessing and all of His forgiveness because Jesus took all of my sin and all of that pain, He got a rotten deal.

But then I kept thinking about it, okay, God is infinite, God is powerful, if this is God's plan and now I am convinced that it is, I'm getting like the killer deal and I'd be an idiot to pass this up, it's that good. This great exchange, this is the principle of imputation, he imputes to Jesus, puts on His side of the ledger all of the failures, all of the foibles, all of the sin. So that He can say, I see you like Jesus.

"He made Him who knew no sin that we might be the righteousness in Him."

So I'll sum it up this way, God the Father at the Cross treated Jesus Christ, like you and I deserved to be treated, so that God the Father could treat us, like Jesus Christ deserves to be treated. That's the principle that is flushed out in verse 21.

Isaiah 53, you want to write that at the margin of your Bible, if you like to take notes, I hope you do, right. Isaiah 53 in the margin of your Bible or on your note says this; "Surely He has borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we esteemed Him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. But He was wounded for our transgressions; He was [pierced] bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement for our peace was upon Him; and by His stripes we are healed."

Why all of this elaborate plan? Here's the answer because the only way to populate heaven is the forgiveness of sin and the only way sin can be forgiven is somebody sinless, God the Son spilling His blood till death so that God could make this great exchange, and that's the principle of substitutionary atonement, very, very key to your Christian walk, it's the Gospel.

The third section of Second Corinthian is a list of exhortations. Paul exhorts them. In chapter 6, verse 11 through chapter 7; verse 16 one of the exhortation is, "Hey guys! Open up your hearts toward Me, don't let these self appointed authoritarian leaders turn you against Me, open up your heart." And the second exhortation is separate yourself from the worldliness that is there in Corinth.

So look at verse 11 of chapter 6; "O Corinthians! We have spoken openly to you, our heart is wide open. You are not restricted by us, but you are restricted by your own affections."

So these leaders in Paul's absence had come into this church, his great work of God at Corinth and started turning their hearts, their affections away from Paul toward them and their strategy was simple, talk enough dirt about Paul so that they will close their hearts toward him. So that then they would open up their hearts toward them. That was their strategy and Paul was on to them and he corrects this in this chapter.

So he says, look, don't close your heart. Look I've opened my heart to you. The word is enlarge, my heart is actually larger and more in love with you now than ever before. So open your heart toward us. I have seen this by the way. I have seen leaders come in with their own agenda, seeking to turn people's hearts away from a leader, from a pastor and toward their own agenda and try to divide groups.

Did you know that every month 1,600 ministers resign from the ministry? Around the world, it's estimated that 1,600 resign from the ministry and there are number of reasons they resign, all the way from moral failure, that's what a lot of people like to look at and think about, but there is a lot more reasons for that than that.

Spiritual burnout and number two fighting in contentions within the church; 94 percent who quit, feel pressure to have the ideal family; 84 percent quit because they are discouraged by others in the church; 85 percent believe the greatest problem is that they're sick and tired of dealing with problem people, year after year, always a problem, always a problem and just it burns them out; 1,600 quit.

No wonder Stuart Briscoe very witty and godly man said, "The qualifications for any pastor must be that he should have the mind of a scholar, he should have the heart of a child, and he should have the height of a rhinoceros." Well Paul had all of those and they're all demonstrated in beautiful balance in Second Corinthians, very brilliant Jewish scholar. Very tender heart, is revealed in Second Corinthians unlike any other book, any other treatise and yet the hide of a rhinoceros. He knows the truth, that's why he can sleep at night and he comes to defend himself.

Look at verse 13; "Now in return for the same (I speak as to children), you also be open. Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness? And what accord has Christ with Belial?" [Another term for Satan.] "What part has a believer with an unbeliever?"

Now primarily, primarily, the analogy is that they should separate from false teachers. You shouldn't be yoked with these false teachers who are turning your hearts away, but the principle is much wider than that. That's just the immediate context. This applies to any kind of alliance that a Christian would form with a non-Christian. It's a good principle to follow.

