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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy - 1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22

Taught on | Keywords: false, doctrine, leadership, conduct, teachers, righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance, gentleness

Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.

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1/21/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Timothy
1 Timothy 1-6;2 Timothy 1-4:22
Skip Heitzig
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Join us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Timothy as we take our fifty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. These loving letters to Timothy, a young pastor in Ephesus, reveal Paul's true love for his brother in Christ and desire to encourage him in the Word and warn against false teachings. In these letters, Paul exhorts Timothy to stand strong and "preach the word" (2 Timothy 4:2). The key chapters to review are 1 Timothy 1-6 and 2 Timothy 1-4.
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Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Bible from 30,000 Feet, The

Have you ever wanted to learn how The Bible fits together? The Bible from 30,000 Feet is an overview study through the entire Bible, hitting the highlights of its people, places, events and themes in about a year. This series will give you a coherent understanding of the holy word of God.



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Detailed Notes

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DESTINATION: First Timothy


Paul, the experienced apostle, writes to young pastor Timothy, who is facing a heavy burden of responsibility in the church at Ephesus. The task is challenging: false doctrine must be erased, public worship safeguarded, and mature leadership developed. In addition to the conduct of the church, Paul talks pointedly about the conduct of the minister. Timothy must be on guard so that his youthfulness doesn't become a liability, rather than an asset to the gospel. He must be careful to avoid false teachers and greedy motives, pursuing instead righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance, and gentleness as befitting a man of God.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 58 A.D.

Paul sent to Rome for two years


c. 63 A.D.

Paul writes the epistle of 1 Timothy


c. 64 A.D.

Severe persecution of Christians begins


c. 67 A.D.

Peter and Paul martyred by Nero


 


TRIP PLANNER:


Paul had four purposes in writing this letter to Timothy.  First, he wanted to encourage Timothy to oppose false teaching.  Also, he wanted to furnish Timothy with written credentials authorized by himself.  Further, he wanted to instruct him in the management of church affairs. Finally, he wanted to exhort him to be diligent in his pastoral duties.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Macedonia - The northern part of Greece located between the Adriatic and Aegean Seas.


Ephesus - A city on the west coast of Asia Minor where Paul established a major church.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Timothy - A traveling companion of Paul. He was the son of a Jewish mother and a Gentile father. His mother, Eunice, and grandmother, Lois, were believers in Jesus.


Paul - Known as Saul before he became a Christian. Born in Tarsus in Asia Minor, he studied Jewish tradition under the elder Gamaliel, becoming a zealous Pharisee.


Hymenaeus and Alexander - Blasphemers whom Paul "delivered to Satan."


 


FUN FACTS:


Paul may have dictated this book to a secretary, possibly Luke.


1 Timothy is one of three "pastoral epistles," 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus.


 


DESTINATION: 2 Timothy


Paul wrote this epistle from a Roman dungeon to his young protégé, Timothy.  This was his second letter to Timothy, and the epistle was the final letter written by Paul. In it, Paul encourages Timothy to stand strong for the faith, to endure hardship, and to preach the Word.


CALENDAR OF EVENTS:


c. 33 A.D.

Saul's conversion on the road to Damascus


c. 67 A.D.

Paul's second imprisonment in Rome


c. 67 A.D.

Paul writes 2 Timothy, his final epistle


TRIP PLANNER:


The book of 2 Timothy consists of Paul's final instructions to his "beloved son," a young pastor in Ephesus. The letter can be broken down as follows: Stand up for the faith - Chapter 1. Stand up in all you do - Chapter 2. Stand up in the battle - Chapter 3. Stand up until the end - Chapter 4.


PLACES OF INTEREST:


Ephesus - The most important city in the Roman province of Asia, on the west coast of what is now Turkey. It was where Timothy was a minister and also where Paul sent Tychicus.


Thessalonica - This city was situated at the intersection of two major Roman roads, which led to it being highly prominent.  Demas headed here after leaving Paul.


Galatia - A Roman province Paul visited on his first missionary journey.  Crescens headed here after leaving Paul.


Dalmatia - A Roman province in the mountainous region east of the Adriatic Sea.  It is also called Illyricum in Romans 15:19.  This is where Titus headed after leaving Paul.


Corinth - A port city of Greece that was a center of trade and industry.  Paul mentions that Erastus stayed there.


Miletus - Part of the Roman province of Asia.  Trophemus stayed here because he was ill.


PEOPLE OF INTEREST:


Aquila and Prisca/Priscilla - A leather worker and his wife who were good friends with Paul.  This couple helped Apollos come to a fuller understanding of the gospel.


Crescens - Companion of Paul serving in Galatia.


Demas - A co-laborer with Paul; Paul mentions that he deserted him because of his love for the present world.


Erastus - An assistant of Paul who helped in Timothy's mission to Macedonia so that Paul could continue to work in Ephesus.


Eunice - Timothy's Jewish mother who was noted for her faith and raised Timothy in the Scriptures from childhood.


Hermogenes - Asian Christian who turned away from Paul.


Lois - Timothy's grandmother noted for her faith.


Onesiphorus - His name means "profit-bringer;" he brought Paul refreshing when Paul was in chains.


Philetus - A teacher representative of those undermining the Christian doctrine of the resurrection.


Trophemus - An Ephesian Christian who likely accompanied Paul to Europe after the Ephesian riot.  Paul had to leave him in Miletus because he was ill.


Tychicus - He went with Paul to Jerusalem with the collection.  He likely was the one who took the letters to the Colossians and the Ephesians.


FUN FACTS:


Soldier, athlete, farmer - Paul uses these as pictures of the Christian life.


Christian math (multiplication) - In 2:2 Paul tells Timothy to share what he's learned with faithful men so that they'll tell their friends and so on, and so on...


With a little help from my friends - Paul mentions 15 of his friends in the closing passages of the book.

Keywords: false, doctrine, leadership, conduct, teachers, righteousness, godliness, faith, love, perseverance, gentleness

Transcript

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This is the Metropolitan Tabernacle the church in London where Charles Spurgeon preached. In building a powerful ministry Spurgeon modeled the principles that Paul taught. Timothy was told all scripture is sufficient for all things; so preach the Word. Our study of the pastoral letters from Paul to Timothy makeup our flight plan in this segment of "The Bible From 30,000 Feet." There's no better place than at the church of the prince of preachers to introduce these studies; so now let's get these final instructions.

Our journal over scriptures takes a new turn as Pastoral Epistles will now come clearly into view in our flight over "The Bible From 30,000 Feet."

Pastor Skip Heitzig: And open your Bibles tonight to First and Second Timothy; those are the two books we'll cover tonight; First and Second Timothy. Now we are almost done with "The Bible From 30,000 Feet." Next week we will look at the Book of Titus and Philemon. The following week, we will look at the book of Hebrews, after that we will be in James and then First and Second Peter and then John, First John, Second John, Third John, Jude, some of those are short, we will just do in one fell swoop and then the Book of Revelation and we have landed the plane by that time.

So we are coming to an end, it's been for me very fruitful, I have really enjoyed it, and here is why, I have taught through the Bible here at this church twice and last time I went through verse by verse every verse of every book, it took me like 11 or 12 years. So to go through it, even though it's been a flyover in just a little over a year, this is like week 56, it is pretty satisfying to see it all come together and I have especially appreciated the hunger and the thirst that I see with all of you guys when I come in the foyer sometimes early and I see you hovering over the note table. So what notes did I miss from the past, I got to get those notes and just shows hungry hearts and can I just say as a pastor how wonderful and even rare it is to be able to preach and teach to a group of people who are as hungry for truth as you are, it's an absolute pleasure. So let's pray tonight.

Heavenly Father, we thank You for Your Word, we thank You that this time of our service tonight is part of our worship, we are demonstrating by our attention to the Word of God that what You say is worth listening to, that it's not worth being distracted from. You have our full attention; we want to understand the message that You gave through Your servant Paul, though it was addressed to young Timothy. It really speaks to anyone in leadership, in the church today. So help us to understand it, we ask in Jesus name, Amen!

First Timothy, Second Timothy, and Titus are in a little special section on their own called the Pastoral Epistles, as Paul writes personal letters to these two young pastors that he leaves to their ministry. Now Paul was at Ephesus for about three years, when he left he put Timothy there. So Timothy whom Paul says is my own son in the faith, he left in Ephesus and he lives Titus in Crete to take over the church there and rise up leadership.

Now, First and Second Timothy are two books that every pastor loves or I should say every pastor should love because it's the first detailed description of how the church operates in the New Testament. If we want to know what it's to be like, this tells you in detail what it is to be like; it talks about the call to the ministry, the qualifications for the ministry, and the care of the minister toward those who need that care in the congregations. Now the first book, First Timothy has a theme that is readily seen. It stated, we don't have to guess the purpose of this book.

He writes in chapter 3 verse 15; "I write so that you may know how you ought to conduct yourself in the House of God, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and ground of the truth."

So he states in one verse the purpose for writing this first letter, a little bit about Timothy, Timothy was important to Paul, 24 times in Paul's writings he will refer to Timothy. Timothy was a son in the faith, as I have said, because he let him to Christ. He was also a protégé of the Apostle. Now this is how it worked, when Paul was on his first missionary journey and he went through Lystra and Derbe and Iconium in a little section where he got stoned, I mean he didn't get stone, they threw rocks at him. He got kicked out of the city. When he was in that first city Lystra that's where Timothy lived with his mother and grandmother and his father.

Now Timothy's mother was a believer. She was Jewish and she believed that Yeshua was the Messiah, Jesus was Christ. His father was a Greek and seems that he was an unbeliever. So he was born of mix parentage. He heard the gospel on Paul's first trip through his hometown and probably through hearing Paul and the influence of his mother and grandmother he came to Christ, so that years later on Paul's second missionary journey, Timothy joined Paul, the Apostle Evangelistic Association and he went on that tour with Paul and he became so important to the apostle that Paul designates him with a very unique term.

In the Book of Philippians, if you remember this, he said, concerning Timothy, "for I have no one likeminded who will naturally care for your state." Remember that little text, like-minded, isopsychos is a one Greek word, equal souled, equal souled. We are like bread and butter, we track. Our minds are, our hearts are in sync, we are equal souled. And it's a very unique term used only once in the New Testament and that's the only time Paul uses it, is to refer to Timothy. So Timothy goes with Paul on the first missionary journey. Later on, Timothy will accompany Paul with a collection of money that they bring back to the church in Jerusalem and then much later on, he will go to Ephesus and take over pastoral duties in Ephesus dealing with false teachers and appointing spiritual leaders.

So when we read First Timothy, we are reading a letter from the apostle to the pastor of the church of Ephesus. That's where he was located at this time. So this talks to us tonight about the church and its leadership, First and Second Timothy. Now today, people have lots of options for churches and people go let's call it church shopping. They have a little sort of list in their mind of ingredients that they want to fulfill. I want this in a church and that in the church, this in a church and that in the church and we have that option today, it's wonderful. Back then, you were lucky if you had an assembly in a town within miles of anywhere and that was it. But today people look for ingredients that they want and the trouble is; we ought to be consulting the founder and the director of the church Himself Jesus Christ. He said, I will build My church. So in finding a church, one should certainly be looking for one that Jesus is the founder of and is following the principles as outlined in these Pastoral Epistles.

So let me just pose a question to you personally before we jump in. Here is the question; I always like to ask it from time to time especially when people are looking around for churches or well this church isn't very this or very that. If everyone in your church were just like you, what kind of church would it be? So that's just, cogitate on that, mull over that for a lifetime and it's very helpful I find. There are six chapters in First Timothy, four chapters in Second Timothy. I am going to give you the outline, not of Second Timothy right yet, but just First Timothy, six chapters, four main divisions. First of all chapter 1, the message of the church, the message of the church, the truth, the gospel, the core message of the church. Chapters 2 and 3, the members of the church, different kinds of people that makeup an assembly; chapter 4, the minister or ministers of the church and chapters 5 and 6, the ministry of the church, that forms the division. Let's consider a few verses in chapter 1, the message of the church.

"Paul, an Apostle of Jesus Christ, by the commandment of God our Savior and the Lord Jesus Christ, our hope, to Timothy, a true son in the faith".

See that little phrase, 'the faith', there was only one true faith and when Paul uses the term the faith as Jude will later use the term the faith. It means the body of revealed truth that the church believes and holds to, the gospel truth.

"Grace, mercy, and peace from God our Father and Jesus Christ our Lord. As I urged you when I was in Macedonia, remain in Ephesus that you may charge some that they teach no other doctrine."

Now one of the words, you are going to notice Paul liked a lot especially in these two letters is the word 'doctrine' and when he uses the two words, other doctrine though it's two words in English, it's one word in the original language, it's heterodidaskaleō, a different teaching, a different gospel, a different teaching, a different gospel, something that people hold to other than the faith, the truth that we have revealed. That is what he writes about here. "Nor give heed to fables and endless genealogies which cause disputes rather than godly edification which is in the faith." So, what people were doing, we can piece together and we have seen this in other letters, so we are used to it by now. There were Gnostic and there were mystics and they added stories and myths to Biblical stories.

So, pretty soon, it was hard to tell what is an actual historical Old Testament narrative versus some myth plus remember the Gnostic believed in the doctrine of emanations that God is too pure and Holy and righteous to touch anything in the physical world so that God, the God never created the earth, never created anything physical because he is spiritual and that what is spiritual, would never defy himself of anything physical.

So, an emanation went out from God and another emanation and another emanation and another emanation, from that emanation and eventually, there was an emanation that went out from God that was so far removed from God that that emanation created the earth. That was their wacky doctrine. It was all made up. All made up. That is what Paul is writing against here.

Verse 18; "This charge I commit to you, son Timothy, according to the prophecies previously made concerning you, that by them, you may wage the good warfare."

A lot of Christians today do not know that we are in a war for the truth, a battle for the truth. Wage the good warfare. What was it the Jude said in his little, epistle verse 3, "Contend earnestly for the faith, once for all, deliver to the saints." Did you hear that contend? You know what that means? Contentious, put up a good fight for the faith. Somebody says something false, you can just, well you know, it's what you believe that is your truth, or you can say, excuse me, but that is not the truth and of course, he is writing in the context of the church. "Of all places we need to guard the truth, it would be here, the faith, the truth what is revealed."

Now, look at chapter 2, we get to the second section, the members of the church, men, women, pastors, deacons, several groups are listed,

Verse 1; "Therefore, I exhort first of all that supplications [that would be strong entreaties], prayers, [a general word], intercessions, [praying on behalf of someone else] and giving a thanks be made for all men, [notice] for kings and all who are in authority that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and reverence. For this is good and acceptable in the sight of God, our Savior who desires all men to be saved and come to the knowledge of the truth."

He didn't say pray for people who agree with your political position; pray for leaders who are sympathetic toward Christian ideologies and pray for all men and all who are in authority. You know as Christians, we are, we have a dual citizenship. Paul said in Philippines, our citizenship is in Heaven. We ought to be looking toward that and thinking about that dwelling on that. He said, "At the same time, we must be responsible citizens of the earth and we ought to be obeying the laws of the land and praying for those who govern."

When Jesus looked into the future and saw His people on the earth, if you remember, He prayed, "Father, I do not pray that you would take them out of the world, but that you would deliver them from the evil one." So, it is clear that He wants us in the world but not of the world. Don't I pray take them out of the world. Now, when we pray, our prayer is take me out of this world. Get me out of this place. Give me a group of people that I can surround myself where there all love Jesus and that will be nice, it is called Heaven, by the way, when you get there, you will know the difference but until then, we were meant to be salt and light here.

Now, when Paul wrote this, the guy-in-charge was Caesar Nero. It didn't get much worse than that. He hated Christians and right about-- well, little bit after this time around 64 AD, he kind of amped up the persecution so that they often dealt with leaders who were hostile toward the faith and Paul says, "don't write them off." God desires all men to be saved, of course, in context he is including those hostile leaders. Pray the God would save Nero. Pray the God would save those people that you didn't vote for or you disagree with or to pray for all men."

Verse 8, "I desire therefore that men pray everywhere, lifting up holy hands without wrath and doubting." The idea here is men are to lead in the public worship of the church, a common posture for prayer is to raise the hands.