Now there is a translation put up by C. K. Barrett of this verse and he renders it. "You must not get into double harness with unbelievers." That's a yoke. A yoke was a wooden device; it linked two animals together to pull a plow, to do the work. Any wise farmer would select animals of the same species, same size, same strength, same temperament, there would be a compatibility because if not; if he chooses animals that don't work well together, they won't work together. They'll come and pull in opposite directions and you won't get any work done.

So you could apply this principle to marriage, you could apply this principle to business alliances. And tell you what; I've seen Christians compromise their values and dating values because they say they're just no good Christian guys at church.

So they become missionaries daters and decide to lead that unsaved heathen but very good looking hulky non-believing man to Christ and they get yoke together and it doesn't really workout very well, not the same temperament, not going in the same direction and they find that their whole life is a tug of war. And God can't do His work through them. Like the farmer couldn't do work through animals that were not yoked together. So that could be again in business, it could be in marriage.

Now we must never misunderstand that Paul is saying we should end all associations with unbelievers. Now they tried that once, it's called the convent, it's called a monastery, separate from the world be only with my kind. Well, how can you ever affect the unbelieving worlds of the Gospel if you think that way?

And Paul makes that clear in First Corinthians. He said, "Hey, when I wrote you before" -- this is First Corinthians but I said that there were at least three letters, some believe four, which would make First Corinthians, Second Corinthians and Second Corinthians Third Corinthians, but we went through that last week, anyway

He said, "When I wrote to you before and I said don't keep company with sexually immoral people, I didn't mean sexually immoral people of the world otherwise you would have to like go to the moon." I'm translating that freely, "you'd have to leave this world," he said, "because they're everywhere." And he wants us to penetrate the world, unbelieving world, the sinners, the cussers, the people who need to hear the message. But it was those who claimed to be believers.

Okay, again Paul is very personal; look at chapter 7, verse 2,
As the heart of the congregation is turning against him he says, "Open your hearts to us, we have wronged no one, we have corrupted no one, we have cheated no one. I do not say this to condemn you, for I have said before, that you are in our hearts, to die together and to live together."

Now scholars try to peace together what may have happened to Corinth with Paul. It could be that some of them were saying, you know Paul is kind of mean and overbearing. He's such a strong leader, after all, remember in First Corinthians, chapter 5, he said that you want to kick that person out of the church. How harsh can you get? That's one possibility.

Some may have misunderstood Paul saying that he wants to take an offering for the church in Jerusalem. It's some sort of financial money making scheme that Paul had cooked up, that's why he said we cheated no one. It's very hard to convince people that you love them when others are trying to turn around your motivations with at every turn, with a counter spin, that's what Paul is suffering being misunderstood.

The fourth section of Second Corinthian is solicitation. This is where Paul says, "I'm coming. I'm going to take an offering and we're going to give the money to the saints of Jerusalem." That's in chapter 8, verse 1 through chapter 9, verse 15, there's a beautiful section about the Christian's relationship to money and giving freely to God's work and principles in portion.

What was happening in Jerusalem that Paul needed to even do this? Because this is a little bit odd typically when it comes to missions giving, the home church supports the outreach church, at least for a while, we've done that to a number of churches around the country and countries around the world. This is foreign missions in reverse. Now you have those churches of our planet supporting the mother church, so to speak, the one that sent them out. So what's the deal?

Probably, here's the deal. Number one, most of the jobs in Jerusalem were temple related and the temple was an institution run by the Sadducees, who denied the resurrection, had turn against the early church. They lost their jobs. So what did they do? Well they went from that to communal living.

We read the book of Acts, right, and they pulled their resources together, they sold their land, their goods, and they put all of the money together because financial times were so tough, and I love that when financial times get tough, the church gets tough and figuring out a way to deal with this. So they started taking care of their own by selling their property, pooling their goods so they had enough money to support each other. But even that money was drawing out.

Number three, probably a famine struck Jerusalem. If you remember back in Acts, chapter 11, there was a prophet in Judaea named Agabus, remember that. Do you remember that Agabus made a prediction that there will be a great famine throughout the world and the Bible says which happened? So if the famine, as Agabus predicted hit Judaea on top of losing their jobs, on top of running out of pooled resources, they were hurting for certain. So the other churches in Macedonia, in Achaia, in Asia Minor, were pooling their resources to give back to the place that blessed the world with the Gospel.