I remember the first time I walked into a Christian assembly and the saw people raising their hands. I wasn't raised in a church that at any kind of open public display of worship. You go to church, you just sort of sit there and you just kind of look around, you don't say anything and then you leave but they are just kind of that is it. But I saw people during times of worship with their hands raised and I thought that is weird that is spooky. I will never do that. It is such a wonderful posture of surrender because it is like if somebody holds you up, they might point a gun at you and say, "put your hands up." When your hands are up, you can't do anything with them. You are helpless to do anything. You can't text when your hands are up. You can't work on another project while your hands are up. It's I surrender.

Now, it is not like you have to raise your hands when you worship. You certainly can and it is certainly appropriate in the Bible. I have often thought it is actually weirder not to raise your hands when you sing I lift my hands up to you Lord, I raise my hands and lot of times I look around and we sing that and you are singing it but you are not doing it. So, I would say, either do it or don't say that you are doing it when you are not doing it. It just sort of makes sense; at least kind of take your cues from the song. "In like manner also that the women adorn themselves in modest apparel with propriety and moderation, not with braided hair or gold or pearls or costly clothing but which is proper for women professing godliness with good works."

Now, this is the church he is speaking about. He is not saying that it is wrong to wear jewelry or it is wrong to do hair up or it is wrong to wear makeup or it is wrong to wear certain fashions. Nothing wrong with that but church isn't to be a fashion show. That is why I love the fact that we can come in our jeans if we want to. If you want to dress up, great but it is not about what you wear or how you look and may I just please, at this point, use this text, "to give a plea to young women to dress modestly for the sake of your Christian brothers who are around you." [Applaud]

Now, I know that Jesus said to men, whoever looks upon another women to lust for her and his heart has committed adultery and that is true. That is a problem but there is another side to that problem. See, if there wasn't Bathsheba bathing on the roof of her house; it would be a lot more helpful for David when he walks outside. There is two sides of that coin and women can dress in such a way as to invite male attention and insight their lustful gratification. So, don't do it. Don't give the opportunity. Arthur W. Pink writes this, "if lustful looking is so grievous a sin, then those who dress and expose themselves with a desire to be looked at and lusted after are not less but perhaps more guilty."

"In this matter, it is not only too often the case that men sin but women tempt them to do so. How great then must be the guilt of a great majority of modern misses who deliberately seek to arouse the sexual passions of young men." So, it is not about you, it is not how you look, it is about God and about worshiping Him and so that is the focus and that is the emphasis Paul was giving.

Now, chapter 3 and 4 are First Timothy brings us to the third section of this epistle, this letter; the ministers of the church are addressed.

Verse 1, "This is a faithful saying, if a man desires the position of a bishop, [bishop means an overseer or an elder or a pastor; those terms are often used interchangeably in the New Testament to speak of the same office] he desires a good work." Now the bishop, the overseer, the elder, the pastor, this was the principal office in the New Testament church. He had helped, we will read about the deacons in a minute but now he lists 16 qualifications for the pastor and look at down at verse 8. "Likewise deacons, [they are part of the same ministry group], deacons must be reverent, not double-tongued, not given too much wine, not greedy for money." By the way, it's there to be reverent, not reverend. Okay, so I just want to make a little point here.

The Bible never uses the term reverend so and so in speaking of a minister, I know we do that and it's just, it's part of our culture, it's going to change. But if you look up the reverend, the only time I found that it applies to anyone in the Bible is to God. Reverend and holy is the Lord. He is to be revered. So I just -- when people call me reverend, I just sort of I don't kind of like want to move away or something. No, I mean, it didn't even sound right, does it? Reverend Skip? Those two words don't match. If I had maybe a cooler name that was more reverend it would work but we are to be reverent. We are to live in such a way both elders and deacons that are reverent in behavior.

"So likewise deacons must be reverent, not double-tongued, not given too much wine, not greedy for money." And the list of qualifications is given now to the deacons. Now let me tell you what a deacon is, the word, the idea of this appears first in the Book of Acts in chapter 2 where the apostles say, we are not going to leave the Word of God and serve tables. Diakonos is the word for serve or servant, Diakonos, deacon. Sometimes the word refers to a specific office, often times the word simply refers to anybody who serves in the local assembly of the church. A servant of God is a deacon, one who serves.

When it's used in the official sense, it's those who help the elders fulfill their spiritual ministry. And chapter 4 continues to, the ministers of the church theme, and he is going to warn of those who will fall away from the truth and the need to warn them and the need to teach the truth. Look at verse 6, "If you instruct the brethren in these things, you will be a good minister of Jesus Christ, nourished in the words of faith and of the good doctrine, [there's that word again], which you have carefully followed."

Now let me just tell you what he is getting at, he is speaking of the need to continually feed and be nourished with the everlasting truth of the word of God and the need is especially needful for those in the ministry. Sometimes people can be ministering to other people and writing sermons and preparing Bible studies and every time they read the Bible they are thinking about their audience, rather than what God is trying to personally show me. And that's to be applied first of all to oneself, that's the idea of that verse that we just read.

Verse 13, "Until I come, give attention to the reading, [well we are doing that], exhortation, [and we are doing that], and to doctrine, [we are doing that]." Verse 16, "Take heed to yourself, [Timothy] and to doctrine, continue in them for in doing this you will save both yourself, and those who hear you."

Now I mentioned that doctrine is used quite a bit, 20 times. Paul himself uses the term in his writings, 20 times doctrine; 37 times it's used in the Bible, doctrine, doctrine, doctrine, doctrine but Paul uses it 20 times. Didaskalia, it means teaching, truth, instruction. Now if I ever felt sorry for a word in a language, I feel sorry for the little word doctrine. I feel sorry because of the way I hear Christians talk about doctrine. Conversations like this, well dude, I don't want to talk about doctrine man, I just want to talk about Jesus. Ooh! That sounds so cool and so hip and so spiritual, it's just flat out wrong.

Well, you know, doctrine, it's just like technical stuff, I am just into God. Listen, doctrine just means healthy good solid teaching. So listen to how it sounds, I am not into good solid healthy teaching man. You are not? Shame on you, you should be because you wouldn't know anything and I wouldn't know anything about Jesus and God and what to do were it not for the teaching, the doctrine, the instruction that comes from the Bible.

Now, when I buy a gadget, I hate the manual. Because sometimes the manual is like four times bigger than the gadget. It's like a dictionary. It's like there is huge volume. It's like and there is no way I am going to read this, I am just going to intuitive. I am going to figure this thing out and if I get stuck I would call somebody who has one of these little gadget. I am not going to look at this book. And that's my concern. My concern is that as Christians, as Christian churches in this modern age we are neglecting the owner's manual. And churches now, the trend now is to say, well preaching is too authoritarian and we should just have discussions and we shouldn't say, thus says the Lord or anything is absolutely true. And there is a movement away from the truth.

And so today, it's more important about what you feel rather than what you know to be true, honestly. Well, how does it make you feel? Oh! That's good. But objective truth has been cast out; so people today are long on zeal and short on facts. And yet what did the Prophet Hosea say? What did God say to the prophet Hosea; my people perish for lack of feeling, oh, my people perished for lack of inner warmth. No, my people perished for lack of knowledge. Four times I have counted at least maybe more Jesus said to the leaders of his day. Have you not read? Have you not read? Like you should know this, it's there in the book. It's right there. This is what God said, we can apply it to our lives.

James Montgomery Boice who is now in heaven. One of my favorite authors wrote, "We do not have a strong church today, nor do we have many strong Christians. We can trace this cause to an acute lack of sound spiritual knowledge. Ask the average Christian to talk about God and after getting past the expected answers you will find that his god is a little god of vacillating sentiments." Now as a pastor here is my goal, I would love and my aim weekly, that's what I live for, is to make sure you are the best fed and best loved congregation on the planet. I want you to know the Bible. I want you to know spiritual truth. I want you to know the will of God and the more you are exposed to the truth and the more I am exposed to the truth, we are going to grow in the knowledge of the will of God. And if I am going to leave any legacy it's that of a Biblically literate, I pray congregation who loves the truth. And I already see it in you and I thank God for that.

Now let's look at finally, chapter 5 and 6, the ministry of the church. The ministry and this is a little section on how to handle all the different kinds of people that gather together, old people, young people, truth seekers, false teachers, that sounds like a Dylan song. Now forget it. I am thinking of -- I am thinking of something. I am thinking of a song actually that he wrote that has a little rhyme in it but you don't want to go there. I don't want to go there.

Verse 1, "Do not rebuke an older man but exhort him as a father, younger men as brothers, older women as mothers, younger women, etcetera."

Verse 3, "Honor widows who are really widows." Now chapter 5 verse 3 through 16 are list of what qualifies a widow to receive help physical, monetary help from the church. They wouldn't give money to anybody. If there were a widow who had no family, no other means of support, husband died, no children, no relatives, then under certain circumstances the church at large would take care of them and those are spelled out here.

Verse 17, "Let the elders who rule well be counted of worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in the word and doctrine." Verse 19, "Do not receive an accusation against an elder except from two or three witnesses. Those who are sinning rebuke in the presence of all, that the rest may also fear."

So all these different kinds of people and how they are to be dealt within the church and that little verse, that last verse; verse 20, you don't see that done very often. Those who are sinning rebuke in the presence of all. And it's very rarely done. I think we have done it maybe twice here in the whole history of the church where we have had a bring somebody up at say what happened because the sin was a public sin and had to be dealt within that kind of a fashion. Early church it was done quite regularly and I will tell you what this did, it brought the fear of God upon people because if sinning in such a way is to damage the church would be dealt with publically, in front of that congregation. You would have people go, okay; I am not going to go there, not going to do that. Now today what people say when you do that, I am just going to go to another church. Back then, they didn't have another church. You are kicked out of the church, you are out of the church. Today, now people would circumvent this.

Let's go to chapter 6, verse 1, continuing about the ministry of the church to various people. "Let us many bond servants as our under the yoke, count their own masters worthy of all honor so that the name of God and his doctrine may not be blasphemed. And those who have believing masters, let them not despise them because they are brethren but rather serve them because those who are benefited are believers and beloved. Teach and exhort these things."

Now this to me is very enlightening, very interesting. This is one of the six times that the New Testament speaks about master-slavery relationships, which were very common 2000 years ago. It's written about in First Corinthians, Ephesians, Colossians, Titus, Timothy and Philemon. When we get to Philemon next week, we will expand more on that. But 2000 years ago, slavery was an established legal institution in the Roman government. In fact, it is believed that 60 million people were slaves 2000 years ago in the Roman Empire. That's half the population of the Roman Empire.

Now I am going to talk about those kind of slaves, let me tell you what they were like. Some was menial labor but many of them were well-to-do, very educated, given a lot of responsibility, hired or brought into the employ of some kind mastership of a very wealthy family. They would be teachers, they would private tutors, they would sometimes be doctors. It is believed that Luke who is a physician was a slave owned by Theophilus, that's why he wrote a Theophilus that was his job to gather the facts.

So they had very reputable positions. And what's interesting to me about all of these different situations is that Paul, John, Peter, none of them ever spoke out against slavery and that's interesting. There is never an attempt to overturn it or abolish it, but simply, understanding that culture back then, you know I am sure, Paul didn't think he is going to rid the Roman empire of 60 million slaves. So he wanted to mitigate against the problems and the church does that, I will explain why in a minute. So what he basically tells slaves to do is be the best slave in the batch, be such a good slave, such a godly slave, such an obedient slave, that the master would even be won to Christ by his servitude. It's a very, very interesting approach.

Now the church was common ground. If you went to an assembly 2000 years ago, you would have slaves and masters sitting next to each other. In fact, at Colossae, Philemon and his slave, Onesimus, who is a runaway slave. Next week we will see what that meant for him to come back, were together. This created some tension because Christianity taught 2000 years ago, whether you are a master or a slave, with Christ you are exactly the same. You are all equal, no one is greater, no one is less. And that was true and they all came together in the assembly. In fact, 2000 years ago in the New Testament assembly there might be a slave who was an elder and a master who was not. So the roles are reversed in terms of who was esteemed, etcetera, very interesting.

It did create some problems because Galatians 3:28 teaches, "There is neither a Jew nor a Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither a male nor a female, you are all one in Christ."

So you come together as a church, all the barriers are loose, they are gone, but I am not going to overturn this thing in the Roman Empire, so if you are in that situation slaves, you be the best slave possible. Masters you treat your slaves with respect like any employee.

Verse 20; "O Timothy! Guard what was committed to your trust, [that is the truth, the Word of God] avoiding the profane and idle babblings and the contradictions of what is falsely called knowledge, by professing it some have strayed concerning the faith. Grace be with you, Amen."

Now it says, grace be with you, it's plural, its grace be with you all. So while this is a letter to Timothy, the very end he is kind of saying, tell everybody at the church that I ministered out for three years in Ephesus, my greetings. So Timothy like every minister was to guard like a sacred trust, truth and stand up for the truth and fight for the truth and warn with the truth and exhort with the truth and teach the truth, that's the theme of First Timothy.

Now let's look at Second Timothy and we will close. Second Timothy is the last letter Paul ever wrote. After Second Timothy, he died. That's the belief. It is his swan song. I think he knew he was coming toward an end, because he says that toward the end of his letter. Now there is quite a difference in tone, from First and Second Timothy. In First Timothy, there is an anticipation. Paul feels I am going to get released from prison soon and Timothy I am going to join you, we will be together again, not in Second Timothy. Second Timothy, he has resigned to the fact that he is not getting out of jail, he is going to die, he says the time of my departure is at hand. He knows he is going to die and that tone is pervasive throughout the letter. So this is what happened.

Paul was in prison in Rome. He got released; he was under house arrest, right. He writes a letter to Timothy, after he writes First Timothy; Titus, he gets released by Caesar Nero from prison. He is out of prison for about a year. We don't exactly know what happened to him, but we can piece some of the things together. He may have gone as far west as Spain in that year. That was his heart's desire, he wrote to the Romans remember, I want to visit you when I go to Spain. So he might have said, I am going to Spain, I want to bring the message of Jesus Christ as far west as I can.

I am convinced, if we would have existed as the United States 2000 years ago, Paul would have want to come here. But he went perhaps to Spain. We know at least he went to Colossae, we know that he went to Ephesus, hung out with Timothy; he probably went to Crete to visit Titus. He helped Timothy a little bit while he was at Ephesus, but later on he was re-arrested at Troas, brought back to Rome, put back in jail, this time a very different jail than the first time. First time, house arrest, first time freedom for people to come in, come out. Second time, when he wrote Second Timothy, he was in the Mamertine Prison locked down, solitary confinement, a hole in the ground.

I visited the Mamertine Prison twice now and I have read through some of these sections in that pit, just to get what it was like. These were the final days for Paul, they were dark days for Paul because -- and many people don't realize this about the apostle. When he writes Second Timothy, most of Paul's best friends deserted him. This wasn't going right. This whole Christianity thing wasn't going like they anticipated. Everybody is getting killed or hurt or arrested. Even Paul the Apostle was arrested then re-arrested and looks like he is going to die. His friends deserted him. He is in a very, very dark place when he writes this letter. So there is four chapters, here is the outline.

Chapter 1, the present calling, the present calling; Timothy given what's going down, here is the calling on your life, that's chapter 1. Chapter 2, pastoral character; this is how you are to conduct yourself as a minister of God. Chapter 3, practical concern, and guess what that was, false doctrine, false teachers; people falling away from the truth. And chapter 4, a personal charge. Let's look at chapter 1, a few verses, the present calling.

"To Timothy, a beloved son: grace, mercy, and peace from God our Father and Christ Jesus our Lord. I thank God, whom I serve with a pure conscience, as my forefathers did, as without ceasing I remember you in my prayers night and day, greatly desiring to see you, being mindful of your tears, that I may be filled with joy. When I call to remembrance the genuine faith that is in you, which dwelt first in your grandmother Lois and your mother Eunice, [some of you are going ah, I got it wrong, others are going, yeah I got it right, because I cheated, no] and I am persuaded is in also in you."