So in chapter 8, verse 1; "Moreover, brethren, we may known to you the grace of God bestowed on the churches of Macedonia: that in great trial of affliction the abundance of their joy and their deep poverty abounded in the riches of their liberality." In another words, they were poor but they gave a lot for this cause.

Verse 3; "For I bear witness that according to their ability, yes, beyond their ability they were freely willing." That is freely willing to give and notice it was out of their poverty. It wasn't really -- when Paul says to give, he says, you should give proportionately to whatever you make. You know, the Bible talks about the tithe and I get asked that a lot. Well, do we tithe on the net or the gross? And if you got to start asking those kind of questions, it's get a little weird. I just -- liberality. Hows that? Generosity, give with hilarity, as we'll see in just a minute.

Obviously, whenever a Christian gives to a cause to a church, to a mission, it should cost him, it should cost him. And I get this principle from David when he was looking for a place to build the temple. Remember the story, Araunah owned the property. So David works out the negotiations. Something like this, "Dude, I want to buy your land." "Oh! What's it for?" "I want to build God a temple." "Well, if you are going to build God a temple, I would like to donate the land. "No, I'm going to pay full prize for it. Give me a good prize and I'll pay for it." "No, it's for the Lord, I'll give it you."

And David said these words, "No, I insist on paying you for it, for I will not sacrifice to the Lord, my God a burnt offering that cost me nothing." It's got to hurt a little bit, it's got a cost, I have to feel it because this is for God and David wanted to pay that prize.

He continues here Verse 7; Paul says, "But as you abound in everything, in faith, in speech, in knowledge, in all diligence," [you are good at all these, you make straight "A's" and all those as a church], "and in your love for us, see that you abound in this grace also."
I have in my own heart; I get to carry the testimony of God's faithfulness for 25 years. What I've seen here has been so much fun through all sorts of different times. I remember as I mentioned back when we first started the church at the Lakes Apartments right down the street, and we were all working at local jobs and just getting together for fellowship and yet we needed to pay the rent on the apartment, clubhouse and we needed cookies for the Wednesday night Bible study, then the Thursday Bible study. We needed coffee; you know what I mean, what's fellowship without that we thought. So that took some money, we are all pitching in and we put a Folgers coffee can in the back and just told people, hey, if you want to help support the cost of this apartment clubhouse and the cookies and the coffee, there's a can you can put your money in it and we'll do it.

And we saw that God was so faithful with the coffee can that when we went to Sunday mornings at the theatre, we thought let's put two coffee cans out, one on either side. Now we are in the big leagues, and we decided to get our own building. We figured God has been so faithful with coffee cans, let's keep this up. Let's just put boxes in different places, same principle. Let people know where they are, not saying we are taking up a special offering and another service and another special offering and I believe there is 40 people with none of that stuff, we just keep it open and watch God be faithful. And just I got to tell you God is faithful. I've seen it and I get to carry that testimony forever in my heart.

But the principles here still stand, you can tell a lot about a person's spirituality or lack of it by their attitude toward money, by their giving, or their lack of it. That's what Jesus said, where a man's heart is, there will his treasure be also. I have it backwards, where a man's treasure is, there will his heart be also. That's the principle.

And the Christian comes to the realization I don't own anything, I'm a steward of everything. I'm steward of it all; it all belongs to the Lord. Here's a little clip that was given to me from a magazine called Church News out of Mississippi.

Quote; "There is a disease which is particularly virulent in this part of the 21st century, it is called Cirrhosis of the Giver. It was actually discovered about 34 AD and ran a terminal course in a couple named Ananias and Sapphira; it is an acute condition which renders the patient's hand immobile when it attempts to move from the billfold to the offering plate. The remedy is removed; the remedy is to remove the afflicted from the house of God since it's clinically observable that this condition disappears in alternate environments such as the golf course or clubs or restaurants."

So Paul is saying, hey, you will excel in so many things Corinth, love and all of these great virtues, excel in this as well.

Chapter 9, verse 6; "But this I say: He who sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and He who sows bountifully will also reap bountifully."

Now we're getting some spiritual principles in giving that this law of the harvest is not just a physical law, it's also a spiritual law. Here is a spiritual law of giving; this isn't the first time it comes up. If you know your Bibles, you know it's a principle throughout.