So let's put the question up, here it is. Who was the mother of Timothy? Was it? Okay, so yeah how many said Eunice? Well, let's see what it is. Do we have the results? Oh, look at that; 46 percent said Eunice, 5 percent Mary, 31 percent said Lydia, that's interesting and 18% said Lois, Lois was grandmother. But hey, you guys are tracking, way to go. Thank you very much for that poll. Pollsters we appreciate that very much.

"Therefore I remind you to stir up the gift of God, verse 6, which is in you through the laying on of my hands."

Let me just fill in some gaps. It seems as I read through First and Second Timothy, it seems that Timothy got discouraged easily or waned easily. The time has got tough that he wasn't kind of up to the performance as a minister should be in difficult times that Paul thought and he needed frequent encouragement and in exhortation to be faithful, to keep the fire alive that's what stir up means, keep the fire burning, keep the coal stoked.

Verse 8; "Therefore do not be ashamed of the testimony of our Lord, nor of me His prisoner, but share with me in the sufferings for the gospel according to the power of God."

What we notice here in this letter is that Paul recognizes that Timothy had a great spiritual upbringing, a mom and a grandmother who are believers. Jewish, believed in Yeshua. They probably got saved in Paul's first missionary journey, they were the instruments that led Timothy and exemplify the Christian faith to Timothy for him to make a decision, and that's a great blessing.

Many of us are the spiritual victims of praying grandmothers and praying mothers. Now keep those prayers coming. I love to see when women say, we are going to pray, it's like yes, things are going to happen. I think of these women who pray for Timothy and Timothy was so valuable to Paul. You know sometimes, today, when couples get together and they are going to have children, often times, up to the point where they have kids, there is no thought about God or reading their Bible or going to church or a spiritual focus until they have children. Okay, now they have a child and suddenly it's like an epiphany, it's like, we got to go to church. We got to have a spiritual emphasis.

Now listen, I am not knocking that or mocking that, I am glad for that. At any time, any spiritual awakening is good. But what they are saying is, oh goodness, my child is going to need spiritual guidance and moorings and a world view that's worth something because I haven't been living that, but they need one. So though that's good at any time, let me suggest young couples who don't have children, do it before you have a child. Dedicate yourself to the Lord long before you have children because if it's just all about, I take my kids to church, they are going to see through that like in about two years when they have enough sense to talk and understand language and articulate. They are going to say, oh hypocrisy. They take miniatures but they never live for God.

A lot of times people will quote Proverbs 22, "Train up a child in the way that he should go. And when he is old, he will not depart from it."

I love what Abraham Lincoln said, he said, "For a parent to train up a child in the way that he should go, he should go that way himself first." There was a group of scholars, four of them, four biblical translators and they were all discussing what they felt was the best translation of the Bible.

So, the first guy said, "Oh, the Old King James that is so majestic, it is the best. You can't beat that." Another scholar said, "I like the NIV, it is a little more contemporary, it has some flavor and color to it that the King James misses." The third guy said, "I love the NASP, it is accurate." The fourth guy said, "You know my favorite and best translation of the New Testament is my parent's translation." And they looked at him and they laughed and said, "What do you mean?" And he said, "They translated every page of the Bible into their own life and it was the most convincing Bible translation I have ever seen or heard. They lived it, they walked it." And so Timothy had this legacy of believing mother and grandmother.

Look down at verse 15 chapter 1; "This you know, that all those in Asia have to turned away from me, among whom are Phygellus and Hermogenes."

Now, we don't know who they were. They probably were leaders who showed some promise as leaders but they deserted their post, they ran away, they left and so can you imagine, being named by Paul because this is going to like, everybody is going to read it for like 2000 more years. Your name is like doing that? There? For good? What a drag which is something else. We find it is not the only times he names, names, Paul actually names people's names publically. If somebody was false or an error, you know they never kind of just soft steps and go, well, you know there are those who believe, he goes, I will tell you who they are who believe, here's their names, stay away from them and if you see them, rebuke them. We are very, very cautious to even get near any of that today. Paul saw that poison must be labeled poison and he did.

Chapter 2 it's the pastoral character. Now, we are just kind of quickly go through this because this is Paul being Mr. Metaphor. You are going to see all these mix metaphors that a leader is the steward, a soldier, an athlete, a farmer and a workmen. You get it all in few verses, watch.

Verse 3; "You must therefore endure hardship as a good soldier of Jesus Christ. No one engaged in warfare entangles themselves for the affairs of this life, that he may please Him, we enlisted him as a soldier."

That is one metaphor. Here is another one. "And if anyone competes in athletics, he is not crowned unless he competes according to the rules."

In verse 6, "the hard working farmer must be first to partake of his crops." Now why does he do this? He is pulling out all these analogies to say, sometimes serving God requires hard work, hard work, all of these that are mentioned are hard working people doing some hard working tasks, so it takes daily determination and commitment and anything worthwhile than life requires that.

So verse 15; "Be diligent [or be persistent] to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed rightly dividing the word of truth."

Be persistent, be diligent, work hard, hard working farmer, athlete, soldier, see all of that is in Timothy. You got to get back into the game, buddy. You can't wane now. You got to work hard especially if you are a pastor of Timothy, work hard. Be diligent, be persistent.

Several years ago, when he was alive, I had the privilege of having Dr. J. Vernon McGee speak here at the midweek Bible study at our church and it was precious. I have always loved listening to him, I grew up listening to him and I interviewed him that day on local radio and J. Vernon McGee is known for taking his people through the whole Bible, verse by verse, everyday at some of his broadcast, he goes through a Book of the Bible and we were talking about how rare that is and I said, "Dr. McGee, I need to ask you a question, why is it-- this is your legacy. You have taught through the whole Bible." I am in my 20's when I am interviewing him, I am just getting started in the ministry. I said, "Why is it that most churches and most pastors don't take their congregations from Genesis to Revelation like you have done through the whole Bible?"

And he said this on the radio, "he said, because they are lazy. I tend to believe friends, that we have many of lazy preachers." That is what he said, I will never forget that. And that is exactly how he said it. "Lazy preachers." So, when he said that and he looked at me, I thought, I don't want to be a lazy preacher. I want to be diligent. I want to understand the text; I want to understand the context. I want to know the language. I want to know the history and be as accurate. Notice, rightly dividing, it means to cut a straight line, that is what it means, cutting a straight line. Now, what was Paul by occupation? He was a tentmaker. And they made tents in those days not with cloth but skins of animals and it required exactness in cutting the skin straight to bring the ends together. That is the analogy he is using. Also, it was used when roads were put in and you had to cut a straight line through a valley or a straight path through a field and what Paul is saying here, given that language, and this analogy is this Timothy, "build a straight road through the field of truth and don't get sidetracked." That is the idea of this verse. Build a straight road through the field of truth and don't get sidetracked. Preach the word.

So, that takes us to chapter 3 and 4. Chapter 3 is the practical concern and you know what, I have discovered that Paul's concern should be our concern. It is the same issues today. People deviate from truth and call themselves Christian churches.

Verse 1; "But know this, in the last days, perilous times will come, men will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy, unloving, unforgiving, slanders, without self-control, brutal, despisers of good, traitors, head strong, haughty, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, having a form of godliness and denying its power and from such people, turn away!"

Boy, you think he just read the local newspaper, coming up with this list. It is amazing that only 30 years after the gospel through Christ in the original apostles, exploded in Jerusalem. A mere 30 years later, there was already at that time a falling away from the truth, a falling away from what is right, a falling away from Christ.

It has always been the case. Satan has always wanted to question truth. From the very beginning, what did he say to Adam and Eve? "Hath God said" came the question to challenge to God's truth. Even Jesus said something that every time I read, I get a lump in my throat. So when the son of man returns, will he find the faith on the earth? A very haunting question, this is what it means, if indeed the church is the pillar on the ground of the truth, which it said so in First Timothy, it is, is where truth, real truth is disseminated. It makes sense that the church will become the battle ground. That just makes sense in simple strategy and that is true, that is why liberalism in the church doesn't surprise us. That is why attacks from the cults don't surprise us, that is why church splits and church attacks don't surprise us because the church, according to the Bible is ground zero. It is ground zero.