Like Jesus said in Luke chapter 6, verse 38; "Give, and it will be on to you: good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over will be put into your bosom. For with the same measure that you use, it will be measured back to you."

Now this is a principle from the Old Testament, God said, "Don't test Me at all, except there's one area that you can test Me in is and I command you to test Me and that's in tithes and offerings. You give, don't hold it back, you freely support My work in the temple and watch what happens, I will open the windows of heaven and pour out a blessing on you that you can't contain, same principle.

Old Testament, Jesus, Paul, the Apostle and Solomon, the book of Proverbs chapter 11 verse 24 and 25; "There is one who scatters, yet increases more; there is one who withholds more than is right, but it leads to poverty. The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself."

I got to tell you that's a principle in the Scripture, I also got to tell you I don't quite understand it, but I know it works. Any more that I don't quite understand, you put something to ground and all the stuff comes up later on when you water it. But it's a law of the harvest and there is a spiritual law of the harvest in giving.

Verse 7; "So let each one give as he purposes in his heart, (has to be individual) not grudgingly nor of necessity; for God loves a cheerful [or hilarious] giver."

So you can be a sad giver, if you look here, giving grudgingly, oh, I don't want to do this, I want to hold onto it. You can be a mad giver of necessity it says, or you can be a glad giver. God likes the last kind.

I love one of the days when we take a tour in Israel and we drive from the north, Sea of Galilee through Beth Shean through the Jordan Valley. Remember that day and we end up at the Dead Sea and then up towards Jerusalem. In just a couple of hours, you're at the Sea of Galilee which is lush and green, there's children playing around, there's trees, life everywhere. You go a few miles south and you get to the Dead Sea, barren, dry, nothing grows in it or around it, it's dead.

And any thinking person would say, huh, it looks like it's the same source of water, the Jordan River that flows into both of them. What's the difference? Why is one alive and one dead? Simple explanation, see if Galilee is alive because it takes in water and it gives out water, inlet and an outlet. The Dead Sea is dead because it hoards everything, there's an inlet, it takes in water and takes in more water and more water, there is no outlet, it evaporates.

And because it only takes in and never gives out, it's dead. And that has become an analogy used by the Jews for centuries of how our lives should be taking in God's blessing and giving out God's blessing and in principle that's what Paul is sharing with the Corinthians.

Now the fifth and final section of this book is vindication. This is where Paul sort of ruffles up his apostolic feathers and defends his own authority, his credentials and his conduct.

Verse 1 of chapter 10, all the way to chapter 12, verse 18; "Now I, Paul, myself am pleading with you by the meekness and gentleness of Christ who in presence am lowly among you, but being absent am bold towards you. But I beg you that when I am present I may not be bold with that confidence by which I intend to be bold against some, (get his drift) who think of us as if we walked according to the flesh."

Those were all the accusations that were going against him.

Verse 8; "For even if I should boast somewhat more about our authority, which the Lord gave us for edification and not for your destruction, I shall not be ashamed lest I seem to terrify you by letters."

Verse 10
"For his letters," they say, "are weighty and powerful, but his bodily presence is weak, his speech contemptible."

It was the accusation; it seems by this group that we're spreading rumors in Corinth. Paul is really big and bold when he writes from afar, he is Mr. Authority, but you get him in your presence face-to-face, eye-to-eye and he's weak. He's short of stature. By the way, this is probably a slur in part about how Paul looked. Now again I don't know how you picture Paul, the Apostle, maybe stately with a deep voice, very handsomely cut face, the perfect beard, a little halo around his head. I don't know how you picture him, but you would have that wrong too.

There's an apocryphal book called "The Acts of Paul and Thecla" which is in account of Paul's physical appearance and here it is quote, "He's a man of little stature, thin haired upon his head, crooked in his legs of good state of body with eyebrows joining." We call that a unibrow, can you picture Paul, the unibrow, "and nose somewhat hooked." So a hooked nose, aquiline nose, short squatty unibrow. But it says full of grace, where sometimes he appeared like a man and sometimes he had the face of an angel.

They were probably making fun of his weighty letters but they said, yeah, but he is just a weakling, he is wimp up close and making fun of his physical stature.