Satan is always on the prowl seeking whom he may devour and my big concern is people in the church because I am a pastor. Every time I read anything at all by this group, The World Council of Churches, I shudder, I wish they'd change their name to World the Eclectic False Doctrine something because they never say anything worthwhile at all. Now, The World Council of Churches has comprises of 350 Churches in 120 different countries that would effectively touch the possibility of 550 million people. Recently, World Council of Churches and 25 theologians who got together in Switzerland put out this statement, "All religious traditions are ambiguous. In other words, they are a combination of good and bad." And quote, listen to this, "We need to move beyond the theology which confines salvation to the explicit personal commitment of Jesus Christ." So, you heard that. I recommend that you do what Paul just said, "From such, turn away." Turn away. Have nothing to do, turn away.

Takes us to chapter 4 and we will close with this; the personal charge verse 2; "Preach the word! Be ready in season and out of season. Convince, rebuke, exhort, with all long suffering and teaching. For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine, but according to their own desires, because they have itching ears, they will heap up for themselves teachers and will turn their ears away from the truth, be turned aside to fables."

Sound doctrine, Hugianō, means literally hygienic doctrine, clean, healthy, teaching. Why would any one ever turn away from good, solid, healthy, Bible teaching? I can tell you exactly why, because it rebukes their ungodliness, and Jesus said, "Men love darkness rather than" what, "light, because their deeds are evil." That's exactly why it happens, you can couch it under -- well my belief system is, but it's simply an accommodation to their own behavior.

Verse 5; "But you, [Timothy but you, in contrast to that], but you be watchful in all things, endure afflictions, do the work of an evangelist, fulfill your ministry."

Okay here it is. This is his parting words, verse 6, "For I am already being poured out as a drink offering, and the time of my departure [the word departure, speaks of a ship setting sail from the harbor] is at hand. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith, finally there is laid up for me, the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge will give to me on that day, and not to me only, but also to all who have loved His appearing."

Timothy, finish well, because Timothy, look at me, is what Paul is saying, look at me, Timothy, I am finishing well, time of my departure is at hand. But I have run the race. Timothy, I finished the course. Timothy stay at it, it's so -- I can't think of a word, it's that bad, whatever word you want to use, to see a life that is lived, and lived, and lived, and then at the end, the finish is poor.

One of the great things I have always admired, and still do, especially as Dr. Billy Graham, is nearing his own -- the end of his life. He won't be with us much longer, he is very frail. I was invited to be at George Beverly Shea's 100th birthday party next week. In a couple of weeks I won't be able to make that, but here is Dr. Billy Graham, and George Beverly Shea, and they are finishing well. They are going to heaven the right way, they are finishing their course.

So, these were among the last words of Paul. Verse 22, "The Lord Jesus Christ, be with your spirit, grace be with you, Amen." His last words; his last words. I have often wondered, what will my last words be, I hope they are good words, I hope it's not like you say something really lame to your wife, and then you get in a car accident, that's the last words.

These are Paul's last words, he preached to the very end, the last sound I ever want to hear, is the sound of my chin hitting the pulpit as I go down [laughing]. That's how I want to finish.

Now this is the end of the Paul's life. After he finished writing this, not very long afterwards, he was taken to a place called, the Basilica Julia, big building in Rome; it was built by Julius Caesar. And there Paul the Apostle stood, before some representative of the Roman government, and he heard the death sentence against him, and after that Paul marched out to his death.

I am borrowing now and closing with this, from A.T. Robertson, "The crowds flowed into town. Some were going out. Paul was only a criminal going to be beheaded. Few, if any, of the crowds knew about or cared anything about him. At a good place on the road some miles out the executioner stopped. The block was laid down. The executioner stood ready, axe in hand. The men stripped Paul, tied him, kneeling upright to a low pillar which exposed his back and his neck. The lectors beat him with rods for the last time. He groaned and bled from his nose and his mouth, and then without a hint of hesitation, the executioner frowned as he swung the blade down swiftly, hitting its mark with a dull thud. And the head of the greatest preacher of the ages rolled upon the ground."

In that brutal moment, Paul the Apostle went from the imperial city of Rome to the celestial city of Heaven. And he was crowned, and he received the reward, that he wrote about in these last words. I am so impressed with the life of Paul the Apostle, I have studied on him, I have been on places, and traveled places and taken people where he has been, love his -- I am convicted by Paul. I thank God for him.

Heavenly Father as we have heard, the last will and testimony of a great man of faith, one who never flinched, did get discouraged. But got back up, threat, whip, shipwreck, prison, hardship of the journey did not stay him, but he move forward always in your will, always believing there was somebody else, who needed to hear and another church that needed to be encouraged, edified, instructed. And he left us with quite a legacy, of a man who ran the race, finished the course. And Father, we just think of our own life and do pray that, by your spirit, by your grace, you would keep us. We have that wonderful promise that, he who has begun a good work, will continue to perform it until the day of Christ. Thank you for a faithful flock. Keep us all serving, following. In Jesus' name, Amen!