Chapter 11, verse 5; "For I consider that I am not at all inferior to the most eminent apostles. Even though I am untrained in speech, yet I am not in knowledge. But we have been thoroughly manifested among you in all things."

Now he's going to give some of his qualifications as an apostle like his conduct among them, his suffering for them in chapter 11.

Then in chapter 12, verse 1; "It is doubtless not profitable for me to boast. I will come to visions and revelations of the Lord."

So, you know, he's sort of talking out loud saying, look I don't want to boast but since you brought up my qualifications, let me tell you what I have been through and he speaks about visions. Now here's a guy that had visions. First vision was on the road to Damascus, Jesus Christ appeared to him. Second vision in Damascus, the Lord again appears to him by the man named Ananias.

When he is at Troas, he sees a vision of a man from Macedonia saying, come over to Macedonia and help us. When he gets to Corinth, the Lord appears to him again and says, keep speaking Paul, don't worry, I'm with you. I have many people in this city. When he gets to Jerusalem, after he's arrested there, the Lord encourages him again, as you testified of Me in Jerusalem you're also going to testify of Me in Rome. Then he's on a boat in a storm, chapter 27 of Acts and again he gets another vision.

All of those visions are one thing, this vision that he speaks about here is quite another.

Verse 2; "I know a man in Christ who fourteen years ago whether in the body I do not know, or whether out of the body I do not know, God knows such a one was caught up to the third heaven."

And Paul is speaking about himself because he will identify himself in a minute. You say, why is he speaking of himself in the third person? A very common rabbinical style of teaching, sort of is if to diffuse the spotlight and talk about yourself without saying me in the first person, it was done in the third person, rabbinical story telling.

Verse 3; "And I know such a man whether in the body or out of the body I do not know, God knows, how he was caught up into paradise and heard inexpressible words, not lawful for a man to utter. Of such a one I will boast;" (or I am the dude that I was just speaking about. "Yet of myself I will not boast, except in my infirmities."

Verse 7; "And lest I should be exalted above measure," listen I've had so many visions, this vision of heaven was so cool that it had to get balanced out with some pain. "Lest I should be exalted above measure, by the abundance of the revelations, a thorn in the flesh was given to me, a messenger of Satan to buffet me, lest I should be exalted above measure."

Have you discovered that God knows how to apportion blessings to you and season them with buffetings so you don't get over blessed and over confident? Like, gosh, I'm like the coolest guy in the world, I must be like seamlessly perfect or something because I get blessed all the time.

And some have a warped theology that say you should have that all the time being perfect to have a miracle everyday. Oh yeah, another miracle, so what. This guy is opened up, I'm me.

You'd be the most arrogant person, nobody would ever like you and you would be about as immature as a baby the rest of your life. So God knows how to balance the blessing with buffetings; as He does here. You don't get all buffetings. He intersperses with blessings as well.

"Concerning this thing, verse 8, I pleaded with the Lord three times that it might depart from me." And He said to me, "My grace is enough for you, My strength is made perfect in weakness. Therefore most gladly I would rather boast in my infirmities, that the power of Christ may rest upon me. Therefore I take pleasure in infirmities, in reproaches, in needs, in persecutions, in distresses, for Christ's sake. For when I am weak, then I am strong."

Listen, the average, even Christian has a hard time buying what he just said. Let alone the unbeliever who thinks, he's just out of his mind. Here's a guy saying, bring it on I actually take pleasure in that bad stuff because it means that I'm at the end of myself. I have to trust Jesus. And most of the world go, whatever dude, don't want any part of it and I think a lot of believers would probably throw their hat in with that vote as well.

But he says when I am weak then I am strong. What was Paul's thorn in the flesh, what was that? There are books written about this. Here's a secret, I don't know. Here's another secret, no one else knows, doesn't say what it is. We're not told. It's eluded to I believe, it's hinted out I suspect, but you -- they are the craziest explanations.

One Scottish commentator said, "Paul's thorn in the flesh was his wife." I bet that commentator probably had a bad marriage. Wouldn't you say with that kind of a comment? Like to examine his home life. Well, I'll tell you what the thorn is not, the thorn isn't some little tiny bothersome things. Because the word he uses here is a very strong Greek word.

It's not the kind of thorn you get when you chop wood and you got a piece of wood in your finger and you go, oh, got a little thorn or I was playing with some roses today oh I got a little thorn. That's not the kind of thorn. The translation would be most accurately put stake in the flesh, along wooden impaling rod in some cases. It was used in antiquity; that kind of a stake, some nagging huge physical malady that was incessant and always bothered him.

Some have guessed malaria, others have thought epilepsy, others have thought migraines. Most scholars believe it was an eye disease. Some sort of blindness. Where there was something called Ophthalmia Neonatorum which was pretty common in those days, or after the great vision he saw on the road to Damascus, his vision was never the same. Or how about this one, this is what I sort of lean to, in Lystra they hit him with stones and they thought he was dead and he got back up, and it could be that since that stoning at Lystra, he never saw the same. He never was the same.

It had long lasting physical affects that was his thorn in the flash and could it be that while he was in body, out of the body experience, everybody thought dead that he was caught up into the third heaven. It seems to fit best for me in the chronology. I'm not certain about it, but that's what I think.

Verse 11; "I have become a fool in boasting and you have compelled me. For I ought to have been commended by you; for in nothing I was behind the most eminent apostles, though I am nothing. Truly the signs of an apostle were accomplished among you with all perseverance, signs and wonders and mighty deeds."

Now the rest of the book chapter 13 is the conclusion concluding remarks.

Verse 10 of chapter 13; "Therefore I write these things being absent, lest being present I should use sharpness, according to the authority which the Lord has given me for edification and not for destruction. Finally, brethren, farewell. Be complete."

Now you know we always don't get the sense. And the idea of complete teleios is maturity, growth. If you were to give a modern rendition of this policy and brethren grow up. That's the idea of be complete, grow up. "Be of good comfort; be of one mind, live in peace and the God of love and peace will be with you. Greet one another with a holy kiss." Now do you notice how many times Paul and Peter use this same phrase? Greet one another with a holy kiss. That was a practice of the early church. "All the saints greet you, the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and the love of God and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all. Amen!"

What's the idea with the holy kiss? You know sometimes people go, do I have to do that? Now I know some single guys that really like this verse of scripture, they go I'm ready for that holy kiss on that cute one over there. But the idea of the kiss very common in the ancient Near East and modern Middle East, kiss on both sides of the cheek because when a person became a Christian 2000 years ago, they were abandoned by their culture and often their family, but they were embraced by the church, their new family and that sign of closest of affection, a holy kiss. It was a sign that you are welcomed here.

So it's actually very beautiful and I would say the form of this greetings varies with the culture, the J. B. Phillip's translation of the holy kiss goes like this. Give one another a hardy handshake, all around for my sake.

So whether it's a kiss, be careful, whether it's a handshake or whether it's a hug. You know how Christians just love to embrace one another. I love that. I remember I first saw Christians do this I thought they were weird. I went to a church and they were hugging everyone. I thought, I'm not going to get near those folks. I don't want to get hugged by them, and then I became a believer and I wanted that embrace and that family. And so Paul saw them as a family and Paul as their father in the faith and father of that fellowship at Corinth and how he loved them and opened his heart toward.

So we have seen the whole book of Second Corinthians in one fell swoop. Now you have a sense of it and why Paul wrote it and just how affectionate he was for that church, what a blessed church at Corinth.

Let's pray Father thank You, for the family of God and thank You for the Word of God that speaks to us that we can read this ancient document that is preserved by Your Holy Spirit without error and we can derive the principles that still are very, very applicable to our lives. We get inside Lord into how You think, what the message of Gospel entails what coming to You and following Your will for our life may cost us and may mean and it sobers us up, gives us hope because when it's all said and done, when this earthly body is destroyed, we have a temple, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens.

No wonder Paul groaned for that glory and we do as well. Thank you Lord for this family of God, for our church fellowship and for the brothers and sisters around us who love us enough to embrace us, but also speak truth into our lives and correct us admonish us. In Jesus' name, Amen!