Additional Messages in this Series

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1/16/2008
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Destination: 2 Kings 1-25
2 Kings 1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of 2 Kings. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will continue to lead us through the history of the divided nation of Israel, and how in spite of the many kings who took control of the land, we will still see a nation without true leadership. As we soar over this book, we will see first how Israel comes into captivity by Assyria, and then the triumph of Babylon over Judah. The key chapters to review are 2 Kings 1-4, and 18-21.
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1/23/2008
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Destination: 1 Chronicles 1-29
1 Chronicles 1-29
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of 1 Chronicles. On this flight we look back once again at God's promise that He would establish His reign on earth through King David. Chapters 1-9 of 1 Chronicles will look in-depth at the the royal line of David and then we will see again the reign of David in chapters 10-29. Join us as we fly at an altitude of 30,000 feet and see how God fulfilled His promises to David and how that presents a witness of His faithfulness to us as well. The key chapters to review are 1 Chronicles 17-18, 21-22, 25, and 28-29
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1/30/2008
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Destination: 2 Chronicles 1-36
2 Chronicles 1-36
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-second departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip Heitzig will take us soaring over the entire book of 2 Chronicles to see the beginning of the reign of King Solomon all the way to the spiritual roller coaster after Solomon's death and the separation of the kingdoms. From the building of the temple (2 Chronicles 1-9), to the decline of the temple (2 Chronicles 10-36:16), to the destruction of the temple (2 Chronicles 36:17-23), we see a parallel to 1 and 2 Kings from a spiritual viewpoint. The key chapters to review are 2 Chronicles 17-20, and 29-32.
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2/6/2008
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Destination: Ezra 1-10
Ezra 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Flight twenty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Ezra. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will point out two very important sections of this book; the restoration of the temple (chapters 1-6), and the reformation of the people (chapters 7-10). This book will continue the narrative of 2 Chronicles by showing God's faithfulness to keep His promises by returning His people to their homeland. The key chapters to review are Ezra 1-10.
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2/13/2008
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Destination: Nehemiah 1-13
Nehemiah 1-13
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for our twenty-fourth departure for the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the entire book of Nehemiah with our pilot, Pastor Skip Heitzig. In this book, Nehemiah, the king's cupbearer, is given permission to lead third and final return to Jerusalem to repair and rebuild the city's walls. This book will show us a political construction (chapters 1-7), and a spiritual instruction (chapters 8-13). Join us as we see how Nehemiah gathers his spiritual strength from God during a time of great opposition.
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2/27/2008
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Destination: Esther 1-10
Esther 1-10
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-five over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the book of Esther. The flight will be divided into two highly important sections: the threat to the Jews (chapters 1-4), in which we will see Haman's attempt to completely eradicate the Jewish people from Persia, and the triumph of the Jews (chapters 5-10), where we will see a young girl's godly strength and fight to save her people. This flight will show us a whole new set of villains, heroes, and ultimately the ever abounding faithfulness of God towards those who follow Him. The key chapters to review are Esther 1-10.
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3/5/2008
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Destination: Job 1-42
Job 1-42
Skip Heitzig
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Our twenty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us over the entire book of Job, the first book in the section of poetical books. This is a powerful story of a man who has everything taken from him; his health, wealth, and even his beloved family. Yet as we see God allowing Satan to test Job, God's faithfulness to those he loves is clear and Job's steadfast faith prevails. Join us this week as we see Job's dilemma (ch.1-2), the debate with his four friends (ch. 3-37), and his final deliverance (ch. 38-42). The key chapters to review are Job1-4, 8,11-12, and 29.
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3/12/2008
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Destination: Psalms 1-72
Psalms 1-72
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight twenty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Psalms 1-72. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us through the first seventy-two chapters of Psalms, which is divided into five books of songs, prayers, and poetry. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 1, 14, 23, 40, and 63.
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3/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Psalms 73-150
Psalms 73-150
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Get ready for our twenty-eighth departure of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. We will fly at cruising altitude over the last three books in Psalms as we read through chapters 73-150. We will see beautiful writings of gladness and grief, pleading and prayers, and reverence and worship. Join us as we look at the deepest thoughts and emotions on the love and power of God. The key chapters to review are Psalms 119, and 146-150.
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3/26/2008
completed
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Destination: Proverbs 1-31
Proverbs 1-31
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Flight twenty-nine over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the entire book of Proverbs. Known for the wisdom it contains, Proverbs reveals to us how to deal with every day situations; be it love and lust, life and death, friends and enemies, and what our God loves and hates. On this flight, Pastor Skip will point out some of the most noted chapters and verses of one of the most read books of the Old Testament. The key chapters to review are Proverbs 1-2, 5, 14, 22, and 31.
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4/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Ecclesiastes 1-12
Ecclesiastes 1-12
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Join us as we continue The Bible From 30,000 Feet, taking our thirtieth flight high above the book of Ecclesiastes. This book reveals some startling truths about how King Solomon felt about finding meaning and fulfillment in life through the things of this world, and ultimately his conclusion that "all is vanity" in a life lived without God. The key chapters to review are 1-3, 5, 8, and 12.
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4/30/2008
completed
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Destination: Song of Solomon 1-8
Song_of_Solomon 1-8
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-one over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over Song of Solomon. This poetic book gives us a glimpse into the true love that Solomon has for a shepherdess, and the love and fulfillment they share in a marriage relationship. At an altitude of 30,000 feet we will be able to see the strong tie into the fulfillment and joy seen in the love of God for His people. The key chapters to review are Song of Solomon 1-8.
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5/7/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 1-39
Isaiah 1-39
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Our thirty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us soaring over the entire book of Isaiah. Thought to be the greatest of all the Prophets of the Old Testament, Isaiah's ministry lasted around fifty years, and his prophecies are quoted in the New Testament more often than any other Prophet. This book shows us a mix of both prophecies of condemnation (chapters 1-39), as well as prophecies of comfort (chapters 40-66). The key chapters to review are Isaiah 1-2, 6, 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/14/2008
completed
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Destination: Isaiah 40-66
Isaiah 40-66
Skip Heitzig
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In our thirty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the second half of Isaiah. As we look through chapters 40-66, we will see the continued work of Isaiah, and how God used his gift of prophecy, both comforting and condemning, to generate change in the individuals he encountered. The key chapters to review are Isaiah 40, 52-53, and 55.
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5/21/2008
completed
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Destination: Jeremiah 1-52
Jeremiah 1-52
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-four over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, as we soar over the entire book of Jeremiah. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us at an altitude of 30,000 feet to see the three writings of the book of Jeremiah. From the warning of judgment, to the promise of restoration, and finally the protective hand of God over those He loves, we will catch a glimpse of a man who openly allowed God to speak through him in unusual and sometimes bizarre ways to open the eyes of the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Jeremiah 13, 18-20, 25, 31, and 52.
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6/11/2008
completed
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Destination: Lamentations 1-5
Lamentations 1-5
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Get your travel planner out for flight thirty-five over the Bible From 30,000 Feet. On this departure, we will look once again at Jeremiah in the book of Lamentations. We will learn why Jeremiah is referred to as "the weeping prophet," as we see him lament over the destruction of Jerusalem. This poetic book begins by revealing a man who is distressed for a nation under the consequences of its own sin, and ends with a prayer for the restoration of the nation from captivity. The key chapters to review are Lamentations 1-5.
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6/18/2008
completed
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Destination: Ezekiel 1-48
Ezekiel 1-48
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In our thirty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a flight high above the Bible to look at the book of Ezekiel. We will witness prophecies we've seen in past books being fulfilled as we see Jerusalem at the time of the Second Babylonian Deportation. As Ezekiel the Priest is deported alongside his people, we see God continue to offer promises of restoration through him, bringing the people a sense of hope in spite of their current tribulations. The key chapters to review are Ezekiel 1-3, 7, 33-34, and 38-39.
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6/25/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 1-6
Daniel 1-6
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Flight thirty-seven over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us on a tour of Daniel 1-6. In these chapters, we will see the first of the deportations of the Israelites to Babylon, and witness both the prophetic history of the book, as well as the four prophetic visions of Daniel. Ultimately, the powerful stories in Daniel reveal a man of God; unwilling to compromise and full of faith. The key chapters to review are Daniel 1-2.
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7/2/2008
completed
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Destination: Daniel 7-12
Daniel 7-12
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Our thirty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us through the second part of Daniel. As we look at chapters 7-12, we will see the four prophetic visions of Daniel, and observe how his faith in God's fulfillment of prophecies led him to fervent prayer for the people of Israel. The key chapters to review are Daniel 9-12.
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7/9/2008
completed
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Destination: Hosea 1-14
Hosea 1-14
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our thirty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the entire book of Hosea, a man called to prophesy to the Northern Kingdom of Israel during the reign of King Jeroboam. As Hosea addresses the sins of the nation, we will see how God used the graphic parallel between his adulterous wife and the unfaithfulness of Israel. The key chapters to review are Hosea 1-4, 6, 9, and 11.
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7/16/2008
completed
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Destination: Joel; Amos; Obadiah
Joel 1-3; Amos 1-9; Obadiah
Skip Heitzig
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Get ready for flight forty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us soaring over Joel, Amos, and Obadiah. In these three books, we take a look at the strong warnings that God gives His people against greed, injustice, false worship, and self-righteousness. We'll see God's use of these ordinary men to give extraordinary messages; we'll witness His patience, and at the end, we'll see how He stands ready to forgive and restore all who turn away from their sin. The key chapters to review are Joel 1-3, Amos 1, 3 and 7, and Obadiah 1.
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7/23/2008
completed
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Destination: Jonah 1-4
Jonah 1-4
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Our forty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet will take us to the well known book of Jonah. In this book, we will see what God can do in the life of a prophet, even one who is blatantly disobedient. Despite Jonah's defiance, God strongly redirects his path and brings him to repentance through a very unique situation. By the end of the book, we will see Jonah right back where he started and bringing God glory by doing exactly what He had originally asked of him. The key chapters to review are Jonah 1-4.
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8/6/2008
completed
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Destination: Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk
Micah; Nahum; Habakkuk
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Get your travel planner out and place your heart in the upright position for our forty-second flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of Micah, Nahum, and Habakkuk, three prophets used by God to criticize, comfort, and encourage the people of Judah. Through these prophets, God's people confess their sins and are confident in the salvation of God's mighty acts. The key chapters to review are Micah 1-7, Nahum 1-3, and Habakkuk 1-3.
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8/13/2008
completed
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Destination: Zephaniah & Haggai
Zephaniah; Haggai
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Prepare yourself for our forty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. This flight will take us soaring over the entirety of both Zephaniah and Haggai. The two books cover five chapters which speak of the coming Day of the Lord, His wrath upon Judah and her neighbors, and an encouragement after their return from exile to rejoice and rebuild the Temple. The key chapters to review are Zephaniah 1-3 and Haggai 1-2.
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8/20/2008
completed
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Destination: Zechariah and Malachi
Zechariah; Malachi
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We are about to take our forty-forth flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet, journeying over the final two books of the Old Testament. In ending the Minor Prophets, we'll first look at the expanded message of rebuilding the temple as Zechariah encourages the people to look to the future reign of the Messiah. We will then speed forward 100 years after the temple was rebuilt to the book of Malachi, where God's chosen people had once again slid back into their sinful practices. After 400 years of prophetic silence, Malachi brings a message of exhortation to the people who had resettled in Jerusalem. The key chapters to review are Zechariah 9-14 and Malachi 1-4.
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9/3/2008
completed
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Destination: Matthew, Mark, and Luke
Matthew, Mark; Luke
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Get your travel planner out for our opening tour of the New Testament and flight forty-five of the Bible from 30,000 Feet! This flight will take us on a sky-high tour over the books of Matthew, Mark and Luke. These three synoptic gospels give us our first glimpses of Jesus' life and death here on earth. We'll see the service, sermons, sacrifices, and sovereignty of our King as we witness the fulfillment of many of the Old Testament prophecies we have previously studied. The key chapters to review are Matthew 1-5 and 17, Mark, and Luke.
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9/10/2008
completed
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Destination: John
John
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-sixth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of John, written by the Apostle John from Ephesus between A.D. 80-90. The spiritual depth of this book and its presentation of the incarnation through the God-man Jesus Christ sets it apart from the other gospels.
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9/17/2008
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Destination: Acts
Acts
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On our forty-seventh flight over the Bible from 30,000 feet Pastor Skip will give a tour of the entire book of Acts. Acts is the history of how Christianity was founded and organized and solved its problems. The gospel writer Luke tells the story of how the community of believers began by faith in the risen Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit, the promised Counselor and Guide, who enabled them to witness, to love, and to serve.
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9/24/2008
completed
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Destination: Romans
Romans
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We are about to take our forty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Join us as we soar over the entire book of Romans, Paul's letter to the church in Rome. This letter primarily focuses on the basic gospel message along with God's plan of salvation and righteousness for all humankind, Jew and Gentile alike. In our broad overview, we'll take a look at Paul's strong emphasis of Christian doctrine and his concern for Israel. The key chapters to review are 1, 3, 4, and 9-11.
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10/8/2008
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Destination: 1 Corinthians
1 Corinthians
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Get your travel planner out for our forty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! As we look at 1 Corinthians, we'll see Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. His letters to the influential church confront their "religious" and arrogant mindsets and defend his ability to be an apostle of Christ. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the turnaround and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 1 Corinthians 2-3 & 12-13.
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10/15/2008
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Destination: 2 Corinthians
2 Corinthians
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Our fiftieth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet takes us on a flight over the second of Paul's letters to the church at Corinth. Between 1 & 2 Corinthians, the congregation was influenced by false teachers who spread opposition to Paul. Through God's grace and use of Paul, he is later able to rejoice over the repentance of the people to God and acceptance of his God-given authority. The key chapters to review are 2 Corinthians 4 & 12.
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10/22/2008
completed
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Destination: Galatians
Galatians
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour through the book of Galatians, a clear letter to the church in Galatia about the importance of remembering grace through faith and not the law. Paul's forceful letter addresses issues of legalism in the church and the false gospel of works. The key chapters to review are Galatians 1-6.
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11/5/2008
completed
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Destination: Ephesians
Ephesians
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Who are we in Christ? Grab your travel planner for flight fifty-two as we look at the book of Ephesians, Paul's letter to the church in Ephesus. In this book, Paul explains how we are the bride of Christ, a temple, and a soldier for the gospel. The unity that Paul emphasizes is described as a body working together for a common goal. The key chapters to review are Ephesians 1-6.
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11/19/2008
completed
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Destination: Philippians
Philippians
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-third flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us through the book of Philippians, another of Paul's letters to the church. Referred to as "the epistle of joy," the message contained in these pages is one of long suffering and joy in the midst of Paul's time in prison. Despite his trials, we will see Paul rejoice over the church in Philippi and encourage them in unity, humility, and prayer. The key chapters to review are Philippians 1-4.
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1/7/2009
completed
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Destination: Colossians
Colossians
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Get your travel planner out for our fifty-fourth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet! On this flight, we will take a look at the young church in Colosse, and how they became the target of a heretical attack. The main theme in the book of Colossians is the complete adequacy of Christ as contrasted with the emptiness of mere human philosophy. The key chapters to review are Colossians 1-4.
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1/14/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Thessalonians
1 Thessalonians 1-5;2 Thessalonians 1-3:18
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-fifth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the books of 1 & 2 Thessalonians. Both books are written as an encouragement to the church in Thessalonica, exhorting them in the word, warning them against pagan immorality, and urging them to remain steadfast in the truth of the Lord. The key chapters to review are 1 Thessalonians 1-5 and 2 Thessalonians 1-3.
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1/28/2009
completed
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Destination: Titus and Philemon
Titus 1-3:15;Philemon 1:1-25
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight fifty-seven of the Bible from 30,000 Feet. On this flight, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the books of Titus and Philemon. While the letter to Titus focuses on the importance of sound doctrine and the elements of the church order, Philemon takes a more personal approach and speaks on the application of the great principles of Christian brotherhood to social life. The key chapters to review are Titus 1-3 and Philemon 1.
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2/4/2009
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Destination: Hebrews
Hebrews
Skip Heitzig
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In our fifty-eighth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, Pastor Skip will take us on a tour over the book of Hebrews. Although the author of the book is not fully known, this well written letter reveals a man with a great desire to encourage Jewish believers to continue in the grace of Jesus Christ, instead of trying to escape persecution by bowing to the rites and rituals of Judaism. The key chapters to review are Hebrews 1-2, 6, 11, and 13.
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2/11/2009
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Destination: James
James
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Our fifty-ninth flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will take us over the distinctive book of James. Although grace through faith in the cross was vital for Jewish believer to understand, James addresses the issue of faith without a consistent lifestyle. This epistle adamantly declares that, "Just as the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead, also." (James 2:26) The key chapters to review are James 1-5.
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2/18/2009
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Destination: 1 and 2 Peter
1 Peter 1-5; 2 Peter 1-3
Skip Heitzig
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Get your travel planner out for flight sixty over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Our tour guide, Pastor Skip Heitzig, will take us on a tour of the books of 1 & 2 Peter. Peter's first letter to the church exhorts Christians to remain steadfast in their faith when under persecution, and his second letter tackles the issue of false teachers and a need for discernment against the spreading apostasy. Both books contain a level of warmth in Peter's expressions, making them a great source of encouragement. The key chapters to review are 1 Peter 1-5 and 2 Peter 1-3.
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2/25/2009
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Destination: 1 John
1 John
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In our sixty-first flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet, our tour guide Pastor Skip will take us through the book of 1 John. John writes to define and defend the nature of the person of Christ against heretical teachings affecting the early church. As John addresses the heretical teachings of the time, he also addresses the preeminence of God's love for us, and our duty to love others in return. The key chapters to review are 1 John 1-5.
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3/25/2009
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Destination: 2, 3 John and Jude
2 John, 3 John; Jude
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Flight sixty-two over the Bible from 30,000 Feet will give a sky high view over three small but concise books, 2 & 3 John and Jude. While all three books have a different primary focus, all are written with the purpose to encourage the church to keep a strong biblical foundation. This study will take us through the importance of biblical discernment, the need to be in fellowship with other believers, as well as the vital need to keep strong in the faith. The key chapters to review are 2 & 3 John, and Jude.
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4/1/2009
completed
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Destination: Revelation 1-11
Revelation 1-11
Skip Heitzig
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With only two more flights to go, we welcome you to get your travel planner ready for the first half of the book of Revelation and flight sixty-three over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. Considered to be one of the most powerful books in Scripture, Revelation is a direct vision from God, to John, which he was asked to record for future generations. Revelation 1:19, "Write, therefore, what you have seen, what is now and what will take place later." As the final warning to the world of the tribulation to come, it also serves as a source of hope for the Church. The key chapters to review are 1-4, 7, and 11.
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4/8/2009
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Destination: Revelation 12-22
Revelation 12-22
Skip Heitzig
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Flight sixty-four brings us to the end of the scriptures and the second and final part of the book of Revelation. Chapters 12-22 lead us into some of the most thrilling text in the entire Bible, giving us a glimpse into the seven bowl judgments, the Beast, and the future tribulation, but also bringing us great hope for God's Church. The key chapters to review are Revelation 12-14, 18, and 20-22.
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4/15/2009
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Bible from 30k Final Q&A
Skip Heitzig
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We have landed our flight over the Bible from 30,000 Feet. As we touch down and head to pick up the final baggage from our 65 flight series, our last sky-high view of the scriptures will includes this final Q&A Celebration. Pastor Skip and others answer questions from the last year, as well as on the spot questions from the audience.

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There are 45 additional messages in this series.