Additional Messages in this Series

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7/11/2007
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Destination: Genesis 1-11
Genesis 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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We begin The Bible from 30,000 Feet with a tour of Genesis Chapters 1-11. On this flight we'll travel all the way back to the very beginning - The Creation. We'll meet the first man and woman and their deceiver - the Serpent. We'll fly over God's new creation and meet a man named Noah, who God saved from His judgment - the Flood. We'll also take a look at "beginnings," the first time things are mentioned in the Bible a special significance should be given to them. The word Genesis itself is a Greek word that means "origin," the book describes the origins of creation.
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7/18/2007
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Destination: Genesis 12-50
Genesis 12-50
Skip Heitzig
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This week's flight is going to take us over the second section of Genesis, which is biographical in nature and focuses on the lives of four key people. Abraham, Isaac, Jacob and Joseph. We'll travel through the time era known as the Age of the Patriarchs. If you look at your window, we'll be passing over Canaan and Egypt, Canaan is modern day Israel.
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7/25/2007
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Destination: Exodus 1-18
Exodus 1-18
Skip Heitzig
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In our third tour, we'll be visiting the book of Exodus chapters 1-18. We'll get an overview of the central historical event contained in the book, the redemption of God's people from the bondage of Egypt. The setting for our journey is the nation of Egypt and Israel's wanderings through the wilderness. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 1, 2, 3, 5, 11, 12 and 14.
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8/1/2007
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Destination: Exodus 19-40
Exodus 19-40
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourth tour, we'll again visit the book of Exodus, visiting chapters 19-40. The setting for this week's journey is the Sinai Peninsula where God reveals the Ten Commandments to the nation of Israel and gives specific instructions on how He is to be worshiped. For this flight the key chapters to review in advance are: Exodus: 20, 25, 26, 27, 29 and 32.
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8/8/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 1-17
Leviticus 1-17
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifth flight from 30,000 Feet, we fly over the first seventeen chapters of the book of Leviticus. This is a book on worship and describes the worship life of the nation of Israel. In this first tour of Leviticus, we'll see how the first part of the book focuses on the way to God through sacrifice and lays down the law - literally - on how man was designed to live and how man can be atoned for his sins. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus: 1-5, 10, 16, 17.
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8/15/2007
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Destination: Leviticus 18-27
Leviticus 18-27
Skip Heitzig
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This week's study will take us through Leviticus chapters 18-27. The theme of Leviticus could be summed up in one word - holiness. The second section of Leviticus focuses on our walk with God through sanctification. Sanctification is the process by which we become holy or set apart for God's purposes. The key chapters to review in advance are: Leviticus 18-20, 22, 23, and 25.
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8/22/2007
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Destination: Numbers 1-14
Numbers 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Our seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through Numbers chapters 1-14. Numbers is the fourth of the Pentateuch. In the Hebrew it is called ba-midbar, "in the wilderness." In the Septuagint version it is called Arithmoi or "numbers," and this name is now the usual title of the book. It is so called because it contains a record of the numbering of the people in the wilderness of Sinai (1-4), and of their numbering afterwards on the plain of Moab (26). The key chapters to review in advance are: Numbers 3, 6, 9, 11, 13 & 14.
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8/29/2007
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Destination: Numbers 15-36
Numbers 15-36
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give us a tour of Numbers chapters 15-36. We'll see that the second section of Numbers covers the failure of one generation to enter the Promised Land and the reorganization of a new generation that enters into the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: 17, 18, 20, 21, 22, and 27.
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9/5/2007
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Destination: Deuteronomy 1-34
Deuteronomy 1-34
Skip Heitzig
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In our ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us on a tour through the entire book of Deuteronomy. The Hebrews called it "Elleh Haddevarim," "These are the Words," or "Devarim," (words). Deuteronomy can be organized around three messages given by Moses while the Israelites were on the plains east of the Jordan River. It occurs after the 40 years of wandering and the Israelites are now ready to enter the Promised Land. The key word of this book is covenant and speaks of the special relationship that God has established with His people. Key chapters for this flight are: 6, 7, 31, 32, 33 and 34.
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9/12/2007
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Destination: Joshua 1-12
Joshua 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Pastor Skip Heitzig will be our tour guide during our tenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week's journey will take us through Joshua 1-12. We'll get to know Joshua, son of Nun, who shared in all the events of the Exodus, and held the place of commander of the host of the Israelites. The book of Joshua describes Israel's conquest of Canaan and the first section describe how Joshua conquered the land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 and 10.
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9/26/2007
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Destination: Joshua 13-24
Joshua 13-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eleventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the Promised Land. We will see how Joshua divides the land "as an inheritance to Israel," and we'll see different tribes and where they settle, both in and out of the Promised Land. Key chapters for this flight are: Joshua 13 and 20-24.
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10/3/2007
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Destination: Judges 1-10
Judges 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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In our twelfth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will once again be our tour guide as we take our first look at the book of Judges. We'll see on this tour how the nation of Israel is caught in the cycle of sin and how each cycle results in ever worsening conditions for them. We'll meet some of the characters that God divinely appointed to the office of Judge. The key chapters to review for this flight are Judges 1–3 and 6–8.
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10/10/2007
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Destination: Judges 11-21
Judges 11-21
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over Judges chapters 11-21. Pastor Skip Heitzig will guide us as we complete this overview of Judges. We will see that the second part of Judges shows the fragile nature of these Judges and a people who, "did what was right in their own eyes," that kept them in their sin cycle.
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10/24/2007
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Destination: Ruth 1-4
Ruth 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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In our fourteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip Heitzig will give us a tour of the little romantic book of Ruth. We'll see how the book of Ruth shows the godly courage and love of two very different women from very different backgrounds. We'll meet some amazing characters on this flight who become key people in the genealogy of Jesus Christ.
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11/7/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 1-15
1 Samuel 1-15
Skip Heitzig
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The fifteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on journey through 1 Samuel chapters 1-15. Join our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig for this exciting tour on which we'll meet a man who would be become King. This man's good looks, physical size and success in war made him an obvious choice from a human perspective, but the book of 1 Samuel highlights his tragic flaw - he disobeyed God's commands. From the ashes of Saul's tragedy God raises up another man who would become King, a man after His own heart, King David. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 8-10 and 15.
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11/14/2007
completed
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Destination: 1 Samuel 16-31
1 Samuel 16-31
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This week our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will complete our tour of the book of 1 Samuel, covering chapters 16-31. On this flight we'll meet the man who God calls, "a man after my own heart (Acts 13:22)," David son of Jesse. We'll see David as a young shepherd boy who defeats Goliath and rises to national prominence overnight. His instant popularity arouses the jealousy of King Saul and forces David into hiding.
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11/21/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 1-10
2 Samuel 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight Seventeen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over 2 Samuel chapters 1-10. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will show us David's triumphs as King over Israel, after the death of Saul. Join us as we see how David's faith in God leads him to be victorious politically and militarily as one by one he defeats his enemies. We will also see how David's obedience leads to a new promise from God. The key chapters to review for this flight are 1-3, 5, 7 and 9.
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12/5/2007
completed
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Destination: 2 Samuel 11-24
2 Samuel 11-24
Skip Heitzig
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In our eighteenth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us to our next destination, 2 Samuel 11-24. On this flight we'll see David's transgressions and the troubles that resulted from them. By presenting both the strengths and weaknesses of David, we see a complete picture of a very real person who was described as being "a man after God's own heart." The key chapters to review are 2 Samuel 11, 12, 15, 18, 19, 23, and 24.
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1/9/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Kings 1-22
1 Kings 1-22
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight nineteen over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over 1 Kings 1-22. On this flight we will see the transition that Israel undertakes as it moves from the rule of King David to the rule of his son King Solomon after his death. After Solomon turns from the Lord, we will see how Israel is divided and moved in and out of the power of many kings such as Ahab, Jehoshaphat, and Ahaziah. These chapters will reveal a story of true loyalty and disobedience to God. The key chapters to review are 1 Kings 1-3, 6, 8, 11, 12, 18, and 19.
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1/16/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
completed
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
completed
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
completed
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
Skip Heitzig
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
Skip Heitzig
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
Skip Heitzig
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
Skip Heitzig
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
Skip Heitzig
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
Skip Heitzig
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
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Destination: John
John
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
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Destination: Acts
Acts
Skip Heitzig
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
completed
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Destination: Romans
Romans
Skip Heitzig
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/22/2008
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/21/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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1/28/2009
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.

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There are 64 additional messages in this series.